Sample records for mouse mus musculus

  1. Norwegian house mice (Mus musculus musculus/domesticus): distributions, routes of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nachman, Michael

    Norwegian house mice (Mus musculus musculus/domesticus): distributions, routes of colonization commensal subspecies of house mouse in Norway: Mus musculus domesticus and M. m. musculus. Five nuclear, reflecting passive human transport to Norway, probably during the Viking period. M. m. musculus may have

  2. Expression of a soluble form of iodotyrosine deiodinase for active site characterization by engineering the native membrane protein from Mus musculus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, Jennifer M.; McTamney, Patrick M.; Rokita, Steven E. (Maryland)

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Reductive deiodination is critical for thyroid function and represents an unusual exception to the more common oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms of dehalogenation in mammals. Studies on the reductive processes have been limited by a lack of convenient methods for heterologous expression of the appropriate proteins in large scale. The enzyme responsible for iodide salvage in the thyroid, iodotyrosine deodinase, is now readily generated after engineering its gene from Mus musculus. High expression of a truncated derivative lacking the membrane domain at its N-terminal was observed in Sf9 cells, whereas expression in Pichia pastoris remained low despite codon optimization. Ultimately, the desired expression in Escherichia coli was achieved after replacing the two conserved Cys residues of the deiodinase with Ala and fusing the resulting protein to thioredoxin. This final construct provided abundant enzyme for crystallography and mutagenesis. Utility of the E. coli system was demonstrated by examining a set of active site residues critical for binding to the zwitterionic portion of substrate.

  3. New Behavioral Insights Into Home Range Orientation of the House Mouse (Mus musculus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Blythe Elizabeth

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Home-range orientation is a necessity for an animal that maintains an area of daily activity. The ability to navigate efficiently among goals not perceived at the starting point requires the animal to rely on place recognition ...

  4. The Blue Whale, Balaenoptera musculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Blue Whale, Balaenoptera musculus SALLY A. MIZROCH, DALE W. RICE, and JEFFREY M. BREIWICK Introduction The blue whale, Balaenoptera mus- culus (Linnaeus, 1758), is not only the largest of the whales metric tons (t) (Mackintosh, 1942). Blue whales are entirely bluish-gray in color, except for the white

  5. Assay for the detection of non-lethal changes that are expressed as a proliferative disadvantage in mouse (Mus musculus) embryo aggregation chimberas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obasaju, M.F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrates the potential utility of the chimera embryo assay in measuring the effects of a variety of non-lethal, potentially hazardous environmental agents on normal mammalian embryonic cells. The two major findings to have emerged from this investigation are, (1) relative cellular contribution per embryo in chimeras was found to depend on the strain of the partner embryo and this relationship apparently does not require cell to cell contact between the partner embryos of the chimera and is already apparent after only two cell cycles; and (2) within the same outbred strain, exposure of one partner embryo in the chimera to either X-irradiation or chlorpromazine, at dose levels that were lower than those previously found to be embryotoxic; such toxicity was revealed as a proliferative disadvantage that was also evident after only 2 cell cycles. Partner embryos in the chimera were distinguished by labelling one of them with the fluorescent dye, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), which was shown to have no detrimental effects on the proliferation rate of the labelled embryos.

  6. The chromatin structure of endogenous MTV proviruses in Mus musculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marich, James Edward

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was performed with the nick translated DNA probes pMTV1 and pTC8. When Southern blots of Eco Rl digested DNAs were probed with these two probes combined, all MTV sequences were detected. To map the sites of hypersensitive restriction enzyme cleavage... Constructions Plasmids pMTV1 (Ucker et al. , 1981) and pTC8 (Peterson et al. , 1985), which together are complementary to the entire MTV genome, were nick translated and used to detect all MTV sequences. Probes pMTV3. 3 and pMTV2. 2 (Peterson, 1985) were...

  7. THE HELICOTREMA: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELS D. C. MOUNTAIN AND A. E. HUBBARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the helicotrema for four species: mouse (Mus musculus C57), chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigar), cat (Felis catus

  8. Measures of immune function of wild mice, Mus STEPHEN R. ABOLINS,* MICHAEL J. O. POCOCK,* JULIUS C. R. HAFALLA, ELEANOR M.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nachman, Michael

    Measures of immune function of wild mice, Mus musculus STEPHEN R. ABOLINS,* MICHAEL J. O. POCOCK of wild animals has been rather little studied. Wild animals' immune function may differ from interindividual variation in the immune function of wild animals. To begin to investigate this, we compared

  9. Transcriptional regulation at multiple steps of cortical development in Mus musculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betancourt, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007; Mason et al. , 2009; Heng et al. , 2012). However,al. , 2007; Mason et al. , 2009; Heng et al. , 2012). It isNat Neurosci 5(4):308-315. Heng YH, Barry G, Richards LJ,

  10. Cepheid Masses: FUSE Observations of S Mus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nancy Remage Evans; Derck Massa; Alexander Fullerton; George Sonneborn; Rosina Iping

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    S Mus is the Cepheid with the hottest known companion. The large ultraviolet flux means that it is the only Cepheid companion for which the velocity amplitude could be measured with the echelle mode of the HST GHRS. Unfortunately, the high temperature is difficult to constrain at wavelengths longer than 1200 \\AA because of the degeneracy between temperature and reddening. We have obtained a FUSE spectrum in order to improve the determination of the temperature of the companion. Two regions which are temperature sensitive near 16,000 K but relatively unaffected by H$_2$ absorption (940 \\AA, and the Ly $\\beta$ wings) have been identified. By comparing FUSE spectra of S Mus B with spectra of standard stars, we have determined a temperature of 17,000 $\\pm$ 500 K. The resultant Cepheid mass is 6.0 $\\pm$ 0.4 M$_\\odot$. This mass is consistent with main sequence evolutionary tracks with a moderate amount of convective overshoot.

  11. Design and Fabrication of Ultralight Weight, Adjustable Multi-electrode Probes for Electrophysiological Recordings in Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunetti, Philip M.

    The number of physiological investigations in the mouse, mus musculus, has experienced a recent surge, paralleling the growth in methods of genetic targeting for microcircuit dissection and disease modeling. The introduction ...

  12. Photometric studies of three multiperiodic Beta Cephei stars: Beta CMa, 15 CMa and KZ Mus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. R. Shobbrook; G. Handler; D. Lorenz; D. Mogorosi

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out single and multi-site photometry of the three Beta Cephei stars Beta and 15 CMa as well as KZ Mus. For the two stars in CMa, we obtained 270 h of measurement in the Stromgren uvy and Johnson V filters, while 150 h of time-resolved Stromgren uvy photometry was acquired for KZ Mus. All three stars are multi-periodic variables, with three (Beta CMa) and four (15 CMa, KZ Mus) independent pulsation modes. Two of the mode frequencies of 15 CMa are new discoveries and one of the known modes showed amplitude variations over the last 33 years. Taken together, this explains the star's diverse behaviour reported in the literature fully. Mode identification by means of the amplitude ratios in the different passbands suggests one radial mode for each star. In addition, Beta CMa has a dominant l=2 mode while its third mode is nonradial with unknown l. The nonradial modes of 15 CMa, which are l KZ Mus is l=2, followed by the radial mode and a dipole mode. Its weakest known mode is nonradial with unknown l, confirming previous mode identifications for the star's pulsations. The phased light curve for the strongest mode of 15 CMa has a descending branch steeper than the rising branch. A stillstand phenomenon during the rise to maximum light is indicated. Given the low photometric amplitude of this nonradial mode this is at first sight surprising, but it can be explained by the mode's aspect angle.

  13. The nature of biodiversity has long been a central focus in biology. This may not seem the case any longer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    restricted set of organisms--the house mouse (Mus musculus), the fruit fly (Drosophila spp.), the nematode of diversity is, in a sense, provided by"adaptation"to an "ecological niche." Adaptation results from the force of selection; and the notion of the ecological niche,to which the organism adapts,remains obscure and poorly

  14. Asteroseismological studies of three Beta Cephei stars: IL Vel, V433 Car and KZ Mus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Handler; R. R. Shobbrook; F. F. Vuthela; L. A. Balona; F. Rodler; T. Tshenye

    2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have acquired between 127 and 150 h of time-resolved multicolour photometry for each of the three Beta Cephei stars IL Vel, V433 Car and KZ Mus over a time span of four months from two observatories. All three objects are multiperiodic with at least three modes of pulsation. Mode identification from the relative colour amplitudes is performed. We obtain unambiguous results for the two highest-amplitude modes of IL Vel (both are l=1) and the three strongest modes of KZ Mus (l=2,0 and 1), but none for V433 Car. Spectroscopy shows the latter star to be a fast rotator (v sin i = 240 km/s), whereas the other two have moderate v sin i (65 and 47 km/s, respectively). We performed model calculations with the Warsaw-New Jersey stellar evolution and pulsation code. We find that IL Vel is an object of about 12 Msun in the second half of its main sequence evolutionary track. Its two dipole modes are most likely rotationally split components of the mode originating as p1 on the ZAMS; one of these modes is m=0. V433 Car is suggested to be an unevolved 13 Msun star just entering the Beta Cephei instability strip. KZ Mus seems less massive (about 12.7 Msun) and somewhat more evolved, and its radial mode is probably the fundamental one. In this case its quadrupole mode would be the one originating as g1, and its dipole mode would be p1. It is suggested that mode identification of slowly rotating Beta Cephei stars based on photometric colour amplitudes is reliable; we estimate that a relative accuracy of 3% in the amplitudes is sufficient for unambiguous identifications. Due to the good agreement of our theoretical and observational results we conclude that the prospects for asteroseismology of multiperiodic slowly rotating Beta Cephei star are good.

  15. Genomic analysis of mouse tumorigenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Mandy Chi-Mun

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences has spurred a growing interest in analyzing mouse models of human cancer using genomic techniques. Comparative genomic studies on mouse and human tumors can be ...

  16. The ecology of anthrax and coinfection trade-offs from an immunological perspective: seasonal aspects of host susceptibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cizauskas, Carrie Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phodopus  sungorus.  Functional  Ecology  23:979–988.  Mus  musculus.  Molecular  Ecology   Abu-­?Raddad,  L.  J.  transmission  of  parasites?  Ecology  Letters  12:528– de  

  17. SciTech Connect: Gametic selection as an evolutionary force:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gametic selection as an evolutionary force: the maintenance of lethal polymorphisms in wild populations of Mus musculus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gametic selection...

  18. Dissection of the telomere complex CST in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leehy, Katherine

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    this simple model since the correlation between telomere length and organismal lifespan does not hold in Mus musculus. Mouse telomeres are up to ten times longer than human telomeres (5-15kb), and yet their life span is much shorter (Gomes et al, 2011... among related species. As a non-coding RNA, TER does not need to adhere to the strict codon sequence requirements that protein coding genes must, which may explain its rapid sequence divergence. Most organisms harbor a single TER (Chen et al, 2000...

  19. In Vitro Function of Frozen-Thawed Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Spermatozoa Undergoing Sorting and Recyopreservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montano Pedroso, Gisele 1981-

    2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ]. The DNA content varies among species and even breeds; cattle 3.7% (Brahman) and 4.22% (Jersey); possum (Trichosurus sp.) 2.3%, chinchilla (Chinchilla sp.) 7.5% and bottlenose dolphins 4.1% X-Y difference in DNA content [34]. This difference has been... elephant (Elephas maximus) 3.4 African elephant (Loxodonta africana) 3.9 Rodentia Rabbit (Oryctolagus Cuniculas) 3.0 Mouse (Mus musculus) 3.3 Plains rat (Pseudomys australis) 4.2 Chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger) 7.5 Sperm sexing technology...

  20. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  1. Sequence of the mouse Y chromosome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alföldi, Jessica E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mouse Y chromosome has been studied for over 50 years, from the early sex determination and immunological phenotypes attributed to it in the 1950s, to the several mouse Y permatogenic phenotypes and the sex ratio ...

  2. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy, Sean

    Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial

  3. Lyme disease in an experimental mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Sunitha

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antibody response, using RIA, to Borrelia burgdorferi B31 isolate in sera from C3H/HeJ strain mice, at a 1;10 dilution, following seven different routes of inoculation. . . . . Page 29 2 C3H/HeJ mouse showing arthus type reaction, 24 hours post intra..., 15 days post injection. . . , 5 Antibody Response, using RIA, to homologous Borrelia hurgdorferi isolates in sera from C3H/HeJ mouse strains, at a 1:10 serum dilution of 5 tail bleeds. . . . . . 34 37 6. C3H/HeJ mouse showing granulomatous skin...

  4. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass...

  5. Pendulum Sensor using an Optical Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall D. Peters; Sheng-Chiang "John" Lee

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical mouse that is in common use with personal computers is employed to measure the motion of a pendulum. The pendulum can be monitored (i) realtime only, or (ii) also with data storage for later detailed analysis using Excel. The software developed for this purpose is a LabView executable algorithm. It allows the user to select among several modes that include filtering operations. The limiting resolution of this position sensor, which is in the neighborhood of 50 micrometers, is determined by the 'dpi' specification of the mouse.

  6. Structural Differences Mouse-over highlighting shows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munzner, Tamara

    regions accordingly · See individual nucleotides in the context· See individual nucleotides in the context· See individual nucleotides in the context· See individual nucleotides in the context of a sequence Finding motifs · Interactive mouse-over highlighting · Search for nucleotide or codon strings · Simple

  7. The branching programme of mouse lung development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    ARTICLES The branching programme of mouse lung development Ross J. Metzger1 {, Ophir D. Klein2 {, Gail R. Martin2 & Mark A. Krasnow1 Mammalian lungs are branched networks containing thousands by three geometrically simple local modes of branching used in three different orders throughout the lung

  8. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of mouse IP-10 shows a novel tetrameric association. Interferon-?-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated ?-sheet of ?90 Å in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two ?-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance.

  9. alters mouse behavior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (such as action-selection processes) provide script languages Ouhyoung, Ming 8 Mouse behavior recognition with the wisdom of crowd MIT - DSpace Summary: In this thesis, we...

  10. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis...

  11. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by...

  12. Interferon-Stimulated Genes in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilford, Sarah

    2008-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERFERON-STIMULATED GENES IN THE PREGNANT MOUSE UTERUS A Senior Honors Thesis by SARAH TILFORD Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs Texas A&M University In partial... fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS May 2008 Major: Biomedical Science and Chemistry ii ABSTRACT Interferon-Stimulated Genes in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus (May 2008) Sarah Tilford Department...

  13. HumanMouse Gene Identification by Comparative Evidence Integration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlovic, Vladimir

    The identification of genes in the human genome remains a challenge, as the actual predictions appear to disagree of genes in the human genome by using a reference, such as mouse genome. However, this comparative genome. In particular, it is not clear whether the mouse is at the correct evolutionary distance from

  14. Investigating the maintenance of the mouse definitive adrenal cortex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xin

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    and Cyp11b1 that encode the enzymes aldosterone synthase and 11?-hydroxylase, which catalyze the terminal reactions in the production of aldosterone and corticosterone, respectively. This thesis aims to investigate the maintenance of the definitive mouse...

  15. Mitochondrial bioenergetic deficit precedes Alzheimer's pathology in female mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    Mitochondrial bioenergetic deficit precedes Alzheimer's pathology in female mouse model and suggests therapeutic targets for prevention of AD. ABAD aging bioenergetics brain hypometabolism mitochondria The essential role of mitochondria in cellular bioenergetics and survival has been well

  16. Mouse Pointing Endpoint Prediction Using Kinematic Template Matching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    Mouse Pointing Endpoint Prediction Using Kinematic Template Matching Phillip T. Pasqual and Jacob O and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work

  17. MUS. COMP. ZOOL OCCASIONAL PAPERS 3 1982

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulsey, C. Darrin

    and describe Ethcostoma baileiji, E. rafincsc/uci, and E. barrcncn.se. We hope, as did Kuehne and Small (1971

  18. Characterization of the mouse pancreatic islet proteome and comparative analysis with other mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Hinault, Charlotte; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Singhal, Mudita; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans and insulin-producing beta cells in particular play a central role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and the islet dysfunction is associated with the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To contribute to the understanding of the biology of the pancreatic islets we applied proteomic techniques based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Here as an initial step we present the first comprehensive proteomic characterization of pancreas islets of the mouse, the commonly used animal model for diabetes research. Two-dimensional SCX LC/RP LC-MS/MS has been applied to characterize of the mouse islet proteome, resulting in the confident identification of 17,350 different tryptic peptides covering 2,612 proteins with at least two unique peptide identifications per protein. The dataset also allowed identification of a number of post-translational modifications including several modifications relevant to oxidative stress and phosphorylation. While many of the identified phosphorylation sites corroborates with previous known sites, the oxidative modifications observed on cysteinyl residues potentially reveal novel information related to the role of oxidation stress in islet functions. Comparative analysis of the islet proteome database with 15 available proteomic datasets from other mouse tissues and cells revealed a set of 68 proteins uniquely detected only in the pancreatic islets. Besides proteins with known functions, like islet secreted peptide hormones, this unique set contains a number of proteins with yet unknown functions. The resulting peptide and protein database will be available at ncrr.pnl.gov web site of the NCRR proteomic center (ncrr.pnl.gov).

  19. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  20. Radiosensitivity of testicular cells in the prepubertal mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergouwen, R.P.F.A.; Roepers-Gajadien, H.L.; Rooij, D.G. de; Eerdenburg, F.J.C.M. van [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands); Huiskamp, R.; Bas, R.J. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Jong, F.H. de [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands); Davids, J.A.G. [Lonbar Petrilaan, Overveen (Netherlands)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of total-body X-irradiation on the prepubertal testis of the CBA/P mouse have been studied. At either day 14 or day 29 post partum male mice were exposed to single doses of X-rays ranging from 15-6.0 Gy. At 1 week after irradiation the repopulation index method was used to study the radiosensitivity of the spermatogonial stem cells. A D{sub 0} value of 1.8 Gy was determined for the stem cells at day 14 post partum as well as for the stem cells at day 29 post partum, indicating that the radiosensitivity of the spermatogonial stem cells in the prepubertal mouse testis is already comparable to that observed in the adult mouse. One, 2 or 3 weeks after irradiation total cell number per testis of Sertoli cells, Leydig cells, mesenchymal cells, macrophages, myoid cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, endothelium and perivascular cells were determined using the disector method. The Sertoli cells and interstitial cell types appeared to be relatively radioresistant during the prepubertal period. No significant changes in plasma testosterone levels were found, indicating that there is no Leydig cell dysfunction after exposure to doses up to 6 Gy during the prepubertal period. Taken together, the radioresponse of the prepubertal mouse testis is comparable to that of the adult mouse testis. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waterston, Robert H.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Birney, Ewan; Rogers, Jane; Abril, Josep F.; Agarwal, Pankaj; Agarwala, Richa; Ainscough, Rachel; Alexandersson, Marina; An, Peter; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Attwood, John; Baertsch, Robert; Bailey, Jonathon; Barlow, Karen; Beck, Stephan; Berry, Eric; Birren, Bruce; Bloom, Toby; Bork, Peer; Botcherby, Marc; Bray, Nicolas; Brent, Michael R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Brown, Stephen D.; Bult, Carol; Burton, John; Butler, Jonathan; Campbell, Robert D.; Carninci, Piero; Cawley, Simon; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Church, Deanna M.; Clamp, Michele; Clee, Christopher; Collins, Francis S.; Cook, Lisa L.; Copley, Richard R.; Coulson, Alan; Couronne, Olivier; Cuff, James; Curwen, Val; Cutts, Tim; Daly, Mark; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Delehaunty, Kimberly D.; Deri, Justin; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dewey, Colin; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Diekhans, Mark; Dodge, Sheila; Dubchak, Inna; Dunn, Diane M.; Eddy, Sean R.; Elnitski, Laura; Emes, Richard D.; Eswara, Pallavi; Eyras, Eduardo; Felsenfeld, Adam; Fewell, Ginger A.; Flicek, Paul; Foley, Karen; Frankel, Wayne N.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Furey, Terrence S.; Gage, Diane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glusman, Gustavo; Gnerre, Sante; Goldman, Nick; Goodstadt, Leo; Grafham, Darren; Graves, Tina A.; Green, Eric D.; Gregory, Simon; Guigo, Roderic; Guyer, Mark; Hardison, Ross C.; Haussler, David; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Hinrichs, Angela; Hlavina, Wratko; Holzer, Timothy; Hsu, Fan; Hua, Axin; Hubbard, Tim; Hunt, Adrienne; Jackson, Ian; Jaffe, David B.; Johnson, L. Steven; Jones, Matthew; Jones, Thomas A.; Joy, Ann; Kamal, Michael; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Karolchik, Donna; Kasprzyk, Arkadiusz; Kawai, Jun; Keibler, Evan; Kells, Cristyn; Kent, W. James; Kirby, Andrew; Kolbe, Diana L.; Korf, Ian; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Kulbokas III, Edward J.; Kulp, David; Landers, Tom; Leger, J.P.; Leonard, Steven; Letunic, Ivica; Levine, Rosie; et al.

    2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome and a key experimental tool for biomedical research. Here, we report the results of an international collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial comparative analysis of the mouse and human genomes, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the two sequences. We discuss topics including the analysis of the evolutionary forces shaping the size, structure and sequence of the genomes; the conservation of large-scale synteny across most of the genomes; the much lower extent of sequence orthology covering less than half of the genomes; the proportions of the genomes under selection; the number of protein-coding genes; the expansion of gene families related to reproduction and immunity; the evolution of proteins; and the identification of intraspecies polymorphism.

  2. Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 9931001 Pulmonary vascular remodeling in isolated mouse lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 993­1001 Pulmonary vascular remodeling in isolated mouse lungs­flow relationships in mouse lungs and does so via structural remodeling. They also provide important baseline data

  3. Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated proteins including EGF domain-specific O-GlcNAc transferase Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain...

  4. Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer. Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer. Abstract: In...

  5. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL6J Mouse Stomach...

  6. Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features Dorsal/Ventral dial.352.3139 Toll Free: 1.877.352.3275 ^^ci&ion Q)e&i^n^^^r ^esea/H^/i Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder 923B-1/07 #12;MODEL 923-B MOUSE GAS ANESTHESIA HEAD HOLDER The KOPF Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder

  7. Video Article Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    Video Article Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused://www.jove.com/details.php?id=2690 DOI: 10.3791/2690 Keywords: Medicine, Issue 50, ex-vivo, mouse, lung, pulmonary vascular impedance of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused with Pulsatile Flow. J. Vis. Exp. (50), e2690

  8. Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of mouse lung development and Nmyc target genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Brendan J.

    Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of mouse lung development and Nmyc target genes provided information regarding the dynamics of gene expression during development of the mouse lung a global survey of protein expression during mouse lung organogenesis from embryonic day E13.5 until

  9. Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after Targeted Ablation of Hair Cells with Diphtheria Toxin Justin S. Golub,1 Ling Tong,1 Tot B. Ngyuen,1 Cliff R. Hume,1 Richard developed a transgenic mouse to permit conditional and selective ablation of hair cells in the adult mouse

  10. Mouse inbred strain differences in ethanol drinking to intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garland Jr., Theodore

    Mouse inbred strain differences in ethanol drinking to intoxication J. S. Rhodes*, , M. M. Ford , C described a simple procedure, Drinking in the Dark (DID), in which C57BL/6J mice self-administer ethanol to a blood ethanol concentration (BEC) above 1 mg/ml. The test consists of replacing the water with 20

  11. aging mouse brain: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aging mouse brain First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Construction of Anatomically Correct...

  12. adult mouse brain: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adult mouse brain First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Mapping of Endogenous Morphine-Like...

  13. Structure and Emergence of Specific Olfactory Glomeruli in the Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the olfactory bulb. Connecting 1000 populations of OSNs to the 1800 glomeruli of the mouse bulb poses-expressing OSNs occupies a large surface area of the bulb and coalesces abruptly into a proto- glomerulus systematic examination of OR-specific glomeruli. Key words: olfaction; olfactory system; olfactory bulb; glo

  14. Biophysical Journal Volume 68 May 1995 1787-1795 Molecular Dynamics in Mouse Atrial Tumor Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    -mail: ddt@ddt.biochem.umn.edu. Abbreviations used: SR, sarcoplasmic reticulum; MVSR, mouse ventricular SR

  15. Polar Biol (2007) 30:391394 DOI 10.1007/s00300-006-0204-8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pairs of thin-billed prions nests despite the presence of introduced ship rats, house mice and feral Pachyptila belcheri (Catry et al. 2003). Ship rats Rattus rattus, house mice Mus musculus and cats Felis em Eco-Etologia, Rua Jardim do Tabaco 44, Lisboa 1149-041, Portugal e-mail: paulo.catry@netc.pt P

  16. Metformin prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of mouse Schwann cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ota, Kimiko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nakamura, Jiro [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Li, Weiguo [Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, School Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA (United States); Kozakae, Mika [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Watarai, Atsuko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuhisa [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yasuda, Yutaka [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nakashima, Eirtaro [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Naruse, Keiko [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Denistry, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya (Japan); Watabe, Kazuhiko [Department of Molecular Neuropathology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Kato, Koichi [Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Aichi (Japan); Oiso, Yutaka [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Hamada, Yoji [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsuruma-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)]. E-mail: yhama@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications via the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). To clarify whether the antidiabetic drug metformin prevents Schwann cell damage induced by MG, we cultured mouse Schwann cells in the presence of MG and metformin. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining, caspase-3 activity, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Intracellular ROS formation was determined by flow cytometry, and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation was also examined. MG treatment resulted in blunted cell proliferation, an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, and the activation of caspase-3 and JNK along with enhanced intracellular ROS formation. All of these changes were significantly inhibited by metformin. No significant activation of AMPK by MG or metformin was observed. Taken together, metformin likely prevents MG-induced apoptotic signals in mouse Schwann cells by inhibiting the formation of AGEs and ROS.

  17. The evaluation of add-on mouse pads using electromyography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Varghese

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EVALUATION OF ADD-ON NIOUSE PADS USING ELECTROMYOGRAPHY A Thesis by VARGHESE THOMAS Submitted to the office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1993 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering THE EVALUATION OF ADD-ON MOUSE PADS USING ELECTROMYOGRAPHY A Thesis by VARGHESE THOMAS Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  18. Diarrhea as a cause of mortality in a mouse model of infectious colitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenshtein, Diana

    Background: Comparative characterization of genome-wide transcriptional changes during infection can help elucidate the mechanisms underlying host susceptibility. In this study, transcriptional profiling of the mouse colon ...

  19. Autoradiographic study of tritium-labeled misonidazole in the mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, L.M.; Nolan, J.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The localization of tritiated misonidazole metabolites in a number of normal tissues in the mouse is reported from autoradiography. The labeled misonidazole was injected at 750 or 75 mg/kg body weight (Rel. Sp. Act. 74 and 740 MBq/mg respectively). The grain count ratio, parenchyma:stroma, for selected tissues was: liver (centrilobular zone) 13; meibomian gland (acini) 68, (duct) 116; esophagus (keratinized layer) 61; enamel organ 17. It is concluded that there are a number of tissues which will accumulate MISO metabolites although they may not all be hypoxic.

  20. The Metabolic Degradation in the Mouse of Dibenzanthracene Labeled in the 9 and 10 Positions with Carbon 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidelberger, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Noted by Date THE MErABOLIC DEGRADATION IN TEE MOUSE OFas to the sites of this degradation have been advanced. Thisin Cancer TF~ UCRL-45 METABOLIC DEGRADATION IN THE MOUSE OF

  1. Semi-Automated Reconstruction of Vascular Networks in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dileepkumar, Ananth

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The KnifeEdge Scanning Microscope (KESM) enables imaging of an entire mouse brain at sub-micrometer resolution. The data from KESM can be used in the reconstruction of neuronal and vascular structures in the mouse brain. Tracing the vascular network...

  2. POSTURE MATCHING AND ELASTIC REGISTRATION OF A MOUSE ATLAS TO SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY RANGE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    POSTURE MATCHING AND ELASTIC REGISTRATION OF A MOUSE ATLAS TO SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY RANGE DATA A. A-imaged mouse based only on the atlas data and the measured surface topography of the i is required for quan- titative bioluminescence or fluorescence tomography. How- ever, only surface range data

  3. Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,* Lee Anne Schery,1 Robin Sharma,1,2 Alfredo, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627, USA 2 The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester indicate that the optical quality of the mouse eye assessed by measurement of its aberrations is remarkably

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Therapy model for advanced intracerebral B16 mouse melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terasaki, Mark

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Therapy model for advanced intracerebral B16 mouse melanoma using radiation for advanced intracerebral B16 melanoma is reported. Implanted tumors (D0), suppressed by a single 15 Gy- bination therapies for brain tumors. Keywords B16 melanoma Á Mouse Á Brain tumor Á Radiation therapy Á

  5. Systematic Enhancement of Polymerization of Recombinant Sickle Hemoglobin Mutants: Implications for Transgenic Mouse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chait, Brian T.

    for Transgenic Mouse Model for Sickle Cell Anemia By Xianfeng Li, Urooj A. Mirza, Brian T. Chait, and James M for sisting of HbS, Hb Antilles, and Hb D-Punjab. Normal mouse sickle cell anemia, we have expressed of sickle cell anemia contact sites between HbS tetramers in the polymer.12 Cur- rently, information

  6. A Method for Measuring Cerebral Blood Volume of Mouse using Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vial, Jean-Claude

    A Method for Measuring Cerebral Blood Volume of Mouse using Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy P Joseph Fourier,Grenoble, France ABSTRACT Knowledge of the volume of blood per unit volume of brain tissue-photon laser scanning microscopy to obtain the local blood volume in the cortex of the anesthetized mouse. We

  7. Assessment of morphometry of pulmonary acini in mouse lungs by nondestructive imaging using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Assessment of morphometry of pulmonary acini in mouse lungs by nondestructive imaging using a more complete understanding of the relationship of lung structure and function. We combined a special to separate individual acini in the mouse lung. Interior scans of the parenchyma at a resolution of 2 µm

  8. Wild mouse open field behavior is embedded within the multidimensional data space spanned by laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golani, Ilan

    Wild mouse open field behavior is embedded within the multidimensional data space spanned- ius), while studies of wild-mouse behavior are relatively rare. An interesting question is the relationship between the phenotypes of M. laboratorius and the phenotypes of their wild ancestors

  9. Tissue heterogeneity in the mouse lung: effects of elastase treatment Satoru Ito,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Tissue heterogeneity in the mouse lung: effects of elastase treatment Satoru Ito,1 Edward P heterogeneity in the mouse lung: effects of elastase treatment. J Appl Physiol 97: 204­212, 2004. First to characterize heterogeneity of tissue elasticity of the lung. The model includes a parallel set of pathways

  10. Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

  11. Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis Ronne L. Surface2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis quantitate metastatic mouse lung tumors in a lung section using a H&E stain. Lung sections from a mouse lung of view from each slide representing a whole lung lobe with multiple lung metastases was selected

  12. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, ?-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

  13. Metabolism of vitamin K in Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terryl Marie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Identification of the product of vitamin K metabolism in Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts was done by comparison of its HPLC gradient elution profile (A) to that of a mixture of authentic vitamin K epoxide standard... METABOLISM OF VITAMIN K IN SWISS 3T3 Mouse FIBROBLASTS A Thesis by TERRyL MARIE JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985...

  14. Studies of Secondary Melanoma on C57BL/6J Mouse Liver Using 1H...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    melanoma in C57BL6J mouse liver . The melanoma group can be differentiated from its control group by PCA analysis of the absolute concentrations or by the absolute peak...

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Gene Transfer to Mouse Heart and Skeletal Muscles Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Gene Transfer to Mouse Heart and Skeletal Muscles Using a Minicircle Expressing-globin polyA. It also contains a translation initiation signal and an untranslated herpes simplex virus

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates mouse liver Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: are abundant in iNKT cells.13-17 For example, mouse liver...

  17. Conditional mouse lung cancer models using adenoviral or lentiviral delivery of Cre recombinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPage, Michel

    The development of animal models of lung cancer is critical to our understanding and treatment of the human disease. Conditional mouse models provide new opportunities for testing novel chemopreventatives, therapeutics and ...

  18. Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain Ken Sugino1,3, Chris M among forebrain neurons and permit the construction of an objective neuronal taxonomy on the basis

  19. Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Stem Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crocker, Alyssa

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Stem Cells. (December 2013) Alyssa Crocker Department of Animal Science Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Michael Golding Department of Veterinary Physiology...

  20. Crude caffeine reduces memory impairment and amyloid b142 levels in an Alzheimer's mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockery, Shawn

    Crude caffeine reduces memory impairment and amyloid b1­42 levels in an Alzheimer's mouse model Yi the elderly. Crude caffeine (CC), a major by-product of the decaffeination of coffee, has potent hydrophilic

  1. Mouse-Specific Tandem IgY7-SuperMix Immunoaffinity Separations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in tandem with a mouse IgY7 column that removes the seven most abundant proteins in blood, the SuperMix column captures >100 additional moderate abundance proteins, thus...

  2. Biophysical Probes of Iron Metabolism in Yeast Cells, Mitochondria, and Mouse Brains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    resonance, electronic absorption spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This integrated biophysical approach was applied to yeast cells, isolated yeast mitochondria, and mouse brains. We determined the concentration of Fe...

  3. Transplantation of Adult Mouse iPS Cell-Derived Photoreceptor Precursors Restores Retinal Structure and Function in Degenerative Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007) Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model with iPSan animal model of sickle cell anemia [36], or engraftment

  4. Mus(tidimensional autsresonant mode conversion L. Friedland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    stagesby Bohm.and Foldy' in applications to relativistic particle accelerators. The term phase stability the gyroresonancecyclic accel- erator (GYRAC)6 and the spatial autoresonancecyclotron (SAC)7acceleratorarebasedon- nanceassociatedwith particle dynamicsandthat in resonant wave interactions. While in the former case the system

  5. MUS420/EE367A Lecture 7A Woodwind Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    -Reed Instruments Schematic Model Reed Bore Mouth Pressure Embouchure Tone-Hole Lattice Bell ( )np+ ( )np- ( )npm Model Bell Mouth Pressure Embouchure Offset Reed to Bell Delay ( )npm 2 BoreReed Reflection Filter

  6. MUS Pension Taskforce: 401(a) and 403(b) Plan RFP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and manager success · Development of a strategic investment line-up (Security selection and asset allocation of the individual offerings in the plan line-up. They only offer TIAA-CREF funds. 2. The 403(b) plan: Multi ­ individuals have no negotiating power · A coordinated education platform to assist employees in making

  7. algerian mice mus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    whereas small-bodied species introductions. Keywords: body size distributions, climate change, human hunting, late Pleistocene, megafaunalOf mice, mastodons and men:...

  8. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J. [Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Departments of Internal Medicine, Chemistry, and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  9. Radiosensitivity of testicular cells in the fetal mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergouwen, R.P.F.A.; Roepers-Gajadien, H.L.; Rooij, D.G. de [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands); Huiskamp, R.; Bas, R.J. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Davids, J.A.G. [Lonbar Petrilaan, Overveen (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of prenatal X irradiation on postnatal development of the CBA/P mouse testis was studied. At days 14, 15 and 18 post coitus pregnant female mice were exposed to single doses of X rays ranging from 0.25-1.5 Gy. Higher doses resulted in extensive loss of fetal mice. In the male offspring, at days 3 and 31 post partum, the numbers of gonocytes, type A spermatogonia and Sertoli cells per testis were determined using the disector method. Furthermore, after irradiation at day 15 post coitus, the numbers of Leydig cells, mesenchymal cells, macrophages, myoid cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, endothelial cells and perivascular cells per testis were also determined at days 3 and 31 post partum. At day 3 post partum, the number of germ cells was decreased after irradiation at days 14 and 15 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.7 Gy was determined for the radiosensitivity of the gonocytes at day 14 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.8 Gy was determined for the gonocytes at day 15 post coitus which, however, seems to be less accurate. No accurate D{sub o} value could be determined for the gonocytes at day 18 post coitus. At day 31 post partum, the repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium as well as testis weights and tubular diameters were more affected by irradiation with increasing age of the mice at the time of irradiation. The percentage of tubular cross sections showing spermatids decreased with increasing dose after irradiation at days 15 and 18 post coitus, but not after irradiation at day 14 post coitus. Furthermore, in tubular cross sections showing spermatids, exposure of testes to 1.25 and 1.5 Gy at day 18 post coitus resulted in significantly lower numbers of spermatids per cross section when compared to those testes exposed to the same doses at day 15 post coitus. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The effects of adult male mouse urine odor on evoked potentials in adult female mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Troy Edwin

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF ADULT MALE MOUSE URINE ODOR ON EVOKED POTENTIALS IN ADULT FEMALE MICE A Thesis by TROY EDWIN BROWN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE MAY 1985 Major Subject: Bioengineering THE EFFECTS OF ADULT MALE MOUSE URINE ODOR ON EVOKED POTENTIALS IN ADULT FEMALE MICE A Thesis by TROY EDWIN BROWN Approved as to style and content by: Jon F. Hunter (Co ? C airman of Committee...

  11. Inherited effects from mouse immature oocytes following low-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Khan, R.; Raabe, O.G.; Walsh, K.J.; Wiley, L.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Institute of Toxicology and Environmental Health

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immature oocytes represent the genetic pool in female mice as well as in women and therefore are principal cells of concern for genetic studies. Previous studies have demonstrated that genetic effects in female mice can be masked by the hypersensitive plasma membrane lethality target of immature oocytes. Studies have also shown that genetic effects can be detected when the plasma mambrane is sufficiently spared. Here, new data obtained using the mouse preimplantation embryo chimera assay are presented and discussed in light of previous findings for irradiated mouse oocytes.

  12. Sorghum gene expression modulated by water deficit and cold stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Sanghyun

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ] 2.4 IP1_69_A06_A002 Nucleoside diphosphate kinase III [A. thaliana] 2.4 ABA1_11_E02_A012 1200010K03Rik protein [Mus musculus] 2.4 OV1_27_H09_A002 VsaA-like protein [Oryza sativa] 2.4 RHOH1_28_A09 Histone H2A [Petroselinum crispum] 2...

  13. General anesthesia selectively disrupts astrocyte calcium signaling in the awake mouse cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Eric A.

    General anesthesia selectively disrupts astrocyte calcium signaling in the awake mouse cortex. However, the direct effect of general anesthesia on astrocyte signaling in awake animals has not pre, anesthesia affected calcium transients in both processes and soma and depressed spontaneous signals, as well

  14. Molecular responses of mouse macrophages to copper and copper oxide nanoparticles inferred from proteomic analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    enhanced cell vulnerability to copper-based nanoparticles but not to copper ion. Furthermore, functional1 Molecular responses of mouse macrophages to copper and copper oxide nanoparticles inferred from, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques (LAN), Grenoble 5

  15. Helicobacter pylori tissue tropism: mouse-colonizing strains can target different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheverud, James M.

    Helicobacter pylori tissue tropism: mouse-colonizing strains can target different gastric niches-adapted Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 had supported an idea that infections by this pathogen start in the gastric diversity and genome evolution. INTRODUCTION Helicobacter pylori chronically infects the gastric mucosa

  16. Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavone, Luigi Michele [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: pavone@dbbm.unina.it; Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mastellone, Vincenzo [Department of Experimental Medicine 'G. Salvatore', University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Avallone, Luigi [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT{sup Cre/+};ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

  17. Circ Res . Author manuscript Nanobodies targeting mouse/human VCAM1 for the nuclear imaging of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wernery 7 , Vicky Caveliers 3 8 , Serge Muyldermans 4 5 , Tony Lahoutte 3 8 , Daniel Fagret 1 2 on mouse and human recombinant VCAM1 proteins and endothelial cells and inin vitro in vivo ApoE-deficient (ApoE ) mice. A nontargeting control nanobody was used in all experiments to demonstrate specificity

  18. Mouse and human phenotypes indicate a critical conserved role for ERK2 signaling in neural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mouse and human phenotypes indicate a critical conserved role for ERK2 signaling in neural crest by the Editorial Board September 5, 2008 (received for review June 2, 2008) Disrupted ERK1/2 (MAPK3/MAPK1) MAPK signaling has been as- sociated with several developmental syndromes in humans; how- ever, mutations in ERK1

  19. Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain% paraformaldehyde. The organ is then sliced into 1 mm sections and optically cleared, or made transparent, using FocusClear, a proprietary optical clearing agent. After optical clearing, the DiI-labeled tissue

  20. Polyclonality of familial murine adenomas: Analyses of mouse chimeras with low tumor multiplicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dove, William

    Polyclonality of familial murine adenomas: Analyses of mouse chimeras with low tumor multiplicity) and homozygous for the tumor resistance allele of the Mom1 locus were established. These chimeras also display of patches in chimeras or mosaics heterotypic for a clonal lineage marker. The ability to detect

  1. MS ID: JLR/2013/039446 Obesity alters the gustatory perception of lipids in the mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 MS ID: JLR/2013/039446 Obesity alters the gustatory perception of lipids in the mouse: plausible INSERM/Université de Bourgogne/AgroSup Dijon, F-21000 Dijon, France. Short title: Obesity decreases-induced obesity; GLP-1, glucagon-like peptide-1; HF, high fat diet; HFHS, high fat/high sucrose diet; LA, linoleic

  2. Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550.12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550 deficits. Lithium is used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, and it has been used to treat mood dysregulation in individuals with FrX. Lithium has also been shown to reverse learning deficits and improve

  3. SkyMouse: A smart interface for astronomical on-line resources and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen-Zhou CUI; Hua-Ping SUN; Yong-Heng ZHAO; Yu LUO; Da-Zhi QI

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development of network and the World Wide Web (WWW), the Internet has been growing and changing dramatically. More and more on-line database systems and different kinds of services are available for astronomy research. How to help users find their way through the jungle of information services becomes an important challenge. Although astronomers have been aware of the importance of interoperability and introduced the concept of Virtual Observatory as a uniform environment for future astronomical on-line resources and services, transparent access to heterogeneous on-line information is still difficult. SkyMouse is a lightweight interface for distributed astronomical on-line resources and services, which is designed and developed by us, i.e., Chinese Virtual Observatory Project. Taking advantage of screen word-capturing technology, different kinds of information systems can be queried through simple mouse actions, and results are returned in a uniform web page. SkyMouse is an easy to use application, aiming to show basic information or to create a comprehensive overview of a specific astronomical object. In this paper current status of on-line resources and services access is reviewed; system architecture, features and functions of SkyMouse are described; challenges for intelligent interface for on-line astronomical resources and services are discussed.

  4. Automouse: An improvement to the mouse computerized uncertainty analysis system operational manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klee, A.J.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. The Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory is responsible for planning, implementing, and managing research development, and demonstration programs to provide an authoritative, defensible engineering basis in support of the policies, programs, and regulations of the EPA with respect to drinking water, wastewater, pesticides, toxic substances, solid and hazardous wastes, and Superfund-related activities. The publication is one of the products of that research and provides a vital communication link between the researcher and the user community. The manual describes a system, called MOUSE (for Modular Oriented Uncertainty SystEm), for dealing with the computational problems of uncertainty, specifically in models that consist of a set of one or more equations. Since such models are frequently encountered in the fields of environmental science, risk analysis, economics, and engineering, the system has broad application throughout these fields. An important part of the MOUSE system is AutoMOUSE which actually writes the computer programs required for the uncertainty analysis computations. Thus, no prior programming knowledge is needed to learn or use MOUSE and, because of its transportability and compactness, the system can be run on a wide variety of personal computers available to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and/or its contractors and grantees.

  5. Evaluation of unmarked deletion mutants as improved Brucella vaccine strains in the mouse and goat models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahl, Melissa Marie

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    and in vitro virulence. Survival and efficacy of these novel deletion mutants were then evaluated in the mouse model. The asp24 mutants, which persist for extended periods in vivo, appear superior as a vaccine candidate compared to approved vaccine strains S19...

  6. Evolutionary Conservation of Expression Profiles Between Human and Mouse Orthologous Genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    ­array-based observations from many individual genes and imply the uselessness of mouse models for studying human genes­profiling technologies became available (Cavalieri, Townsend, and Hartl 2000; Enard et al. 2002; Oleksiak, Churchill all the technologies for producing transcriptome data, the DNA (oligonucleotide or cDNA) microarray

  7. Caspase Activation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle Exposed to Neomycin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Caspase Activation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle Exposed to Neomycin Lisa L. Cunningham, Alan exposure results in the apoptotic destruction of auditory and vestibular hair cells. This ototoxic hair, immunohistochemistry, and specific caspase inhibitors to determine which caspases are activated in the hair cells

  8. Formation of Enzymatically Active, Homotypic, and Heterotypic Tetramers of Mouse Mast Cell Tryptases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sali, Andrej

    Formation of Enzymatically Active, Homotypic, and Heterotypic Tetramers of Mouse Mast Cell an 150-kDa tetramer structure. Heparin was not required for this structural change. When incubated at 37 of this tryptase to form the enzymati- cally active tetramer was more dependent on a highly conserved Trp

  9. The PanK2 Genes of Mouse and Human Specify Proteins with DistinctSubcellular Locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Lydikis, Athanasios; Stevens,Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Wenner, Brett R.; Bain, James R.; Newgard,Christopher B.; Rock, Charles O.; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis is initiated by pantothenatekinase (PanK) and CoA levels are controlled through differentialexpression and feedback regulation of PanK isoforms. PanK2 is amitochondrial protein in humans, but comparative genomics revealed thatacquisition of a mitochondrial targeting signal was limited to primates.Human and mouse PanK2 possessed similar biochemical properties, withinhibition by acetylCoA and activation by palmitoylcarnitine. Mouse PanK2localized in the cytosol, and the expression of PanK2 was higher in humanbrain compared to mouse brain. Differences in expression and subcellularlocalization should be considered in developing a mouse model for humanPanK2 deficiency. (c) 2007 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. A filtered database search algorithm for endogenous serum protein carbonyl modifications in a mouse model of inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slade, Peter G.

    During inflammation, the resulting oxidative stress can damage surrounding host tissue, forming protein-carbonyls. The SJL mouse is an experimental animal model used to assess in vivo toxicological responses to reactive ...

  11. Rapid Structural Remodeling of Thalamocortical Synapses Parallels Experience-Dependent Functional Plasticity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Jason E.

    Monocular lid closure (MC) causes a profound shift in the ocular dominance (OD) of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). Anatomical studies in both cat and mouse V1 suggest that large-scale structural rearrangements of ...

  12. Flow cytometry quantitation of dopamine receptor D2 loss as a sensitive measure of Huntington's Disease progression in mouse neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crook, Zachary R. (Zachary Ryan)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mouse models of Huntington's Disease (HD) are often used for testing potential therapeutic compounds. These experiments require substantial investments in time and resources, and have yet to produce any intervention that ...

  13. Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Atlas In Vector Graphics For Enhanced Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jinho

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    KNIFE-EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPE MOUSE BRAIN ATLAS IN VECTOR GRAPHICS FOR ENHANCED PERFORMANCE A Thesis by JINHO CHOI Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair of Committee, Yoonsuck Choe Committee Members, John Keyser Louise Abbott Department Head, Duncan M. \\Hank" Walker August 2013 Major Subject: Computer Science Copyright 2013 Jinho Choi ABSTRACT The microstructure...

  14. Effect of gamma-linolenic acid on mouse macrophage prostaglandin E1 synthesis and phospholipid metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Yang-Yi

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , in this study, the modulatory effect of dietary GLA on mouse peritoneal macrophage PGEI, PGE2 and PGI2 biosynthesis is presented. MATERIALS AND METHODS Materials All tissue culture media were purchased from Whitaker M. A. Bioproducts (Walkersville, MD... in the PGE2 RIA kit (Nuclear Magnetics, Cambridge, MA) was 100% and 50%, respectively, as determined by the manufacturer and confirmed by our preliminary test (Appendix II). Therefore, the apparent concentration of immunoreactive PGEI was multiplied by two...

  15. SkyMouse: A smart interface for astronomical on-line resources and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CUI, Chen-Zhou; ZHAO, Yong-Heng; LUO, Yu; QI, Da-Zhi

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development of network and the World Wide Web (WWW), the Internet has been growing and changing dramatically. More and more on-line database systems and different kinds of services are available for astronomy research. How to help users find their way through the jungle of information services becomes an important challenge. Although astronomers have been aware of the importance of interoperability and introduced the concept of Virtual Observatory as a uniform environment for future astronomical on-line resources and services, transparent access to heterogeneous on-line information is still difficult. SkyMouse is a lightweight interface for distributed astronomical on-line resources and services, which is designed and developed by us, i.e., Chinese Virtual Observatory Project. Taking advantage of screen word-capturing technology, different kinds of information systems can be queried through simple mouse actions, and results are returned in a uniform web page. SkyMouse is an easy to use application, a...

  16. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Lu, Fred G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Lerch, Jason P. [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada) [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Nieman, Brian J., E-mail: bjnieman@phenogenomics.ca [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  17. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France); Ranouil, Julien [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Général Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France)] [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Général Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France); Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France)] [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France); Walker, Paul [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France); Brunotte, François [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse-like phantom. OSLDs exhibited a reproducibility of 2.4% and good linearity was found between 60 and 450 mGy. The energy scaling factor was calculated to be between 1.80 ± 0.16 and 1.86 ± 0.16, depending on protocol used. In phantoms, mean doses to tissue over a whole-body CT examination were ranging from 186.4 ± 7.6 to 234.9 ± 7.1 mGy. In mice, mean doses to tissue in the mouse trunk (thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and flanks) were between 213.0 ± 17.0 and 251.2 ± 13.4 mGy. Skin doses (3 OSLDs) were much higher with average doses between 350.6 ± 25.3 and 432.5 ± 34.1 mGy. The dose delivered during a topogram was found to be below 10 mGy. Use of the multimouse bed of the system gave a significantly 20%–40% lower dose per animal (p < 0.05).Conclusions: Absorbed doses in micro-CT were found to be relatively high. In micro-SPECT/CT imaging, the micro-CT unit is mainly used to produce a localization frame. As a result, users should pay attention to adjustable CT parameters so as to minimize the radiation dose and avoid any adverse radiation effects which may interfere with biological parameters studied.

  18. Mouse and joystick performance comparison for moving and stationary index tracking displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frick, Douglas Jon

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the speed at which the target was traveling. Capture rates were calculated by dividing the number of TABLE 1 Numher and pex'cent G f x'eseax'ch pax t 1c ipant 8 who pax"t3. c3. pated Xn Both control tJJpe cond3. t3. ons fox' each d 3. sp1a+ mode An XBH... LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Block diagram for an open loop manual control system 2 Block diagram for a single input/output feedback control system 3 INSI mechanical mouse and JS800 joystick 4 Target sizes and shapes 10 12 5 Originating...

  19. The genetic control of avascular area in mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Bryhim, Bliss; Radel, Jeff; Macdonald, Stuart J.; Symons, R. C. Andrew

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    data. Due to inconsistencies in the genotyping results, an albino female mouse from the low avascular area group was excluded from subsequent analysis. The genotype of the tyrosinase locus of the mice not selected for genotyping was inferred from coat... color. In this cross, albinism was conferred by homozygosity for the BALB/c allele of tyrosinase. The genotype of albino mice at the tyrosinase locus was encoded as AB/cAB/c. For all non- albino mice, a code indicating “not-AB/cAB/c” was used. QTL...

  20. Effect of nitroimidazoles on glucose utilization and lactate accumulation in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, C.F. (Roswell Park Memorial Inst., Buffalo, NY); Subjeck, J.R.; Brody, H.; Shen, J.; Johnson, R.J.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation sensitizers misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) can produce central and peripheral neuropathy in patients and laboratory animals. Nitroimidazoles can also interfere with glycolysis in vitro under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In the present work, the authors studied the effect of MISO or DMM on lactate production and glucose utilization in mouse brain. It is observed that these compounds result in a 25% inhibition of lactate production in brain slices relative to the control at a 10 mM level. Additionally, MISO (1.0 mg/g/day) or DMM (1.4 mg/g/day) were administered daily (oral) for 1, 4, 7, or 14 days to examine the effect of these two drugs on the regional glucose utilization in C3Hf mouse brain. Five microcuries of 2-deoxy(/sup 14/C)glucose was given following the last drug dose and autoradiographs of serial brain sections were made and analyzed by a densitometer. Following a single dose of either MISO or DMM, no significant differences in glucose uptake were observed when compared with controls. However, following 4, 7, and 14 doses the rate of glucose utilization was significantly reduced in the intoxicated animals. Larger reductions were measured in specific regions including the posterior colliculus, cochlear nuclei, vestibular nuclei, and pons with increasing effects observed at later stages. These results share a degree of correspondence with the regional brain pathology produced by these nitroimidazoles.

  1. Arsenic- and cadmium-induced toxicogenomic response in mouse embryos undergoing neurulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Joshua F.; Yu, Xiaozhong [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Moreira, Estefania G. [Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Physiological Sciences, State University of Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Hong, Sungwoo [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Faustman, Elaine M., E-mail: faustman@u.washington.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center on Human Development and Disability, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are well-characterized teratogens in animal models inducing embryotoxicity and neural tube defects (NTDs) when exposed during neurulation. Toxicological research is needed to resolve the specific biological processes and associated molecular pathways underlying metal-induced toxicity during this timeframe in gestational development. In this study, we investigated the dose-dependent effects of As and Cd on gene expression in C57BL/6J mouse embryos exposed in utero during neurulation (GD8) to identify significantly altered genes and corresponding biological processes associated with embryotoxicity. We quantitatively examined the toxicogenomic dose-response relationship at the gene level. Our results suggest that As and Cd induce dose-dependent gene expression alterations representing shared (cell cycle, response to UV, glutathione metabolism, RNA processing) and unique (alcohol/sugar metabolism) biological processes, which serve as robust indicators of metal-induced developmental toxicity and indicate underlying embryotoxic effects. Our observations also correlate well with previously identified impacts of As and Cd on specific genes associated with metal-induced toxicity (Cdkn1a, Mt1). In summary, we have identified in a quantitative manner As and Cd induced dose-dependent effects on gene expression in mouse embryos during a peak window of sensitivity to embryotoxicity and NTDs in the sensitive C57BL/6J strain.

  2. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is required for developmental closure of the ductus venosus in the neonatal mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradfield, Christopher A.

    venosus in the neonatal mouse Authors: Garet P. Lahvis, Robert W. Pyzalski, Edward Glover, Henry C. Pitot: computerized tomography MR: magnetic resonance VEGF: vascular endothelial growth factor DA: ductus arteriosus of an embryonic structure and is not acquired after birth. We observed that the shunt is found in late stage wild-type

  3. Assessment of Cerebellar and Hippocampal Morphology and Biochemical Parameters in the Compound Heterozygous, Tottering/leaner Mouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, Emily M.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to two different mutations in the gene that encodes the a1A subunit of voltage-activated CaV 2.1 calcium ion channels, the compound heterozygous tottering/leaner (tg/tgla) mouse exhibits numerous neurological deficits. ...

  4. Slow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertram, Richard

    of the ramp current-voltage curves, oscillated and was larger during the silent phase than during the activeSlow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations Jianhua Ren,1 Arthur Sherman,2 Richard Bertram,3 Paulette B

  5. Impact of Mouse Model on Pre-Clinical Dosimetry in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Samir Boutaleb1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/1 Impact of Mouse Model on Pre-Clinical Dosimetry in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Samir Boutaleb animal dosimetry serves as an important link in establishing a relationship between absorbed dose are based on models aiming at representing the animals used during pre-clinical experiments. However

  6. n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Alter Mouse CD4+ T Cell Activation by Modifying the Lipid Bilayer Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Tim Yu-Tien

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2], which modulates actin remodeling, is perturbed by n-3 PUFA. Utilizing the transgenic Fat-1 mouse model that synthesizes n-3 PUFA de novo and enriches the plasma membrane with n-3 PUFA, and wild type (WT) mice fed...

  7. Silencing of SPC2 Expression Using an Engineered Ribozyme in the Mouse TC-3 Endocrine Cell Line*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    Silencing of SPC2 Expression Using an Engineered Ribozyme in the Mouse TC-3 Endocrine Cell Line the distinct roles of a member of this family (SPC2), gene silencing in cultured cells is an ideal approach to establish TC-3 stable cell lines expressing the chimeric tRNAVal - ribozyme transcript targeting SPC2 m

  8. Identification and Evaluation of Brucella Recombinant Outer Membrane Proteins as Subunit Vaccinogen Candidates in the Mouse Model of Brucellosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Gabriel

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    in alveolar epithelial cells. From an immunogenicity standpoint, all proteins elicited IgG production in Brucella-exposed goats, mouse and humans. Antigen-specific recall responses in splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice immunized with a cocktail of the three...

  9. 3D segmentation of mouse organs from MR images using deformable simplex mesh models G. Hamarneh1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    3D segmentation of mouse organs from MR images using deformable simplex mesh models G. Hamarneh1 , H. Delingette2 , M. Henkelman1 1 Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, 2 INRIA brains and kidneys from MR images. Algorithmic details and 3D segmentation results are presented

  10. Impedance in Isolated Mouse Lungs for the Determination of Site of Action of Vasoactive Agents and Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    Impedance in Isolated Mouse Lungs for the Determination of Site of Action of Vasoactive Agents the review of this article. Abstract--Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension is a disease of the lung vasculature that is usually quantified by pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). However, a more complete description of lung

  11. Mechanoelectrical Transduction and Adaptation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle, a Low-Frequency Vestibular Organ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corey, David P.

    Mechanoelectrical Transduction and Adaptation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle, a Low and Communicative Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030 Hair cells of inner ear organs sensitive to frequencies above 10 Hz adapt to maintained hair bundle deflections at rates that reduce

  12. PACAP Interactions in the Mouse Brain: Implications for Behavioral and Other Disorders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acquaah-Mensah, George; Taylor, Ronald C.; Bhave, Sanjiv V.

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As an activator of adenylate cyclase, the neuropeptide Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Peptide (PACAP) impacts levels of cyclic AMP, a key second messenger available in brain cells. PACAP is involved in certain adult behaviors. To elucidate PACAP interactions, a compendium of microarrays representing mRNA expression in the adult mouse whole brain was pooled from the Phenogen database for analysis. A regulatory network was computed based on mutual information between gene pairs using gene expression data across the compendium. Clusters among genes directly linked to PACAP, and probable interactions between corresponding proteins were computed. Database 'experts' affirmed some of the inferred relationships. The findings suggest ADCY7 is probably the adenylate cyclase isoform most relevant to PACAP's action. They also support intervening roles for kinases including GSK3B, PI 3-kinase, SGK3 and AMPK. Other high-confidence interactions are hypothesized for future testing. This new information has implications for certain behavioral and other disorders.

  13. Honokiol inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vavilala, Divya Teja [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States)] [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States); O’Bryhim, Bliss E. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)] [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ponnaluri, V.K. Chaithanya [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States)] [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States); White, R. Sid; Radel, Jeff [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)] [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Symons, R.C. Andrew [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States) [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ophthalmology Department, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Surgery, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Mukherji, Mridul, E-mail: mukherjim@umkc.edu [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States)] [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Aberrant activation of HIF pathway is the underlying cause of ischemic neovascularization. •Honokiol has better therapeutic index as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. •Daily IP injection of honokiol in OIR mouse model reduced retinal neovascularization. •Honokiol also prevents vaso-obliteration, the characteristic feature of the OIR model. •Honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. -- Abstract: Aberrant activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is the underlying cause of retinal neovascularization, one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. The HIF pathway also plays critical roles during tumor angiogenesis and cancer stem cell transformation. We have recently shown that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of the HIF pathway in a number of cancer and retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. Here we evaluate the safety and efficacy of honokiol, digoxin, and doxorubicin, three recently identified HIF inhibitors from natural sources. Our studies show that honokiol has a better safety to efficacy profile as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. Further, we show for the first time that daily intraperitoneal injection of honokiol starting at postnatal day (P) 12 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model significantly reduced retinal neovascularization at P17. Administration of honokiol also prevents the oxygen-induced central retinal vaso-obliteration, characteristic feature of the OIR model. Additionally, honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. Since honokiol suppresses multiple pathways activated by HIF, in addition to the VEGF signaling, it may provide advantages over current treatments utilizing specific VEGF antagonists for ocular neovascular diseases and cancers.

  14. Characterization of mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase, a Nudix hydrolase encoded by the Nudt14 gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyen, Candy A.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Zhai, Lanmin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Roach, Peter J., E-mail: proach@iupui.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2009-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Recombinant mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase (UGPPase), encoded by the Nudt14 gene, was produced in Escherichia coli and purified close to homogeneity. The enzyme catalyzed the conversion of [{beta}-{sup 32}P]UDP-glucose to [{sup 32}P]glucose-1-P and UMP, confirming that it hydrolyzed the pyrophosphate of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar to generate glucose-1-P and UMP. The enzyme was also active toward ADP-ribose. Activity is dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and was greatest at alkaline pH above 8. Kinetic analysis indicated a K{sub m} of {approx}4 mM for UDP-glucose and {approx}0.3 mM for ADP-ribose. Based on V{sub max}/K{sub m} values, the enzyme was {approx}20-fold more active toward ADP-ribose. UGPPase behaves as a dimer in solution and can be cross-linked to generate a species of M{sub r} 54,000 from a monomer of 30,000 as judged by SDS-PAGE. The dimerization was not affected by the presence of glucose-1-P or UDP-glucose. Using antibodies raised against the recombinant protein, Western analysis indicated that UGPPase was widely expressed in mouse tissues, including skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, lung, fat, heart and pancreas with a lower level in brain. It was generally present as a doublet when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, suggesting the occurrence of some form of post-translational modification. Efforts to interconvert the species by adding or inhibiting phosphatase activity were unsuccessful, leaving the nature of the modification unknown. Sequence alignments and database searches revealed related proteins in species as distant as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans.

  15. Molecular mapping of the tubby (tub) mutation on mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, W.K.; Goldberg-Berman, J.; Power-Kehoe, L.; Leibel, R.L. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 180 F2 progeny of a C57BL6/J x CAST/Ei tub/+F1 intersubspecific intercross, a map of 28 molecular markers (including eight genes) on chromosome 7 surrounding the tub locus was generated. Using 33 obese F2 progeny, tub was localized approximately 50-52 cM distal to the centromere on mouse chromosome 7 in the interval defined proximally by hemoglobin beta (Hbb), D7Mit38, D7Mit217, D7Mit37, D7Mit96, and D7Mit33 and distally by D7Mit 98. Using 39 obese F2 progeny from a similar intersubspecific intercross, a telomeric boundary of the interval defining tub was defined by D7Mit53; the order centromere-Hbb/tub-D7Mit53/D7Mit328/D7Mit220-parathyroid hormone (Pth)-calcitonin (Calc)-zona pellucida 2 (2p2) was established. By combining the data from the two crosses, the most likely gene order on mouse chromosome 7 is centromere-Hbb-tub-Pth-Calc, thus making it likely that the human homolog of tub resides on 11p15, where the gene order HBB-PTH-CALC is conserved. Assignment of the human tubby homolog to 11p15 allows selection and development of polymorphic molecular markers that can be used to examine segregation of a human homolog of tubby in pedigrees segregating for obesity. The gene sulfonylurea receptor was eliminated as a candidate gene for tubby on the basis of its map position, approximately 3.1 {plus_minus} 3.1 cM centromeric of tyrosinase and approximately 14.9 {plus_minus} 4.8 cM centromeric of Hbb. 47 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

  17. Visualization of nitric oxide production in the mouse main olfactory bulb by a cell-trappable copper(II) fluorescent probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, Lindsey E.

    We report the visualization of NO production using fluorescence in tissue slices of the mouse main olfactory bulb. This discovery was possible through the use of a novel, cell-trappable probe for intracellular nitric oxide ...

  18. A Novel Role of the WNT-Dishevelled-GSK3? Signaling Cascade in the Mouse Nucleus Accumbens in a Social Defeat Model of Depression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Matthew B.

    Based on earlier gene expression and chromatin array data, we identified the protein, dishevelled (DVL)-2, as being regulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key brain reward region, in the mouse social defeat model of ...

  19. MicroRNAs in early embryonic development : dissecting the role of miR-290 through miR-295 in the mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Lucas M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroRNAs mediate developmental regulation of gene expression via translational repression of target mRNAs. Targeted deletion of the miRNA biogenesis machinery in the mouse has demonstrated essential roles for miRNAs during ...

  20. Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven Hermann, Rainer Reich, Michael Schafers, and Klaus Hinrichs, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinrichs, Klaus

    Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven present a visualization system for the visual analysis of PET/CT scans of aortic arches of mice

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in the mouse lung: Association with lung pathology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacurari, M. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Qian, Y., E-mail: yaq2@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Porter, D.W.; Wolfarth, M. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Wan, Y.; Luo, D. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Ding, M. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Castranova, V. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Guo, N.L., E-mail: lguo@hsc.wvu.edu [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9190 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the fibrous shape and durability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), concerns regarding their potential for producing environmental and human health risks, including carcinogenesis, have been raised. This study sought to investigate how previously identified lung cancer prognostic biomarkers and the related cancer signaling pathways are affected in the mouse lung following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT. A total of 63 identified lung cancer prognostic biomarker genes and major signaling biomarker genes were analyzed in mouse lungs (n = 80) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 7 and 56 days post-exposure using quantitative PCR assays. At 7 and 56 days post-exposure, a set of 7 genes and a set of 11 genes, respectively, showed differential expression in the lungs of mice exposed to MWCNT vs. the control group. Additionally, these significant genes could separate the control group from the treated group over the time series in a hierarchical gene clustering analysis. Furthermore, 4 genes from these two sets of significant genes, coiled-coil domain containing-99 (Ccdc99), muscle segment homeobox gene-2 (Msx2), nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2), and wingless-type inhibitory factor-1 (Wif1), showed significant mRNA expression perturbations at both time points. It was also found that the expression changes of these 4 overlapping genes at 7 days post-exposure were attenuated at 56 days post-exposure. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) found that several carcinogenic-related signaling pathways and carcinogenesis itself were associated with both the 7 and 11 gene signatures. Taken together, this study identifies that MWCNT exposure affects a subset of lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. - Research Highlights: > Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes affect lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. > The results suggest potentially harmful effects of MWCNT exposure on human lungs. > The results could potentially be used for the medical surveillance of workers.

  2. Random mtDNA mutations modulate proliferation capacity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukat, Alexandra [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Edgar, Daniel [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Bratic, Ivana [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Maiti, Priyanka [Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany)] [Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany); Trifunovic, Aleksandra, E-mail: aleksandra.trifunovic@ki.se [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, S-17171 Stockholm (Sweden); Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Ageing-Associated Diseases (CECAD), Cologne University Clinic, D-50674 Cologne (Germany)

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Increased mtDNA mutations in MEFs lead to high level of spontaneous immortalization. {yields} This process is independent of endogenous ROS production. {yields} Aerobic glycolysis significantly contributes to spontaneous immortalization of MEFs. -- Abstract: An increase in mtDNA mutation load leads to a loss of critical cells in different tissues thereby contributing to the physiological process of organismal ageing. Additionally, the accumulation of senescent cells that display changes in metabolic function might act in an active way to further disrupt the normal tissue function. We believe that this could be the important link missing in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of premature ageing in the mtDNA mutator mice. We tested proliferation capacity of mtDNA mutator cells in vitro. When cultured in physiological levels of oxygen (3%) their proliferation capacity is somewhat lower than wild-type cells. Surprisingly, in conditions of increased oxidative stress (20% O{sub 2}) mtDNA mutator mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit continuous proliferation due to spontaneous immortalization, whereas the same conditions promote senescence in wild-type cells. We believe that an increase in aerobic glycolysis observed in mtDNA mutator mice is a major mechanism behind this process. We propose that glycolysis promotes proliferation and allows a fast turnover of metabolites, but also leads to energy crisis due to lower ATP production rate. This could lead to compromised replication and/or repair and therefore, in rare cases, might lead to mutations in tumor suppressor genes and spontaneous immortalization.

  3. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)] [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Pepinsky, R. Blake [BiogenIdec, Inc., 14 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States)] [BiogenIdec, Inc., 14 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Fishman, Paul S. [Research Service, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) [Research Service, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Brown, Robert H. [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)] [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Francis, Jonathan W., E-mail: jwfrancisby@gmail.com [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

  4. MSH regulation of tyrosinase in Cloudman S-91 mouse melanoma cell cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, B.B.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (MSH) causes an increase in tyrosinase activity (O-diphenol: O/sub 2/ oxidoreductase) in Cloudman S-91 mouse melanoma cell cultures following a lag period of approximately 9 hours. Treatment of cells with 2 x 10/sup -7/M ..cap alpha..- MSH for 6 days results in a 90 fold increase in the specific activity of the enzyme. The hormone mediated increase in tyrosinase activity is dependent upon continued transcription since the enzyme induction is suppressed by either cordycepin (1..mu..g/ml) or ..cap alpha..-amanitin (10..mu..g/ml). To determine if MSH is increasing the synthesis rate of tyrosinase, cell cultures, either exposed to MSH for various times or left untreated, were pulsed with (/sup 3/H)-leucine for 4 hours and tyrosinase immunoprecipitated with an anti-tyrosinase polyclonal antiserum raised in rabbits. The immunoprecipitates were solubilized and electrophoresed on SDS polyacrylamide gels. The proteins were electroblotted to nitrocellulose and the radioactivity in the tyrosinase bands determined. These studies have shown that while tyrosinase activity in hormone-treated cells may increase 90 fold, the rate of synthesis of the enzyme increases only 3 fold at most. Immunoprecipitation analysis of equivalence points of tyrosinase from control and MSH-treated cultures suggests the presence of inactive forms of the enzyme in melanoma cell cultures. These results suggest that, in addition to stimulating tyrosinase synthesis, MSH may also promote the activation of pre-existing enzyme molecules.

  5. Vertebrate survey of a dredge spoil salt marsh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Betty Jo

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . , . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 22 Ppl f. 1 t ph* f~S'd~hfdd Mus musculus from October, 1975 through March, 1976 on the Bolivar Peninsula study area, Texas. 24 Sex, reproductive state and age percentages in population pl f ~S' d ~htfd, 0 h, 1979 h Sh S* h. 1976 on the Bolivar... subordinant animals as a class. 9 t f . 1 pl ' 1, ~sd Soartina, Monarda, and Sesbania-Mixed Grass, were analysed for g ' p f hying' d . A ly ' f ' f h ~S'dppl 1 hd tg'f'diff f ppl density in the four plant communities (Table 7) . Duncan's multiple g...

  6. Requirement of B-Raf, C-Raf, and A-Raf for the growth and survival of mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Wenjing; Hao, Baixia; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yingying; Yue, Jianbo, E-mail: jbyue@me.com

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) have been implicated to be dispensable for self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK signaling and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) not only allows mouse ES cells to self-renew independent of extracellular stimuli but also enables more efficient derivation of naïve ES cells from mouse and rat strains. Interestingly, some ERKs stay active in mouse ES cells which are maintained in regular medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). Yet, the upstream signaling for ERK activation and their roles in mouse ES cells, other than promoting or priming differentiation, have not been determined. Here we found that mouse ES cells express three forms of Raf kinases, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. Knocking-down each single Raf member failed to affect the sustained ERK activity, neither did A-Raf and B-Raf double knockdown or B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown change it in ES cells. Interestingly, B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown, not A-Raf and B-Raf knockdown, inhibited the maximal ERK activation induced by LIF, concomitant with the slower growth of ES cells. On the other hand, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf triple knockdown markedly inhibited both the maximal and sustained ERK activity in ES cells. Moreover, Raf triple knockdown, similar to the treatment of U-0126, an MEK inhibitor, significantly inhibited the survival and proliferation of ES cells, thereby compromising the colony propagation of mouse ES cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that all three Raf members are required for ERK activation in mouse ES cells and are involved in growth and survival of mouse ES cells. - Highlights: ?Mouse ES (mES) cells express all three Raf members, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. ?Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) temporally activates ERKs in mES cells. ?B-Raf and C-Raf are required for LIF-induced maximal ERKs activity in mES cells. ?All Raf members are required for LIF-induced sustained ERK activity in mES cells. ?All Raf members are required the survival and proliferation of mES cells.

  7. Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Pamela K. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, NJ (United States); Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cunningham, Michael L. [National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

  8. Effects of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on mouse T-lymphocyte function and diglyceride formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Kara Hosack

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) of triplicate stimulated cultures (9). Lymphocyte-Macrophage Co-culture Lymphocytes were purified by nylon wool adherence and resident macrophages were isolated from the mouse peritoneum. Lymphocytes (2x10- per well) from each diet group were combined... with macrophages (5x105 per well) from each diet group, for a total of 9 different treatment groups. Co-cultures were stimulated with 2 different doses of Con A (5 ug/ml and 10 ug/ml), incubated, labeled, harvested, and counted by liquid scintillation...

  9. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane technical mixture regulates cell cycle and apoptosis genes through the activation of CAR and ER? in mouse livers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A. [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Pustylnyak, Vladimir O., E-mail: pustylnyak@ngs.ru [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Pirogova str., 2, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is a widely used organochlorine pesticide and a xenoestrogen that promotes rodent hepatomegaly and tumours. A recent study has shown significant correlation between DDT serum concentration and liver cancer incidence in humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We hypothesised that a mixture of DDT isomers could exert effects on the liver through pathways instead of classical ERs. The acute effects of a DDT mixture containing the two major isomers p,p?-DDT (85%) and o,p?-DDT (15%) on CAR and ER? receptors and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes were studied in mouse livers. ChIP results demonstrated increased CAR and ER? recruitment to their specific target gene binding sites in response to the DDT mixture. The results of real-time RT-PCR were consistent with the ChIP data and demonstrated that the DDT was able to activate both CAR and ER? in mouse livers, leading to target gene transcriptional increases including Cyp2b10, Gadd45?, cMyc, Mdm2, Ccnd1, cFos and E2f1. Western blot analysis demonstrated increases in cell cycle progression proteins cMyc, Cyclin D1, CDK4 and E2f1 and anti-apoptosis proteins Mdm2 and Gadd45?. In addition, DDT exposure led to Rb phosphorylation. Increases in cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis proteins were accompanied by a decrease in p53 content and its transcriptional activity. However, the DDT was unable to stimulate the ?-catenin signalling pathway, which can play an important role in hepatocyte proliferation. Thus, our results indicate that DDT treatment may result in cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition through CAR- and ER?-mediated gene activation in mouse livers. These findings suggest that the proliferative and anti-apoptotic conditions induced by CAR and ER? activation may be important contributors to the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis as produced by DDT in rodent livers. - Highlights: • DDT activated both CAR and ER? and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes. • DDT produced increases in cell cycle and anti-apoptosis proteins and decrease in p53. • DDT mixture was unable to stimulate the ?-catenin signalling pathway in mouse livers.

  10. Automatic Seedpoint Selection and Tracing of Microstructures in the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dongkun

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    in neuronal structures [4]. Research about the neuronal structure can also help understand how the neuronal structure processes information. In order to investigate neuronal structures, researchers at the Brain Network Lab (BNL) at Texas A&M University... by re- searchers at the Brain Network Laboratory (BNL) at Texas A&M University (TAMU) to scan entire mouse brains at a sub-micrometer resolution (down to 300 nm). This instrument consists of a high-precision stage, a diamond knife and an illuminator...

  11. LEIOCEPHALIDAE 1989 Leiocephalinae Frost and Etheridge, Misc. Publ. Mus. Nat. Hist. Univ.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Hispaniola, Navassa, and Martinique. Recently extinct species were found on Barbuda and Antigua, Anguilla, Guadeloupe, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica. Leiocephalus Gray 1827 Leiocephalus Gray, Philos. Mag, 84: 1. Range: Cuba and nearby islands, the Cayman Islands, the Bahama Islands, Hispaniola

  12. MUS420/EE367A Lecture 5C Commuted Synthesis of Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    Energy Decay Relief (EDR) of a Violin Body Impulse Response 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1 2 3 4 5 -80 -60 -40 -20 0 20 40 Time (frames) bodyv6t - Summed EDR Band Centers (kHz) Magnitude(dB) · Energy summed

  13. Biogeographic characterization of blue whale song worldwide: Using song to identify populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Mark A; Mesnick, Sarah L; Hildebrand, John A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Songs of Indian Ocean blue whales, Balaenoptera musculus. (and Gordon, J.C.D. 1991. Blue whales Balaenoptera musculus1982. Vocalisations of the blue whale, Balaenoptera musculus

  14. Cell Detection in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscopy Images of Nissl-stained Mouse and Rat Brain Samples Using Random Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lal Das, Shashwat

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopy has developed into a very powerful medium for studying the brain. The Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM), for example, is capable of imaging whole rat and mouse brains in three dimensions, and produces over 1.5 terabytes of images per...

  15. 4-D Micro-CT of the Mouse Heart Cristian T. Badea, Boma Fubara, Laurence W. Hedlund, and G. Allan Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the origin, progression, and treatment of the disease--the leading cause of death in the United States [1 high photon fluence rate and integrated motion control. Materials and Methods: Simul- taneous cardiac] and a major cause of death worldwide [2]. The mouse is a commonly studied animal for such research because

  16. Impact of early versus later fluoroquinolone treatment on the clinical, microbiological and resistance outcomes in a mouse-lung model of Pasteurella multocida infection.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , for a given marbofloxacin dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were better, and the selectionImpact of early versus later fluoroquinolone treatment on the clinical, microbiological and resistance outcomes in a mouse-lung model of Pasteurella multocida infection. Aude A. Ferran, Pierre

  17. CistromeMap: A knowledgebase and web server for ChIP-Seq and DNase-Seq studies in mouse and human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    Bo Qin1, , Meng Zhou2, , Ying Ge1, , Len Taing3,4 , Tao Liu4,3 , Qian Wang1 , Su Wang1 , JunshengIP-Seq and DNase-Seq data in mouse and human. We have also manually curated metadata to ensure annotation consistency, and developed a user-friendly display matrix for quick navigation and retrieval of data

  18. Local volume changes of the corpus callosum from 3D MR images of wildtype and knockout mouse brains G. Hamarneh1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    CC from the MR images (Figure 1a) using Livewire, a semi-automatic segmentation tool provided by AmiraLocal volume changes of the corpus callosum from 3D MR images of wildtype and knockout mouse brains G. Hamarneh1 , J. Chen1 , N. Lifshitz1 , J. Henderson2 , M. Henkelman1 1 Hospital for Sick Children

  19. Mode of Action and Pharmacokinetic Studies of 2-Butoxyethanol in the Mouse with an Emphasis on Forestomach Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Mast, Terryl J.; Miller, Rodney A.; Thrall, Brian D.; Corley, Rick A.

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic inhalation studies with 2-butoxyethanol conducted by National Toxicology Program identified the forestomach and liver of B6C3F1 mice as target organs for tumorigenicity. Previous studies have sown that liver tumors likely results from chronic hemolysis-induced oxidative stress. For forestomach lesions see in mice, chronic contact irritation (cytotoxicity) and regenerative hyperplasia are hypothesized to result in forestomach tumor development. To test this, experiments were conducted to address the sensitivity of mouse forestomach to BE administered by various routes. Oral administration of undiluted BE was shown to cause irritation and a compensatory proliferative response in mouse forestomach confirming that direct contact between forestomach and BE can cause irritation. However, only small amounts of BE were detected on fur of mice at the end of 6-h, whole-body or nose-only inhalation exposures to highest concentration used in the NTP chromic inhalation studies. Furthermore, no significant differences were detected in end-exposure blood concentrations of BE and butoxyacetic acid between these types of exposures. In addition, parenteral administration of BE also resulted in forestomach lesions, indicating there may be sources other than grooming for BE- or BAA-induced forestomach irritation. In pharmacokinetic study, BE and to a lesser extend BAA were eliminated more slowly from the forestomach tissue of mice than from blood or other tissues, following either oral gavage or ip injection. The forestomach was the only tissue with detectable levels of BE at 24 h. BE and BAA were both excreted in the saliva and were present in stomach contents for a prolong period of time following these routes of exposure which may further contribute to forestomach tissue dosimetry. Thus, there appear to be multiple mechanisms behind the increased levels of BE and BAA in the forestomach tissue of mice, which together can contribute to a prolong contact irritation, compensatory hyperplasia, and tumorigenicity in mice. The relevant of these effects in humans, who lack a forestomach, is questioned.

  20. Chondroregulatory action of prolactin on proliferation and differentiation of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells in 3-dimensional micromass cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)] [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand) [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol, E-mail: naratt@narattsys.com [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand) [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor mRNAs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PRL concentration (10 ng/mL) increased chondrocyte viability and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher PRL concentrations ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL) decreased viability and increased apoptosis. -- Abstract: A recent investigation in lactating rats has provided evidence that the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) increases endochondral bone growth and bone elongation, presumably by accelerating apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and/or subsequent chondrogenic matrix mineralization. Herein, we demonstrated the direct chondroregulatory action of PRL on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in 3-dimensional micromass culture of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line. The results showed that ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor (PRLR) transcripts, and responded typically to PRL by downregulating PRLR expression. Exposure to a low PRL concentration of 10 ng/mL, comparable to the normal levels in male and non-pregnant female rats, increased chondrocyte viability, differentiation, proteoglycan accumulation, and mRNA expression of several chondrogenic differentiation markers, such as Sox9, ALP and Hspg2. In contrast, high PRL concentrations of Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL, comparable to the levels in pregnancy or lactation, decreased chondrocyte viability by inducing apoptosis, with no effect on chondrogenic marker expression. It could be concluded that chondrocytes directly but differentially responded to non-pregnant and pregnant/lactating levels of PRL, thus suggesting the stimulatory effect of PRL on chondrogenesis in young growing individuals, and supporting the hypothesis of hypertrophic chondrocyte apoptosis in the growth plate of lactating rats.

  1. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Anson, E-mail: piercea2@uthscsa.edu [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States) [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran's Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas, 78284 (United States); Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti [Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States)] [Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Yoo, Si-Eun [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States) [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States) [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran's Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas, 78284 (United States)

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  2. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and drug-induced toxicity in a panel of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Claudia V.; Oliveira, Paulo J. [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal)] [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal); Will, Yvonne [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States); Nadanaciva, Sashi, E-mail: sashi.nadanaciva@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been proposed to be involved in idiosyncratic drug reactions. However, current in vitro and in vivo models lack the genetic diversity seen in the human population. Our hypothesis is that different cell strains with distinct mtDNA SNPs may have different mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles and may therefore vary in their response to drug-induced toxicity. Therefore, we used an in vitro system composed of four strains of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with mtDNA polymorphisms. We sequenced mtDNA from embryonic fibroblasts isolated from four mouse strains, C57BL/6J, MOLF/EiJ, CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ, with the latter two being sequenced for the first time. The bioenergetic profile of the four strains of MEFs was investigated at both passages 3 and 10. Our results showed that there were clear differences among the four strains of MEFs at both passages, with CZECHII/EiJ having a lower mitochondrial robustness when compared to C57BL/6J, followed by MOLF/EiJ and PERA/EiJ. Seven drugs known to impair mitochondrial function were tested for their effect on the ATP content of the four strains of MEFs in both glucose- and galactose-containing media. Our results showed that there were strain-dependent differences in the response to some of the drugs. We propose that this model is a useful starting point to study compounds that may cause mitochondrial off-target toxicity in early stages of drug development, thus decreasing the number of experimental animals used. -- Highlights: ? mtDNA SNPs may be linked to individual predisposition to drug-induced toxicity. ? CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ mtDNA was sequenced for the first time in this study. ? Strain-dependent mitochondrial capacity differences were measured. ? Strain-dependent differences in response to mitochondrial toxicants were observed.

  3. Ortho-aminoazotoluene activates mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanina, Mariya A., E-mail: maria.smetanina@gmail.com [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Group of Pharmacogenomics, Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 8, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Pakharukova, Mariya Y. [Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kurinna, Svitlana M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Unit 1000, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Merkulova, Tatyana I. [Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car{sup -/-}) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car{sup -/-} livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. - Highlights: > The azo dye and mouse carcinogen OAT is a very effective mCAR activator. > OAT increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. > OAT CAR-dependently increases the expression of a specific subset of CAR target genes. > OAT induces an unexpectedly deferred, but CAR-dependent hepatocyte proliferation.

  4. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boulware, Stephen [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Vasquez, Karen M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (?-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ? 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ? This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ? 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ? This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

  5. A melanocyte-specific gene, Pmel 17, maps near the silver coat color locus on mouse chromosome 10 and is in a syntenic region on human chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, B.S.; Chintamaneni, C.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kim, K.K. (Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ., Indianapolis (United States)); Kozak, C.A. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N. (National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States)); Barton, D.; Francke, U. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Melanocytes preferentially express an mRNA species, Pmel 17, whose protein product cross-reacts with anti-tyrosinase antibodies and whose expression correlates with the melanin content. The authors have now analyzed the deduced protein structure and mapped its chromosomal location in mouse and human. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the Pmel 17 cDNA showed that the protein is composed of 645 amino acids with a molecular weight of 68,600. The Pmel 17 protein contains a putative leader sequence and a potential membrane anchor segment, which indicates that this may be a membrane-associated protein in melanocytes. The deduced protein contains five potential N-glycosylation sites and relatively high levels of serine and threonine. Three repeats of a 26-amino acid motif appear in the middle of the molecule. The human Pmel 17 gene, designated D12S53E, maps to chromosome 12, region 12pter-q21; and the mouse homologue, designated D12S53Eh, maps to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10, a region also known to carry the coat color locus si (silver).

  6. Radiosensitivity of mouse lip mucosa: Influence of anesthesia, carbogen, and a new high O/sub 2/ carrying perfluorochemical emulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.; de Vathaire, F.; Lartigau, E.; Malaise, E.P.; Guichard, M.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of a new perfluorochemical emulsion based on F-66E (54%, w/v) which carries, in combination with carbogen, twice as much oxygen as Fluosol-DA 20% was tested on the radiation response of the lip mucosa of unanesthetized mice. Mice were pretreated with 0.015 ml/g of the F-66E emulsion in the presence of carbogen for 1 h prior to and during irradiation. There was a significant increase in the mortality rate following the highest radiation dose in mice given F-66E emulsion plus carbogen. The reactions of lip mucosa of mice given F-66E emulsion and/or carbogen were not significantly different from that of the control group using three end points (average score, mean peak, incidence of mucosal desquamation), but the peak mucosal reaction was delayed. The radiosensitivity of the mouse lip mucosa to Ethrane, an anesthetic gas inhaled with carbogen, was also tested. The reaction of lip mucosa in the anesthetized mice was significantly greater than that of the control group. There was also a significant increase in the mortality rate following the two highest radiation doses.

  7. Tissue distribution of sup 14 C- and sup 3 H-labelled misonidazole in the tumor-bearing mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, L.M.; Nolan, J.; Butler, S. (MRC Radiobiology Unit, Didcot, Oxon (England))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The retention of labelled misonidazole (MISO) was measured in a range of normal tissues in the mouse 24 hr after the intravenous injection of ({sup 14}C)MISO (ring labelled) and ({sup 3}H)-MISO (side-arm labelled). For ({sup 14}C)MISO the 24 hr tissue retention, in order of the highest to the lowest levels (excluding pathways of excretion), was esophageal epithelium, liver, foot pad, eyelid, lung, subcutaneous lung tumor (A110), esophageal wall, uterus, eye ball, blood, salivary gland, spleen, voluntary muscle, pancreas, inguinal fat. It was assumed that the {sup 14}C represented MISO metabolite(s) bound to macromolecules. An approximately similar pattern was observed for ({sup 3}H)MISO, but a higher percentage of the injected activity per gram of tissue was retained, probably due to the presence of tritiated water in the tissues. It has generally been assumed that significant levels of MISO binding are restricted to hypoxic tissues, for example tumors, but the present results show that significant levels of binding can also occur in apparently normoxic tissues. The explanation is put forward that this binding may be due to local high levels of nitroreductase capacity.

  8. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xuan; Hu, Mary Y.; Liu, Maili; Hu, Jian Z.

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.

  9. Skp2 promotes adipocyte differentiation via a p27{sup Kip1}-independent mechanism in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okada, Mitsuru; Sakai, Tamon; Nakamura, Takehiro [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Kitajima, Shigetaka [Department of Biochemical Genetics, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Matsuki, Yasushi; Watanabe, Eijiro; Hiramatsu, Ryuji [Pharmacology Research Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd., Takarazuka 665-0051 (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroshi [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama 589-8511 (Japan)], E-mail: hsakaue@med.kindai.ac.jp; Kasuga, Masato [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan)

    2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Skp2, the substrate-binding subunit of an SCF ubiquitin ligase complex, is a key regulator of cell cycle progression that targets substrates for degradation by the 26S proteasome. We have now shown that ablation of Skp2 in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) results both in impairment of adipocyte differentiation and in the accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}, a principal target of the SCF{sup Skp2} complex. Genetic ablation of p27{sup Kip1} in MEFs promoted both lipid accumulation and adipocyte-specific gene expression. However, depletion of p27{sup Kip1} by adenovirus-mediated RNA interference failed to correct the impairment of adipocyte differentiation in Skp2{sup -/-} MEFs. In contrast, troglitazone, a high-affinity ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), largely restored lipid accumulation and PPAR{gamma} gene expression in Skp2{sup -/-} MEFs. Our data suggest that Skp2 plays an essential role in adipogenesis in MEFs in a manner that is at least in part independent of regulation of p27{sup Kip1} expression.

  10. Dynamic change of histone H2AX phosphorylation independent of ATM and DNA-PK in mouse skin in situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koike, Manabu [DNA Repair Gene Research, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: m_koike@nirs.go.jp; Mashino, Minako; Sugasawa, Jun; Koike, Aki [DNA Repair Gene Research, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Histone H2AX undergoes phosphorylation on Ser 139 ({gamma}-H2AX) rapidly in response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by exogenous stimuli, such as ionizing radiation. However, the endogenous phosphorylation pattern and modifier of H2AX remain unclear. Here we show that H2AX is regulated physically at the level of phosphorylation at Ser139 during a hair cycle in the mouse skin. In anagen hair follicles, {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells were observed in the outer root sheath (ORS) and hair bulb in a cycling inferior region but not in a permanent superficial region. In telogen hair follicles, {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells were only detected around the germ cell cap. In contrast, following X-irradiation, {gamma}-H2AX was observed in various cell types including the ORS cells in the permanent superficial region. Furthermore, {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells were detected in the skin of mice lacking either ATM or DNA-PK, suggesting that these kinases are not essential for phosphorylation in vivo.

  11. Interactions between ultraviolet light and interleukin-1 on MSH binding in both mouse melanoma and human squamous carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birchall, N.; Orlow, S.J.; Kupper, T.; Pawelek, J. (Univ. of Auckland, (New Zealand))

    1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between beta-melanotropin (MSH), interleukin 1-a (IL-1), and ultraviolet light (UV) were examined in Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma and RHEK human squamous carcinoma cell lines. The following points were established: (1) both cell lines produced IL-1 and their production was stimulated by exposure of the cells to UV; (2) both cell lines possessed high affinity binding sites for MSH, and their ability to bind MSH was modulated by IL-1; (3) IL-1 exhibited both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on MSH binding to Cloudman cells; and (4) the stimulatory effect of IL-1 on MSH binding to melanoma cells was reflected in enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH regarding tyrosinase activity (E.C. 1.14.18.1) and melanin content. The findings raise the possibility that interactions between keratinocytes and melanocytes may be regulated by IL-1 and MSH, and suggest a possible mechanism for stimulation of cutaneous melanogenesis by solar radiation: enhancement of MSH receptor activity by induction of IL-1.

  12. Assay using embryo aggregation chimeras for the detection of nonlethal changes in X-irradiated mouse preimplantation embryos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Miller, L.; Samuels, S.J.; Chang, R.J.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a short-term in vitro assay for the detection of sublethal effects produced by very low levels of ionizing radiation. The assay utilizes mouse embryo aggregation chimeras consisting of one irradiated embryo paired with an unirradiated embryo whose blastomeres have been labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). X irradiation (from 0.05 to 2 Gy) and chimera construction were performed with four-cell stage embryos, and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h to the morula stage. The morulae were partially dissociated with calcium-free culture medium and viewed under phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution of irradiated (unlabeled) and control (FITC labeled) embryos per chimera. In chimeras where neither embryo was irradiated, the ratio of the unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.50 (17.8 +/- 5.6 cells per unlabeled embryo and 17.4 +/- 5.5 cells per FITC-labeled partner embryo). However, in chimeras formed after the unlabeled embryos were irradiated with as little as 0.05 Gy, the ratio of unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.43 (P less than 0.01). The apparent decreases in cell proliferation were not observed in irradiated embryos that were merely cocultured with control embryos, regardless of whether the embryos were zona enclosed or zona free. We conclude that very low levels of radiation induce sublethal changes in cleaving embryos that are expressed as a proliferative disadvantage within two cell cycles when irradiated embryos are in direct cell-to-cell contact with unirradiated embryos.

  13. Studies of Secondary Melanoma on C57BL/6J Mouse Liver Using 1H NMR Metabolomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Ju; Isern, Nancy G.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NMR metabolomics, consisting of solid state high resolution (hr) magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H NMR (1H hr-MAS), liquid state high resolution 1H-NMR, and principal components analysis (PCA) has been used to study secondary metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse liver . The melanoma group can be differentiated from its control group by PCA analysis of the absolute concentrations or by the absolute peak intensities of metabolites from either 1H hr-MAS NMR data on intact liver tissues or liquid state 1H-NMR spectra on liver tissue extracts. In particular, we found that the absolute concentrations of alanine, glutamate, creatine, creatinine, fumarate and cholesterol are elevated in the melanoma group as compared to controls, while the absolute concentrations of succinate, glycine, glucose, and the family of linear lipids including long chain fatty acids, total choline and acylglycerol are decreased. The ratio of glycerophosphocholine to phosphocholine is increased by about 1.5 fold in the melanoma group, while the absolute concentration of total choline is actually lower in melanoma mice. These results suggest the following picture in secondary melanoma metastasis: Linear lipid levels are decreased by beta oxidation in the melanoma group, which contributes to an increase in the synthesis of cholesterol, and also provides an energy source input for TCA cycle. These findings suggest a link between lipid oxidation, the TCA cycle and the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) signal pathway in tumor metastases. Thus this study indicates that the metabolic profile derived from NMR analysis can provide a valuable bio-signature of malignancy and cell hypoxia in metastatic melanoma.

  14. Proteomic Identification and Quantification of S-glutathionylation in Mouse Macrophages Using Resin-Assisted Enrichment and Isobaric Labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Guo, Jia; Hatchell, Kayla E.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Clauss, Therese RW; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Wu, Si; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Thrall, Brian D.; Qian, Weijun

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein S-glutathionylation (SSG) is an important regulatory posttranslational modification of protein cysteine (Cys) thiol redox switches, yet the role of specific cysteine residues as targets of modification is poorly understood. We report a novel quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic method for site-specific identification and quantification of S-glutathionylation across different conditions. Briefly, this approach consists of initial blocking of free thiols by alkylation, selective reduction of glutathionylated thiols and enrichment using thiol affinity resins, followed by on-resin tryptic digestion and isobaric labeling with iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) for MS-based identification and quantification. The overall approach was validated by application to RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages treated with different doses of diamide to induce glutathionylation. A total of 1071 Cys-sites from 690 proteins were identified in response to diamide treatment, with ~90% of the sites displaying >2-fold increases in SSG-modification compared to controls.. This approach was extended to identify potential SSG modified Cys-sites in response to H2O2, an endogenous oxidant produced by activated macrophages and many pathophysiological stimuli. The results revealed 364 Cys-sites from 265 proteins that were sensitive to S-glutathionylation in response to H2O2 treatment. These proteins covered a range of molecular types and molecular functions with free radical scavenging, and cell death and survival included as the most significantly enriched functional categories. Overall the results demonstrate that our approach is effective for site-specific identification and quantification of S-glutathionylated proteins. The analytical strategy also provides a unique approach to determining the major pathways and cell processes most susceptible to glutathionylation at a proteome-wide scale.

  15. Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

  16. Development of doxorubicin-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, Varsha G., E-mail: varsha.desai@fda.hhs.gov [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Herman, Eugene H. [Division of Drug Safety Research, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States)] [Division of Drug Safety Research, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Moland, Carrie L.; Branham, William S. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lewis, Sherry M. [Office of Scientific Coordination, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Office of Scientific Coordination, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Davis, Kelly J. [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); George, Nysia I. [Division Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Division Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Department of Information and Mathematics, Korea University, Jochiwon, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Information and Mathematics, Korea University, Jochiwon, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Kerr, Susan [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR 72211 (United States)] [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR 72211 (United States); Fuscoe, James C. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)] [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Serum levels of cardiac troponins serve as biomarkers of myocardial injury. However, troponins are released into the serum only after damage to cardiac tissue has occurred. Here, we report development of a mouse model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced chronic cardiotoxicity to aid in the identification of predictive biomarkers of early events of cardiac tissue injury. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were administered intravenous DOX at 3 mg/kg body weight, or an equivalent volume of saline, once a week for 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were sacrificed a week following the last dose. A significant reduction in body weight gain was observed in mice following exposure to a weekly DOX dose for 1 week and longer compared to saline-treated controls. DOX treatment also resulted in declines in red blood cell count, hemoglobin level, and hematocrit compared to saline-treated controls after the 2nd weekly dose until the 8th and 9th doses, followed by a modest recovery. All DOX-treated mice had significant elevations in cardiac troponin T concentrations in plasma compared to saline-treated controls, indicating cardiac tissue injury. Also, a dose-related increase in the severity of cardiac lesions was seen in mice exposed to 24 mg/kg DOX and higher cumulative doses. Mice treated with cumulative DOX doses of 30 mg/kg and higher showed a significant decline in heart rate, suggesting drug-induced cardiac dysfunction. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the development of DOX-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} mice. -- Highlights: ? 24 mg/kg was a cumulative cardiotoxic dose of doxorubicin in male B6C3F{sub 1} mice. ? Doxorubicin-induced hematological toxicity was in association with splenomegaly. ? Doxorubicin induced severe testicular toxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} male mice.

  17. Name ID# Date General Degree Credit Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    field Area III core course in any field 3-5 4 4 MUS 119 Materials of Music I MUS 120 Materials of Music II MUS 121 Ear Training I MUS 122 Ear Training II MUS 219 Materials of Music III MUS 220 Materials 3 MUS-APL 10 Concert Class* MUS-APL 108, 109 Class Piano Senior Recital** OR Senior Project*** *8

  18. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  19. Use of a transfected and amplified Drosophila heat shock promoter construction for inducible production of toxic mouse c-myc proteins in CHO cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurm, F.M.; Gwinn, K.A.; Papoulas, O.; Pallavicini, M.; Kingston, R.E.

    1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    After transfection and selection with methotrexate, CHO cell lines were established which contained up to 2000 copies of an expression vector for c-myc protein. The vector contained the Drosophila heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) promoter fused with the coding region of the mouse c-myc gene. Incubation of cells for up to 3 hours at 43/sup 0/C resulted in at least a 100-fold induction of recombinant c-myc mRNA. When cells were shifted back to 37/sup 0/C, within 1 to 4 hours, this RNA was translated into protein to yield about 250 ..mu..g per 10/sup 9/ cells. Cells died a few hours later, suggesting that high concentrations of intracellular c-myc are cytotoxic. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Identification of the human ERK gene as a putative receptor tyrosine kinase and its chromosomal localization to 1p36.1: A comparative mapping of human, mouse, and rat chromosomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Toshiyuki; Matsuda, Yoichi; Hori, Tada-aki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [and others] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); and others

    1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    From a newly determined cDNA sequence of the human ERK gene, a highly hydrophobic portion was identified upstream of the putative tyrosine kinase domain. This is the first evidence that the ERK protein possesses a receptor-like membrane-spanning structure. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of R-banded metaphase chromosomes revealed that the ERK gene is located in chromosome region 1p36.1. This locus is near the frequent translocation breakpoint or deletion region of neuroblastoma and some other cancers. A comparative mapping study of the mouse and rat homologues indicated that each counterpart maps to the mouse chromosome 4D2.2-D3 and rat chromosome 5q36.13 regions, both of which have conserved linkage homology to human chromosome 1p. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Bisphenol A down-regulates rate-limiting Cyp11a1 to acutely inhibit steroidogenesis in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretz, Jackye, E-mail: peretz@illinois.edu [2001 South Lincoln Ave, 3211 VMBSB, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu [2001 South Lincoln Ave, 3223 VMBSB, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the backbone of polycarbonate plastic products and the epoxy resin lining of aluminum cans. Previous studies have shown that exposure to BPA decreases sex steroid hormone production in mouse antral follicles. The current study tests the hypothesis that BPA first decreases the expression levels of the steroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse antral follicles, leading to a decrease in sex steroid hormone production in vitro. Further, the current study tests the hypothesis that these effects are acute and reversible after removal of BPA. Exposure to BPA (10 ?g/mL and 100 ?g/mL) significantly decreased expression of Cyp11a1 and StAR beginning at 18 h and 72 h, respectively, compared to controls. Exposure to BPA (10 ?g/mL and 100 ?g/mL) significantly decreased progesterone levels beginning at 24 h and decreased androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels at 72 h and 96 h compared to controls. Further, after removing BPA from the culture media at 20 h, expression of Cyp11a1 and progesterone levels were restored to control levels by 48 h and 72 h, respectively. Additionally, expression of StAR and levels of androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol never decreased compared to controls. These data suggest that BPA acutely decreases expression of Cyp11a1 as early as 18 h and this reduction in Cyp11a1 may lead to a decrease in progesterone production by 24 h, followed by a decrease in androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol production and expression of StAR at 72 h. Therefore, BPA exposure likely targets Cyp11a1 and steroidogenesis, but these effects are reversible with removal of BPA exposure. - Highlights: • BPA may target Cyp11a1 to inhibit steroidogenesis in antral follicles. • BPA may decrease the expression of Cyp11a1 prior to inhibiting steroidogenesis. • The adverse effects of BPA on steroidogenesis in antral follicles are reversible.

  2. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan) [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Department of Pharmacy, Nara Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, 1248-1 Ikoma, Nara 630-0293 (Japan); Tsubaki, Masanobu [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yamazoe, Yuzuru [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Ogaki, Mitsuhiko [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan); Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Kusunoki, Takashi [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Shozo, E-mail: nishida@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  3. Structure of the mouse tyrosinase-related protein-2/dopachrome tautomerase (Tyrp2/Dct) gene and sequence of two novel slaty alleles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budd, P.S.; Jackson, I.J. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have isolated the eight exons and 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking regions of the mouse tyrosinase-related protein-2 (dopachrome tautomerase) gene (Tyrp2/Dct), which is mutated in slaty mice. The gene has a structure that is considerably different from those of other tyrosinase family members in both the number and the position of introns, consistent with the suggestion that the divergence of the family represents an ancient gene duplication. We also identify in the 5{prime} flanking DNA an 11-bp element, the M-box, conserved in other tyrosinase family genes. We have characterized point mutations in two slaty alleles recently identified at the Jackson Laboratory: slaty-2J (slt{sup 2J}) has a similar phenotype to the original slaty (slt) mutation, and slaty light (Slt{sup lt}), which has a more severe effect and is semidominant. We suggest that the slaty-light phenotype is a result of the failure of the enzyme to be correctly targeted to its normal location on the inner face of the melanosomal membrane. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Examination of the effects of arsenic on glucose homeostasis in cell culture and animal studies: Development of a mouse model for arsenic-induced diabetes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, David S. [Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Hernandez-Zavala, Araceli [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Walton, Felecia S. [Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Adair, Blakely M. [Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Dedina, Jiri; Matousek, Tomas [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Laboratory of Trace Element Analysis, Videnska 1083, CZ-142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Styblo, Miroslav [Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)], E-mail: styblo@med.unc.edu

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous epidemiologic studies found increased prevalences of type 2 diabetes mellitus in populations exposed to high levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in drinking water. Although results of epidemiologic studies in low-exposure areas or occupational settings have been inconclusive, laboratory research has shown that exposures to iAs can produce effects that are consistent with type 2 diabetes. The current paper reviews the results of laboratory studies that examined the effects of iAs on glucose metabolism and describes new experiments in which the diabetogenic effects of iAs exposure were reproduced in a mouse model. Here, weanling male C57BL/6 mice drank deionized water with or without the addition of arsenite (25 or 50 ppm As) for 8 weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests revealed impaired glucose tolerance in mice exposed to 50 ppm As, but not to 25 ppm As. Exposure to 25 and 50 ppm As in drinking-water resulted in proportional increases in the concentration of iAs and its metabolites in the liver and in organs targeted by type 2 diabetes, including pancreas, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Dimethylarsenic was the predominant form of As in the tissues of mice in both 25 and 50 ppm groups. Notably, the average concentration of total speciated arsenic in livers from mice in the 50 ppm group was comparable to the highest concentration of total arsenic reported in the livers of Bangladeshi residents who had consumed water with an order of magnitude lower level of iAs. These data suggest that mice are less susceptible than humans to the diabetogenic effects of chronic exposure to iAs due to a more efficient clearance of iAs or its metabolites from target tissues.

  5. Variation in the sensitivity of the mouse spermatogonial stem cell population to fission neutron irradiation during the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Beek, M.E.; Davids, J.A.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dose-response studies of the radiosensitivity of spermatogonial stem cells in various epithelial stages after irradiation with graded doses of fission neutrons of 1 MeV mean energy were carried out in the Cpb-N mouse. These studies on the stem cell population in stages IX-XI yielded simple exponential lines characterized by an average D0 value of 0.76 +/- 0.02 Gy. In the subsequent epithelial stages XII-III, a significantly lower D0 value of 0.55 +/- 0.02 Gy was found. In contrast to the curves obtained for stem cells in stages IX-III, the curves obtained in stages IV-VIII indicated the presence of a mixture of radioresistant and radiosensitive stem cells. In stage VII, almost no radioresistant stem cells appeared to be present and a D0 value for the radiosensitive stem cells of 0.22 +/- 0.01 Gy was derived. Previously, data were obtained on the size of colonies (in number of spermatogonia) derived from surviving stem cells. Combining these data with data from the newly obtained dose-response curves yielded the number of stem cells, per stage and with the specific radiosensitivities, present in the control epithelium. In stages IX-XI, there are approximately 6 stem cells per 1000 Sertoli cells with a radiosensitivity characterized by a D0 of 0.76 Gy, which corresponds to one-third of the As population in these stages. (The As spermatogonia are presumed to be the stem cells of spermatogenesis.) IN stages XII-III, there are approximately 12 stem cells per 1000 Sertoli cells with a radiosensitivity characterized by a D0 of 0.55 Gy, which roughly equals the number of A single spermatogonia in these stages. These calculations could not be made for stages IV-VIII since no simple exponential lines were obtained for these stages.

  6. Responses of the L51781Y tk/sup +//tk/sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay: III. 72 coded chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.; Cattanach, P.; Edwards, I.; McBride, D.; Riach, C.; Caspary, W.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seventy-two chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L51781Y tk/sup +///sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay, using procedures based upon those described previously. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before planting in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 ..mu..g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Significant responses were obtained with allyl isothiocyanate, p-benzoquinone dioxime, benzyl acetate, 2-biphenylamine HCl, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)ether, cadmium chloride, chlordane, chlorobenzene, chlorobenzilate, 2-chloroethanol, chlorothalonil, cytarabine x HCl, p,p'-DDE, diazinon, 2,6-dichloro-p-phenylenediamine, N,N-diethylthiourea, diglycidylresorcinol ether, 2,4-dimethoxy aniline x HCl, disperse yellow 3, endosulfan, 1,2-epoxyhexadecane, ethyl acrylate, ethyl benzene, ethylene thiourea, F D and C yellow Number 6, furan, heptachlor, isophorone, mercuric chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline x 2 HCl, methyl viologen, nickel sulfate x 6H/sub 2/O, 4,4'-oxydianiline, pentachloroethane, piperonyl butoxide, propyl gallate, quinoline, rotenone, 2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-4-nitro-anisole, 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethane, trichlorfon, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, 1,1,3-trimethyl-2-thiourea, 1-vinyl-3-cyclopetene dioxide, vinyl toluene, and ziram. The assay was incapable of providing a clear indication of whether some chemicals were mutagens; these benzyl alcohol, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, phenol, succinic acid-2,2-dimethyl hydrazide, and toluene.

  7. Effects of prolactin on lipid biosynthesis and protein kinase C in mouse mammary gland and NB sub 2 node lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, S.B.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In cultured mouse mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice, prolactin (PRL) stimulates an increased rate of incorporation of ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 3}H)glucose into triglycerides. The effect is significant between 4-6 hours after addition of PRL. Enzymes likely to be rate-limiting to this process include acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthetase, acetyl CoA synthetase, and/or pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). It is possible that early perturbations of phospholipid (PL) metabolism may represent the initial cellular effects of PRL. Consequently the effect of PRL on the incorporation of several precursors into PLs was determined. Employing ({sup 14}C)acetate as a substrate, PRL stimulates its incorporation into phosphatidylcholine, as early as 1-2 hours, and phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine by 2-4 hours. ({sup 3}H)Glycerol incorporation into triglycerides was significantly enhanced by PRL between 4-6 hours, but not into PLs until after 16 hours. Similarly, PRL did not enhance incorporation of ({sup 32}P)O{sub 4}, ({sup 3}H)choline, ({sup 3}H)inositol or ({sup 3}H)seine into PLs until 14-16 hours after addition to culture. 12-O-tetradeconyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was found to increase ({sup 3}H)uridine incorporation into RNA, and ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation into caseins in a PRL-like manner. In addition, PRL stimulates a transient, time-dependent translocation of PKC to the particulate fraction of mammary gland explants.

  8. Chemical compositions responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung by coarse and fine particulate samples from contrasting air pollution in Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Happo, M.S.; Hirvonen, M.R.; Halinen, A.I.; Jalava, P.I.; Pennanen, A.S.; Sillanpaa, M.; Hillamo, R.; Salonen, R.O. [National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Health

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism in mortality and morbidity associated with exposures of cardiorespiratory patients to urban air particulate matter. We investigated the association of the chemical composition and sources of urban air fine (PM2.5-0.2) and coarse (PM10-2.5) particulate samples with the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. The particulate samples were collected during selected seasons in six European cities using a high-volume cascade impactor. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. At 4, 12, and 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cell number, total protein, and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and KC). Dicarboxylic acids and transition metals, especially Ni and V, in PM2.5-0.2 correlated positively and some secondary inorganic ions (NO{sub 3}{sup -}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}) negatively with the inflammatory activity. Total organic matter and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} had no consistent correlations. In addition, the soil-derived constituents (Ca{sup 2+}, Al, Fe, Si) showed positive correlations with the PM2.5-0.2-induced inflammatory activity, but their role in PM10 (2.5) remained obscure, possibly due to largely undefined biogenic material. Markers of poor biomass and coal combustion, i.e., monosaccharide anhydrides and As, were associated with elevated PAH contents in PM2.5 (0.2) and a consistent immunosuppressive effect. Overall, our results support epidemiological findings that the local sources of incomplete combustion and resuspended road dust are important in urban air particulate pollution-related health effects.

  9. Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Using Cysteinyl Peptide Enrichment Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Dian; Shukla, Anil K.; Chen, Baowei; Kim, Jong Seo; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Qu, Yi; Aryal, Uma K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Clauss, Therese RW; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S-nitrosylation (SNO) is an important reversible thiol oxidation event that has been increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. While many proteins susceptible to S-nitrosylation have been reported, site-specific identification of physiologically relevant SNO modifications remains an analytical challenge due to the low-abundance and labile nature of the modification. Herein we present further improvement and optimization of the recently reported, resin-assisted cysteinyl peptide enrichment protocol for SNO identification and the extension of this application to mouse skeletal muscle to identify specific sites sensitive to S-nitrosylation by quantitative reactivity profiling. The results of our data indicate that the protein- and peptide-level enrichment protocols provide comparable specificity and coverage of SNO-peptide identifications. S-nitrosylation reactivity profiling was performed by quantitatively comparing the site-specific SNO modification levels in samples treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), an NO donor, at two different physiologically relevant concentrations (i.e., 10 ?M and 100 ?M). The reactivity profiling experiments overall identified 489 SNO-modified cysteine sites from 197 proteins with the specificity of 95.2% at the unique-peptide-level based on the percentage of Cys-peptides. Among these sites, 260 sites from 135 proteins were observed with relatively high reactivity to S-nitrosylation; such SNO-sensitive sites are more likely to be physiologically relevant. Many of the SNO-sensitive proteins are preferentially localized in mitochondria, contractile fiber and actin cytoskeleton, suggesting the susceptibility of these subcellular compartments to redox regulation. Moreover, the SNO-sensitive proteins seem to be primarily involved in metabolic pathways, including TCA cycle, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glutathione metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting the importance of redox regulation in muscle metabolism and insulin action.

  10. Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

  11. Monitoring Cyp2b10 mRNA expression at cessation of 2-year carcinogenesis bioassay in mouse liver provides evidence for a carcinogenic mechanism devoid of human relevance: The dalcetrapib experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoflack, J-C.; Mueller, L., E-mail: Lutz.Mueller@roche.com; Fowler, S.; Braendli-Baiocco, A.; Flint, N.; Kuhlmann, O.; Singer, T.; Roth, A.

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Dalcetrapib is a cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) modulator in clinical assessment for cardiovascular outcome benefits. In compliance with regulatory requirements, dalcetrapib was evaluated in rodent 2-year carcinogenesis bioassays. In the mouse bioassay, male mice demonstrated increased liver weight and statistically increased incidences of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma. Hepatic cytochrome p450 (Cyp) 2b10 mRNA induction and increased Cyp2b10 enzyme activity signify activation of hepatic nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a widely established promoter of rodent-specific hepatic tumors. We therefore monitored hepatic Cyp2b10 mRNA and its enzyme activity in a subset of dalcetrapib-treated male mice from the bioassay. Methods: Liver samples were obtained from ? 1/3 of male mice from each dose group including vehicle-controls (mean and earliest study day of death 678 and 459 respectively). Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to determine Cyp2b10 mRNA expression and Cyp1a-, Cyp2b10- and Cyp3a-selective activities were monitored. Results: Cyp2b10 mRNA was strongly induced by dalcetrapib with an expected wide inter-individual variation (5–1421-fold). Group average fold-induction versus vehicle-controls showed a dose-related increase from 48-fold (250 mg/kg/day) to 160-fold (750 mg/kg/day), which declined slightly at 2000 mg/kg/day (97-fold). Cyp enzyme activities showed approximate doubling of total Cyp P450 content per milligram protein and a 9-fold increase in Cyp2b10-selective pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activity (750 mg/kg/day). Discussion: These data from hepatic Cyp2b10 monitoring are strongly suggestive of CAR activation by dalcetrapib, a mechanism devoid of relevance towards hepatocarcinogenesis in humans; results show feasibility of Cyp2b10 as a surrogate marker for this mechanism at cessation of a carcinogenesis bioassay. -- Highlights: ? Liver tumors were induced in male mice by dalcetrapib in a 2-y study (bioassay). ? Cyp2b10 induction typifies activation of nuclear receptor CAR in mouse liver. ? First report of hepatic Cyp2b10 monitoring at the end of a mouse bioassay. ? Cyp2b10 induction supports CAR activation by dalcetrapib in mouse bioassay. ? CAR activation is a mechanism of hepatic tumorigenesis of no relevance to humans.

  12. 9. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  13. Ann. Naturhist. Mus. Wien 100 B 193 -198 Wien, Dezember 1998 Description of Laccobius gloriana sp.n. from Spain, and notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribera, Ignacio

    atrocephalus REITTER, 1872 has three recognized subspecies: (1) the nominal form, in North Africa, the Middle East, Sicily and SE Spain; (2) L. atrocephalus ytenensis SHARP, 1910 in western Europe and North Africa

  14. In vitro cytotoxicity tests of ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based varistor fabricated from ZnO micro and nanoparticle powders on L929 mouse cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sendi, Rabab Khalid, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com; Mahmud, Shahrom, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com; Munshi, Ayman, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com [Nano-optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R.), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Penang (Malaysia); Seeni, Azman, E-mail: azanseeni@gmail.com [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute (AMDI), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 13200, Bertam, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study investigated the cytotoxicity of ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-varistors. To this effect, ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} varistors fabricated from ZnO micro-and nanoparticle powders are prepared via conventional ceramic processing method. The effects of ZnO particle size on the properties of ZnO varistors are also investigated. The strong solid-state reaction during sintering may be attributed to the high surface area of the 20 nm ZnO nanoparticles that promote strong surface reaction. The intensity of XRD peaks reflected the high degree of crystallinity of the ZnO nanoparticles. However, the width of the peaks in case of ZnO nanoparticles has increased due to the quantum size effect. The cytotoxicity evaluation of ZnO varistor was conducted on mouse connective tissue fibroblast cells (L929) using Trypan Blue Exclusion Assay analysis. The results show that the four types of varistor samples lead to cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, morphological modifications and apoptosis at the various concentration range and the toxic effects are obviously displayed in high concentration samples. 20nm-VDR is the most toxic materials followed by 40nm-VDR, P8-VDR, and W4-VDR in a descending order.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-binding protein (PBP) but not PPAR-interacting protein (PRIP) is required for nuclear translocation of constitutive androstane receptor in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Dongsheng [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sarkar, Joy [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Ahmed, Mohamed R. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Viswakarma, Navin [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Jia Yuzhi [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Yu Songtao [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sambasiva Rao, M. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Reddy, Janardan K. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)]. E-mail: jkreddy@northwestern.edu

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates transcription of phenobarbital-inducible genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in liver. CAR is localized to the hepatocyte cytoplasm but to be functional, it translocates into the nucleus in the presence of phenobarbital-like CAR ligands. We now demonstrate that adenovirally driven EGFP-CAR, as expected, translocates into the nucleus of normal wild-type hepatocytes following phenobarbital treatment under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. Using this approach we investigated the role of transcription coactivators PBP and PRIP in the translocation of EGFP-CAR into the nucleus of PBP and PRIP liver conditional null mouse hepatocytes. We show that coactivator PBP is essential for nuclear translocation of CAR but not PRIP. Adenoviral expression of both PBP and EGFP-CAR restored phenobarbital-mediated nuclear translocation of exogenously expressed CAR in PBP null livers in vivo and in PBP null primary hepatocytes in vitro. CAR translocation into the nucleus of PRIP null livers resulted in the induction of CAR target genes such as CYP2B10, necessary for the conversion of acetaminophen to its hepatotoxic intermediate metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. As a consequence, PRIP-deficiency in liver did not protect from acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis, unlike that exerted by PBP deficiency. These results establish that transcription coactivator PBP plays a pivotal role in nuclear localization of CAR, that it is likely that PBP either enhances nuclear import or nuclear retention of CAR in hepatocytes, and that PRIP is redundant for CAR function.

  16. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin causes increases in expression of c-erb-A and levels of protein-tyrosine kinases in selected tissues of responsive mouse strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bombick, D.W.; Jankun, J.; Tullis, K.; Matsumura, F. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) administered in vivo causes drastic reduction in the weight of the mouse thymus at low doses the reduction becoming statistically significant after 2 days. To understand the cause for such thymic involution TCDD-evoked changes in various biochemical parameters in this tissue were examined. The most noticeable change was observed in the increased activity of specific protein-tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C and an increased level of p21{sup ras}-associated binding of ({sup 3}H)GTP. The above changes appear to be a selective effect on these special classes of proteins. It has become apparent that the rise in protein-tyrosine kinase activities becomes significant within 24 hr, whereas the rise in protein kinase C does not become significant until 48 hr. In view of similarities between TCDD and thyroid hormones in causing thymic involution, the levels of c-erb-A expression were assessed in the liver by using avian {sup 32}P-labeled v-erb-A probe and RNA transfer blot hybridization technique. The results clearly indicate that TCDD has the property to elevate levels of mRNA bearing homology to v-erb-A. Based on such observations a hypothesis has been proposed that TCDD owes its potency to its ability to stimulate the expression of one of a family of DNAs bearing homology to v-erb-A and that one of the major consequences of such an action is stimulation of various tyrosine kinases.

  17. Assignment of the tyrosinase-related protein-2 gene (TYRP2) to human chromosome 13q31-q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Extended synteny with mouse chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturm, R.A. (Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)); Baker, E.; Sutherland, G.R. (Centre for Medical Genetics, North Adelaide (Australia))

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recombinant human genomic liver DNA [lambda]-phage library was screened with the insert of the pHuTRP-2 cDNA clone to isolate a series of bacteriophage with inserts spanning the human TYRP2 gene. One of the [lambda]-phage clones ([lambda]HuT-YRP2-7) containing a 2-kb HindIII fragment with the 5[prime] exon sequence of the cDNA as determined by sequence analysis was used for the gene localization study. DNA prepared from the phage by Qiagen chromatography was nick-translated with biotin-14-dATP and hybridized in situ at a final concentration of 5 ng/[mu]l to metaphases from two normal males. The fluorescence in situ hybridization method was modified from that previously described in that chromosomes were stained before analysis with both propidium iodide as counterstain and DAPI for chromosome identification. Twenty metaphases from the first normal male were examined for fluorescent signal. All of these metaphases showed signal on one or both chromatids of chromosome 13 in the region 13q31-q33; 88% of this signal was at the interface of bands 13q31-q32. There was a total of four nonspecific background dots observed in these 20 metaphases. A similar result was obtained from hybridization of the probe to 20 metaphases from the second normal male (data not shown). This region has also been shown to contain the propionyl coenzyme A carboxylase [alpha]-chain gene by in situ hybridization. The localization of the TYRP2 locus to human chromosome 13q31-q32 extends the syntenic region of chromosome 13 with mouse chromosome 14. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsubaki, Masanobu [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Imano, Motohiro [Department of Surgery, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Surgery, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Ogaki, Mitsuhiko [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan); Yanae, Masashi [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan) [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Depeartment of Pharmacy, Sakai Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, Sakai, Osaka 590-0132 (Japan); Nishida, Shozo, E-mail: nishida@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ? We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ? YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ? YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ? YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment in osteosarcoma.

  19. ABBREVIATIONS:GABA, @-aminobutyncacid;SNpr,substantianigraparsreticulata;FZP,flurazepam;EPSP,excitatorypostsynapticpotential; DZP diazepamISO isoguvacineMUS muscimolTHIP 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-cJ-pyridin-3-olBAC baclofen.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Nader G.

    1992 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics ReductioninChronicFlurazepam-TreatedRats1 XIANG-HUI XIE and ELIZABETH I. TIETZ Departmentof Pharmacology,MedicalCollegeof Ohio,Toledo,Ohio-RR-050700 from the Department of Health and Human Services. Portions of this manuscript have been

  20. Bol. Mus. Para. Emlio Goeldi. Cincias Humanas, Belm, v. 3, n. 2, p. 195-211, maio-ago. 2008 A cidade, um foco de diversidade agrcola no Rio Negro (Amazonas, Brasil)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A cidade, um foco de diversidade agrícola no Rio Negro (Amazonas, Brasil)? The urban area, a center pour le Développement. Unité de Recherche 200, Brasília, Brasil (laura.emperaire@uol.com.br). II;A cidade, um foco de diversidade agrícola no Rio Negro (Amazonas, Brasil)? 196 INTRODU��O O

  1. Non-equilibrium vibrational and electron energy distributions functions in atmospheric nitrogen ns pulsed discharges and \\mus post-discharges: the role of electron molecule vibrational excitation scaling-laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colonna, Gianpiero; Celiberto, Roberto; Capitelli, Mario; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of the electron energy distribution function in nanosecond atmospheric nitrogen discharges is investigated by means of self-consistent solution of the chemical kinetics and the Boltzmann equation for free electrons. The post-discharge phase is followed to few microseconds. The model is formulated in order to investigate the role of the cross section set, focusing on the vibrational-excitation by electron-impact through resonant channel. Four different cross section sets are considered, one based on internally consistent vibrational-excitation calculations which extend to the whole vibrational ladder, and the others obtained by applying commonly used scaling-laws.

  2. MICRON MOUSE IMAGING SYSTEM The Micron Mouse Imaging System is a Core Resource for the Moran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc, Robert E.

    arm and PC cradle (J) Micron camera-amplifier unit (Toshiba IK-TU51CU) (D) Micron integrated xenon tolerance, reporting requirements · IP Urethane (non-recovery use only) ... wide tolerance, slow acting, carcinogen · Topical: 1% lidocaine in 0.1% NaCl prepared by user or equivalent from pharmacy · Vaporizer

  3. Blue whale response to underwater noise from commercial ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenna, Megan Frances

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrodynamics and energetics of blue whale lunge feeding:2010. Association between Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)and calling behavior of blue whales from a suction-cup-

  4. alter allgemeinzustand und: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    auf den Bewegungsumfang der Halswirbelsule und die elektrische Aktivitt des SPC (Musculus semispinalis capitis) (more) Pogrzeba, Miriam Ruth 2009-01-01 2 Der...

  5. alter hufigkeit und: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    auf den Bewegungsumfang der Halswirbelsule und die elektrische Aktivitt des SPC (Musculus semispinalis capitis) (more) Pogrzeba, Miriam Ruth 2009-01-01 2 Der...

  6. annex der einfluss: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    auf den Bewegungsumfang der Halswirbelsule und die elektrische Aktivitt des SPC (Musculus semispinalis capitis) (more) Pogrzeba, Miriam Ruth 2009-01-01 13...

  7. Unsupervised Learning of Naive Morphology with Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazakov, Dimitar

    ­e:mus, teg­imus, aud­i:mus, am­ant, mon­ent, teg­unt, aud­iunt. It is one type of Item and Arrangement (IA

  8. Growth and maintenance of the mouse adrenal cortex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Su-Ping

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and death have been identified. Several models for stem cell maintenance of the adult adrenal cortex have been proposed, but adrenocortical stem cells have not yet been identified. Adrenal cortices of 21OH/LacZ transgenic mice show similar mosaic patterns...

  9. PRIME R NOTES Microsatellite markers in wood mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Robert J.

    , USA Keywords: Apodemus, Chelyabinsk, genetic markers, microsatellites, Murinae Received 13 June 1997 in the vicinity of Chelyabinsk, Russia, one of the Earth's most radioactively and chemically polluted spots. Here of the microsatellite markers is described in animals collected near Chelyabinsk. Mice of the genus Apodemus comprise

  10. antigen mouse monoclonal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in adulthood of autoreactive T cells specific to that antigen. The renal-specific ... Marshall, Naomi Jane 2009-01-01 45 The Journal of Neuroscience, March 1988, 8(3): 874-882...

  11. attenuates mouse neuroinvasiveness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kowar; Otmar Scherzer 2010-09-22 7 Atlas-based attenuation correction for small animal PETMRI scanners Abhijit J. Chaudhari, ajchaudhari@ucdavis.edu, Biology and Medicine...

  12. Changes in misonidazole binding with hypoxic fraction in mouse tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, D.G.; Hazlehurst, J.L.; Brown, J.M.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Binding of misonidazole (MISO) or a derivative to hypoxic cells in tumors has been proposed as a method for identifying tumors, and measuring their level of hypoxia. The author has recently shown that the hypoxic fraction of tumor cells can be altered over a wide range in vivo by acutely changing the hematocrit of the host animal by transfusion. The present study is aimed to investigate the changes in binding by /sup 14/C MISO that accompanied this procedure. Tumor bearing mice were injected with /sup 14/C MISO, irradiated with a single dose of X rays (20 Gy) and their tumor excised and bisected. One half of each tumor was used to determine cell survival in vitro, the other was used for /sup 14/C scintillation counting. As previously described, tumor cell survival was dramatically increased in acutely anemic mice and this was accompanied by an increase in /sup 14/C MISO binding to the tumors. The relationship between clonogenic cell survival and binding was found to be linear on a log-log plot for each of the tumor lines studied, but the slopes of the lines were different in different tumor lines and generally steeper than the value of 1.0 expected for a 1:1 correspondence between cells binding radioactivity and radiobiological resistance.

  13. Effects of Systemic Inflammation on Synaptogenesis in Developing Mouse Hippocampus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloniowski, Slawomir

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1? IP: intraperitoneal ITAM: immunoreceptor tyrosine-basedUpon TREM2 activation, ITAM of DAP12 becomes phosphorylated,

  14. Geometrically Decoupled Phased Array Coils for Mouse Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sahil

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    B] measurements with flux probe????...???.. ..... 54 47 Circuit showing position of the tuning and matching capacitors .............. 70 48 Central core and shield of the semi rigid cable??????????. 72 49 Stepwise construction of a balun....16cms) (Figure 9(a)). The protel file for the endrings with 2 sizes of apertures is saved on the d:/Sahil/endringsmall.pcb and d:/Users/Sahil/endringlarge.pcb (Figure 9(b)). Two of these structures were stuck together using plastic epoxy...

  15. The mouse visually evoked potential : neural correlates and functional applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muhammad, Rahmat

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The visually evoked potential (VEP) is a local field potential (LFP) evoked in visual cortex in response to visual stimuli. Unlike extracellular single unit recordings, which allow us to probe the function of single spiking ...

  16. Reverse Genetics System for Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Kristen

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    the virus has entered the target cell, it begins to translate viral replication proteins and then to copy the genome in order to access the structural genes needed to make progeny virus. The entire replication cycle takes place in the cytoplasm of the host... to the 3? UTR of MHV, it does not provide access to genes upstream of the S gene, leaving only 1/3 of the genome available for analysis (50). The other two thirds of the genome consists of ORF1a and ORF1b, which contain the replicase genes. These genes...

  17. Metabonomic Profiling of TASTPM Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Zeping; Browne, Edward R.; Liu, Tao; Angel, Thomas E.; Ho, Paul C.; Chun Yong Chan, Eric

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for the development of new therapies against and diagnosis of AD. In this study, non-targeted metabotyping of TASTPM transgenic AD mice was performed. The metabolic profiles of both brain and plasma of TASTPM mice were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to those of wild type C57BL/6J mice. TASTPM mice were metabolically distinct compared to wild type mice (Q28 Y = 0.587 and 0.766 for PLS-DA models derived from brain and plasma, respectively). A number of metabolites were found to be perturbed in TASTPM mice in both brain (D11 fructose, L-valine, L-serine, L-threonine, zymosterol) and plasma (D-glucose, D12 galactose, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and D-gluconic acid). In addition, enzyme immunoassay confirmed that selected endogenous steroids were significantly perturbed in brain (androstenedione and 17-OH-progesterone) and plasma (cortisol and testosterone) of TASTPM mice. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that perturbations related to amino acid metabolism (brain), steroid biosynthesis (brain), linoleic acid metabolism (plasma) and energy metabolism (plasma) accounted for the differentiation of TASTPM and wild-type

  18. Transgenic mouse models of childhood-onset psychiatric disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Holly Rochelle

    Childhood-onset psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), mood disorders, obsessive compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSD), and schizophrenia (SZ), affect ...

  19. aux tissus mous: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Cette note presente un moniteur d'acces aux donnees d'un PLC Schneider ou Siemens, pouvant fonctionner sur n'importe quelle plateforme (Windows, Linux...) equipee...

  20. Acquisition and Mining of the Whole Mouse Brain Microstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Jae-Rock

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and their connectivity patterns have been completely mapped out in the mid-80s [33]. Connectomics will be driven by new technologies. The Blue Brain Project [34], an ambitious attempt to reverse-engineer the mammalian brain, is an example of the large-scale modeling... of the latest de- velopments in serial sectioning microscopy [43] (Fig. 5). ATLUM sections a tissue block, collects a series of ribbons, and puts them on a long carbon-coated tape that is cut into a section library. As the name of the technology implies, imaging...

  1. Glove Mouse Project The goal of this project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    premise for the house is to care for the pet when the owner is unavailable or away. "Smart"Home Project Quality and Ventilation System The system automatically detects and ventilates out hazardous indoor c

  2. a13 control mouse: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of the first indications that mitochondria may play a role in pathogenesis was the report nearly Douglas C. Wallace 1999-01-01 117 Research and Development of a 13-inch...

  3. Mammalian genetics pioneer Liane Russell writes Mouse House history...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ResearchReviews in Mutation Research is publicly available at http:www.sciencedirect.comsciencearticlepiiS1383574213000690 . - Bill Cabage, 865.574.4399, December 30...

  4. Monitoring transient repolarization segment morphology deviations in mouse ECG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oefinger, Matthew Blake, 1976-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details the design, implementation and validation of a system that facilitates partial automation for detection of anomalous repolarization segment morphologies in the ECG of mice. The technology consists of ...

  5. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy production via glycolysis, ?-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful...

  6. RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In some cases, the development of an MOU (particularly negotiation of the MOU terms) has been viewed as a distraction that prevented the project from move forward in a...

  7. adult mouse nervous: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nervous system (CNS). Here we labeled and followed Neurog1 factor; neural progenitor; brain development; genetic fate mapping; Ngn1 The central nervous system (CNS Goodrich, Lisa...

  8. adult mouse subventricular: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: Much excitement has been generated by the identification of adult brain regions harboring neural stem cells and their continual generation of new neurons...

  9. atdc5 mouse progenitor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the progenitor. In addition, it is interesting in its own as a sample of the interstellar medium in a high redshift galaxy. Measures of the density and structure of the GRB...

  10. Comparative analysis of proteome and transcriptome variation in mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ghazalpour 1 * . , Brian Bennett 1. , Vladislav A. PetyukNat Genet 41: 166–167. 12. Bennett BJ, Farber CR, Orozco L,Citation: Ghazalpour A, Bennett B, Petyuk VA, Orozco L,

  11. Effects of Systemic Inflammation on Synaptogenesis in Developing Mouse Hippocampus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloniowski, Slawomir

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2(3):284-291. Streit WJ, Graeber MB, Kreutzberg GW. 1988.2(3):284-291. Streit WJ, Graeber MB, Kreutzberg GW. 1988.

  12. Conservation of exon scrambling in human and mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Monica L. (Monica Lauren)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exon scrambling is a phenomenon in which the exons of an mRNA transcript are spliced in an order inconsistent with that of the genome. In this thesis, I present a computational analysis of scrambled exons in human and ...

  13. The development of direction selectivity in the mouse retina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elstrott, Justin Blake

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    286. McLaughlin, T. , and O'Leary, D.D. (2005). MolecularC.L. , Feller, M.B. , and O'Leary, D.D. (2003). Retinotopic2006; McLaughlin and O'Leary, 2005), DSGCs at the same D-V,

  14. Effects of Systemic Inflammation on Synaptogenesis in Developing Mouse Hippocampus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloniowski, Slawomir

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neurosci 28(3):117-119. Battaglia FP, Benchenane K, SirotaY,Gross CG, Kopil C, Battaglia L, McBreen M, Stranahan AM,Neurosci 28(3):117-119. Battaglia FP, Benchenane K, Sirota

  15. arsenic mouse micronucleus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arsenic uptake and heavy metals on arsenic distribution in an arsenic-contaminated soil Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: Effects of plant arsenic uptake...

  16. Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramhall, Naomi F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

  17. Approaches of soil data aggregation for hydrologic simulations Yuzhou Luo a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    are organized in ESRI shapefiles (for the spatial locations of MUs) and text files (for attribute data of soil

  18. Cleaner, More Efficient Diesel Engines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Musculus, Mark

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Mark Musculus, an engine combustion scientist at Sandia National Laboratories, led a study that outlines the science base for auto and engine manufacturers to build the next generation of cleaner, more efficient engines using low-temperature combustion. Here, Musculus discusses the work at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility.

  19. Cleaner, More Efficient Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musculus, Mark

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Mark Musculus, an engine combustion scientist at Sandia National Laboratories, led a study that outlines the science base for auto and engine manufacturers to build the next generation of cleaner, more efficient engines using low-temperature combustion. Here, Musculus discusses the work at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility.

  20. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. ace01musculus.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

  1. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ce001musculus2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel...

  2. FONDER ET REFONDER LA VILLE : RCITS ET REPRSENTATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dambrine, Marc

    , directeur du musée national du Château de Pau, JEAN-LOUIS GOUT, président de l'UPPA, DANIEL BALOUP

  3. Behavioral context of call production by eastern North Pacific blue whales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Erin M; Calambokidis, J; Burgess, W C; McDonald, M A; LeDuc, C A; Hildebrand, J A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by eastern North Pacific blue whales Erin M. Oleson 1, *,context of calls produced by blue whales Balaenoptera mus-North Pacific population of blue whales (Thompson 1965,

  4. Neutrino Flavor Ratios Modified by Cosmic Ray Re-acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawanaka, Norita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Re-acceleration of $\\pi$'s and $\\mu$'s modifies the flavor ratio at Earth (at astrophysical sources) of neutrinos produced by $\\pi$ decay, $\

  5. La rcupration de l'nergie de la houle, La Revue 3EI n59, Dc embre 2009, p : 17 La rcupration de l'nergie de la houle, Partie 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    systèmes à corps mus par la houle. Ainsi, les plus récents (Pelamis, AWS, CETO, SEAREV, Wavebob...) font

  6. Supplementary Information: Estimation of Pfs Specific Activity Materials. Mouse anti-polyhistidine and goat anti-mouse IgG conjugated to alkaline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    ). This was done by connecting the cathode and anode (nickel chromium wire) using alligator clips to a DC power. Estimations of Pfs specific activity. Pfs-chitosan conjugate was prepared and electrodeposited onto different

  7. MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 664, pp. 18, 3 figs. Reithrodon auritus. By Ulyses F. J. Pardin~as and Carlos A. Galliari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayssen, Virginia

    . Reithrodon Waterhouse, 1837 Mus Fischer, 1814:71 (part, not Linnaeus, 1758). Type species Mus auritus Fischer- sion on Zoological Nomenclature, 1985, Art. 68c) antedating cuniculoides, designated type by Coues 1999). Reithrodon auritus (Fischer, 1814) Rata Conejo Rat oreillard Azara, 1801:91. Type locality ``les

  8. Boosting Monte Carlo Rendering by Ray Histogram Fusion MAURICIO DELBRACIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    and Universidad de la Rep´ublica, Uruguay PABLO MUS ´E Universidad de la Rep´ublica, Uruguay ANTONI BUADES ENS), ENS-Cachan, France, mdelbra@fing.edu.uy; P. Mus´e, Universidad de la Rep´ublica, Montevideo, Uruguay

  9. Section Enrollment Report (CENSUS) -Table of Contents Subject Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    NUPH NUPH-Nuclear Pharmacy NUR NUR-Nursing NUTR NUTR-Nutrition Science OBHR OBHR-Orgnztnl Bhvr &Hum CLCS-Classics CLPH CLPH-Clinical Pharmacy CMCI CMCI-CIC Common Market CMPL CMPL-Comparative Literature-Materials Engineering MUS MUS-Music History & Theory NRES NRES-Natural Res & Environ Sci NUCL NUCL-Nuclear Engineering

  10. Section Enrollment Report (CENSUS) -Table of Contents Subject Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    NUPH NUPH-Nuclear Pharmacy NUR NUR-Nursing NUTR NUTR-Nutrition Science OBHR OBHR-Orgnztnl Bhvr &Hum-Chinese CIC CIC Traveling Scholar CLCS CLCS-Classics CLPH CLPH-Clinical Pharmacy CMCI CMCI-CIC Common Market-Materials Engineering MUS MUS-Music History & Theory NRES NRES-Natural Res & Environ Sci NUCL NUCL-Nuclear Engineering

  11. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany)] [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Hernandez, Victor H. [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany) [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Moser, Tobias [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany) [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Göttingen (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany) [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 ?m. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  12. Mouse and human embryonic stem cells: can they improve human health by preventing disease?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, Prue

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    current progress and potential for regenerative medicine.progress toward development of new industrial prod- ucts and medicines.

  13. Maintenance and elimination of long-term axial progenitors in mouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wymeersch, Filip Jos

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Elongation of the vertebrate rostrocaudal axis depends on localised populations of axial progenitors. Previous work has demonstrated the presence of Neuromesodermal (NM) progenitors that behave a ...

  14. Functional Expression of the CXC-Chemokine Receptor-4/ Fusin on Mouse Microglial Cells and Astrocytes'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springer, Timothy A.

    -1a (SDF-1a). Both astrocytes and microglial cells mobilized calcium following stimulation with chemically synthesized SDF-1a. SDF-la- and carbachol-mediated calcium responses of astrocytes were partially and other G proteins. In contrast, the calcium responses of microglial cells to SDF-la were completely

  15. anti-mouse muc6 antibody: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (15-17) and that the interaction between CD2 and LFA-3 can mediate adhesion of J Clark; Debbie A Law; David J Paterson; Michael Puklavec; Alan; F. Williams 1988-01-01 328...

  16. A Structurally Based Investigation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Mouse Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Melissa

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    to the elastase. ............... 35 3.3 Pressure-diameter and pressure-force for the native vessel (a and b) as compared to the pressure-diameter and pressure-force data for the post- elastase vessel (c and d). Culled data are represented by the symbols... in the native (a) and post-elastase vessel (c). Collagen is stained in pink and cell nuclei in purple. VVG stain for elastin in the native (b) and post-elastase vessel (d), where elastin is stained black...

  17. Targeted Deletion of Kcne2 Impairs HCN Channel Function in Mouse Thalamocortical Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Santoro B, Liu DT, Yao H, Bartsch D, Kandel ER, et al. (Santoro B, Grant SG, Bartsch D, Kandel ER (1997) Interactive

  18. Elucidating the Role Genotoxic Susceptibility Plays in Pulmonary Diseases of the Mouse and Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Aaron Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2002. 21(48): p. 7435-51. Bartsch, H. , DNA adducts in human2002. 21(48): p. 7435-51. Bartsch, H. , DNA adducts in human

  19. Development, characterization and transcriptional profiling of a mouse model of fatal infectious diarrhea and colitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenshtein, Diana

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citrobacter rodentium is a naturally occurring murine bacterial pathogen which is used to model human diarrheagenic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC) infections in mice. C. rodentium causes colonic hyperplasia and a variable degree ...

  20. Condensin I Reveals New Insights on Mouse Meiotic Chromosome Structure and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alberto Viera 1 *, Roc?´o Go´mez 1 , Mar?´a T. Parra 1 ,structure. Citation: Viera A, Go´mez R, Parra MT, Schmiesingde Madrid. Roc?´o Go´mez is supported by a Fundacio´n

  1. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Shu-Cheng [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China) [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Wei [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tao, Ze-Zhang, E-mail: zezhangtao@gmail.com [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China)] [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China)

    2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ?1 ?M at 24 h after treatment and ?0.5 ?M at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression.

  2. LATE EFFECTS OF HEAVY CHARGED PARTICLES ON THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE MOUSE CORONARY ARTERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, V.V.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. REFERENCES 1. P. Rubin andEnergy under contract W-7405-ENG-48. Running Title: ChargedEnergy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 DISCLAIMER This document

  3. MYELOID NEOPLASIA Perturbed hematopoiesis in the Tc1 mouse model of Down syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhe

    lymphoblastic leukemia and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL); DS newborns present with transient myelo-5 In addition, they also have an increased incidence of both acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute aspects of physiology, including hematopoiesis. DS children have greatly increased rates of acute

  4. Time course and progression of wild type ¿-Synuclein accumulation in a transgenic mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cerebral cortex (RSC, S1, Pir, CA1-3, M2, oCx), subcorticalOlf), piriform cortex (Pir), retrosplenial cortex (RSC),

  5. Characterisation of microRNA expression in post-natal mouse mammary gland development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avril-Sassen, Stefanie; Goldstein, Leonard D; Stingl, John; Blenkiron, Cherie; Le Quesne, John; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Karagavriilidou, Konstantina; Watson, Christine J; Tavare, Simon; Miska, Eric A; Caldas, Carlos

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    . For example during puberty and gestation, proliferation and associated processes of cell division and mitosis were highly represented, cal- cium/sodium ion transport, translation and intracellular protein transport were prominent during lactation, apop- tosis... and miR-429. There is increasing evidence that this miRNA family plays a crucial role in the regulation of epithelial to mesenchy- mal transition (EMT). All five members of the miR-200 family were markedly down-regulated in cells that had undergone EMT...

  6. tion. Human or mouse intestinal epithelial cells that express the poly-Ig receptor were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Antibodies specific for Clostrid- ium difficile toxin A and Helicobacter pylori urease have been generated, Glauser M et al (1995) Oral immunization with Helicobacter pylori urease as a treatment against Helicobacter infection. Gas- troenterology (in press) Haneberg B, Kendall D, Amerongen HM, Apter FM

  7. Automated, all-optical cranial surgery for transcranial imaging of mouse brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Diana

    E. , Ultrashort Laser Pulses. Ultrafast optics, Trenbio,T. , Chirped Pulse Amplification. Ultrafast optics, Trenbio,ultrafast laser systems [2] which produce laser pulses with

  8. Proteomic analysis of c-butyrolactone-treated mouse thalamus reveals dysregulated proteins upon absence seizure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daesoo

    to the disease pro- gress at protein level, we performed proteomic studies using the thalamus of mice for which suggest that absence seizures are associated with restricted functional sets of pro- teins, whose down difference gel electrophoresis, c-butyrolactone, proteome, sensory pro- cessing, thalamus. J. Neurochem

  9. FUNCTIONAL AND MECHANISTIC STUDY OF DOT1L IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC HEMATOPOIESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yi

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    both starved and restimulated MEF ………..………… 51 2.8 Whole-mount immunolabeling for fluorescence …………..……………………... 51 2.9 Analysis of primitive and definitive hematopoiesis by colony forming unit assay ………………………………………………………… 52 2... and KO primitive and definitive erythroid colonies ………….……………………………………………….. 79 Figure 3.8 C-kit/CD41 staining of E10.5 yolk sacs from WT and Dot1L KO embryos ……….……………………………………………………….. 80 Figure 3.9 c-kit+/CD45...

  10. Eri1 regulates microRNA homeostasis and mouse lymphocyte development and antiviral function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upon cross-linking of all ITAM-associated receptors tested (production on cross-linking of ITAM-associated receptors in

  11. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. Figure 3 Epigenetic deregulation of target genes in the3027 Figure 2 Epigenetic deregulation of target genes in

  12. Mickey and the Mouse: The Motion Picture and Television Industry's Copyright Concerns on the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torpoco, Mark S.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on-line services from liability for infringing transmissionsline service providers from direct or vicarious copyright liability for transmissions

  13. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PLoS One 2009; 2: e895. Song CX, Szulwach KE, Fu Y, Dai Q,Szulwach KE, Li X, Li Y, Song CX, Wu H, Dai Q, et al. 5-hmC-cells), cerebral cortex (CX, CA1, CA3 and den- tate gyrus)

  14. ARTICLE IN PRESS Genetic variations that regulate bone morphology in the male mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to aging, menopause, or mechanical unloading, define an individual's susceptibility to osteoporosis [1­4]. Identification of the factors that may control these two primary predictors of osteoporosis, includ- ing

  15. Guiding the osteogenic fate of mouse and human mesenchymal stem cells through feedback system control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system control Yoshitomo Honda 1,2,3 , Xianting Ding 4,5 ,How to cite this article: Honda, Y. et al. Guiding the

  16. Identification and Characterization of Modulators of Chemotherapeutic Response in Mouse Models of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doles, Jason (Jason David)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemotherapeutic drug resistance is a major cause of cancer treatment failure. While much attention has been focused on the genetics of tumor development, less is known about the genetic determinants of therapeutic outcome. ...

  17. Hormonal effects on the development of the mouse ovary in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Philip Allen

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to that of the ovary in vi vo. particular characteristics of the ovary to evaluate include the stage of development of the fol lie les, the size and growth rate of the oocytes, the deposition of the zona pel lucida, and the abundance and condition of the thecal... and used to determine the maximal oocyte diameter. The total number of oocytes per square centimeter was also determined. Relative measures of the amount and density of the zona pel lucida, the amount and morphology of the mitochondria, the abundance...

  18. Automated, all-optical cranial surgery for transcranial imaging of mouse brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Diana

    guided surgery with ultra-short pulsed laser light. Currentharmonic generation with ultra-short laser pulses [37]. Inablation with ultra-short laser pulses as a precision

  19. A Structurally Based Investigation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Mouse Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Melissa

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters of the two vessels that experience AAAs in different models, but also the effects of three major components of AAA formation. Biaxial mechanical tests were performed using a modified computer- controlled device. We examined the solid mechanics...

  20. Cell-cell and cell-medium interactions in the growth of mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Nikhil, 1979-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Embryonic stem cells serve as powerful models for the study of development and disease and hold enormous potential for future therapeutics. Due to the potential for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to provide a variety of tissues ...

  1. Biophysical Probes of Iron Metabolism in Yeast Cells, Mitochondria, and Mouse Brains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    being used for essential processes, the cell must regulate tightly iron import, metabolism, trafficking, and homeostasis. These processes were studied using biophysical methods centered on Mossbauer spectroscopy supplemented by electron paramagnetic...

  2. Example 2: Mouse Skeletal Study by Renee Prater et al. C alcified Diaphysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    the Second Life Aided Training Environment (SLATE) to make training cost-effective. In SLATE, a user becomes

  3. Guiding the osteogenic fate of mouse and human mesenchymal stem cells through feedback system control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honda, Y; Ding, X; Mussano, F; Wiberg, A; Ho, C-M; Nishimura, I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3, S32–38 (2009). 37. Diefenderfer, D. L. , Osyczka, A. M. ,1, 38. Osyczka, A. M. , Diefenderfer, D. L. , Bhargave, G. &

  4. Mechanisms of ocular dominance plasticity in the juvenile and adult mouse visual cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khibnik, Lena A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity is a classic example of bidirectional experience-dependent plasticity in the primary visual cortex. This form of plasticity is most robust during early postnatal development (termed the ...

  5. Metabolism of vitamin K in Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terryl Marie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the carboxylation of blood proteins, induce GLU VITAMIN K CYCLE GLA K Carboxylase K Epoxidase HHO I I II -N-C-C- + CO~+ 0~ I H-C-H I H-C-H I COOH H HO I I II -N-CM- I H-C-H I H-C HOOC COOH / X CHs OH K red. K Epoxide Reductase 0 CHs...

  6. Functional and biochemical analysis of ERK2 in mouse embryonic stem cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, William

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ERK-MAPK pathway is a dynamic signaling module, conserved across Eukarya, and capable of processing a myriad of environmental and cellular signals. It has been implicated in controlling important cell fate decisions ...

  7. Genomic Imprinting Variations in the Mouse Type 3 Deiodinase Gene Between Tissues and Brain Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, M. Elena; Charalambous, Marika; Saferali, Aabida; Fiering, Steven; Naumova, Anna K.; St. Germain, Donald; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Hernandez, Arturo

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    following the manufacturers di- rections (TKT4 and TKT3 from Siemens, Washington, DC). Serum TSH was determined by RIA as previously described (9). DNA and RNA isolation and Northern and Southern analysis Total RNA and poly (A#3;) RNA were isolated from...

  8. Nonrandom distribution of mouse spermatogonial stem cells surviving fission neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Beek, M.E.; Davids, J.A.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colony formation by surviving spermatogonial stem cells was investigated by mapping pieces of whole mounted tubuli at intervals of 6 and 10 days after doses of 0.75 and 1.50 Gy of fission neutron irradiation. Colony sizes, expressed in numbers of spermatogonia per colony, varied greatly. The mean colony size found in different animals was relatively constant. The mitotic indices in large and small colonies and in colonies in different epithelial stages did not differ significantly. Size differences in these spermatogenic colonies are not caused by differences in growth rate. Surviving stem cells start to form colonies at variable times after irradiation. The number of colonies per unit area varied with the epithelial stages. Many more colonies were found in areas that during irradiation were in stages IX-III (IX-IIIirr) than in those that were in stages IV-VII (IV-VIIirr). After a dose of 1.50 Gy, 90% of all colonies were found in areas IX-IIIirr. In conclusion, the previously found difference in repopulation after irradiation between areas VIII-IIIirr and III-VIIIirr can be explained not by differences in colony sizes and/or growth rates of the colonies in these areas but by a difference in the number of surviving stem cells in both areas. In area XII-IIIirr three times more colonies were found after a dose of 0.75 Gy than after a dose of 1.50 Gy. In area IV-VIIirr the numbers of colonies differed by a factor of six after both doses. This finding indicates that spermatogonial stem cells are more sensitive to irradiation in epithelial stages IV-VII than in stages XII-III. In control material, spermatogonia with a nuclear area of 70-110 micron2 are rare. However, especially 6 days after irradiation, single cells of these dimensions are rather common. These cells were found to lie at random over the tubular basement membrane with no preference for areas with colonies.

  9. Strain differences in the response of mouse testicular stem cells to fractionated radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meistrich, M.L. (Univ. of Texas, Houston); Finch, M.; Lu, C.C.; de Ruiter-Bootsma, A.L.; de Rooij, D.G.; Davids, J.A.G.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The survival of spermatogonial stem cells in CBA and C3H mice after single and split-dose (24-hr interval) irradiation with fission neutrons and gamma rays was compared. The first doses of the fractionated regimes were either 150 rad (neutrons) or 600 rad (gamma). For both strains the neutron survival curves were exponential. The D/sub 0/ value of stem cells in CBA decreased from 83 to 25 rad upon fractionation; that of C3H stem cells decreased only from 54 to 36 rad. The survival curves for gamma irradiation, which all showed shoulders, indicated that C3H stem cells had larger repair capacities than CBA stem cells. However, the most striking difference between the two strains in response to gamma radiation was in the slopes of the second-dose curves. Whereas C3H stem cells showed a small increase of the D/sub 0/ upon fractionation (from 196 to 218 rad), CBA stem cells showed a marked decrease (from 243 to 148 rad). The decreases in D/sub 0/ upon fractionation, observed in both strains with neutron irradiation and also with gamma irradiation in CBA, are most likely the result of recruitment or progression of radioresistant survivors to a more sensitive state of proliferation or cell cycle phase. It may be that the survivng stem cells in C3H mice are recruited less rapidly and synchronously into active cycle than in CBA mice. Thus, it appears that the strain differences may be quantitative, rather than qualitative.

  10. A.M.B.E.R. Shark-Fin: An Unobtrusive Affective Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuncheva, Ludmila I.

    (Source) [21] Nacke EDA, EMG HalfLife2 Mod [26] Rani HR, EDA Pong [27] Saari User control knobs Generic

  11. The Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villanueva, Elizabeth Mary

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    increasingly common disorder is Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder or FASD. FASD is seen in many infants that have been exposed to alcohol, an environmental toxin, during fetal development. This disorder causes distinct mental and physical abnormalities whose...

  12. Erk1 and Erk2 Regulate Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Migration during Mouse Embryonic Angiogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmers Foundation (MCO). TZ was funded by a predoctoral fellowship from the Department of Defense Breast

  13. Precision cancer mouse models through genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Haiwei

    The cancer genome is highly complex, with hundreds of point mutations, translocations, and chromosome gains and losses per tumor. To understand the effects of these alterations, precise models are needed. Traditional ...

  14. DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION OF THE DRUG-PROCESSING GENOME IN MOUSE LIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yue

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the recent progress in understanding the expression patterns and regulatory mechanisms of drug-processing genes, namely phase-I and -II drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in adults, very little is known of ...

  15. Natural history and karyology of the Yucatán vesper mouse, Otonyctomys hatti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genoways, Hugh H.; Timm, Robert M.; Engstrom, Mark D.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G41G62G73G74G72G61G63G74 G53G65G76G65G6EG74G65G65G6EG20G73G70G65G63G69G6DG65G6EG73G20G6FG66G20G74G68G65G20G72G61G72G65G20G59G75G63G61G74GE1G6EG20G76G65G73G70G65G72G20G6DG6FG75G73G65G2C G4FG74G6FG6EG79G63G74G6FG6DG79G73G20G68G61G74G74G69G2CG20G61G72G...65G20G6EG6FG77G20G6BG6EG6FG77G6EG20G66G72G6FG6DG20G42G65G6CG69G7AG65G2CG20G47G75G61G74G65G2D G6DG61G6CG61G2CG20G61G6EG64G20G74G68G65G20G4DG65G78G69G63G61G6EG20G73G74G61G74G65G73G20G6FG66G20G43G61G6DG70G65G63G68G65G2CG20G51G75G69G6EG74G61G6EG61 G52G6FG...

  16. DCAMKL-1 expression identifies tuft cells rather than stem cells in the adult mouse intestinal epithelium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    differentiation markers. Tuft cells, also known as brush, caveolated, multivesicular or fibrillovesicular cells, are found in the hollow organs of the GI tract and in respiratory organs 6 . They are reliably distinguished

  17. THE DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LANGERHANS CELLS AND INTRAEPIDERMAL NERVE FIBERS IN THE MOUSE AND RAT FOOTPAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Argenia Lanisha Necole

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Skin disorders are often associated with immune and nervous system dysfunction. Intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) detect mechanical, thermal, and noxious stimuli. Although immune cells such as mast and T cells can alter ...

  18. A novel cell culture model for studying differentiation and apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Katrina E; Binas, Bert; Chapman, Rachel S; Kurian, Kathreena M; Clarkson, Richard W E; Clark, A John; Birgitte Lane, E; Watson, Christine J

    2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    % glutaraldehyde in 0.1 mol/l sodium cacodylate/HCl buffer of pH 7.2–7.4 at 4°C for 48 h. After washing with distilled water (dH2O) for 20 min, the samples underwent secondary fixation in 1% osmium tetroxide in dH2O for 45 min at room temperature. Samples were... electrophoresis sample buffer (0.125 mol/l Tris HCl pH 6.8, 2% sodium dodecyl sul- phate, 2% ?-2-mercaptoethanol, 10% glycerol), shearing the DNA by repetitive pipetting, boiled for 10 min and stored at –20°C. The protein concentrations of the samples were...

  19. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    male germ cells handle DNA damage? Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.strand breaks and DNA base damage at different cellularrelationship to genetic damage, Mutat. Res. 216 (1989) 221-

  20. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    male germ cells handle DNA damage? Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.strand breaks and DNA base damage at different cellularrelationship to genetic damage, Mutat. Res. 216 (1989) 221-

  1. Mouse and human embryonic stem cells: can they improve human health by preventing disease?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, Prue

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    94 (2), 310-321. George, S. ; Heng, B. C. ; Vinoth, K. J. ;1349. Cao, T. ; Lu, K. ; Fu, X. ; Heng, B. C. Differentiated

  2. FoxP genes subdivide interneuron subclasses in the developing mouse spinal cord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Timothy Tin Heng

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Biology by Timothy Tin Heng Wong Committee in charge:The Thesis of Timothy Tin Heng Wong is approved and it isSpinal Cord by Timothy Tin Heng Wong Master of Science in

  3. The architecture of the mouse trigeminal-facial brainstem : disynaptic circuitry, genomic organization, and follicle mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, David William; Matthews, David William

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    matrix factorization of trigeminal EEM . . . . . . . .trigem- inal EEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4.1.3A genes (~1.5e5, 1) voxels EEM = (1, ~2e4) (~1.5e5, ~2e4) B

  4. System for remote multichannel real-time monitoring of mouse ECG via the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oefinger, Matthew Blake, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardware/software system was developed to allow real-time monitoring of multiple physiological signals simultaneously via the Internet. The hardware is specifically designed for measuring ECG signals from mice, while the ...

  5. The use of mouse models to elucidate the genetic and environmental components of neural tube defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gefrides, Lisa Anne

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    closure, and the other influencing neural crest migration (Franz, 1992). Pax3 codes for a 479 amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 56 kD. It is expressed exclusively between gestational days 8 and 13 (Goulding et aL, 1991) in several parts... commonly exist, a 140kD and 180kD species. Beginning around 10-12 somites (early GD 9), Sp/Sp mice exhibit a 200kD sialylated form of N-CAM, while Sp/+ embryos exhibit a subset of intermediate 180-200kD form of N-CAM, in addition to the regular 140kD...

  6. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of mouse UPR responsive protein P58(IPK) TPR fragment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Jiahui; Wu, Yunkun [Department of Cell Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Ron, David [Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Sha, Bingdong, E-mail: bdsha@uab.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the ER, a P58(IPK) TPR fragment without the C-terminal J-domain has been crystallized. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), which can promote protein folding and misfolded protein degradation and attenuate protein translation and protein translocation into the ER. P58(IPK) has been proposed to function as a molecular chaperone to maintain protein-folding homeostasis in the ER under normal and stressed conditions. P58(IPK) contains nine TPR motifs and a C-terminal J-domain within its primary sequence. To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the ER, a P58(IPK) TPR fragment without the C-terminal J-domain was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 2.5 Å resolution using a synchrotron X-ray source. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.53, b = 92.75, c = 84.32 Å, ? = 90.00, ? = 119.36, ? = 90.00°. There are two P58(IPK) molecules in the asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 60%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  7. Multiscale structural analysis of mouse lingual myoarchitecture employing diffusion spectrum magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelward, Bevin

    structural autocorrelation TPM , respectively. Mesoscale myofi- ber tracts were generated by alignment the properties of the respective ODFs and the virtual super- imposition of the distributed mesoscale myofiber tracts. The identifi- cation of a mesoscale anatomical construct, which specifically links

  8. Investigations into arsenate-induced neural tube defects in a mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Denise Suzanne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Of the many environmental agents considered to potentially contribute to NTD risk, arsenic is one that is surrounded in controversy. We have developed a model system utilizing maternal intraperitoneal (I.P.) exposure on E7.5 and E8.5 to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium...

  9. Killing of Targets by CD8+ T Cells in the Mouse Spleen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    , Knoxville, Tennessee, United States of America, 2 National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Massachusetts, United States of America, 3 Theoretical Biology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract.e., the death rate of individual target cells remains proportional to the frequency (or the total number

  10. Cholinergic neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate mouse brown adipose tissue metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Dong Kun; Blouet, Clemence; Ruiz, Henry H.; Buettner, Christoph; Chua, Streamson Jr; Schwartz, Gary J.; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2015-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    with 95% O2/5% CO2 and maintained atw3 #3;C. This solution contained the following (in mM): 248 sucrose, 2 KCl, 1 MgCl2, 1.25 KH2PO4, 26 NaHCO3, 1 sodium pyruvate, and 10 glucose. Transverse coronal brain slices (200 mm) were prepared using a vibratome...

  11. The effect of insulin deficiency on tau and neurofilament in the insulin knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, Ruben [William K. Warren Medical Research Institute, University of Oklahoma Medical Health Science Center, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); E-mail: ruben.schechter@okstate.edu; Beju, Delia [William K. Warren Medical Research Institute, University of Oklahoma Medical Health Science Center, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); Miller, Kenneth E. [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States)

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Complications of diabetes mellitus within the nervous system are peripheral and central neuropathy. In peripheral neuropathy, defects in neurofilament and microtubules have been demonstrated. In this study, we examined the effects of insulin deficiency within the brain in insulin knockout mice (I(-/-)). The I(-/-) exhibited hyperphosphorylation of tau, at threonine 231, and neurofilament. In addition, we showed hyperphosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK-3 {beta}) at serine 9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK 1) showed decrease in phosphorylation, whereas ERK 2 showed no changes. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated swollen mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus, and dispersion of the nuclear chromatin. Microtubules showed decrease in the number of intermicrotubule bridges and neurofilament presented as bunches. Thus, lack of insulin brain stimulation induces JNK hyperphosphorylation followed by hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofilament, and ultrastructural cellular damage, that over time may induce decrease in cognition and learning disabilities.

  12. Auditory Processing and Ultrasonic Vocalization Production in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotschafer, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vrij FM, Levenga J, van der Linde HC, Koekkoek SK, De ZeeuwFM, Koekkoek SK, van der Linde HC, Nieuwenhuizen I, Song C,Vrij FM, Levenga J, van der Linde HC, Koekkoek SK, De Zeeuw

  13. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    van Buul, D.G. de Rooij, DNA double-strand breaks and gamma-for the transition proteins in DNA strand break repair, FEBSBoissonneault, Stimulation of DNA repair by the spermatidal

  14. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    van Buul, D.G. de Rooij, DNA double-strand breaks and gamma-for the transition proteins in DNA strand break repair, FEBSBoissonneault, Stimulation of DNA repair by the spermatidal

  15. A Novel Sensitive Method of Detecting Mnemonic Decline in Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Rebecca

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    in initial discrimination learning or on the ability to ransfer this learned information to the altered context. In contrast, at 12 months of age, APP+PS1 mice learned the initial concurrent discriminations on par with iv NTgs but were impaired when... involves nondemented patients on a series of eight concurrent discriminations with each pair consisting of two objects that vary in color or two colors that vary in shape. Therefore, each pair consists of a relevant and irrelevant feature. Patients...

  16. Response and Resistance to NF-?B Inhibitors in Mouse Models of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Wen

    Lung adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. We recently showed that genetic inhibition of the NF-?B pathway affects both the initiation and the maintenance of lung cancer, identifying this pathway as ...

  17. Requirement for NF-?B signalling in a mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meylan, Etienne

    NF-?B transcription factors function as crucial regulators of inflammatory and immune responses as well as of cell survival. They have also been implicated in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. However, despite ...

  18. Progressive Genomic Instability in the FVB/Kras[superscript LA2] Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacks, Tyler E.

    Alterations in DNA copy number contribute to the development and progression of cancers and are common in epithelial tumors. We have used array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to visualize DNA copy number alterations ...

  19. Embryotoxic and histopathologic effects of aflatoxin B1 during early pregnancy in the mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia-Hsu, Ying

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    %, respectively. AFB1 reduced body weight in both pregnant and nonpregnant female mice. The target organs for AFB1 toxicity on female mice include liver and kidney. Histologic alteration on liver is characterized by loss of outline of lobules, closing sinusoids.... . . . . . . . . . Criteria for Histologic Evaluation . . Statistical Methods Page nl V1 vn 1x X1 22 22 23 24 24 25 26 34 IV RESULTS General Embryo toxicity 35 35 35 CHAPTER Results of Weight Measurements . . Histopathologic Examination...

  20. The Sex Chromosome Trisomy mouse model of XXY and XYY: metabolism and motor performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breast cancer [19,20], osteoporosis [21,22], and autoimmunee.g. , hypogonadism, osteoporosis, and learning and socialDi MA, Vinanzi C, Foresta C: Osteoporosis in Klinefelter's

  1. Associations Between Paternal Responsiveness and Stress Responsiveness in the Biparental California Mouse, Peromyscus californicus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauke, Miyetani

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    receptor antagonist, s179d-prl, delay the onset of maternalsion of the peptides prolactin (PRL) and oxytocin (OT), andChanges in peripheral PRL levels in fathers of several

  2. Embryotoxic and histopathologic effects of aflatoxin B1 during early pregnancy in the mouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia-Hsu, Ying

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    %, respectively. AFB1 reduced body weight in both pregnant and nonpregnant female mice. The target organs for AFB1 toxicity on female mice include liver and kidney. Histologic alteration on liver is characterized by loss of outline of lobules, closing sinusoids.... . . . . . . . . . Criteria for Histologic Evaluation . . Statistical Methods Page nl V1 vn 1x X1 22 22 23 24 24 25 26 34 IV RESULTS General Embryo toxicity 35 35 35 CHAPTER Results of Weight Measurements . . Histopathologic Examination...

  3. Impaired Adult Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Masashi Tabuchi 1 , Stuart M. Allan 1 , Elysse M. Knight 1 ,JJ, Jones VC, Tabuchi M, Allan SM, Knight EM, et al. (2008)

  4. UPTAKE OF [3H]-COLCHICINE INTO BRAIN AND LIVER OF MOUSE, RAT, AND CHICK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Edward L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by M.R. Rosenzweig and E.l. Bennett, Cambridge, MA: The MITJ.F. , D.W. landry, E.l. Bennett, and M.E. Jarvik. long-termRAT,AND CHICK Edward L. Bennett, Marie Hebert Alberti, and

  5. Comparing performance of keyboarding/mousing tasks using notebook computer flat panel displays vs. CRT monitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ventrca, Rachel Lynn

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sitting Popliteal Height Thigh Clearance Height Elbow-Fingertip Distance Buttock-Knee Distance Buttock-Popliteal Distance Hand Length Hand Breath OLDER 73 65 + 21. 5 167. 96 + 13. 8 156. 45 + 13. 7 138. 99 + 13. 0 106. 33 + 10. 2 74. 66 + 6 6... entry task ranged between 99. 8 and 107. 8 degrees (Figure 13). The mean elbow angle for Treatment 6 was greater than that of Treatments 2 and 3 by at least 5. 0 degrees. The mean elbow angle for Treatment 4 was greater than that of Treatment 3...

  6. Transcriptomic responses in mouse brain exposed to chronic excess of the neurotransmitter glutamate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinkun; Bao, Xiaodong; Pal, Ranu; Agbas, Abdulbaki; Michaelis, Elias K.

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    compensatory responses offering protection against stress, promoting growth of neuronal processes (neurites) and re-establishment of synapses. The transcription of a key gene in the neurite growth network, the kinase Ptk2b, was significantly up-regulated in Tg...

  7. Automated, all-optical cranial surgery for transcranial imaging of mouse brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Diana

    harmonic generation with ultra-short laser pulses [37]. Inablation with ultra-short laser pulses as a precisionHere, the incident ultra-short laser pulse is split with

  8. Transplacental transfer of immune antibodies in the mouse demonstrated by antibody labeled in vivo with tritium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinney, Hubert Eugene

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this manner are valid only for the iso- tope used in their construction and only when the same counting conditions prevail such as machine settings, coctail formula, type of quencher present, and counting temperature. 39 VITA Hubert E. McKinney was born...

  9. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Felicia S. L.; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    .ac.uk/projects/trim galore/). Reads from sam- ples that pass the quality control were then aligned to the mm10 genome using Bowtie2 (14) and peak called us- ing MACS2 (15) at different stringencies (P-value between 1e?4 and 1e?15). A suitable P-value was selected based...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Decreased Choroidal and Retinal Blood Flow in the DBA/2J Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    proteins: tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), which causes iris stromal atrophy,6 and glycoprotein

  11. NOTCH2 REGULATES BMP4 AND MORPHOGENESIS IN THE DEVELOPING MOUSE CILIARY BODY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanzie, Christopher Patrick

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    = Pituitary tumor-transforming 1 rSMAD = Receptor - mothers against decapentaplegic homolog SMAD = Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog TGF-? = Transforming growth factor-beta Tryp = Tyrosinase-related protein Wnt2b = Wingless-type MMTV integration... of the tyrosinase gene as a phenotype enhancer for both CYP1b1-/- and FOXC1-/- mice. Treatment of subsequent CYP1b1-/- albino mice with L-dopa in utero led to a remarkable rescuing of the phenotype. This provides an outstanding example of the necessity...

  12. Dicer deletion and short RNA expression analysis in mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calabrese, Joseph Mauro

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RNA interference (RNAi) manages many aspects of eukaryotic gene expression through sequence-specific interactions with RNA. Short RNAs, 20-30 nucleotides in length, guide the various effector proteins of RNAi to silence ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 000:000000 (2011) Quantitative Analysis of Tumor Burden in Mouse Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehorai, Arye

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lung via MRI Vanessa K. Tidwell,1 Joel R. Garbow,2 Alexander S. Krupnick,3 John A. Engelbach,2 and Arye Nehorai1 Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Despite recent advances. Preclinical rodent models provide a unique opportu- nity to test novel therapeutic drugs for targeting lung

  14. Characterization of Urinary Iron Loss in the fsn (flaky skin) Anemia Mouse Mutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kress, Robert Lee

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron overloading is a serious medical problem for blood transfusion-dependent diseases such as sickle cell disease, ?–Thalassemia Major, and Myelodysplastic syndromes which require chronic blood transfusions to ...

  15. Mouse models of lung cancer : understanding the molecular and cellular basis of lung tumorigenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Erica L. (Erica Lynn), 1973-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Patients are typically diagnosed with advanced disease and have a high fatality:case ratio. Despite its prevalence, the identity of the cell of origin, precursor ...

  16. Cortical Processing of Frequency Modulated Sweeps in a Mouse Model of Presbycusis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trujillo, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RV. Responses of neurons in chinchilla auditory cortex toresponses of neurons in the chinchilla inferior colliculus.than those reported in chinchilla A1 (Brown and Harrison,

  17. Auditory Processing and Ultrasonic Vocalization Production in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotschafer, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009) Responses of neurons in chinchilla auditory cortex toauditory cortex of chinchillas showed a negative correlation

  18. Acquisition of renogenic competence in the early mouse embryo and embryonic stem cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganeva, Veronika Veskova

    2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The acquisition of renogenic competence (the ability to give rise to kidney) during embryonic development is not yet fully understood. Clarifying the temporal and molecular aspects of this process is equally essential ...

  19. Microsoft Word - FINAL 2010_SPFPA_CBA With MOUs.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch ProjectLyneis,Nevada SNJV Document5,

  20. Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG -EnergyProcess Heatingat HomeasSaving

  1. RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia: Energy ResourcesInformation

  2. RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia: Energy ResourcesInformationInformation

  3. atlas h8 combined: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rate of 40 MHz by a factor 103, using simple algorithms that can be executed with a latency of the order of 1 mus. The input stage of the Level- 1 Muon consists of an array...

  4. atlas combined beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rate of 40 MHz by a factor 103, using simple algorithms that can be executed with a latency of the order of 1 mus. The input stage of the Level- 1 Muon consists of an array...

  5. 2010. XX, 524 p. Hardcover SFr. 233.00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & warfare. Soil and Culture explores high culture and popular culture--from the paintings of Hierony- mus% VAT for electronic products. Pre-publication pricing: Unless otherwise stated, pre-pub prices

  6. Thecal morphology of Ornithocercus magnificus (dinoflagellata) with notes on related species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Dean Rayburn

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Michener. 1911. Reports on the scient, results of the exped. to the eastern tropical Pacific, in charge of Alexander Agassiz by the U. S, Fish Commission Steamer "Albatross. " New genera and species of dinoflagellates, Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. Harvard...

  7. BULLETIN D'INSCRIPTION L'Education nouvelle au service d'une nation rformer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Université

    Musée de la Résistance nationale à l'attention de Julie BAFFET Parc du Vercors. 88, avenue Marx Dormoy B : .............................................................................. Code postal : ................................. Ville : .............................. Téléphone

  8. atlas superconducting linac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 mus. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern...

  9. anl aps positron linac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 mus. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern...

  10. alverez linac structures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 mus. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern...

  11. apf-ih type linac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 mus. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern...

  12. acelerador lineal linac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 mus. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern...

  13. PEOPLE PORTRAIT futurPrixNobeltouslesdeux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    pour ajouter une corde à son arc: un pro- gramme en management et administrationàl'Université de interuniversi- taires. Après un séjour Eras- mus au Centre Hospitalier UniversitairedeGrenoble,il a enseigné et

  14. State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    and Applied Science BS in Industrial and Systems Engineering-Four-Year Program Rockland Community College (A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema, ME, EECE, CS, BE) ENR 206 CIRCUITS Free Elective Gen Ed Elective (N) Any Social Science #12;

  15. SOUTHEASTERN NATURALIST2008 7(1):173179 A Complex Mimetic Relationship Between the Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCallum, Malcolm

    and Ozark Highlands Leech Malcolm L. McCallum1,* , Stacy Beharry2 , and Stanley E. Trauth3 Abstract Meyer (Ozark Highlands Leech) and Notophthal- mus viridescens louisianensis (Wolterstorff) (Central Newt

  16. The characterization of a mouse model of transient stroke using ex vivo MR microscopy and in vivo MR imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shuning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disrupted blood-brain barrier after an ischemic attack can cause vasogenic edema and increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation. Therefore, early detection and monitoring of BBB damage is important in the pathological ...

  17. The expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase during postnatal development in the leaner and tottering mouse cerebella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeve, Daniel Richard

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Tottering and leaner mice carry different mutations in the portion of their genetic information (tottering locus) that encodes for the ??[A] subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium ion channels. These channels, located on the cell membrane...

  18. Genetic Removal of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Rescues the Symptoms of Fragile X Syndrome in a Mouse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidhu, Harpreet Kaur

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vitronectin, aggrecans, MCP-3, SDF, CD44, transglutaminase (RNA: ribonucleic acid SDF: stromal cell derived factor SER:1?, stromal cell derived factor (SDF) and pro-tumor necrosis

  19. p53 constrains progression to anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in a Braf-mutant mouse model of papillary thyroid cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, David Glenn

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) has among the worst prognoses of any solid malignancy. The low incidence of the disease has in part precluded systematic clinical trials and tissue collection, and there has been little ...

  20. Identification and characterisation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor expressing cells using a new transgenic mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Paul; Parker, Helen E.; Adriaenssens, Alice E.; Hodgson, Joshua M.; Cork, Simon C.; Trapp, Stefan; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    coverslipped and viewed using epifluorescence (Nikon Eclipse 80; Kingston upon Thames, UK). Photomicrographs were taken with a Micropublisher 3.3 RTV camera and QCapture Pro software (Qimaging Inc., Surrey, BC, Canada). Nodose and Enteric Ganglia culture Nodose... -fluorescence was prominent in the area postrema. This is a region with a leaky blood brain barrier that has been postulated previously as an area potentially capable of responding to circulating GLP-1 concentrations (24). In the hypothalamus, we found glp1r...

  1. Identification of apolipoprotein D as a cardioprotective gene using a mouse model of lethal atherosclerotic coronary artery disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, D. R.

    Mice with homozygous null mutations in the HDL receptor (scavenger receptor class B, type I, or SR-BI) and apolipoprotein E (apoE) genes [SR-BI/apoE double KO (SR-BI[superscript ?/?]/apoE[superscript ?/?] or dKO) mice] ...

  2. Induction and Patterning of Neural Crest Cells in the Developing Mouse Embryo: Roles for Gcnf and Hhat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Jennifer Frances

    2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . 31 crest cells results in cardio- and non-cardiovascular defects, including persistent truncus arteriosus, an incomplete septation of the aortic and pulmonary outflow tracts; non-cardiovascular phenotypes include defects in thymic, parathyroid...). Normal craniofacial development requires the orchestrated differentiation of these germ layers for functional integration of the facial and skull bones, muscle, connective tissue, skin, and the central and peripheral nervous systems (Trainor 2005...

  3. Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects on the activity of the lung transcriptome (*8,500of the two CARs on the lung transcriptome were further50 genes detected in the lungs of CS-exposed mice. These

  4. Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation and Its Effects on Elemental Distributions in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cells in X-Ray Fluorescence Microanalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, Qiaoling; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Deng, Junjing; Mak, Rachel; Moonier, Nena; et al

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapidly-frozen hydrated (cryopreserved) specimens combined with cryo-scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy provide an ideal approach for investigating elemental distributions in biological cells and tissues. However, because cryopreservation does not deactivate potentially infectious agents associated with Risk Group 2 biological materials, one must be concerned with contamination of expensive and complicated cryogenic x-ray microscopes when working with such materials. We employed ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to decontaminate previously cryopreserved cells under liquid nitrogen, and then investigated its effects on elemental distributions under both frozen hydrated and freeze dried states with xray fluorescence microscopy. We show that the contents and distributions of most biologicallymore »important elements remain nearly unchanged when compared with non-ultravioletirradiated counterparts, even after multiple cycles of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and cryogenic x-ray imaging. This provides a potential pathway for rendering Risk Group 2 biological materials safe for handling in multiuser cryogenic x-ray microscopes without affecting the fidelity of the results.« less

  5. Deregulation of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling cascade is associated with neurodegeneration in Npc1-/- mouse brain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bi, Xiaoning; Liu, Jihua; Yao, Yueqin; Baudry, Michel; Lynch, Gary

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inherited Diseases Deregulation of the Phosphatidylinositol-tion, and for NF- ? B deregulation; moreover, these changes3 ? Is Associated with Deregulation of NF- ? B Accumulating

  6. n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Alter Mouse CD4+ T Cell Activation by Modifying the Lipid Bilayer Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Tim Yu-Tien

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that very long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) possess anti-inflammatory properties. The ...

  7. Conditional inactivation of Brca1 in the mouse ovarian surface epithelium results in an increase in preneoplastic changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark-Knowles, Katherine V. [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, 501 Smyth Rd., Box 926, Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 8L6 (Canada) and Ottawa Health Research Institute, 501 Smyth Rd., Box 926, Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 8L6 (Canada)]. E-mail: kclar075@uottawa.ca; Garson, Kenneth [Ottawa Health Research Institute, 501 Smyth Rd., Box 926, Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 8L6 (Canada); Jonkers, Jos [Division of Molecular Biology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vanderhyden, Barbara C. [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, 501 Smyth Rd., Box 926, Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 8L6 (Canada); Ottawa Health Research Institute, 501 Smyth Rd., Box 926, Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 8L6 (Canada)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is thought to arise from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE); however, the molecular events underlying this transformation are poorly understood. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene result in a significantly increased risk of developing EOC and a large proportion of sporadic EOCs display some sort of BRCA1 dysfunction. Using mice with conditional expression of Brca1, we inactivated Brca1 in the murine OSE and demonstrate that this inactivation results in the development of preneoplastic changes, such as hyperplasia, epithelial invaginations, and inclusion cysts, which arise earlier and are more numerous than in control ovaries. These changes resemble the premalignant lesions that have been reported in human prophylactic oophorectomy specimens from women with BRCA1 germline mutation. We also report that inactivation of Brca1 in primary cultures of murine OSE cells leads to a suppression of proliferation due to increased apoptosis that can be rescued by concomitant inactivation of p53. These observations, along with our finding that these cells display an increased sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent cisplatin, indicate that loss of function of Brca1 in OSE cells impacts both cellular growth control and DNA-damage repair which results in altered cell behavior manifested as morphological changes in vivo that arise earlier and are more numerous than what can be attributed to ageing.

  8. Nanobodies Targeting Mouse/Human VCAM1 for the Nuclear Imaging of Atherosclerotic First author's surname and short title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Caveliers2,7 , PhD; Serge Muyldermans3,4 , PhD, Tony Lahoutte2,7 , MD PhD; Daniel Fagret1 , MD Ph proteins and endothelial cells and in vivo in ApoE-deficient (ApoE-/- ) mice. A nontargeting control for all 3 ratios). Atherosclerotic lesions located within the aortic arch of ApoE-/- mice were

  9. Cerebellar Purkinje cell death in the P/Q -type voltage-gated calcium ion channel mutant mouse, leaner 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank-Cannon, Tamy Catherine

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Mutations of the á1A subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels are responsible for several inherited disorders affecting humans, including familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia type 2 and spinocerebellar ...

  10. Inhibitory actions of Ah receptor agonists and indole-containing compounds in breast cancer cell lines and mouse models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kelcey Manae Becker

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) binds synthetic and chemoprotective phytochemicals, and research in this laboratory has developed selective AhR modulators (SAhRMs) for treatment of breast cancer. Activation of the AhR ...

  11. Analysis of transcriptional responses in the mouse dorsal striatum following acute MDMA (Ecstasy): identification of ERK-controlled genes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ): identification of ERK-controlled genes. J. Salzmann, C. Canestrelli, F. Noble*, and C. Marie-Claire. Université rewarding effects in mice were dependent upon ERK activation and that dorsal striatum was a critical region for mediating ERK-dependent Egr1 MDMA-induced transcription. Here, we extend these findings by showing that MDMA

  12. Inhibitory actions of Ah receptor agonists and indole-containing compounds in breast cancer cell lines and mouse models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kelcey Manae Becker

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    . Recently, it has been reported that the SAhRM 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane inhibited DMBA-induced mammary tumor growth in rats and also inhibited MAPK and PI3-K pathways in human breast cancer cells. BT-474 and MDA-MB-453 cell lines are ErbB2...

  13. The Ligand Binding Domain of GCNF Is Not Required for Repression of Pluripotency Genes in Mouse Fetal Ovarian Germ Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okumura, Leah M.

    In mice, successful development and reproduction require that all cells, including germ cells, transition from a pluripotent to a differentiated state. This transition is associated with silencing of the pluripotency genes ...

  14. The Krppel-associated Box Repressor Domain Can Induce Reversible Heterochromatization of a Mouse Locus in Vivo*S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Citi, Sandra

    and doxy- cycline (dox)-controlled tet repressor KRAB fusion protein (tTRKRAB) can induce reversible was recruited to the Kif2A locus, and YFP expression was reduced. This effect was reversed when dox was given

  15. Effect of docosahexaenoic acid on ras post-translational processing and localization in a transgenic mouse colonic cell line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, Esther Dick

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . 45 CHAPTER VI SUMMARY AND FUTURE INVESTIGATIONS . . . . 50 LITERATURE CITED . . 53 APPENDIX 1 PREPARATION OF YAMC MEDIA AND PLATING OF YAMC-RAS CELLS. 63 APPENDIX 2 PASSAGING PROTOCOL APPENDIX 3 FREEZING MEDIA PREPARATION AND FREEZING PROTOCOL... and the supernatant taken as the cytosolic extract. For preparation of the membrane fraction, the pellet was resuspended in the above buffer containing Triton-X 100 at a final concentration of 1N and allowed to incubate for 30 minutes on ice and then centrifuged...

  16. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kastan, M. B. (1997). DNA damage induces phosphorylation ofby ATM in response to DNA damage. Science 281, Barber, R. ,Nussenzweig, A. (2002). DNA damage-induced G2-M checkpoint

  17. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mutation rate in the post-chernobyl families from ukraine.mutation rate after the Chernobyl accident. Nature 380, 683-fallout following the Chernobyl accident (Dubrova et al. ,

  18. Characterization of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element of the mouse hepatitis virus 3' untranslated region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Reed Findley

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of the selection process for Alb4 recombinants???????... 77 18 Plaque dilution of ATW5', B36 and A59 controls??????..????? 79 19 RT-PCR of potential mutant recombinants????????..????... 80 20 Panel A is a representative experiment... for mutants MT2A, MT3C, and M24C????????????????????.. 92 21 A representative RT-PCR for negative strand DI RNA??????.???. 94 22 Panel A is a representative experiment for mutants ATW, ATW5', and ATW3'????????????????????. 96 23 Semi...

  19. Analysis of the mouse embryonic stem cell regulatory networks obtained by ChIP-chip and ChIP-PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Divya

    Background: Genome-wide approaches have begun to reveal the transcriptional networks responsible for pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed either by hybridization to a ...

  20. Autophagy induction reduces mutant ataxin-3 levels and toxicity in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzies, Fiona M.; Huebener, Jeannette; Renna, Maurizio; Bonin, Michael; Riess, Olaf; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    cytoprotective and autophagy- inducing properties offer the possibility for the development of treatment rationales involving simultaneous lithium and rapamycin administration (Sarkar et al., 2008). Therefore there may be much potential for the use of drugs upre... , have been demonstrated to sequester transcription factors (Perez et al., 1998). Ataxin-3 may also have a more direct role in transcription regulation through its interactions with histone acetyltransferases (Li et al., 2002) and histone deacetylases...

  1. Investigation of T cell-mediated immune surveillance against tumor-specific antigens in genetically engineered mouse models of cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du Page, Michel Justin Porter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association of tumor cells and lymphocytes has led to the hypothesis that our immune system actively inhibits the formation and progression of cancer, a phenomenon called tumor immune surveillance. T cells specific to ...

  2. Maternal Diet-induced Obesity Programs Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Adult Male Mouse Offspring Independent of Current Body Weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackmore, Heather L.; Niu, Youguo; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Giussani, Dino A.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of age) were weaned ad libitium onto standard laboratory chow [RM1 (Spe- cial Dietary Services)]. At 3, 5, and 8 weeks of age mice were culled after an overnight fast by carbon dioxide asphyxiation. Due to the requirements of the isolated Langendorff... in both the chronotropic and inotropic response to sympathetic stimulation (33, 34) and are involved in calcium mobilization. Concurrent with the functional sympathetic dominance, protein levels of the #2;1 adrenergic receptor were increased in hearts...

  3. Transcription factors SOX4 and SOX11 function redundantly to regulate the development of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036, China *Running title: Sox4 and Sox11 in RGC11 in retina results in a complete loss of RGCs. Conclusion: Sox4 and Sox11 function redundantly loss of RGCs was observed in Sox4/Sox11-null retinas, suggesting the two genes play similar roles

  4. Interneuron networks and cortical dynamics : emulated whisking drives SOM interneurons in the ketamine anesthetized mouse SI neocortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skowronski-Lutz, Ethan M. (Ethan Mikael)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the core of this thesis I test and confirm the hypothesis that separate classes of interneurons respond differentially to sensory stimulation independent of volitional or other top-down control on the part of the animal. ...

  5. Conditional deletion of epithelial IKKbeta impairs alveolar formation through apoptosis and decreased VEGF expression during early mouse lung morphogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HL076538, V.L. ); American Lung Association of CA ResearchBL performed the lung morphometric and quantitativedouble transgenic animals and lung dissections. JX performed

  6. Cerebellar Purkinje cell death in the P/Q -type voltage-gated calcium ion channel mutant mouse, leaner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank-Cannon, Tamy Catherine

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . The leaner mutation causes reduced calcium ion influx upon activation of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels. This disrupts calcium homeostasis and leads to a loss of cerebellar neurons, including cerebellar Purkinje cells. Because of its similarities...

  7. A learning deficit related to age and b-amyloid plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guiquan; Chen, Karen S; Knox, Jane H; Inglis, Jennifer; Bernard, Andrew; Martin, Stephen J; Justice, Alan; McConlogue, Lisa; Games, Dora; Freedman, Stephen B; Morris, Richard G M

    2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Mice that overexpress the human mutant amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) show learning deficits, but the apparent lack of a relationship between these deficits and the progressive b-amyloid plaque formation that the hAPP ...

  8. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  9. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hye Yun

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve ...

  10. Functional Identification of Tumor Suppressor Genes Through an in vivo RNA Interference Screen in a Mouse Lymphoma Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bric, Anka

    Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) capable of stably suppressing gene function by RNA interference (RNAi) can mimic tumor-suppressor-gene loss in mice. By selecting for shRNAs capable of accelerating lymphomagenesis in a ...

  11. Maternal diet-induced obesity programmes cardiovascular dysfunction in adult male mouse offspring independent of current body weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackmore, Heather L.; Niu, Youguo; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Giussani, Dino A.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    health and disease. N Engl J Med. 2008;359(1):61–73. 5. Giussani DA, Davidge ST. Developmental programming of cardio- vascular disease by prenatal hypoxia. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2013; 6(5):328–337. 6. Reynolds RM, Allan KM, Raja EA, et al. Maternal...

  12. Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Feasibility study in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieck, Birgit [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada)] [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada); Bates, David; Pichardo, Samuel, E-mail: spichard@lakeheadu.ca, E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Curiel, Laura, E-mail: spichard@lakeheadu.ca, E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4, Canada and Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada)] [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4, Canada and Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada); Zhang, Kunyan [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)] [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Escott, Nicholas [Department of Pathology, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada)] [Department of Pathology, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada)] [Philips Healthcare, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. Methods: 50?l of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 5} colony forming units (cfu)/?l was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5?°C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Results: Macroscopic evaluation of treated abscess indicated a diminution of external size of abscess 1 day after treatment. Treatment did not cause open wounds. The median (lower to upper quartile) bacterial count 1 day after treatment was 6.18 × 10{sup 3} (0.76 × 10{sup 3}–11.18 × 10{sup 3}), 2.86 × 10{sup 3} (1.22 × 10{sup 3}–7.07 × 10{sup 3}), and 3.52 × 10{sup 3} (1.18 × 10{sup 3}–6.72 × 10{sup 3}) cfu/100 ?l for control, MT and HT groups, respectively; for the 4-day end point, the count was 1.37 × 10{sup 3} (0.67 × 10{sup 3}–2.89 × 10{sup 3}), 1.35 × 10{sup 3} (0.09 × 10{sup 3}–2.96 × 10{sup 3}), and 0.07 × 10{sup 3} (0.03 × 10{sup 3}–0.36 × 10{sup 3}) cfu/100 ?l for control, MT and HT, showing a significant reduction (p = 0.002) on the bacterial load four days after focused ultrasound treatment when treating at high temperature (HT). The MPO amount remained unchanged between groups and days, indicating no change on local neutrophil recruitment in the abscess caused by the treatment. The white blood cell count remained unchanged between groups and days indicating that no systemic inflammatory response was caused by the treatment. Conclusions: Focused ultrasound induces a therapeutic effect in abscesses induced by MRSA. This effect is observed as a reduction of the number bacteria without significantly altering the amount of MPO at the site of a MRSA-induced abscess. These initial results suggest that focused ultrasound is a viable option for the treatment of localized MRSA-related infections.

  13. Examining mechanisms underlying the selective vulnerability of motor units in a mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, Sophie Rose

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a childhood form of motor neuron disease that causes a progressive paralysis that, in its most severe form, results in death before two years of age. There is currently no cure or treatment ...

  14. The crystal structure of mouse VDAC1 at 2.3 Å resolution reveals mechanistic insights into metabolite gating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ujwal, R.; Cascio, D.; Colletier, J.P.; Faham, S.; Zhang, J.; Toro, L.; Ping, P.; Abramson, J. (UCLA)

    2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) constitutes the major pathway for the entry and exit of metabolites across the outer membrane of the mitochondria and can serve as a scaffold for molecules that modulate the organelle. We report the crystal structure of a {beta}-barrel eukaryotic membrane protein, the murine VDAC1 (mVDAC1) at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, revealing a high-resolution image of its architecture formed by 19 {beta}-strands. Unlike the recent NMR structure of human VDAC1, the position of the voltage-sensing N-terminal segment is clearly resolved. The {alpha}-helix of the N-terminal segment is oriented against the interior wall, causing a partial narrowing at the center of the pore. This segment is ideally positioned to regulate the conductance of ions and metabolites passing through the VDAC pore.

  15. Mitochondrial fragmentation and superoxide anion production in coronary endothelial cells from a mouse model of type 1 diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makino, A.; Scott, B. T.; Dillmann, W. H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    muscle: effects of type 2 diabetes, obesity, weight loss,alpha and interleukin-6. Diabetes 54:2685–2693 28. Bach D,endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Circ Res 88:

  16. Development of the mouse as a laboratory animal model for the study of Corynebacterium equi pneumonia in foals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Joanne Marie

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Norris Animal Foundation: Report of foal pneumonia panel. Denver, Colorado. 1978, pp 2-30. 8. Ca t BR: . 81 aostst P o d I II t I ~Mi hlolo Bp I VPI ld, 111, Ch s C. V o a~s, 918, pp 118- 13. 9. M h tlA, Pat IIA: ~kt I ~gt 11* ad~Vito1 ed 7. Iowa...

  17. Effects of the Over-Expression of Neuronal Glutamate Dehydrogenase (Glud1) on Mouse Brain Mitochondrial Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anguiano, Laura

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Glutamate has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity and subsequent neurodegeneration through changes in synaptic function, loss of glutamatergic neurons, synapses, and dendrites. All of these characteristics are also observed ...

  18. Chronic cisplatin treatment promotes enhanced damage repair and tumor progression in a mouse model of lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Trudy Gale

    Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment, yet the mechanisms of response to specific therapies have been largely unexplored in vivo. Employing genetic, genomic, and imaging approaches, we examined ...

  19. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanamala, Naveena, E-mail: wqu1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hatfield, Meghan K., E-mail: wla4@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Farcas, Mariana T., E-mail: woe7@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Schwegler-Berry, Diane [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hummer, Jon A., E-mail: qzh3@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shurin, Michael R., E-mail: shurinmr@upmc.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Birch, M. Eileen, E-mail: mib2@cdc.gov [NIOSH/CDC, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226 (United States); Gutkin, Dmitriy W., E-mail: dwgutkin@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kisin, Elena, E-mail: edk8@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bugarski, Aleksandar D., E-mail: zjl1@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shvedova, Anna A., E-mail: ats1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Department Physiology and Pharmacology, WVU, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: • Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. • Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. • Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. • Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.

  20. Loss of Hsp70 Exacerbates Pathogenesis But Not Levels of Fibrillar Aggregates in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindquist, Susan

    Endogenous protein quality control machinery has long been suspected of influencing the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of misfolded proteins. Huntington's disease (HD) ...

  1. Multiple Organ System Defects and Transcriptional Dysregulation in the Nipbl+/-  Mouse, a Model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as distinguished by chinchilla coat color) were scored.distinguishable by chinchilla coat color) were obtained only

  2. A Systems Genetics Approach to the Identification of Causal Genes in Heart Failure Using a Large Mouse Panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Christoph Daniel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. K. in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology SolutionsG. K. in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Solutions

  3. 5¿ tRNA halves are present as abundant complexes in serum, concentrated in blood cells, and modulated by aging and calorie restriction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the mouse genome with bowtie according to Maq’s defaultto the mouse genome with bowtie according to the end-to-endto the mouse genome with bowtie according to Maq’s default

  4. Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the mouse brain. Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the mouse brain. Abstract: Integrating...

  5. In-Source Fragmentation and the Sources of Partially Tryptic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using three biological samples, including a standard protein mixture, a mouse brain tissue homogenate, and a mouse plasma sample. Since the in-source fragments of a...

  6. Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation in Mouse. Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation in Mouse. Abstract: The relationships between...

  7. The effects of physiological age on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckspan, Caitlin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jaenisch. Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model withcan be used to treat sickle cell anemia in a mouse model 5 ,

  8. alar ligaments radiological: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    irradiations of the ears. Bystander effects in the hairless mouse ear 2.4 164 Lubomir Smilenov CRR Biol. Mouse irradiation using IND 354 Management of Contaminated Territories...

  9. Proteomic Identification and Quantification of S-glutathionylation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Quantification of S-glutathionylation in Mouse Macrophages Using Resin-Assisted Enrichment and Proteomic Identification and Quantification of S-glutathionylation in Mouse...

  10. Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Using Cysteinyl Peptide Enrichment Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal...

  11. Target Plasma Formation for Magnetic Compression/Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Chrien, R.E.; Christian, J.M.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Goforth, J.H.; Haight, R.C.; Idzorek, G.; King, N.S.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Larson, R.E.; Morgan, G.L.; Olinger, B.W.; Oona, H.; Sheehey, P.T.; Shlachter, J.S.; Smith, R.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Warthen, B.J.; Younger, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Chernyshev, V.K.; Mokhov, V.N.; Demin, A.N.; Dolin, Y.N.; Garanin, S.F.; Ivanov, V.A.; Korchagin, V.P.; Mikhailov, O.D.; Morozov, I.V.; Pak, S.V.; Pavlovskii, E.S.; Seleznev, N.Y.; Skobelev, A.N.; Volkov, G.I.; Yakubov, V.A. [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Arzamas-16 (Russian Federation)] [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Arzamas-16 (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental observations of plasma behavior in a novel plasma formation chamber are reported. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations suggesting that the plasma could subsequently be adiabatically compressed by a magnetically driven pusher to yield 1 GJ of fusion energy. An explosively driven helical flux compression generator mated with a unique closing switch/opening switch combination delivered a 2.7 MA, 347 {mu}s magnetization current and an additional 5 MA, 2.5 {mu}s electrical pulse to the chamber. A hot plasma was produced and 10{sup 13} D-T fusion reactions were observed.

  12. Saving for dry days: Aquifer storage and recovery may help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    underground storage (MUS) of recoverable water. The Committee on Sustainable Underground Storage of Recoverable Water uses MUS ?to denote purposeful recharge of water into an aquifer system for intended recovery and use as an element of long-term water...tx H2O | pg. 2 Saving for dry days Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 3 Aquifer storage and recovery may help With reoccurring droughts and growing population, Texas will always be looking for better ways to save or use water. Some water...

  13. Characterisation of a novel culture condition for the establishment and maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cells and implications for the mechanisms of self-renewal. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Jason Patrick

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pluripotency is defined as the ability of a cell to give rise to all the cell types of the adult organism. In vivo this property is possessed transiently by the cells of the epiblast in the developing embryo but it can ...

  14. Therapeutic versus neuroinflammatory effects of passive immunization is dependent on Abeta/amyloid burden in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    correlation of Ab with TGFb and SDF-1. Immunized males showlevels of MCP-1, IL-10, SDF-1, and RANTES in PBS-treatedT, Gawaz M: Decreased CXCL12 (SDF-1) plasma levels in early

  15. Distinct graft-versus-leukemic stem cell effects of early or delayed donor leukocyte infusions in a mouse chronic myeloid leukemia model.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yi-Fen; Gavrilescu, L Cristina; Betancur, Monica; Lazarides, Katherine; Klingemann, Hans; Van Etten, Richard A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    but not with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Leukemia. 49.induced B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which have the

  16. Cell-to-cell variability and culture conditions during self-renewal reversibly affect subsequent differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Jit Hin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cell-to-cell variability in clonal populations is reflected in a distribution of mRNA and protein levels among individual cells, including those of key transcription factors governing embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency ...

  17. Comparison of Different Forms of Herpes Simplex Replication-Defective Mutant Viruses as Vaccines in a Mouse Model of HSV-2 Genital Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knipe, David M.

    Comparison of Different Forms of Herpes Simplex Replication-Defective Mutant Viruses as Vaccines for revision June 6, 2001; accepted July 11, 2001 Some subunit vaccines composed of herpes simplex virus (HSV against HSV-2. © 2001 Academic Press INTRODUCTION Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is the principal etio

  18. Inhibition of Amyloid-? (A?) Peptide-Binding Alcohol Dehydrogenase-A? Interaction Reduces A? Accumulation and Improves Mitochondrial Function in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Jun; Du, Heng; Yan, Shiqiang; Fang, Fang; Wang, Chaodong; Lue, Lih-Fen; Guo, Lan; Chen, Doris; Stern, David M.; Moore, Frank J. Gunn; Chen, John Xi; Arancio, Ottavio; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    that inhibition of the ABAD-A? interaction, using a decoy peptide (DP) in vitro and in vivo, protects against aberrant mitochondrial and neuronal function and improves spatial learning/memory. Intraperitoneal administration of ABAD-DP [fused to the transduction...

  19. The Binding of Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein to Mouse CD36 Is Mediated in Part by Oxidized Phospholipids That Are Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Edward A.

    Friedman¶ , Edward A. Dennis, Joseph L. Witztum, Daniel Steinberg, and Oswald Quehenberger** From ( 50%) both by the reconstituted apoB from OxLDL and by microemulsions prepared from OxLDL lipids and by demonstrating reciprocal inhibition, i.e. apoB from OxLDL inhibited the binding of the OxLDL lipids and vice

  20. Inhibition of Angiogenesis by a Mouse Sprouty Protein* Received for publication, August 1, 2000, and in revised form, October 25, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    .M006922200 Sang Hoon Lee, Derrick J. Schloss, Lesley Jarvis§, Mark A. Krasnow§, and Judith L. Swain¶ From

  1. The Tissue-Specific lncRNA Fendrr Is an Essential Regulator of Heart and Body Wall Development in the Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grote, Phillip

    The histone-modifying complexes PRC2 and TrxG/MLL play pivotal roles in determining the activation state of genes controlling pluripotency, lineage commitment, and cell differentiation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can ...

  2. Systematic examination of the impact of pre-stimulus alpha- mu and gamma band oscillations on perception : correlative and causal manipulation in mouse and human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, Dominique L. (Dominique Leon)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The over-arching hypothesis that drives my work is that neural dynamics, fluctuating on millisecond to second time scales, powerfully impact perception. In this thesis, I employ correlative electrophysiological recording ...

  3. Bisphenol A at a low concentration boosts mouse spermatogonial cell proliferation by inducing the G protein-coupled receptor 30 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Huang, Wei [Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100091 (China); Liu, Yu-Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most prevalent chemicals in daily-use materials, therefore, human exposure to BPA is ubiquitous. We found that low concentrations of BPA stimulate the spermatogonial GC-1 cells proliferation by G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30)-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-c-Fos pathway. However, through the same pathway GPR30 expression has been shown to be induced by EGF, an EGFR ligand. Thus, we want to know if low concentrations of BPA are able to induce the GPR30 expression and the possible mechanism(s) in GC-1 cells. By transient transfection with expression plasmids, 10{sup ?9} M BPA significantly transactivates the Gpr30-5?-flanking region through activating the GPR30, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), estrogen receptor-? (ER-?), and EFGR-ERK pathways. Furthermore, an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site located within this region is found to be responsible for the transactivation of BPA. Expectedly, through the same pathways, BPA significantly induces the gene and protein expression of GPR30. c-Fos is further observed to be strongly recruited to the AP-1 site in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and its dysfunction on the AP-1 site markedly suppresses the expression of GPR30, p-ERK1/2, p-Ser118-ER-? and cell proliferation by BPA. Our results demonstrate that a low-concentration BPA induces GPR30 expression through the GPR30-EFGR-ERK-c-Fos, ER-?, and PKG pathways, presumably boosting the cells proliferation via a regulatory loop. The present study provides a novel insight into the potential role of GPR30 in the initiation and progression of male germ cell cancer induced by environmentally relevant BPA. - Highlights: ? Low concentrations of BPA activate the PKG and GPR30-EFGR-ERK-ER-? pathways. ? Low concentrations of BPA activate the AP-1 site of Gpr30-5?-flanking region. ? Low concentrations of BPA induce the expression of GPR30 gene and protein. ? Low concentrations of BPA boost GC-1 cells proliferation via a regulatory loop.

  4. Effect of long-term culturing on the potential of mouse embryonic stem cells for in vitro and in vivo development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitalipov, Sh.M.; Mitalipova, M.M.; Ivanov, V.I.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed comparative analysis of in vitro and in vivo pluripotency for two clones of ES-D3 cells subjected to different number of passages after the beginning of subcloning. Both clones of ES cells produced characteristically shaped colonies and embryoid bodies during culturing in suspension. High activity of alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated in ES cells by cytochemical staining. The proportion of aneuploid ES cells increased with the increase in the number of passages, as shown by karyotyping. Experiments on producing chimeric mice using ES cells have shown that clone D3W (passage 17) exceeds clone D3M (passage 42) both in terms of chimera proportion among the offspring and in terms of the extent of coat chimerism (proportion of agouti coat color (ES component) in the coat of chimeras). 26 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. A lentiviral system for RNAi transgenesis and the Ena/VASP triple-knockout defines neuronal and non-neuronal functions in mouse development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinson, Douglas A. (Douglas Adam), 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mammalian development extends and exploits signaling pathways that function exclusively in axon guidance in lower organisms. This emerging paradigm employs complex expression patterns of expanded protein families to achieve ...

  6. Increased hepatic oxidative metabolism distinguishes the action of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta from Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the ob/ob mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Lee D; Hassall, David G; Winegar, Deborah A; Haselden, John N; Nicholls, Andrew W; Griffin, Julian L

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of 20°C/minute to 310°C (transfer line temperature = 250°C; ion source = 250°C; electron ionization = 70 eV). The detector was turned on after 240 s and full-scan spectra were collected using three scans/s over a range of 50 to 650 m/z. The derivatized... with an Acquity UPLC 1.7 µm bridged ethyl hybrid C8 column (2.1 × 100 mm; Waters Corporation) that was kept at 65°C and coupled to a Micromass QTof-Micro™ with a Z-spray™ electrospray source. The electrospray source was operated in positive ion mode...

  7. A physical map of the mouse genome Simon G. Gregory*, Mandeep Sekhon, Jacqueline Schein, Shaying Zhao, Kazutoyo Osoegawak, Carol E. Scott*, Richard S. Evans*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saeedi, Parvaneh

    Ness, Pawan Pandoh, Anna-Liisa Prabhu, Parvaneh Saeedi, Duane Smailus, Lorraine Spence, Jeff Stott§, Daniel Russell§, Larry Overton§, Joel A. Malek§, Mike Holmes§, Michael Heaney§, Jyoti Shetty§, Tamara*, Pieter J. de Jongk, Claire M. Fraser§, Marco Marra, John D. McPherson & David R. Bentley* * The Wellcome

  8. Effects of Chronic Nicotine Exposure and Lack of High Affinity Nicotinic Receptors on Cortico-Hippocampal Areas in the Aging Mouse Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Pei-San

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    performance. Epidemiology studies show that smoking is negatively correlated with the incidence of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Postmortem research and neuroimaging studies show that loss of nicotinic binding sites in the brain is the major...

  9. Role of Tissue Repair in Survival from S-(1,2-Dichlorovinyl)-L-Cysteine– Induced Acute Renal Tubular Necrosis in the Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S-(1,2-Dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), a model nephrotoxi-cant in mice, causes acute tubular necrosis and death at high doses. Our earlier studies revealed that renal tissue repair was critical for survival in mice with DCVC nephrotoxicity. The ob-jective of this study was to investigate if increasing renal tissue repair could protect mice from the lethal outcome of DCVC. Male Swiss Webster (SW) mice were administered a low dose of DCVC (15 mg/kg, ip) 72 h before injection of a normally lethal dose of DCVC (75 mg/kg, ip); this resulted in 100 % protection against the lethal effect of DCVC. Because DCVC caused twofold decrease in cytosolic and mitochondrial -lyase activity, the possibility that DCVC protection may be caused by decreased bioactivation was examined. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2, 6 mg/kg), a nephrotoxicant with no effect on -lyase activity, was administered 96 h before a lethal dose of DCVC. This also resulted in 100 % protection from the lethal effect of DCVC. In both studies total glutathione was unchanged at any time after the lethal dose of DCVC was admin-istered, obviating the role of glutathione in protection. In both cases the augmented and sustained tissue repair induced by prim-ing dose and documented by 3H-thymidine pulse labeling and immunocytochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen re-sulted in 100 % survival in spite of the extensive renal injury. These findings suggest that stimulation of renal tubular repair by the priming dose, through augmented cell division, and the resistance of new cells to mechanisms of progression of injury, underlies auto- and heteroprotection against DCVC. The molecular mech-anisms may have potential application in pharmacotherapeutic intervention for treatment of acute renal failure.

  10. The pro-apoptotic K-Ras 4A proto-oncoprotein does not affect tumorigenesis in the ApcMin/+ mouse small intestine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patek, Charles E.; Arends, Mark J.; Rose, Lorraine; Luo, Feijun; Walker, Marion; Devenney, Paul S.; Berry, Rachel L.; Lawrence, Nicola J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Sansom, Owen J.; Hooper, Martin L.

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    -actin transcripts were 185 bp, 158 bp and 148 bp respectively. The specificities of the PCR reactions were confirmed by dissociation curve analysis and 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. All PCR products were analysed when in the exponential phase of PCR amplification... of uncensored observations. 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Age (days) K ap la n- M ei er s ur vi va l f un ct io nPage 6 of 9 (page number not for citation purposes) complex relationship between apoptosis and cancer...

  11. Motor Neuron-Specific Restoration of SMN in Two SMA Mouse Models: Insights into the Role of Motor Neurons in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paez, Ximena

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    . The intronic splicing silencer (N1 ISS-N1, discovered by Singh et al. 2006) is the main checkpoint of SMN2 exon 7 splicing regulation. Once ISS-N1 is deleted exon 7 is included. Anti-N1 treatment was capable of elevating SMN levels in type I SMA patient...

  12. A new mouse model to explore the initiation, progression, and therapy of BRAF(V600E)-induced lung tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dankort, David; Filenova, Elena; Collado, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Jones, Kirk; McMahon, Martin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and RAS mutations in human lung cancer and melanoma. Cancerreceptor signaling pathway in lung cancers. Int. J. Can- ceractivated in non-small-cell lung cancer and associated with

  13. Antitumor effects of L-BLP25 Antigen-Specific tumor immunotherapy in a novel human MUC1 transgenic lung cancer mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yannelli JR: Vaccines for lung cancer. J Thorac Oncol 2006,vaccines in non-small cell lung cancer. J Thorac Oncol 2006,6. Szabo E: MUC1 expression in lung cancer. Methods Mol Med

  14. Binding of Protoporphyrin IX and Metal Derivatives to the Active Site of Wild-Type Mouse Ferrochelatase at Low Porphyrin-to-Protein Ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.

    Biotecnologia, Departamento de Qui´mica, Faculdade de Cie^ncias e Tecnologia, UniVersidade NoVa de Lisboa, 2829

  15. AAV-mediated delivery of the transcription factor XBP1s into the striatum reduces mutant Huntingtin aggregation in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuleta, Amparo [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile) [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vidal, Rene L. [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile) [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile); Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey [Department of Molecular Biology, Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Biology, Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Hetz, Claudio, E-mail: chetz@med.uchile.cl [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile) [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, 651 Huntington Av., Boston, MA 02446 (United States); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contribution of ER stress to HD has not been directly addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of XBP1s using AAVs decreases Huntingtin aggregation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a new in vivo model of HD based on the expression of a large fragment of mHtt-RFP. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutations that expand a polyglutamine region in the amino-terminal domain of Huntingtin (Htt), leading to the accumulation of intracellular inclusions and progressive neurodegeneration. Recent reports indicate the engagement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in human HD post mortem samples and animal models of the disease. Adaptation to ER stress is mediated by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an integrated signal transduction pathway that attenuates protein folding stress by controlling the expression of distinct transcription factors including X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Here we targeted the expression of XBP1 on a novel viral-based model of HD. We delivered an active form of XBP1 locally into the striatum of adult mice using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs) and co-expressed this factor with a large fragment of mutant Htt as a fusion protein with RFP (Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP) to directly visualize the accumulation of Htt inclusions in the brain. Using this approach, we observed a significant reduction in the accumulation of Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP intracellular inclusion when XBP1 was co-expressed in the striatum. These results contrast with recent findings indicating a protective effect of XBP1 deficiency in neurodegeneration using knockout mice, and suggest a potential use of gene therapy strategies to manipulate the UPR in the context of HD.

  16. Effects of Chronic Nicotine Exposure and Lack of High Affinity Nicotinic Receptors on Cortico-Hippocampal Areas in the Aging Mouse Brain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Pei-San

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    feature of neurodegenerative diseases related to dementia and cognitive impairment. Caloric restriction, a regimen that extends the lifespan in all mammalian species studied so far including rodents and primates, is a highly regulated response to food...

  17. The Medial Entorhinal Cortex's role in temporal and working memory : characterization of a mouse lacking synaptic transmission in Medial Entorhinal Cortex Layer III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivest, Alexander Jay

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Declarative memory requires the integration and association of multiple input streams within the medial temporal lobe. Understanding the role each neuronal circuit and projection plays in learning and memory is essential ...

  18. Effects of chronic, low-intensity gamma irradiation on the gonadotropic response of the ovaries and testes of the albino mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Jerry Don

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    i senor icsl Cells, of Ter=s osrtiel fuli' illr, ent c f tho recuire e ct for tne oe ree of i ". ST::R GF SCI-~;CE :~u ust, , l?tO J sjcr Subject: I'olo y (ioolo y) FFFECTS OF CHRONIC, LOvk-INTENSITY Ghhhh& IRRaDI&TION ON THE, GONADOTROPIC... made re. . ardin =" th? effect of irradi?tion on endocrin . secret' on by the testes. abbott (195') reoorted that ardro?enic caoacity was rot reduced as juc:, ed by the wei;hts of accessory sex or-ans in the course of twerty-five weeks after...

  19. A Selective HDAC 1/2 Inhibitor Modulates Chromatin and Gene Expression in Brain and Alters Mouse Behavior in Two Mood-Related Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Frederick A.

    Psychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression, are projected to lead global disease burden within the next decade. Pharmacotherapy, the primary – albeit often ineffective – treatment ...

  20. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA clone for human tyrosinase that maps at the mouse c-albino locus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, B.S.; Haq, A.K.; Pomerantz, S.H.; Halaban, R.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Screening of a lambdagt11 human melanocyte cDNA library with antibodies against hamster tyrosinase resulted in the isolation of 16 clones. The cDNA inserts from 13 of the 16 clones cross-hybridized with each other, indicating that they were form related mRNA species. One of the cDNA clones, Pmel34, detected one mRNA species with an approximate length of 2.4 kilobases that was expressed preferentially in normal and malignant melanocytes but not in other cell types. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed that the putative human tyrosinase is composed of 548 amino acids with a molecular weight of 62,610. The deduced protein contains glycosylation sites and histidine-rich sites that could be used for copper binding. Southern blot analysis of DNA derived from newborn mice carrying lethal albino deletion mutations revealed that Pmel34 maps near or at the c-albino locus, the position of the structural gene for tyrosinase.

  1. Selective cytotoxicity of 4-S-cysteaminylphenol on follicular melanocytes of the black mouse: rational basis for its application to melanoma chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Y.; Jimbow, K.

    1987-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously shown that 4-S-cysteaminylphenol (4-S-CAP) causes a significant inhibition of in vivo melanoma growth. To clarify the mechanism of the in vivo antimelanoma effect, this study evaluated the cellular and subcellular changes of follicular melanocytes after s.c. administration of 4-S-CAP on the lumbar areas of black and albino mice. 4-S-CAP produced a prompt, selective swelling and lysis of melanocytes, resulting eventually in the necrosis of melanocytes and the depigmentation of black hair follicles. None of the degenerative changes were seen in melanocytes and keratinocytes of control albino follicles. Comparison of melanocytes in black and albino follicles revealed that melanin synthesis is highly active in the melanocytes of black follicles while melanin and tyrosinase synthesis is not seen in the melanocytes of albino follicles. The findings indicate that the selective melanocytotoxicity of 4-S-CAP is manifested by lysis and necrosis of cells which are actively engaged in melanin synthesis. 4-S-CAP appears to provide a new modality for rational chemotherapy of malignant melanoma.

  2. Systematic implications of mtDNA sequence variation in a deer mouse species endemic to islands in the Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Ashli Francille

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of Biology Texas AkM University College Station, Texas DATE OF BIRTH: MARITAL STATUS: PERMANENT ADDRESS: 08 December 1982, Odessa, Texas single 1913 E. Tate, Brownfield, TX 79316 EDUCATION: Brownfield High School South Plains College Texas A...-present 2002-2003 ORGANIZATIONS: National Honor Society National Spanish Honor Society Golden Key National Honour Soctety MSC Town Hall 1999-2000 Brownfield High School 1999-2000 Brownfield High School 2001-present Texas A&M University 2001...

  3. Whole mouse blood microRNA as biomarkers for exposure to c-rays and THOMAS TEMPLIN, SALLY A. AMUNDSON, DAVID J. BRENNER, &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    , SALLY A. AMUNDSON, DAVID J. BRENNER, & LUBOMIR B. SMILENOV Center for Radiological Research, Columbia and the physiological effects of ionising radiation. Correspondence: Dr Lubomir B. Smilenov, PhD, Assistant Professor

  4. Striatal expression of a calmodulin fragment improved motor function, weight loss and neuropathology in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Ying; Dudek, Nichole L.; Li, Qian; Fowler, Stephen C.; Muma, Nancy A.

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein (htt). Increasing evidence suggests that transglutaminase (TGase) plays a critical ...

  5. Striatal expression of a calmodulin fragment improved motor function, weight loss and neuropathology in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Ying; Dudek, Nichole; Li, Qian; Fowler, Stephen C.; Muma, Nancy A.

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein (htt). Increasing evidence suggests that transglutaminase (TGase) plays a critical ...

  6. D2 dopamine receptor internalization prolongs the decrease of radioligand binding after amphetamine: A PET study in a receptor internalization-deficient mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    of subgroups of G- protein coupled receptors (Kohout et al., 2001). We recently demonstrated that knockout

  7. Greco Lab Antibody List Antobody Species Host Dilution Company Catalog Number Storage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Valentina

    _1000 Covance PRB-149P -20C IF Krt5 mouse rabbit 1_1000 Covance PRB-160P -20C IF Krt6 mouse rabbit 1_500 Covance PRB-169P -20C IF Krt10 mouse rabbit 1_1000 Covance PRB-159P -20C IF Krt17 mouse rabbit 1_1000 Abcam ab

  8. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biochemical indices of quality. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Engineering studies on freezing and cold storage systems . · · . . . . . . . · . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Storage of fish in refrigerated sea water . . . 5 Time-temperature tolerance of frozen seafoods 5 to meet the needs of industry. Funda- ment al research has been continued in the field of fish - mus cle

  9. Towards a Conceptual Model of a Bio-Robotic AUV: Pectoral Fin Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    of these technological problems whereas the FY03 ONR MURI program (Integrated Artificial Mus- cle, High-Lift Bio of marine mammals systems (MMS), specifically dolphins. The key technological advances required in order to reach this goal are: 1) An engineered sonar system that matches the perfor- mance of MMS. 2) An AUV

  10. MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedges, Blair

    . Pub. 5:1-35). and revision by Schwartz and Henderson (1988. Milwaukee Publ. Mus. Contr. BioI. Geol. 74. This is a supplement to West Indiall Amphibians and Reptiles: A Chl'r:k-list by Schwartz and Henderson that section is presented. As in Schwartz and Henderson. original locality records in miles are not converted

  11. Supplement 12, Authors: A To Z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Humphrey, Judith M.; Segal, Dorothy B.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Book of Fur Farming. Every Day Reference Guide for All Ranchers. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Bol. Funda??o Gon?alo Moniz, Bahia.?Boletim da Funda??o Gon?alo Moniz. Bahia, Brasil. Bol. Mus. Paraense Emilio Goeldi.?Boletim do Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi...

  12. Detoxification of Organophosphate Nerve Agents by Immobilized Escherichia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    et al., 1989). In the United States over 40 million kilograms of organo- phosphate pesticides, in ap- proximately 100 min, at a specific rate of 0.160 mM min-1 (g cell dry wt)-1 . The immobilized with mus- cular responses, and in vital organs produces serious symp- toms and eventually death (Donarski

  13. Thermal activation energies of potassium bromide and lithium fluoride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isham, Elmer Rex

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sooe due~ ~ 387 (1939) ~ (8) Lsvsreusv ic, M, ~ Lusbasoeuoe of Solids (Jahu Miley and mus, Luc ~ hev cork, 1950)~ (9) see Bafbe~ (5) p&8& 4'l. (10) Boufiglioli, Brovetto aud Cortsse, Phys. Rsv. ~ 951 (1959) ~ (11) Halpertu, Rristi&ugoller, aud...

  14. alport syndrome concerted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theory and Musicianship II MUS 288 202 Music Theory and Musicianship II 231 Aalberts, Daniel P. First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21...

  15. Study of the digital camera acquisition process and statistical modeling of the sensor raw data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Study of the digital camera acquisition process and statistical modeling of the sensor raw data C. In the present report we present a detailed analysis of the digital image acquisition process which allows us. Aguerrebere, J. Delon, Y. Gousseau, P. Mus´e 1 Introduction The accurate modeling of the acquisition process

  16. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    populations of mus- sels. Dam construction, siltation, water pollution, min- ing and industrial wastes important commer- cial value in the cultured pearl and jewelry industry. Our pearly mussels are of unique- sels are underway. However, water pollution continues to threaten streams crucial to their survival

  17. Cellular/Molecular A Chimera Analysis of Prestin Knock-Out Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dallos, Peter

    Cellular/Molecular A Chimera Analysis of Prestin Knock-Out Mice Mary Ann Cheatham,1 Sharon Low, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, and 3MusWorks, Falls Church, Virginia 22042 A chimera. In this report, we describe a chimera analysis of prestin function. A chimera is a genetic composite. It contains

  18. The bionomics of seven species of Anthonomus Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Danny Brent

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANTHONOMUS PUSILLUS LECONTE . . . . . . . . . . 28 ANTHONOMUS RUFIPENNIS LECONTE . . . ~ . . ~ . . 39 ANTHONOMUS ALBOPILOSUS DIETZ ~ o ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ 47 ANTHONOMUS AENEOLUS DIETE ~ ~ . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 54 ANTHONOMUS HETEROTHECAE PIERCE ~ ~ o... study. 39 ANTHONOMUS RUFIPENNIS LECONTK Antnonomus ~rufd annie LeConte, ld76, froo. Amer. Phil. Soc. , 15;200. Type: Pennsylvania; in Mus. Comp, Zool. ; Diets, 1891, Trans. Amer. Entomol. Soc. , 18: 205; Blatchley and Leng, 1916, Rhyncho- phora...

  19. Evaluation of ultrasound and other sources of information to predict beef carcass traits and final carcass value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Dustin Tyler

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    investigated using four sets of independent variables referred to as sources A, B, C, or D and ultrasound scan session (1 Â? 4). An analysis included initial weight at first scan session (IWT), FRM and MUS as independent variables through GLM procedures. B...

  20. Beginners French Fall 2011 Professor: Vronique Sauron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    pronoms COD Les pronons COI Pourquoi ? Parce que... Leçon 4 : Aller au musée Situer un lieu sur un plan is available in the Academic Conduct Code. Students are advised that the penalty against students on a Boston U

  1. Charte informatique Mnhn_Ed11.doc Page 1/7 Charte d'utilisation des ressources informatiques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle La présente charte est avant tout un code de bonne conduite. Elle, départements et directions ainsi que leurs périphériques ; l'ensemble du parc logiciel, des bases de données

  2. Contributions-from the Biological Laboratory of the U. S. Fish Commission, Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and handsomely colored fish." The first catch, of nearly 2,000 pounds, was made in water varying' from 80 to 120 and cooked. Captain Kirby stated that they were the finest fish he had ever eaten, and he determined to save it waa examined by Messrs. Goode & Bean, and described (Proceedings U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. II, pp. 205

  3. 2005 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved. Evolution, 59(7), 2005, pp. 16001603

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohtola, Esa

    Lund, Sweden 6E-mail: jan-ake.nilsson@zooekol.lu.se Abstract. Sedentary passerine birds living- entary passerine birds living in temperate and boreal regions. During this period, energy requirements is produced by shivering, primarily in the flight mus- cles. In situations where an increased sustained work

  4. Bachelor of Arts, Music/Business, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    DLM Mathematics 3-4 DLN Natural, Physical, & Applied Sciences course with lab 4 DLN Natural, Physical, and Applied Sciences course 3-4 DLV MUS 100 Introduction to Music 3 DLL Literature and Humanities 3-4 DLS COMM 101 Fundamentals of Communication 3 DLS ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 ACCT 205 Introduction

  5. FRZ Section Enrollment Report (SER) -Table of Contents Subject Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Engineering NUPH Nuclear Pharmacy NUR Nursing OBHR Orgnztnl Bhvr & Humn Resources OLS Organiz Ldrshp Enrollment Report (SER) - Table of Contents Subject Description CLPH Clinical Pharmacy CMCI CIC Common Market & Leadership MUS Music History & Theory NS Naval Science NRES Natural Res & Environ Science NUCL Nuclear

  6. A ten-year decrease in plant species richness on a neotropical inselberg:1 detrimental effects of global warming?2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of global warming?2 3 EMILE FONTY*, CORINNE SARTHOU, DENIS LARPIN§ and JEAN-FRAN�OIS4 PONGE*1 5 6 *Muséum 15 Keywords: aridity, biodiversity loss, global warming, low forest, plant communities, tropical16 probable cause of the observed species disappearance is global warming, which severely28 affected northern

  7. Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Binghamton University BS in Computer Engineering-Four-Year Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    5/12/2011 Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Binghamton University BS-AS in engineering science 2009 Fall Spring BU Course No. Course Name Transfer Course BU Course No. Course Name Project II Technical Elective I Technical Elective II General Ed Elective (A) Thea, Art, Mus, Cinema

  8. State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    and Applied Science BS in Industrial and Systems Engineering-Four-Year Program -Application curriculum code: 1367 BROOME COMMUNITY COLLEGE--AS in engineering science 2009 Fall Spring BU Course No. Course Name transfer Gen Ed Elective (A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema **** *************************************************Year

  9. Transfer Information Sheet for Bergen Community College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    223 Business Law I BLS 111 3 ART, CIN, DAN. MUS, THR, LIT, WRT 204 or 205 Art, Cinema, DanceEd "H" or GenEd "C" 6 Bio, CHM, ESC or PHY Lab Science GenEd "L" 4 ECO 202 Macroeconomics ECON 162 3 or PHY Science elective Science elective 4 ECO 201 Microeconomics ECON 160 3 Total transfer credits 62

  10. State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    General Ed Elective (A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema General Ed Elective (N) Any social science *Electrical and Applied Science BS in Computer Engineering-Four-Year Program Rockland Community College Elective (H) ENG/THEA/ART/PHIL/CINEMA EECE 382 EECE Seminar II Year 4 Fall Spring BU Course # Course Name

  11. State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    203 Professional Elec II General Ed Elec A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema General Ed Elec (N) Any social science and Applied Science BS in Electrical Engineering-Four-Year Program Rockland Community College Communication Systems EECE 382 EECE Seminar II General Ed Elective (H) ENG/THEA/ART/PHIL/CINEMA Year 4 Fall

  12. State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Engineering Elective General Ed Elective (N) Any Social Science General Ed Elective (A) Thea, Art, Mus, Cinema and Applied Science BS in Bioengineering-Four-Year Program Fall 2011 Application curriculum code: 1532 BROOME COMMUNITY COLLEGE-AS in engineering science Fall Spring Course No. Course Name Transfer Course Course No

  13. 1H NMR Metabolomics Study of Metastatic Melanoma in C57BL/6J...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NMR Metabolomics Study of Metastatic Melanoma in C57BL6J Mouse Spleen. 1H NMR Metabolomics Study of Metastatic Melanoma in C57BL6J Mouse Spleen. Abstract: Melanoma is a malignant...

  14. On Target May 2013 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Gets Clear, 3D Brain Scans of Moving Mice Mouse Medicine: System Gets Clear, 3D Brain Scans of Moving Mice Three markers attached to the head of a mouse enable the...

  15. A vascular access system (VAS) for preclinical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry-Pusey, Brittany Nan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crump Institute database, PET/CT FDG mouse studies that wereMR), computer tomography (CT), and PET imaging Training andof the mouse is erased in the CT and PET image. Another 3D

  16. annual radiological environmental: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    irradiations of the ears. Bystander effects in the hairless mouse ear 2.4 164 Lubomir Smilenov CRR Biol. Mouse irradiation using IND 115 ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM INFORMATION 1997 BNL...

  17. archaeal dna-sliding clamp: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    irradiations of the ears. Bystander effects in the hairless mouse ear 2.4 164 Lubomir Smilenov CRR Biol. Mouse irradiation using IND 418 Weitere Kolloquiumstermine sind im WWW...

  18. Biometric Authentication via Keystroke Sound Joseph Roth Xiaoming Liu Arun Ross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the mouse [15]. Although it is nonin- trusive, keystroke dynamics utilizes key-logging to record typed texts

  19. Biometric Authentication via Keystroke Sound Joseph Roth Xiaoming Liu Arun Ross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Arun Abraham

    the mouse [16]. Although being non- intrusive, keystroke dynamics utilizes key-logging to record all typed

  20. Michael DiMaio Immunohistochemical Algorithm for Differentiating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    -derived IL-1 as Driver of Pathology in a Mouse Model of Gout 2012 Pathology Research Retreat Awardees

  1. ERJ rev 10.02.2012 1 UCHC Guide to CellQuest Pro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    : unstained control, Mouse 1, spleen 4, isotype control FITC, dox-treated 15, etc. These can be used

  2. Role of Flagellar Motility in Trypanosoma brucei Pathogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kisalu, Neville Kielau

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phase contrast images. Representative trypanosomes (arrows)mouse infections. Representative live video shows propulsivemouse infections. Representative live video shows defective

  3. Cell Prolif. 2007, 40, 106124 2007 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beebe, David J.

    , Madison 53706. Tel.: +608 265 5182; E-mail: Alexander@oncology.wisc.edu #12;Simulating mouse mammary gland

  4. Endogenous mammalian histone H3.3 exhibits chromatin-related functions during development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reads were aligned using Bowtie, followed by peak callingthe mouse genome mm9 with Bowtie. We used two different peak

  5. In Orbit Timing Calibration of the Hard X-Ray Detector on Board Suzaku

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yukikatsu Terada; Teruaki Enoto; Ryouhei Miyawaki; Yoshitaka Ishisaki; Tadayasu Dotani; Ken Ebisawa; Masanobu Ozaki; Yoshihiro Ueda; Lucien Kuiper; Manabu Endo; Yasushi Fukazawa; Tsuneyoshi Kamae; Madoka Kawaharada; Motohide Kokubun; Yoshikatsu Kuroda; Kazuo Makishima; Kazunori Masukawa; Tsunefumi Mizuno; Toshio Murakami; Kazuhiro Nakazawa; Atsushi Nakajima; Masaharu Nomach; Naoki Shibayama; Tadayuki Takahashi; Hiromitsu Takahashi; Makoto S. Tashiro; Toru Tamagawa; Shin Watanabe; Makio Yamaguchi; Kazutaka Yamaoka; Daisuke Yonetoku

    2007-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The hard X-ray detector (HXD) on board the X-ray satellite Suzaku is designed to have a good timing capability with a 61 $\\mu$s time resolution. In addition to detailed descriptions of the HXD timing system, results of in-orbit timing calibration and performance of the HXD are summarized. The relative accuracy of time measurements of the HXD event was confirmed to have an accuracy of $1.9\\times 10^{-9}$ s s$^{-1}$ per day, and the absolute timing was confirmed to be accurate to 360 $\\mu$s or better. The results were achieved mainly through observations of the Crab pulsar, including simultaneous ones with RXTE, INTEGRAL, and Swift.

  6. UCSD HOUSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LABORATORY ANIMALS Enclosure Composition &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    > 25 Nursing w/L Polypropylene (opaque) or polycarbonate (clear) box 25 x 16 x 13 10 7 5 4 1 Mouse - 25 > 25 Nursing w/L Polycarbonate box 42 x 21 x 20 22 17 11 9 1 Mouse 25 Nursing w/L Lo-Profile Polycarbonate box 42 x 21 x 15 22 17 11 9 1 Mouse 25 Nursing

  7. XM-17330/27330 STANDARD SAMPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skemer, Philip

    ac- cording to the situation. Click: To press and release the left mouse button. Right-click: To press and release the right mouse button. Double-click: To press and release the left mouse button twice intensity measurement/FIT mode measurement...................... 41 4.2 Measurement Using Calibration Curve

  8. A High-Resolution Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genetic Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nachman, Michael

    A High-Resolution Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genetic Map of the Mouse Genome Sagiv Shifman1 humans. Using more than 10,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms evenly spaced across the mouse genome, we nucleotide polymorphism genetic map of the mouse genome. PLoS Biol 4(12): e395. DOI: 10.1371/journal

  9. Nonylphenol-mediated CYP induction is PXR-dependent: The use of humanized mice and human hepatocytes suggests that hPXR is less sensitive than mouse PXR to nonylphenol treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mota, Linda C. [Clemson University, Environmental Toxicology, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Barfield, Christina [Clemson University, Biological Sciences, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Hernandez, Juan P. [University of Texas at El Paso, Biological Sciences, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Baldwin, William S., E-mail: baldwin@clemson.edu [Clemson University, Environmental Toxicology, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Clemson University, Biological Sciences, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonylphenol (NP), a by-product of alkylphenol ethoxylates, is a pervasive surfactant that activates the xenosensing nuclear receptor, the pregnane X-receptor (PXR) in transactivation assays in vitro. We are interested in determining if NP activates PXR in vivo, determining if hPXR and mPXR act similarly, and investigating the role of PXR in protecting individuals from NP. Wild-type (WT), PXR-null, and humanized PXR (hPXR) mice were treated with NP at 0, 50 or 75 mg/kg/day for one week, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, liver histopathology, and serum NP concentrations were examined. WT mice treated with NP showed induction of Cyp2b, and male-specific induction of Cyp2c and Cyp3a. CYPs were not induced in PXR-null mice, demonstrating that PXR is necessary for NP-mediated CYP induction. CAR-mediated CYP induction was not observed in the PXR-null mice despite previous data demonstrating that NP is also a CAR activator. hPXR mice only showed moderate Cyp induction, suggesting that hPXR is not as sensitive to NP as mPXR in vivo. NP-mediated Cyp3a induction from three human hepatocyte donors was not significant, confirming that hPXR is not very sensitive to NP-mediated CYP induction. Lastly, mice with PXR (mPXR and hPXR) showed lower NP serum concentrations than PXR-null mice treated with NP suggesting that PXR plays a role in decreasing liver toxicity by basally regulating phase I-III detoxification enzymes that promote the metabolism and elimination of NP. In summary, PXR is required for NP-mediated CYP-induction, mPXR mediates greater CYP induction than hPXR in vivo, and the presence of PXR, especially mPXR, is associated with altered histopathology and increased clearance of NP.

  10. Gastric colonisation with a restricted commensal microbiota replicates the promotion of neoplastic lesions by diverse intestinal microbiota in the Helicobacter pylori INS-GAS mouse model of gastric carcinogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lertpiriyapong, Kvin

    Objectives: Gastric colonisation with intestinal flora (IF) has been shown to promote Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-associated gastric cancer. However, it is unknown if the mechanism involves colonisation with specific or diverse ...

  11. G54SIM Lab 02 Tutorial: Laptop Simulation Build a simulation model of a laptop operation. When the laptop is on and the user is working, i.e. is pressing the keyboard keys and moving the mouse, the laptop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    the battery usage. To wake the laptop up you need to press the power button. In any of the three states On {EnergyConsumption} [EnergyConsumption=: Laptop.isStateActive(On)?5 : Laptop.isStateActive(ScreenOff)?31 G54SIM Lab 02 Tutorial: Laptop Simulation Task Build a simulation model of a laptop operation

  12. Animal Conservation (2005) 8, 329346 C 2005 The Zoological Society of London. Printed in the United Kingdom doi:10.1017/S1367943005002313 Genetic relatedness of the Preble's meadow jumping mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    or endangered. Thirty- five organisms have since been removed from the list. Seven `delistings' resulted from

  13. Supplement 22, Part 7, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , J.; and Lucinska, ?., 1976, Pol- skie Pismo Entom., v. 46 (2), 261-318 Docophorulus linariae: Polen Acanthodactylus erythrurus lineo-maculatus (foie) Dollfus, R. P., 1975, Bull. Mus. Nat. Hist. Nat., Paris, 3. s. (302), Zool. (212), 659- 684...-426 microfilariae: Ethiopia Acrocephalus palustris Zlotorzycka, J.; and Lucinska, ?., 1976, Pol skie Pismo Entom., v. 46 (2), 261-318 Docophorulus mirificus: Polen Acrocephalus schoenobaenus Ashford, R. W.; et al., 1976, J. Wildlife Dis., v. 12 (3) , 409...

  14. UNIVERSIT DE TOURS UFR de Droit, d'conomie et des Sciences Sociales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MAROC (1912-1956) : Fès-nouvelle THESE DE DOCTORAT EN HISTOIRE Présentée par Charlotte Jelidi, née Mus Maroc, celles de la Société des Architectes diplômés par le Gouvernement, celles de l'Institut français (1924-1930). Sources : Archives municipales de Fès. Beaufils Louis Formé à l'ENSBA. Arrivé au Maroc

  15. Publication trimestrielle N 228 -DCEMBRE 2006 L'Arganier : arbre du Maroc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    49 Publication trimestrielle N° 228 - D�CEMBRE 2006 L'Arganier : arbre du Maroc De la récolte du collecte. Musée national des Arts et Traditions populaires L'Arganier : arbre du Maroc De la récolte du plus septentrional. Espèce sylvestre endémique du Maroc, sa présence remonterait à l'ère tertiaire, où

  16. A High-resolution Spectrum of the R CrB Star V2552 Ophiuchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kameswara Rao; David L. Lambert

    2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy have added V2552 Oph to the rare class of R Coronae Borealis variables. We confirm this classification of V2552 Oph through a comparison of our high-resolution optical spectrum of this star and that of R CrB and other F-type members of the class. We show that V2552 Oph most closely resembles Y Mus and FH Sct, stars in which Sr, Y, and Zr are enhanced.

  17. Laser synchronized high-speed shutter for spectroscopic application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Paul C. (Tracy, CA); Porter, Eldon L. (Tracy, CA); Prast, Thomas L. (Livermore, CA); Sunnarborg, Duane A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast mechanical shutter, based on rotating chopper wheels, has been designed and implemented to shutter the entrance slit of a spectrograph. This device enables an exposure time of 9 .mu.s to be achieved for a 0.8 mm wide spectrograph entrance slit, achieves 100% transmission in the open state, and an essentially infinite extinction ratio. The device further incorporates chopper wheel position sensing electronics to permit the synchronous triggering of a laser source.

  18. Special Publication No. 3, Ticks And Tickborne Diseases, I. Genera And Species of Ticks, Part 1. Genera A-G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Farr, Marion M.; Roach, Katharine F.; Anastos, George

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    River, Belgian Congo, Euxerus erythropus maestus; Paiata, Liberia, Papio cynocephalus; Kilosa, Tanganyika Territory) Darling, S. T., ( 1912N), 71-73 (Cathartes aura, Lep- todeira albofusca, Mus norvegicus; Panama City) Dinnik, J. ?., Walker, J... americana, Bos taurus; Panama) Faust, E. C., (1929A), 27-44 (dogs; China) da Fonseca, F., (1954c), 93-167 (Myrmecophaga t. tridactyla; Brazil) da Fonseca, F., [1959c], 99-186 (Monodelphys domes- tica; Brazil) da Fonseca, F., (1960?), 89-144 (Dasyprocta...

  19. Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

  20. Part 8, Authors: K To Kyzer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Dorothy B.; Ray, Doris H.; Carson, Gertrude B.; Hassall, Albert; Doss, Mildred A.

    1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inst, et Mus. Zool. Univ. Athen.?Acta Instituti et Musei Zoologici Universitatis Atheniensis. [Athensl Acta Liter, et Sc. Sueciae.?Acta Literaria et Scientiarum Sueciae. Upsala. Acta Med. Keijo.?Acta Medicinalia in Keijo. Universitas Imperialis... in Keijo, Japonia. Acta Med., Rio de Janeiro.?Acta Medica. Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Acta Med. URSS.?Acta Medica URSS. Moskva. Acta Soc. Reg. Sc. Upsaliensis.?Acta Socie- tatis Regiae Scientiarum Upsaliensis. Upsala. Acta Zool. Fennica.?Acta Zoologica...