National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mouse mus musculus

  1. Comparative genome mapping of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) reveals greater similarity to rat (Rattus norvegicus) than to the lab mouse (Mus musculus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsdell, Clifton M; Lewandowski, Adrienne A; Glenn, Julie Weston; Vrana, Paul B; O'Neill, Rachel J; Dewey, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The comprehensive mouse radiation hybrid map densely cross-link- age and radiation hybrid cell maps) [2]. As a result,radiation http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/8/65 hybrid maps

  2. New Behavioral Insights Into Home Range Orientation of the House Mouse (Mus musculus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Blythe Elizabeth

    2011-05-06

    . In Chapter 2, I trained mice to navigate to their home within a circular arena, with access to a visual beacon and an enriched visual background. The mice showed that to navigate home, they preferred to rely on the extra-arena (background) cues for compass...

  3. The Blue Whale, Balaenoptera musculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Blue Whale, Balaenoptera musculus SALLY A. MIZROCH, DALE W. RICE, and JEFFREY M. BREIWICK Introduction The blue whale, Balaenoptera mus- culus (Linnaeus, 1758), is not only the largest of the whales metric tons (t) (Mackintosh, 1942). Blue whales are entirely bluish-gray in color, except for the white

  4. THE HELICOTREMA: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELS D. C. MOUNTAIN AND A. E. HUBBARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the helicotrema for four species: mouse (Mus musculus C57), chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigar), cat (Felis catus

  5. Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sounds from the North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) sounds from the North Atlantic David K. Mellingera) Bioacoustics 2003 Sounds of blue whales were recorded from U.S. Navy hydrophone arrays in the North Atlantic-duration, very-low-frequency sound units repeated every 1­2 min are typical of blue whale sounds recorded

  6. MUS 122: Survey of Jazz Number of Credits 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MUS 122: Survey of Jazz Number of Credits 3 Instructor Peter Epstein Catalog Description'" (1959) Bessie Smith, "Back Water Blues" (1927) [Count Basie, "One O'Clock Jump" (1937)] Reading: New

  7. MouStress: Detecting Stress from Mouse Motion David Sun1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canny, John

    -hand dynamics that captures mus- cle stiffness during mouse movement. We show that the within-subject mouse interfaces, mouse interaction ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2 User Interfaces (H.1.2, I.3.6): Theory and methods, Input devices and strategies INTRODUCTION Stress has a profound impact on the emotional

  8. CONTROLLING RODENTS IN COMMERCIAL POULTRY FACILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    mouse (Mus musculus), Norway rat (Rat- tus norvegicus), and roof rat (Rattus rattus) are commonly found magnify the expense. Conducting effective and efficient programs to control rodents in commercial poultry

  9. School of Music Application for MusB (Hons)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    School of Music Application for MusB (Hons) Performance Audition Admission to performance requires of musical style, artistry, interpretation, musicianship and personality in the performance of music; ! the technical proficiency of the applicant in relation to the demands of 400-level performance; ! the prospect

  10. MUS Pension Taskforce: 401(a) and 403(b) Plan RFP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    3/19/2014 1 MUS Pension Taskforce: 401(a) and 403(b) Plan RFP rationale and status update MSU of the individual offerings in the plan line-up. They only offer TIAA-CREF funds. 2. The 403(b) plan: Multi with other retirement plans in Big Sky Conference? 5 Constraints on current 401(a) and 403(b) Plans preclude

  11. Stress, mixed messages, and hormone signaling : regulation of translation and the unfolded protein response in pituitary gonadotropes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Minh-Ha T.

    2008-01-01

    4 Mus musculus ES cells cDNA, RIKEN full- length enrichedAV216648 RIKEN full-length enriched, ES cells Mus musculusAV216412 RIKEN full-length enriched, ES cells Mus musculus

  12. Effects of voluntary activity and genetic selection on aerobic capacity in house mice (Mus domesticus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    Effects of voluntary activity and genetic selection on aerobic capacity in house mice (Mus of voluntary activity and genetic selection on aerobic capacity in house mice (Mus domesticus). J. Appl. Physiol. 84(1): 69­76, 1998.--An animal model was developed to study effects on components of exercise

  13. Study of deuterium charging behaviour in palladium and palladium alloy plates, changing surface treatments, by $\\mu$S pulsed electrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celani, F; Tripodi, P; Petrocchi, A; Di Gioacchino, D; Marini, P; Di Stefano, V; Diociaiuti, M; Mancini, A

    1995-01-01

    Study of deuterium charging behaviour in palladium and palladium alloy plates, changing surface treatments, by $\\mu$S pulsed electrolysis

  14. Lifelong voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    in the heart A. M. BRONIKOWSKI,1,7 P. A. CARTER,2 T. J. MORGAN,2 T. GARLAND, JR.,3 N. UNG,1 T. D. PUGH,4 R voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart. Physiol changes that normally occur in the aging heart. Male mice (Mus domesticus) were sampled from the 16th

  15. Deuterium overloading of palladium wires by means of high power $\\mu$s pulsed electrolysis and electromigration suggestions of a "phase transition" and a related excess heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celani, F; Tripodi, P; Petrocchi, A; Di Gioacchino, D; Marini, P; Di Stefano, V; Pace, S; Mancini, A

    1996-01-01

    Deuterium overloading of palladium wires by means of high power $\\mu$s pulsed electrolysis and electromigration

  16. The nature of biodiversity has long been a central focus in biology. This may not seem the case any longer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    restricted set of organisms--the house mouse (Mus musculus), the fruit fly (Drosophila spp.), the nematode of diversity is, in a sense, provided by"adaptation"to an "ecological niche." Adaptation results from the force of selection; and the notion of the ecological niche,to which the organism adapts,remains obscure and poorly

  17. Numerical simulation of deuterium loading profile in palladium and palladium alloy plates from experimental data of absorbed mole rate obtained using $\\mu$s pulsed electrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celani, F; Tripodi, P; Petrocchi, A; Nakamura, M; Di Gioacchino, D; Marini, P; Di Stefano, V; Preparata, Giuliano; Verpelli, M

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of deuterium loading profile in palladium and palladium alloy plates from experimental data of absorbed mole rate obtained using $\\mu$s pulsed electrolysis

  18. Track recognition in 4 [mu]s by a systolic trigger processor using a parallel Hough transform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klefenz, F.; Noffz, K.H.; Conen, W.; Zoz, R.; Kugel, A. . Lehrstuhl fuer Informatik V); Maenner, R. . Lehrstuhl fuer Informatik V Univ. Heidelberg . Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Wissenschaftliches Rechnen)

    1993-08-01

    A parallel Hough transform processor has been developed that identifies circular particle tracks in a 2D projection of the OPAL jet chamber. The high-speed requirements imposed by the 8 bunch crossing mode of LEP could be fulfilled by computing the starting angle and the radius of curvature for each well defined track in less than 4 [mu]s. The system consists of a Hough transform processor that determines well defined tracks, and a Euler processor that counts their number by applying the Euler relation to the thresholded result of the Hough transform. A prototype of a systolic processor has been built that handles one sector of the jet chamber. It consists of 35 [times] 32 processing elements that were loaded into 21 programmable gate arrays (XILINX). This processor runs at a clock rate of 40 MHz. It has been tested offline with about 1,000 original OPAL events. No deviations from the off-line simulation have been found. A trigger efficiency of 93% has been obtained. The prototype together with the associated drift time measurement unit has been installed at the OPAL detector at LEP and 100k events have been sampled to evaluate the system under detector conditions.

  19. The mouse genome informatics and the mouse genome database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maltais, L.J.; Blackburn, R.E.; Bradt, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is a centralized, comprehensive database of the mouse genome that includes genetic mapping data, comparative mapping data, gene descriptions, mutant phenotype descriptions, strains and allelic polymorphism data, inbred strain characteristics, physical mapping data, and molecular probes and clones data. Data in MGD are obtained from the published literature and by electronic transfer from laboratories working on large backcross panels of mice. MGD provides tools that enable the user to search the database, retrieve data, generate reports, analyze data, annotate records, and build genetic maps. The Encyclopedia of the Mouse Genome provides a graphic user interface to mouse genome data. It consists of software tools including: LinkMap, a graphic display of genetic linkage maps with the ability to magnify regions of high locus density: CytoMap, a graphic display of cytogenetic maps showing banded chromosomes with cytogenetic locations of genes and chromosomal aberrations; CATS, a catalog searching tool for text retrieval of mouse locus descriptions. These software tools provide access to the following data sets: Chromosome Committee Reports, MIT Genome Center data, GBASE reports, Mouse Locus Catalog (MLC), and Mouse Cytogenetic Mapping Data. The MGD is available to the scientific community through the World Wide Web (WWW) and Gopher. In addition GBASE can be accessed via the Internet.

  20. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  1. Austral Ecology (2004) 29, 215224 Do feral house mice have an impact on invertebrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretoria, University of

    2004-01-01

    ). On Marion Island, the now exterminated domestic cat (Felis catus) and the domestic mouse (Mus domesticus

  2. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy, Sean

    Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial

  3. Polar Biol (2007) 30:391394 DOI 10.1007/s00300-006-0204-8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Pachyptila belcheri (Catry et al. 2003). Ship rats Rattus rattus, house mice Mus musculus and cats Felis catus have possibly been present on the island for at least 100 years and yet prions have been able

  4. Dazl regulates mouse embryonic germ cell development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gill, Mark E

    2010-01-01

    In the mouse, germ cells can undergo differentiation to become either oocytes or spermatozoa in response to sex of their gonadal environment. The nature of the germ cell-intrinsic aspects of this signaling have not been ...

  5. The branching programme of mouse lung development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnow, Mark A.

    ARTICLES The branching programme of mouse lung development Ross J. Metzger1 {, Ophir D. Klein2 {, Gail R. Martin2 & Mark A. Krasnow1 Mammalian lungs are branched networks containing thousands by three geometrically simple local modes of branching used in three different orders throughout the lung

  6. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-01

    The structure of mouse IP-10 shows a novel tetrameric association. Interferon-?-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated ?-sheet of ?90 Å in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two ?-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance.

  7. RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MOUs MOU Between Nine Federal Agencies Regarding Coordination in Federal Agency Review of Electric Transmission Facilities on Federal Land. Sets procedures for federal agency...

  8. Laboratory Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) with Foreign Partners

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-05-14

    This memorandum establishes policy and procedures for any Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between DOE National Laboratories and any foreign entity, whether governmental or private.

  9. Towards the integration of mouse databases - definition and implementation of solutions to two use-cases in mouse functional genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruenberger, Michael; Alberts, Rudi; Smedley, Damian; Swertz, Morris A; Schofield, Paul; Consortium, Casimir; Schughart, Klaus

    2010-01-22

    number of allelic variants in many genes, combina- tions thereof, and many knock-out mouse lines with deletions in single genes are available [1]. Research on mouse model systems has generated valuable discoveries for our understanding of the biological... genomics studies (see the Mouse Resource Browser MRB [7]). Ad-hoc integration of these databases is very difficult. Many databases require a separate login procedure and need to be accessed using different methods (e.g. via a website, downloadable files...

  10. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardison, Ross C.

    and knockin techniques17­22 . For these and other reasons, the Human Genome Project (HGP) recognized from its ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome comparative analysis of the mouse and human genomes, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from

  11. HumanMouse Gene Identification by Comparative Evidence Integration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlovic, Vladimir

    The identification of genes in the human genome remains a challenge, as the actual predictions appear to disagree of genes in the human genome by using a reference, such as mouse genome. However, this comparative genome. In particular, it is not clear whether the mouse is at the correct evolutionary distance from

  12. The Mouse House: a brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Liane B [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable source of mouse models for human genetic disorders.

  13. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  14. Detection of single photons by toad and mouse rods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reingruber, J; Pahlberg, J; Woodruff, ML; Sampath, AP; Fain, GL; Holcman, D

    2013-01-01

    variability of the single photon responses of mammalian rodtime (sec) Fig. 4. Single-photon response for WT mouse0.40. (B) Twenty single-photon response simulations (black)

  15. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  16. Ecological Connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi Reservoirs and Triatoma pallidipennis Hosts in an Anthropogenic Landscape with Endemic Chagas Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Janine M.; Gutié rrez-Cabrera, Ana E.; Salgado-Ramí rez, Liliana; Peterson, A. Townsend; Sá nchez-Cordero, Ví ctor; Ibarra-Cerdeñ a, Carlos N.

    2012-09-26

    . Blood from six non-human species was identified from bug bloodmeals: Sigmodon hispidus, Mus musculus, Didelphis virginiana, Canis familiaris, Felis catus, and Gallus gallus. Bloodmeal rates were similar between seasons for most non- human animal species... female (lane 2), Canis familiaris from a stage 2 nymph (lane 3), Felis catus from a stage 5 nymph (lane 4-), Gallus gallus from a male (lane 5), Sigmodon hispidus from a female (lane 6), Mus musculus from a stage 5 nymph (lane 7), S. hispidus and human...

  17. Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 9931001 Pulmonary vascular remodeling in isolated mouse lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 993­1001 Pulmonary vascular remodeling in isolated mouse lungs­flow relationships in mouse lungs and does so via structural remodeling. They also provide important baseline data

  18. Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of mouse lung development and Nmyc target genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Brendan J.

    Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of mouse lung development and Nmyc target genes provided information regarding the dynamics of gene expression during development of the mouse lung a global survey of protein expression during mouse lung organogenesis from embryonic day E13.5 until

  19. Video Article Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    Video Article Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused://www.jove.com/details.php?id=2690 DOI: 10.3791/2690 Keywords: Medicine, Issue 50, ex-vivo, mouse, lung, pulmonary vascular impedance of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused with Pulsatile Flow. J. Vis. Exp. (50), e2690

  20. Taming Wild Behavior: The Input Observer for Obtaining Text Entry and Mouse Pointing Measures from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    Taming Wild Behavior: The Input Observer for Obtaining Text Entry and Mouse Pointing Measures from that can run quietly in the background of users' computers and measure their text entry and mouse pointing to segment text entry and mouse pointing input streams into "trials." We are the first to measure errors

  1. Reverse Genetics System for Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Kristen

    2011-04-19

    , providing a convenient animal model that can be investigated without the restrictions necessary to work with the SARS-coronavirus. A reverse genetic cDNA assembly system was developed for the betacoronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHVA59), in 2002...

  2. Acquisition and Mining of the Whole Mouse Brain Microstructure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Jae-Rock

    2010-10-12

    data acquisition and analysis framework to overcome these challenges with a focus on data from the C57BL/6 mouse brain. Since there has been no such complete microstructure data from any mammalian species, the sheer amount of data can overwhelm...

  3. Granulocytic nuclear differentiation of lamin B receptordeficient mouse EPRO cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olins, Ada L.

    Granulocytic nuclear differentiation of lamin B receptor­deficient mouse EPRO cells Monika Zwergera of the inner nuclear membrane. Re- cent studies have demonstrated that genetic deficiency of LBR during changes to the expression of nuclear envelope proteins and heterochromatin structure that result from

  4. Investigating the maintenance of the mouse definitive adrenal cortex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xin

    2013-11-29

    Cherry-11B-EGFP ES cells. In conclusion, the location and fate of the adrenocortical progenitor cells were demonstrated by the BrdU pulse-chase studies in different mouse models. An AS-mCherry-11B-EGFP BAC construct was generated, and used to study...

  5. Supporting Information Feng et al. 10.1073/pnas.1002720107

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steve

    (%)Methylationlevels(%)Methylationlevels(%) upstream transposon downstream CG CHG CHH Chlamydomonasreinhard i (LINEs) upstream transposon downstream Mus musculus upstream transposon downstream 0 15 30 45 60 75 90 0 20 40 60 80 100 0 20 40 60 80 100 0 Fig. S3. Distribution of methylation along transposons. Upstream and downstream regions are the same

  6. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Mariateresa, E-mail: mariateresa.mancuso@enea.it [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy); Leonardi, Simona [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy); Giardullo, Paola; Pasquali, Emanuela [Department of Radiation Physics, Guglielmo Marconi University, Rome (Italy); Tanori, Mirella [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy); De Stefano, Ilaria [Department of Radiation Physics, Guglielmo Marconi University, Rome (Italy); Casciati, Arianna [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy); Naus, Christian C. [Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, The Life Sciences Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna [Laboratory of Radiation Biology and Biomedicine, Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1{sup +/?}) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1{sup +/?} and Cx43{sup +/?} mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1{sup +/?} mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases.

  7. Expression of esterase-2 in developing mouse embryos and neonates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deal, Frank Hans

    1981-01-01

    locus on mouse chromosome 8 was examined in developing embryos and neonates. A genetically defined congenic strain (B6'SK-R) was developed by directed selection of the Es-2a (null) allele from SK/Cam in'breds onto a C57BL/- 6J background for use... as maternal invironments in which the gene product can be assayed. The esterase-2 gene product (ES-2) was purified by means of isoelectric foc- using and gel filtration of C57BL/6J kidney homogenates. Purified ES-2 was used to elicit antisera from New...

  8. POSTURE MATCHING AND ELASTIC REGISTRATION OF A MOUSE ATLAS TO SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY RANGE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    -imaged mouse based only on the atlas data and the measured surface topography of the iPOSTURE MATCHING AND ELASTIC REGISTRATION OF A MOUSE ATLAS TO SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY RANGE DATA A. A Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA, 2 Department of Biomedical

  9. RICE UNIVERSITY Building a 3D Atlas of the Mouse Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Tao

    RICE UNIVERSITY Building a 3D Atlas of the Mouse Brain by Tao Ju A Thesis Submitted in Partial, Texas April, 2005 #12;Building a 3D Atlas of the Mouse Brain Tao Ju Abstract Building and studying 3D representations of anatomical structures, such as the brain, plays an important role in modern biology and medical

  10. Assessment of morphometry of pulmonary acini in mouse lungs by nondestructive imaging using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Assessment of morphometry of pulmonary acini in mouse lungs by nondestructive imaging using a more complete understanding of the relationship of lung structure and function. We combined a special to separate individual acini in the mouse lung. Interior scans of the parenchyma at a resolution of 2 µm

  11. Tissue heterogeneity in the mouse lung: effects of elastase treatment Satoru Ito,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Tissue heterogeneity in the mouse lung: effects of elastase treatment Satoru Ito,1 Edward P heterogeneity in the mouse lung: effects of elastase treatment. J Appl Physiol 97: 204­212, 2004. First to characterize heterogeneity of tissue elasticity of the lung. The model includes a parallel set of pathways

  12. Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,* Lee Anne Schery,1 Robin Sharma,1,2 Alfredo, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627, USA 2 The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester indicate that the optical quality of the mouse eye assessed by measurement of its aberrations is remarkably

  13. Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

  14. Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis Ronne L. Surface2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis quantitate metastatic mouse lung tumors in a lung section using a H&E stain. Lung sections from a mouse lung of view from each slide representing a whole lung lobe with multiple lung metastases was selected

  15. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

    2012-12-21

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, ?-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

  16. Hoplopleura janzeni n. sp. (Phthiraptera: Anoplura), a new sucking louse from a Central American swimming mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durden, Lance A.; Timm, Robert M.

    2001-12-01

    Both sexes of a new species of sucking louse Hoplopleura janzeni (Phthiraptera: Hoplopleuridae) are described and illustrated from the Central American ichthyomyine swimming mouse Rheomys raptor (Rodentia: Muridae) collected ...

  17. Conditional mouse lung cancer models using adenoviral or lentiviral delivery of Cre recombinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPage, Michel J.

    The development of animal models of lung cancer is critical to our understanding and treatment of the human disease. Conditional mouse models provide new opportunities for testing novel chemopreventatives, therapeutics and ...

  18. Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain Ken Sugino1,3, Chris M among forebrain neurons and permit the construction of an objective neuronal taxonomy on the basis

  19. Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Stem Cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crocker, Alyssa

    2013-02-04

    ABSTRACT Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Stem Cells. (December 2013) Alyssa Crocker Department of Animal Science Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Michael Golding Department of Veterinary Physiology...

  20. GBR 12909 administration as a mouse model of bipolar disorder mania: mimicking quantitative assessment of manic behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Jared W.; Goey, Andrew K.; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Paulus, Martin P.; Geyer, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    INVESTIGATION GBR 12909 administration as a mouse model ofstudies, acute administration of 2.5 mg/kg amphetamine toet al. 2009). Acute administration of the DAT selective

  1. Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Lei, E-mail: yhchloech@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •RECK is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in mouse liver. •The FXR response element is located within the intron 1 of RECK gene. •FXR agonist reverses the down-regulation of RECK in the liver in mouse NASH model. -- Abstract: Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver.

  2. Laser-Assisted In Vitro Fertilization Facilitates Fertilization of Vitrified-Warmed C57BL/6 Mouse Oocytes with Fresh and Frozen-Thawed Spermatozoa, Producing Live Pups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Stephanie E.

    The utility of cryopreserved mouse gametes for reproduction of transgenic mice depends on development of assisted reproductive technologies, including vitrification of unfertilized mouse oocytes. Due to hardening of the ...

  3. Frictional lichenified dermatosis from prolonged use of a computer mouse: Case report and review of the literature of computer-related dermatoses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghasri, Pedram; Feldman, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    The patient used the computer mouse with her right hand in aon her right palm after using her computer mouse 6 hours perof the right hand of a 32-year-old computer programmer who

  4. 388 nature genetics volume 22 august 1999 A YAC-based physical map of the mouse genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boguski, Mark S.

    goals of the Human Genome Project1. Here we report the results of a project at the Whitehead Institute of approximately 92% of the mouse genome. We also report the results of a project at the MRC UK Mouse Genome Centre assembling a physical map of the human genome3. The STSs used for screening came from several sources: simple

  5. Fourier-domain holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor spheroids and mouse eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolte, David D.

    Fourier-domain holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor spheroids and mouse eye Kwan Jeong, Leilei Peng, John J. Turek, Michael R. Melloch, and David D. Nolte Fourier-domain holography (FDH) has the hologram in the Fourier plane significantly reduces background arising from reference light scattered from

  6. Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-07-04

    We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

  7. Characterization of Urinary Iron Loss in the fsn (flaky skin) Anemia Mouse Mutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kress, Robert Lee

    2014-08-31

    target to treat iron overload. The flaky–skin anemia (fsn) mouse possesses a mutation in the Ttc7 gene (tetratricopeptide repeat domain 7) and had been observed to excrete elevated iron levels in its urine. We hypothesized that the mutation in fsn...

  8. A Lentiviral RNAi Library for Human and Mouse Genes Applied to an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - able libraries of synthetic siRNAs targeting defined gene families have identified mResource A Lentiviral RNAi Library for Human and Mouse Genes Applied to an Arrayed Viral High short hairpin RNA (shRNA) libraries targeting the human and murine ge- nomes. The libraries currently

  9. Sox6 Up-Regulation by Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Promotes Survival and Maintenance of Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sox6 Up-Regulation by Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Promotes Survival and Maintenance migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has important roles in supporting the proliferation and/or survival) of the adult mouse forebrain. Retroviral overexpression of Sox6 in NSPCs increases the number of primary

  10. SkyMouse: A smart interface for astronomical on-line resources and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen-Zhou CUI; Hua-Ping SUN; Yong-Heng ZHAO; Yu LUO; Da-Zhi QI

    2007-11-27

    With the development of network and the World Wide Web (WWW), the Internet has been growing and changing dramatically. More and more on-line database systems and different kinds of services are available for astronomy research. How to help users find their way through the jungle of information services becomes an important challenge. Although astronomers have been aware of the importance of interoperability and introduced the concept of Virtual Observatory as a uniform environment for future astronomical on-line resources and services, transparent access to heterogeneous on-line information is still difficult. SkyMouse is a lightweight interface for distributed astronomical on-line resources and services, which is designed and developed by us, i.e., Chinese Virtual Observatory Project. Taking advantage of screen word-capturing technology, different kinds of information systems can be queried through simple mouse actions, and results are returned in a uniform web page. SkyMouse is an easy to use application, aiming to show basic information or to create a comprehensive overview of a specific astronomical object. In this paper current status of on-line resources and services access is reviewed; system architecture, features and functions of SkyMouse are described; challenges for intelligent interface for on-line astronomical resources and services are discussed.

  11. Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavone, Luigi Michele [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: pavone@dbbm.unina.it; Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mastellone, Vincenzo [Department of Experimental Medicine 'G. Salvatore', University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Avallone, Luigi [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

    2008-12-12

    Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT{sup Cre/+};ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

  12. THE VOMERONASAL ORGAN IS REQUIRED FOR THE MALE MOUSE MEDIAL AMYGDALA RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL-COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    , FL 32306-4295, USA Abstract--Many species use chemical signals to convey in- formation relevantTHE VOMERONASAL ORGAN IS REQUIRED FOR THE MALE MOUSE MEDIAL AMYGDALA RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL chemical signals may be detected by the vomeronasal organ, which sends projections to the accessory

  13. Distinct impacts of Eda and Edar loss of function on the mouse dentition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Cyril; Pantalacci, Sophie; Tafforeau, Paul; Headon, D; Laudet, Vincent; Viriot, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    The Eda-A1-Edar signaling pathway is involved in the development of organs with an ectodermal origin, including teeth. In mouse, mutants are known for both the ligand, Eda-A1 (Tabby), and the receptor, Edar (Downless). The ...

  14. Mouse and human phenotypes indicate a critical conserved role for ERK2 signaling in neural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mouse and human phenotypes indicate a critical conserved role for ERK2 signaling in neural crest by the Editorial Board September 5, 2008 (received for review June 2, 2008) Disrupted ERK1/2 (MAPK3/MAPK1) MAPK signaling has been as- sociated with several developmental syndromes in humans; how- ever, mutations in ERK1

  15. Erk1 and Erk2 Regulate Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Migration during Mouse Embryonic Angiogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erk1 and Erk2 Regulate Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Migration during Mouse Embryonic membrane with subsequent migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. The Ras/ Raf/MEK/ERK pathway is required for EC function during angiogenesis. Although in vitro studies implicate ERK1 and ERK2

  16. Multiplex Three-Dimensional Brain Gene Expression Mapping in a Mouse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Desmond J.

    Multiplex Three-Dimensional Brain Gene Expression Mapping in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease model of Parkinson's disease (PD) had been induced by methamphetamine. Quality-control analyses obscure (Owen et al. 2000). These diseases frequently have important genetic contributions, but it has

  17. A test for detecting long-term sensorimotor dysfunction in the mouse after focal cerebral ischemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schallert, Tim

    A test for detecting long-term sensorimotor dysfunction in the mouse after focal cerebral ischemia, therefore, developed a sensorimotor functional test (corner test) and applied this test to a model of focal after ischemia. The corner test, which is sensitive to chronic sensorimotor and postural symmetries

  18. JAP-00590-2004 Mechanics, nonlinearity, and failure strength of lung tissue in a mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    JAP-00590-2004 Mechanics, nonlinearity, and failure strength of lung tissue in a mouse model% higher in the PPE-treated group (P lung hydroxyproline content, which represents remodeling may play a significant role in all aspects of lung functional changes leading to progressive

  19. Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain% paraformaldehyde. The organ is then sliced into 1 mm sections and optically cleared, or made transparent, using FocusClear, a proprietary optical clearing agent. After optical clearing, the DiI-labeled tissue

  20. Formation of Enzymatically Active, Homotypic, and Heterotypic Tetramers of Mouse Mast Cell Tryptases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sali, Andrej

    Formation of Enzymatically Active, Homotypic, and Heterotypic Tetramers of Mouse Mast Cell an 150-kDa tetramer structure. Heparin was not required for this structural change. When incubated at 37 of this tryptase to form the enzymati- cally active tetramer was more dependent on a highly conserved Trp

  1. Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550.12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550 deficits. Lithium is used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, and it has been used to treat mood dysregulation in individuals with FrX. Lithium has also been shown to reverse learning deficits and improve

  2. Increase in Sialylation and Branching in the Mouse Serum N-glycome Correlates with Inflammation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Dublin, Ireland Abstract Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer and is often diagnosed, the described changes in the ovarian cancer mouse model are relevant to humans and serum N-glycome analysis Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer in females and the second most common gynaecological cancer

  3. Assessing various carbon dioxide flow rates to minimize distress during laboratory mouse euthanasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    Assessing various carbon dioxide flow rates to minimize distress during laboratory mouse euthanasia, University of British Columbia · Laboratory rodents are commonly euthanized by exposure to carbon dioxide (CO Carly Moody, Beverly Chua, I. Joanna Makowska, Daniel M. Weary Faculty of Land and Food Systems

  4. Novel Sequential Protocols for a ERP Based BCI Mouse M. Salvaris, C. Cinel and R. Poli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poli, Riccardo

    Novel Sequential Protocols for a ERP Based BCI Mouse M. Salvaris, C. Cinel and R. Poli Abstract of this has been focused on trying to overcome observed irregularities in ERP classification due to temporal300 event-related potential (ERP). The P300 ERP has a centro-parietal focus and typically occurs

  5. Automouse: An improvement to the mouse computerized uncertainty analysis system operational manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klee, A.J.

    1992-08-01

    Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. The Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory is responsible for planning, implementing, and managing research development, and demonstration programs to provide an authoritative, defensible engineering basis in support of the policies, programs, and regulations of the EPA with respect to drinking water, wastewater, pesticides, toxic substances, solid and hazardous wastes, and Superfund-related activities. The publication is one of the products of that research and provides a vital communication link between the researcher and the user community. The manual describes a system, called MOUSE (for Modular Oriented Uncertainty SystEm), for dealing with the computational problems of uncertainty, specifically in models that consist of a set of one or more equations. Since such models are frequently encountered in the fields of environmental science, risk analysis, economics, and engineering, the system has broad application throughout these fields. An important part of the MOUSE system is AutoMOUSE which actually writes the computer programs required for the uncertainty analysis computations. Thus, no prior programming knowledge is needed to learn or use MOUSE and, because of its transportability and compactness, the system can be run on a wide variety of personal computers available to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and/or its contractors and grantees.

  6. Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after Targeted Ablation of Hair Cells with Diphtheria Toxin Justin S. Golub,1 Ling Tong,1 Tot B. Ngyuen,1 Cliff R. Hume,1 Richard utricle by inserting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) gene into the Pou4f3 gene, which encodes

  7. Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Jeffrey A.

    Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain Ellen L May 2008 Available online xxxx Keywords: MnSOD Superoxide dismutase Resveratrol Antioxidant enzyme Brain Heart Liver Mitochondria Reactive oxygen species a b s t r a c t trans-Resveratrol (3,40 ,5

  8. Mapping of the NEP receptor tyrosine kinase gene to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Sweetser, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The mouse receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) NEP, also called Ptk-3, is widely expressed, with high levels in proliferating neuroepithelia of mouse embryos. The recently described human discoidin domain receptor (DDR) has a predicted amino acid sequence 93% identical to that of murine NEP and may be its human homologue. We have mapped the gene encoding NEP in human and mouse by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a mouse cDNA probe. The NEP/Nep gene maps to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C, respectively. This places the NEP/Nep gene at, or near, the major histocompatibility (MHC) locus-HLA in human and H2 in mouse, respectively. Based on its pattern of expression during development, NEP and Nep represent candidate genes for several MHC-linked developmental abnormalities in human and mouse. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Physical and genetic localization of the gene encoding the AP-2 transcription factor to mouse chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, G. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)] [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Gordon, M.; Siracusa, L.D. [Jefferson Cancer Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others] [Jefferson Cancer Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    1996-01-15

    Transcription factors are a major determinant of developmental fate. The chromosomal localization of the genes encoding these proteins provides important information that can link them to known genetic abnormalities. Here, we report the mapping of the mouse gene for transcription factor AP-2, a protein that has been implicated in human oncogenesis. Using FISH, we have mapped the gene encoding the transcription factor AP-2, Tcfap2, to mouse Chromosome 13A5-B1. We have also extended this analysis by placing Tcfap2 on the mouse mutations that map in the vicinity of this transcription factor. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Rapid Structural Remodeling of Thalamocortical Synapses Parallels Experience-Dependent Functional Plasticity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Jason E.

    Monocular lid closure (MC) causes a profound shift in the ocular dominance (OD) of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). Anatomical studies in both cat and mouse V1 suggest that large-scale structural rearrangements of ...

  11. Induction of chloride secretory currents across mouse ileal tissues by rotavirus enterotoxic peptide in different age mice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Virginia Waters

    2002-01-01

    ) is enterotoxic and induces a chloride efflux across neonatal mouse intestinal mucosa. Chloride ion efflux across mucosal tissue is measured as an electrical current in Ussing chambers and is the predominant electrolyte driving fluid secretion. Until recently a...

  12. The Consensus Coding Sequence (Ccds) Project: Identifying a Common Protein-Coding Gene Set for the Human and Mouse Genomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but ...

  13. Flow cytometry quantitation of dopamine receptor D2 loss as a sensitive measure of Huntington's Disease progression in mouse neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crook, Zachary R. (Zachary Ryan)

    2013-01-01

    Mouse models of Huntington's Disease (HD) are often used for testing potential therapeutic compounds. These experiments require substantial investments in time and resources, and have yet to produce any intervention that ...

  14. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  15. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Wong, C. Shun; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  16. A self-reconfiguring metamorphic nanoinjector for injection into mouse zygotes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aten, Quentin T. [Nexus Spine, LLC, Salt Lake City, Utah 84124 (United States)] [Nexus Spine, LLC, Salt Lake City, Utah 84124 (United States); Jensen, Brian D.; Howell, Larry L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States); Burnett, Sandra H. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents a surface-micromachined microelectromechanical system nanoinjector designed to inject DNA into mouse zygotes which are ?90??m in diameter. The proposed injection method requires that an electrically charged, DNA coated lance be inserted into the mouse zygote. The nanoinjector's principal design requirements are (1) it must penetrate the lance into the mouse zygote without tearing the cell membranes and (2) maintain electrical connectivity between the lance and a stationary bond pad. These requirements are satisfied through a two-phase, self-reconfiguring metamorphic mechanism. In the first motion subphase a change-point six-bar mechanism elevates the lance to ?45??m above the substrate. In the second motion subphase, a compliant folded-beam suspension allows the lance to translate in-plane at a constant height as it penetrates the cell membranes. The viability of embryos following nanoinjection is presented as a metric for quantifying how well the nanoinjector mechanism fulfills its design requirements of penetrating the zygote without causing membrane damage. Viability studies of nearly 3000 nanoinjections resulted in 71.9% of nanoinjected zygotes progressing to the two-cell stage compared to 79.6% of untreated embryos.

  17. The effect of interferon-{beta} on mouse neural progenitor cell survival and differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, Marek [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)] [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Knight, Julia [Neuroscience Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)] [Neuroscience Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Tobita, Mari; Soltys, John; Panitch, Hillel [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)] [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Mao-Draayer, Yang, E-mail: yang.mao-draayer@vtmednet.org [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)] [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)

    2009-10-16

    Interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) is a mainstay therapy for relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the direct effects of IFN-{beta} on the central nervous system (CNS) are not well understood. To determine whether IFN-{beta} has direct neuroprotective effects on CNS cells, we treated adult mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vitro with IFN-{beta} and examined the effects on proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. We found that mouse NPCs express high levels of IFN{alpha}/{beta} receptor (IFNAR). In response to IFN-{beta} treatment, no effect was observed on differentiation or proliferation. However, IFN-{beta} treated mouse NPCs demonstrated decreased apoptosis upon growth factor withdrawal. Pathway-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays demonstrated that IFN-{beta} treatment upregulated the STAT 1 and 2 signaling pathway, as well as GFRA2, NOD1, Caspases 1 and 12, and TNFSF10. These results suggest that IFN-{beta} can directly affect NPC survival, possibly playing a neuroprotective role in the CNS by modulating neurotrophic factors.

  18. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  19. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  20. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhoorn, Sander [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Jaarsma, Dick [Erasmus Univ. Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Neuroscience.; Vermeij, Wilbert P. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Tresini, Maria [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Weymaere, Michael [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Menoni, Hervé [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Brandt, Renata M. C. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; de Waard, Monique C. [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Intensive Care.; Botter, Sander M. [Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Sarker, Altaf H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Division.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Cooper, Priscilla K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Division.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics and Dept. of Vascular Surgery.; Niedernhofer, Laura J. [The Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  1. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; et al

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays manymore »progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.« less

  2. Pointright: a system to redirect mouse and keyboard control among multiple machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johanson, Bradley E. (Palo Alto, CA); Winograd, Terry A. (Stanford, CA); Hutchins, Gregory M. (Mountain View, CA)

    2008-09-30

    The present invention provides a software system, PointRight, that allows for smooth and effortless control of pointing and input devices among multiple displays. With PointRight, a single free-floating mouse and keyboard can be used to control multiple screens. When the cursor reaches the edge of a screen it seamlessly moves to the adjacent screen and keyboard control is simultaneously redirected to the appropriate machine. Laptops may also redirect their keyboard and pointing device, and multiple pointers are supported simultaneously. The system automatically reconfigures itself as displays go on, go off, or change the machine they display.

  3. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Kejun; Chen, Yaoming; Dai, Zongming; Bi, Yuan; Cai, Tongjian [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Hou, Lichao [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Chai, Yubo; Song, Qinghe; Chen, Sumin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Luo, Wenjing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Chen, Jingyuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of mouse cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently initiates an inflammatory response, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to characterize cDNA sequences of a new mouse LPS-responsive gene, and to evaluate the effects of MLrg. Full-length cDNAs were obtained from LPS-treated NIH3T3 cells. We report that the MLrg gene produces two alternative splice products (GenBank Accession Nos. (DQ316984) and (DQ320011)), respectively, encoding MLrgW and MLrgS polypeptides. Both proteins contain zinc finger and leucine zipper domains and are thus potential regulators of transcription. Expression of MLrgW and MLrgS were robustly upregulated following LPS treatment, and the proteins were localized predominantly in the nuclear membrane and cytoplasm. In stable transfectants over-expressing MLrgW the proportion of cells in G1 phase was significantly reduced, while in cells over-expressing MLrgS the proportion of cells in G2 was significantly increased; both proteins are thus potential regulators of cell cycle progression. Upregulation of MLrgW and MLrgS may be an important component of the LPS inflammatory pathway and of the host response to infection with GNB.

  4. Arsenic- and cadmium-induced toxicogenomic response in mouse embryos undergoing neurulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Joshua F.; Yu, Xiaozhong; Moreira, Estefania G.; Hong, Sungwoo; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2011-01-15

    Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are well-characterized teratogens in animal models inducing embryotoxicity and neural tube defects (NTDs) when exposed during neurulation. Toxicological research is needed to resolve the specific biological processes and associated molecular pathways underlying metal-induced toxicity during this timeframe in gestational development. In this study, we investigated the dose-dependent effects of As and Cd on gene expression in C57BL/6J mouse embryos exposed in utero during neurulation (GD8) to identify significantly altered genes and corresponding biological processes associated with embryotoxicity. We quantitatively examined the toxicogenomic dose-response relationship at the gene level. Our results suggest that As and Cd induce dose-dependent gene expression alterations representing shared (cell cycle, response to UV, glutathione metabolism, RNA processing) and unique (alcohol/sugar metabolism) biological processes, which serve as robust indicators of metal-induced developmental toxicity and indicate underlying embryotoxic effects. Our observations also correlate well with previously identified impacts of As and Cd on specific genes associated with metal-induced toxicity (Cdkn1a, Mt1). In summary, we have identified in a quantitative manner As and Cd induced dose-dependent effects on gene expression in mouse embryos during a peak window of sensitivity to embryotoxicity and NTDs in the sensitive C57BL/6J strain.

  5. Natural history and karyology of the Yucatán vesper mouse, Otonyctomys hatti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genoways, Hugh H.; Timm, Robert M.; Engstrom, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    Seventeen specimens of the rare Yucatán vesper mouse, Otonyctomys hatti, are now known from Belize, Guatemala, and the Mexican states of Campeche, Quintana Roo, and Yucatán. We herein report a second specimen of O. hatti, from Belize, extending the known geographic range of the species 95 km to the southeast in the country. This is the first location at which O. hatti has been taken sympatrically with the Central American vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti. We also report data on three additional specimens of O. hatti from Campeche. Nyctomys and Otonyctomys share similar habits and habitat requirements, and might compete where they overlap. However, the distribution of O. hatti corresponds closely to that of other Yucatán endemics, and the distinct distributions of the two genera probably reflects biogeographic history and different habitat requirements, rather than result from direct competition. The karyotype of O. hatti is 2n = 50, FN = 58. Although superficially similar, it differs in important respects with the karyotypes reported for N. sumichrasti....Resumen--Diescisiete especímenes del ratón Otonyctomys hatti, especie rara de Yucatán, son ahora conocidos de Belice, Guatemala y los Estados de Campeche, Quintana Roo y Yucatán. Aquí, informamos de un segundo especímen de O. hatti de Belice...

  6. n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Alter Mouse CD4+ T Cell Activation by Modifying the Lipid Bilayer Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Tim Yu-Tien

    2014-12-05

    phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2], which modulates actin remodeling, is perturbed by n-3 PUFA. Utilizing the transgenic Fat-1 mouse model that synthesizes n-3 PUFA de novo and enriches the plasma membrane with n-3 PUFA, and wild type (WT) mice fed...

  7. Impedance in Isolated Mouse Lungs for the Determination of Site of Action of Vasoactive Agents and Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    Impedance in Isolated Mouse Lungs for the Determination of Site of Action of Vasoactive Agents the review of this article. Abstract--Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension is a disease of the lung vasculature that is usually quantified by pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). However, a more complete description of lung

  8. Assessment of Cerebellar and Hippocampal Morphology and Biochemical Parameters in the Compound Heterozygous, Tottering/leaner Mouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, Emily M.

    2010-07-14

    Due to two different mutations in the gene that encodes the a1A subunit of voltage-activated CaV 2.1 calcium ion channels, the compound heterozygous tottering/leaner (tg/tgla) mouse exhibits numerous neurological deficits. Human disorders that arise...

  9. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is required for developmental closure of the ductus venosus in the neonatal mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradfield, Christopher A.

    venosus in the neonatal mouse Authors: Garet P. Lahvis, Robert W. Pyzalski, Edward Glover, Henry C. Pitot: computerized tomography MR: magnetic resonance VEGF: vascular endothelial growth factor DA: ductus arteriosus of an embryonic structure and is not acquired after birth. We observed that the shunt is found in late stage wild-type

  10. Automatic analysis of flow cytometric DNA histograms from irradiated mouse male germ cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampariello, F.; Mauro, F.; Uccelli, R.; Spano, M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic procedure for recovering the DNA content distribution of mouse irradiated testis cells from flow cytometric histograms is presented. First, a suitable mathematical model is developed, to represent the pattern of DNA content and fluorescence distribution in the sample. Then a parameter estimation procedure, based on the maximum likelihood approach, is constructed by means of an optimization technique. This procedure has been applied to a set of DNA histograms relative to different doses of 0.4-MeV neutrons and to different time intervals after irradiation. In each case, a good agreement between the measured histograms and the corresponding fits has been obtained. The results indicate that the proposed method for the quantitative analysis of germ cell DNA histograms can be usefully applied to the study of the cytotoxic and mutagenic action of agents of toxicological interest such as ionizing radiations.18 references.

  11. A simple, low-cost, data logging pendulum built from a computer mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gintautas, Vadas; Hubler, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Lessons and homework problems involving a pendulum are often a big part of introductory physics classes and laboratory courses from high school to undergraduate levels. Although laboratory equipment for pendulum experiments is commercially available, it is often expensive and may not be affordable for teachers on fixed budgets, particularly in developing countries. We present a low-cost, easy-to-build rotary sensor pendulum using the existing hardware in a ball-type computer mouse. We demonstrate how this apparatus may be used to measure both the frequency and coefficient of damping of a simple physical pendulum. This easily constructed laboratory equipment makes it possible for all students to have hands-on experience with one of the most important simple physical systems.

  12. Visualization of nitric oxide production in the mouse main olfactory bulb by a cell-trappable copper(II) fluorescent probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, Lindsey E.

    We report the visualization of NO production using fluorescence in tissue slices of the mouse main olfactory bulb. This discovery was possible through the use of a novel, cell-trappable probe for intracellular nitric oxide ...

  13. Human Neural Stem Cells Differentiate and Promote Locomotor Recovery in an Early Chronic Spinal coRd Injury NOD-scid Mouse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Desiree L.; Uchida, Nobuko; Hamers, Frank T.; Cummings, Brian J.; Anderson, Aileen J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Spinal coRd Injury NOD-scid Mouse Model Desire´e L.in C57BL/6, BUB/ BnJ, and NOD-SCID mice after contusionresistant control strain for NOD mice. Diabetes 41: 60.

  14. A Novel Role of the WNT-Dishevelled-GSK3? Signaling Cascade in the Mouse Nucleus Accumbens in a Social Defeat Model of Depression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Matthew B.

    Based on earlier gene expression and chromatin array data, we identified the protein, dishevelled (DVL)-2, as being regulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key brain reward region, in the mouse social defeat model of ...

  15. The genomic and genetic basis of mammalian sexual reproduction : sequence of the mouse Y chromosome, and a gene regulatory program for meiotic prophase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, Ying Qi Shirleen

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sexual reproduction requires sexual determination, sexual differentiation, and the production of haploid gametes. In this thesis, I examined the genomic evolution of the mouse Y chromosome, which instructs sexual ...

  16. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links to Neurodegenerative Colette A. Sacksteder,, Wei-Jun Qian,,| Tatyana V. Knyushko, Haixing Wang,| Mark H. Chin, Goran Lacan,@

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Desmond J.

    proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or otherEndogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links to Neurodegenerative Disease Colette A Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, and Department of Human Genetics and Department of Molecular

  17. Chromosomal mapping of the human and mouse homologues of two new members of the AP-2 family of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, J.A.; Sheer, D. [ICRF, London (United Kingdom)] [ICRF, London (United Kingdom); Bosher, J.M. [Hammersmith Hospital, Longon (United Kingdom)] [and others] [Hammersmith Hospital, Longon (United Kingdom); and others

    1996-07-01

    The AP-2 transcription factor has been shown to play an important role in the development of tissues of ectodermal origin and has also been implicated in mammary oncogenesis. It has recently been found that AP-2 is encoded by a family of related genes, AP-2{alpha}, AP-2{beta}, and AP-2{gamma}. As a further step in understanding the role of each of these genes has in development, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the chromosomal locations of the mouse and human homologues of the newly isolated AP-2{beta} and AP-2{gamma} genes. Tcfap2b and Tcfap2c map to mouse chromosomes 1A2-4 and 2H3-4, respectively, while TFAP2B and TFAP2C map to human chromosomes 6p12 and 20q13.2, the later being a region that is frequently amplified in breast carcinoma. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Cell-specific oxidative stress and cytotoxicity after wildfire coarse particulate matter instillation into mouse lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Keisha M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Last, Jerold A.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10-2.5}) from wildfire smoke is more toxic to lung macrophages on an equal dose (by mass) basis than coarse PM isolated from normal ambient air, as evidenced by decreased numbers of macrophages in lung lavage fluid 6 and 24 hours after PM instillation into mouse lungs in vivo and by cytotoxicity to a macrophage cell line observed directly in vitro. We hypothesized that pulmonary macrophages from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM would undergo more cytotoxicity than macrophages from controls, and that there would be an increase in oxidative stress in their lungs. Cytotoxicity was quantified as decreased viable macrophages and increased percentages of dead macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM. At 1 hour after PM instillation, we observed both decreased numbers of viable macrophages and increased dead macrophage percentages as compared to controls. An increase in free isoprostanes, an indicator of oxidative stress, from control values of 28.1 ± 3.2 pg/mL to 83.9 ± 12.2 pg/mL was observed a half-hour after PM instillation. By 1 hour after PM instillation, isoprostane values had returned to 30.4 ± 7.6 pg/mL, not significantly different from control concentrations. Lung sections from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM showed rapid Clara cell responses, with decreased intracellular staining for the Clara cell secretory protein CCSP 1 hour after wildfire PM instillation. In conclusion, very rapid cytotoxicity occurs in pulmonary macrophages and oxidative stress responses are seen 0.5–1 hour after wildfire coarse PM instillation. These results define early cellular and biochemical events occurring in vivo and support the hypothesis that oxidative stress-mediated macrophage toxicity plays a key role in the initial response of the mouse lung to wildfire PM exposure. -- Highlights: ? We studied very early events (0.5–1 hour) after giving wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} to mice. ? Wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} rapidly kills lung macrophages in mice. ? Wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} rapidly elicits oxidative stress in mice. ? Wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} rapidly elicits Clara cell CCSP secretion in mice. ? Wildfire PM{sub 10-2.5} rapidly elicits TNF-? secretion into BALF in mice.

  19. PR-Set7 is degraded in a conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model of lung cancer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Zhidong; Mao, Jian -Hua; Hsieh, David; Au, Alfred; Jablons, David M.; Li, Hui; You, Lian

    2015-06-01

    Background and objective. Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential to ensure normal organismal development and to prevent diseases such as cancer. PR-Set7 (also known as Set8) is a cell cycle regulated enzyme that catalyses monomethylation of histone 4 at Lys20 (H4K20me1) to promote chromosome condensation and prevent DNA damage. Recent studies show that CRL4CDT2-mediated ubiquitylation of PR-Set7 leads to its degradation during S phase and after DNA damage. This might occur to ensure appropriate changes in chromosome structure during the cell cycle or to preserve genome integrity after DNA damage. Methods. We developed a new model of lung tumor developmentmore »in mice harboring a conditionally expressed allele of Cul4A. We have therefore used a mouse model to demonstrate for the first time that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo. With this model, staining of PR-Set7 in the preneoplastic and tumor lesions in AdenoCre-induced mouse lungs was performed. Meanwhile we identified higher protein level changes of ?-tubulin and pericentrin by IHC. Results. The level of PR-Set7 down-regulated in the preneoplastic and adenocarcinomous lesions following over-expression of Cul4A. We also identified higher levels of the proteins pericentrin and ?-tubulin in Cul4A mouse lungs induced by AdenoCre. Conclusion. PR-Set7 is a direct target of Cul4A for degradation and involved in the formation of lung tumors in the conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model.« less

  20. Activation of a c-K-ras oncogene by somatic mutation in mouse lymphomas induced by gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrero, I.; Villasante, A.; Corces, V.; Pellicer, A.

    1984-09-14

    Mouse tumors induced by gamma radiation are a useful model system for oncogenesis. DNA from such tumors contains an activated K-ras oncogene that can transform NIH 3T3 cells. This report describes the cloning of a fragment of the mouse K-ras oncogene containing the first exon from both a transformant in rat-2 cells and the brain of the same mouse that developed the tumor. Hybrid constructs containing one of the two pieces were made and only the plasmid including the first exon from the transformant gave rise to foci in NIH 3T3 cells. There was only a single base difference (G----A) in the exonic sequence, which changed glycine to aspartic acid in the transformant. By use of a synthetic oligonucleotide the presence of the mutation was demonstrated in the original tumor, ruling out modifications during DNA-mediated gene transfer and indicating that the alteration was present in the thymic lymphoma but absent from other nonmalignant tissue. The results are compatible with gamma radiation being a source of point mutations.

  1. Studies on glycoproteins produced by wild type and wheat germ agglutinin-resistant B16 mouse melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinnaduwage, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two variants of B16 mouse melanoma cells have been selected in serum-free medium for their resistance to toxic levels of wheat germ agglutinin isolation 1 (WGA). Chromosome analysis and characteristic melanin production showed that the variants are derived from the parent mouse melanoma cell lines. However, the two variants were less tumorigenic in mice compared to the parent B16 mouse melanoma cells. The variants showed a marked decrease in cell agglutination with WGA. Cell agglutination with recin and peanut lectin was not different between the three cell lines, but the two variants showed a slight increase in agglutination with concanavalin A. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin to the two variant cells was reduced compared to that of the parent cell. Glycoproteins secreted or shed by the three lines were isolated after growth in serum-free medium in the presence of (/sup 3/He)glucosamine and bovine serum albumin (1%). These metabolically labeled products were fractionated on the basis of their interaction with WGA-Sepharose (2 mg/ml). The WGA-Sepharose affinity chromatographic data suggested a decrease in WGA-binding glycoprotein(s) secreted to the medium by the two variants. The WGA-bound glycoproteins from the two variants upon SDS-PAGE revealed three bands of approximate molecular weights, 92,000, 56,000, and 42,000, none of which were present in the parent cell line (50,000 molecular weight).

  2. Chromosomal mosaicism in mouse two-cell embryos after paternal exposure to acrylamide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Lowe, Xiu; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2008-10-14

    Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos is a common cause ofspontaneous abortions, however, our knowledge of its etiology is limited. We used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) painting to investigate whether paternally-transmitted chromosomal aberrations result in mosaicism in mouse 2-cell embryos. Paternal exposure to acrylamide, an important industrial chemical also found in tobacco smoke and generated during the cooking process of starchy foods, produced significant increases in chromosomally defective 2-cell embryos, however, the effects were transient primarily affecting the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. Comparisons with our previous study of zygotes demonstrated similar frequencies of chromosomally abnormal zygotes and 2-cell embryos suggesting that there was no apparent selection against numerical or structural chromosomal aberrations. However, the majority of affected 2-cell embryos were mosaics showing different chromosomal abnormalities in the two blastomeric metaphases. Analyses of chromosomal aberrations in zygotes and 2-cell embryos showed a tendency for loss of acentric fragments during the first mitotic division ofembryogenesis, while both dicentrics and translocations apparently underwent propersegregation. These results suggest that embryonic development can proceed up to the end of the second cell cycle of development in the presence of abnormal paternal chromosomes and that even dicentrics can persist through cell division. The high incidence of chromosomally mosaic 2-cell embryos suggests that the first mitotic division of embryogenesis is prone to missegregation errors and that paternally-transmitted chromosomal abnromalities increase the risk of missegregation leading to embryonic mosaicism.

  3. Evolution of Genes and Gene Networks in Filamentous Fungi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwald, Charles Joaquin

    2011-10-21

    _ODC Epichloe festucae EF015404 EF_LolD Epichloe festucae EF012267 FG_ODC Fusarium graminearum EAA75548 HS_ODC Homo sapiens P11926 LD_ODC Leishmania donovani P27116 LE_ODC Lycopersicon esculentum O22616 MM_ODC Mus musculus P00860 NC_LolD Neotyphodium... laevis P27120 EN_OAHsh Emericella nidulans P50125 EF_LolC Epichlo? festucae EF012267 EF_pOAHsh Epichlo? festucae EF015401 FG_OAHsh Fusarium graminearum EAA67392 KL_MET17 Kluyveromyces lactis Q92441 NC_pOAHsh Neotyphodium coenophialum EF015402 NP...

  4. Requirement of B-Raf, C-Raf, and A-Raf for the growth and survival of mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Wenjing; Hao, Baixia; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yingying; Yue, Jianbo, E-mail: jbyue@me.com

    2013-11-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) have been implicated to be dispensable for self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK signaling and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) not only allows mouse ES cells to self-renew independent of extracellular stimuli but also enables more efficient derivation of naïve ES cells from mouse and rat strains. Interestingly, some ERKs stay active in mouse ES cells which are maintained in regular medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). Yet, the upstream signaling for ERK activation and their roles in mouse ES cells, other than promoting or priming differentiation, have not been determined. Here we found that mouse ES cells express three forms of Raf kinases, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. Knocking-down each single Raf member failed to affect the sustained ERK activity, neither did A-Raf and B-Raf double knockdown or B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown change it in ES cells. Interestingly, B-Raf and C-Raf double knockdown, not A-Raf and B-Raf knockdown, inhibited the maximal ERK activation induced by LIF, concomitant with the slower growth of ES cells. On the other hand, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf triple knockdown markedly inhibited both the maximal and sustained ERK activity in ES cells. Moreover, Raf triple knockdown, similar to the treatment of U-0126, an MEK inhibitor, significantly inhibited the survival and proliferation of ES cells, thereby compromising the colony propagation of mouse ES cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that all three Raf members are required for ERK activation in mouse ES cells and are involved in growth and survival of mouse ES cells. - Highlights: ?Mouse ES (mES) cells express all three Raf members, A-Raf, B-Raf, and C-Raf. ?Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) temporally activates ERKs in mES cells. ?B-Raf and C-Raf are required for LIF-induced maximal ERKs activity in mES cells. ?All Raf members are required for LIF-induced sustained ERK activity in mES cells. ?All Raf members are required the survival and proliferation of mES cells.

  5. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine mechanisms involve inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} influx, and IL-13 and eotaxin secretion. • No significant toxicity was observed in mice orally treated with curine for 7 days. • Curine has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs.

  6. Methoxychlor reduces estradiol levels by altering steroidogenesis and metabolism in mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S., E-mail: mbasava2@illinois.edu; Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@illinois.edu; Hernandez-Ochoa, Isabel, E-mail: mihernandez@cinvestav.mx; Paulose, Tessie, E-mail: tessie@illinois.edu; Leslie, Traci C., E-mail: tleslie2@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2011-06-15

    The organochlorine pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is a known endocrine disruptor that affects adult rodent females by causing reduced fertility, persistent estrus, and ovarian atrophy. Since MXC is also known to target antral follicles, the major producer of sex steroids in the ovary, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that MXC decreases estradiol (E{sub 2}) levels by altering steroidogenic and metabolic enzymes in the antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mouse ovaries and cultured with either dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or MXC. Follicle growth was measured every 24 h for 96 h. In addition, sex steroid hormone levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes as well as the E{sub 2} metabolic enzyme Cyp1b1 were measured using qPCR. The results indicate that MXC decreased E{sub 2}, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone (P{sub 4}) levels compared to DMSO. In addition, MXC decreased expression of aromatase (Cyp19a1), 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd17b1), 17{alpha}-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (Cyp17a1), 3{beta} hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd3b1), cholesterol side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1), steroid acute regulatory protein (Star), and increased expression of Cyp1b1 enzyme levels. Thus, these data suggest that MXC decreases steroidogenic enzyme levels, increases metabolic enzyme expression and this in turn leads to decreased sex steroid hormone levels. - Highlights: > MXC inhibits steroidogenesis > MXC inhibits steroidogenic enzymes > MXC induces metabolic enzymes

  7. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein ? (C/EBP?) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBP? and PPAR?. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBP? and C/EBP? was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  8. Page i MUS/AFMSU Collective Bargaining Agreement Non-Tenure Track Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    -DISCRIMINATION ............................................................................... 3 2.13 NO STRIKE - NO LOCKOUT

  9. of glucose on insulin responsiveness in mus-cle and on insulin secretion from pancreas are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    and gluconeogenesis (6). CRTC2 enhances the transcription of genes encoding proteins critical to gluconeogenesis

  10. MUS420/EE367A Lecture 7B Digital Waveguide Modeling of Bowed Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    = Friction Curve × Differential Velocity Reaction Force = String Wave Impedance × Velocity Change · Nominally StringBow Bow Velocity (Primary Control) Bow Force Bow Position BridgeString-1 Nut or Finger Lowpass Body into two sections · Bow junction = nonlinear two-port · Primary control variable = bow velocity velocity

  11. GEORGE, J. C. 1962. A histophysiological study ofthe red and white mus-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . MidI. Nat. 68:487-494. GORDON, M. S. 1968. Oxygen consumption of red and white muscles from tuna.). Compo Biochem. Physiol. 49B:367-373. JOHNSTON, I. A., W. DAVISON, AND G. GOLDSPINK. 1977. Energy that is common in southern California 1965; StephensetaI.1974). These authors and Helly' have suggested

  12. Pharmacological and rAAV Gene Therapy Rescue of Visual Functions in a Blind Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batten, Matthew L.; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Tu, Daniel C.; Doan, Thuy; Zhu, Li; Pang, Jijing; Glushakova, Lyudmila; Moise, Alexander R.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Hauswirth, William W.; Rieke, Fred; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2005-11-01

    [20]. Whole mouse livers were removed from Lrat?/? mice after eye removal during the above experiments. Livers were weighed and then frozen in liquid N2. Frozen livers were transferred to a 15-ml glass centrifuge tube (Corex #8441 [Corning Life... of homogenate was transferred to an 8-ml glass tube on ice, and 1 ml of ice-cold ethanol and 5 ll of 5 M NaOH were added and vortexed. Finally, 4 ml of ice- cold hexane was added, and the mixture was vortexed and centrifuged for 5 min using a Beckman J2-HS...

  13. Cell Detection in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscopy Images of Nissl-stained Mouse and Rat Brain Samples Using Random Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lal Das, Shashwat

    2014-11-26

    of images, use heuristics that are time consuming to develop, or do not generalize well to three dimensional data. In this thesis, I propose two methods based on random forests for detecting neuron bodies in the rat and mouse brain KESM data. The proposed...

  14. 4-D Micro-CT of the Mouse Heart Cristian T. Badea, Boma Fubara, Laurence W. Hedlund, and G. Allan Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the origin, progression, and treatment of the disease--the leading cause of death in the United States [1 high photon fluence rate and integrated motion control. Materials and Methods: Simul- taneous cardiac] and a major cause of death worldwide [2]. The mouse is a commonly studied animal for such research because

  15. DownloadedBy:[informainternalusers]At:09:176November2007 Changes in expression of P2X7 receptors in NOD mouse pancreas during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    in NOD mouse pancreas during the development of diabetes ROBSON COUTINHO-SILVA1,2 , TIM ROBSON1 , PHILIP This study examined the expression of P2X7 receptors in pancreatic islets of the non-obese diabetic (NOD examined P2X7 receptor expression in normal and diabetic spleens using flow cytometry. In non-diabetic NOD

  16. The Teratogenic Sensitivity to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Is Modified by a Locus on Mouse Chromosome 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradfield, Christopher A.

    The Teratogenic Sensitivity to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin Is Modified by a Locus on Mouse- phrosis in developing mice exposed to the pollutant 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin). Administration of 64 g/kg dioxin to C57BL/6J (B6) dams at embryonic day 9 (E9) led to palatal clefting

  17. The crystal structure of a partial mouse Notch-1 ankyrin domain: Repeats 4 through 7 preserve an ankyrin fold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubman, Olga Y.; Kopan, Raphael; Waksman, Gabriel; Korolev, Sergey (Birbeck); (St. Louis-MED); (WU-MED)

    2010-07-20

    Folding and stability of proteins containing ankyrin repeats (ARs) is of great interest because they mediate numerous protein-protein interactions involved in a wide range of regulatory cellular processes. Notch, an ankyrin domain containing protein, signals by converting a transcriptional repression complex into an activation complex. The Notch ANK domain is essential for Notch function and contains seven ARs. Here, we present the 2.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of ARs 4-7 from mouse Notch 1 (m1ANK). These C-terminal repeats were resistant to degradation during crystallization, and their secondary and tertiary structures are maintained in the absence of repeats 1-3. The crystallized fragment adopts a typical ankyrin fold including the poorly conserved seventh AR, as seen in the Drosophila Notch ANK domain (dANK). The structural preservation and stability of the C-terminal repeats shed a new light onto the mechanism of hetero-oligomeric assembly during Notch-mediated transcriptional activation.

  18. Suppression of somatic expansion delays the onset of pathophysiology in a mouse model of Huntington’s Disease

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Budworth, Helen; Harris, Faye R.; Williams, Paul; Lee, Do Yup; Holt, Amy; Pahnke, Jens; Szczesny, Bartosz; Acevedo-Torres, Karina; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; McMurray, Cynthia T.; et al

    2015-08-06

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is caused by inheritance of a single disease-length allele harboring an expanded CAG repeat, which continues to expand in somatic tissues with age. The inherited disease allele expresses a toxic protein, and whether further somatic expansion adds to toxicity is unknown. We have created an HD mouse model that resolves the effects of the inherited and somatic expansions. We show here that suppressing somatic expansion substantially delays the onset of disease in littermates that inherit the same disease-length allele. Furthermore, a pharmacological inhibitor, XJB-5-131, inhibits the lengthening of the repeat tracks, and correlates with rescue of motormore »decline in these animals. The results provide evidence that pharmacological approaches to offset disease progression are possible.« less

  19. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerecke, Donald R. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), a Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: gerecke@eohsi.rutgers.edu; Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Tong Weida [US FDA, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AK (United States); Androulakis, Ioannis P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Georgopoulos, Panos G. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

  20. Chondroregulatory action of prolactin on proliferation and differentiation of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells in 3-dimensional micromass cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)] [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand) [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol, E-mail: naratt@narattsys.com [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand) [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor mRNAs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PRL concentration (10 ng/mL) increased chondrocyte viability and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher PRL concentrations ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL) decreased viability and increased apoptosis. -- Abstract: A recent investigation in lactating rats has provided evidence that the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) increases endochondral bone growth and bone elongation, presumably by accelerating apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and/or subsequent chondrogenic matrix mineralization. Herein, we demonstrated the direct chondroregulatory action of PRL on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in 3-dimensional micromass culture of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line. The results showed that ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor (PRLR) transcripts, and responded typically to PRL by downregulating PRLR expression. Exposure to a low PRL concentration of 10 ng/mL, comparable to the normal levels in male and non-pregnant female rats, increased chondrocyte viability, differentiation, proteoglycan accumulation, and mRNA expression of several chondrogenic differentiation markers, such as Sox9, ALP and Hspg2. In contrast, high PRL concentrations of Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL, comparable to the levels in pregnancy or lactation, decreased chondrocyte viability by inducing apoptosis, with no effect on chondrogenic marker expression. It could be concluded that chondrocytes directly but differentially responded to non-pregnant and pregnant/lactating levels of PRL, thus suggesting the stimulatory effect of PRL on chondrogenesis in young growing individuals, and supporting the hypothesis of hypertrophic chondrocyte apoptosis in the growth plate of lactating rats.

  1. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and drug-induced toxicity in a panel of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Claudia V.; Oliveira, Paulo J. [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal)] [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal); Will, Yvonne [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States); Nadanaciva, Sashi, E-mail: sashi.nadanaciva@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been proposed to be involved in idiosyncratic drug reactions. However, current in vitro and in vivo models lack the genetic diversity seen in the human population. Our hypothesis is that different cell strains with distinct mtDNA SNPs may have different mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles and may therefore vary in their response to drug-induced toxicity. Therefore, we used an in vitro system composed of four strains of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with mtDNA polymorphisms. We sequenced mtDNA from embryonic fibroblasts isolated from four mouse strains, C57BL/6J, MOLF/EiJ, CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ, with the latter two being sequenced for the first time. The bioenergetic profile of the four strains of MEFs was investigated at both passages 3 and 10. Our results showed that there were clear differences among the four strains of MEFs at both passages, with CZECHII/EiJ having a lower mitochondrial robustness when compared to C57BL/6J, followed by MOLF/EiJ and PERA/EiJ. Seven drugs known to impair mitochondrial function were tested for their effect on the ATP content of the four strains of MEFs in both glucose- and galactose-containing media. Our results showed that there were strain-dependent differences in the response to some of the drugs. We propose that this model is a useful starting point to study compounds that may cause mitochondrial off-target toxicity in early stages of drug development, thus decreasing the number of experimental animals used. -- Highlights: ? mtDNA SNPs may be linked to individual predisposition to drug-induced toxicity. ? CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ mtDNA was sequenced for the first time in this study. ? Strain-dependent mitochondrial capacity differences were measured. ? Strain-dependent differences in response to mitochondrial toxicants were observed.

  2. Dioxin exposure reduces the steroidogenic capacity of mouse antral follicles mainly at the level of HSD17B1 without altering atresia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karman, Bethany N., E-mail: bklement@illinois.edu; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S., E-mail: mbshivapur@gmail.com; Hannon, Patrick, E-mail: phannon2@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2012-10-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent ovarian toxicant. Previously, we demonstrated that in vitro TCDD (1 nM) exposure decreases production/secretion of the sex steroid hormones progesterone (P4), androstenedione (A4), testosterone (T), and 17?-estradiol (E2) in mouse antral follicles. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which TCDD inhibits steroidogenesis. Specifically, we examined the effects of TCDD on the steroidogenic enzymes, atresia, and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) protein. TCDD exposure for 48 h increased levels of A4, without changing HSD3B1 protein, HSD17B1 protein, estrone (E1), T or E2 levels. Further, TCDD did not alter atresia ratings compared to vehicle at 48 h. TCDD, however, did down regulate the AHR protein at 48 h. TCDD exposure for 96 h decreased transcript levels for Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1, Hsd17b1, and Cyp19a1, but increased Hsd3b1 transcript. TCDD exposure particularly lowered both Hsd17b1 transcript and HSD17B1 protein. However, TCDD exposure did not affect levels of E1 in the media nor atresia ratings at 96 h. TCDD, however, decreased levels of the proapoptotic factor Bax. Collectively, these data suggest that TCDD exposure causes a major block in the steroidogenic enzyme conversion of A4 to T and E1 to E2 and that it regulates apoptotic pathways, favoring survival over death in antral follicles. Finally, the down?regulation of the AHR protein in TCDD exposed follicles persisted at 96 h, indicating that the activation and proteasomal degradation of this receptor likely plays a central role in the impaired steroidogenic capacity and altered apoptotic pathway of exposed antral follicles. -- Highlights: ? TCDD disrupts steroidogenic enzymes in mouse antral follicles. ? TCDD particularly affects the HSD17B1 enzyme in mouse antral follicles. ? TCDD does not affect atresia ratings in mouse antral follicles. ? TCDD decreases levels of the proapoptitic factor Bax in mouse antral follicles. ? TCDD down regulates the AHR protein in mouse antral follicles.

  3. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boulware, Stephen [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Vasquez, Karen M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (?-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ? 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ? This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ? 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ? This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

  4. Glomerular-specific imprinting of the mouse Gs{alpha} gene: How does this relate to hormone resistance in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, C.M.; Dutton, E.R.; Seymour, A.

    1996-09-01

    The gene for alpha-stimulating guanine-nucleotide binding polypeptide, Gnas, has been considered as a candidate for the imprinting effects ascribed to distal mouse Chromosome (Chr) 2. Its human homologue (GNAS1) appears, from clinical and biochemical studies of patients with Albright hereditary ostodystrophy, to be paternally imprinted. GNAS1 maps to 20q13, a region that shows linkage conservation with distal mouse Chr 2. We have mapped Gnas within the imprinting region on distal Chr 2 by linkage analysis. To establish if Gnas is imprinted, we have looked for expression differences in tissues taken from mice carrying maternal duplication/paternal deficiency for distal Chr 2 (MatDp2) and its reciprocal (PatDp2). RNA in situ hybridization revealed high levels of Gnas mRNA in glomeruli of PatDp2 embryos at late gestation and lower levels in glomeruli of MatDp2 embryos. These results strongly suggest that Gnas is maternally imprinted and suggest that the mouse gene may be imprinted in a manner opposite the predicted in human. 42 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonalmore »Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.« less

  6. Metabolite Signatures in Hydrophilic Extracts of Mouse Lungs Exposed to Cigarette Smoke Revealed By 1H NMR Metabolomics Investigation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Xuan; Feng, Ju; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.; Liu, Maili; Hu, Mary Y.

    2015-05-12

    Herein, 1H-NMR metabolomics are carried out to evaluate the changes of metabolites in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. It is found that the concentrations of adenosine derivatives (i.e. ATP, ADP and AMP), inosine and uridine are significantly fluctuated in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with those of controls regardless the mouse is obese or regular weight. The decreased ATP, ADP, AMP and elevated inosine predict that the deaminases in charge of adenosine derivatives to inosine derivatives conversion are altered in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. Transcriptional analysis reveals that the concentrations ofmore »adenosine monophosphate deaminase and adenosine deaminase are different in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, confirming the prediction from metabolomics studies. We also found, for the first time, that the ratio of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to phosphocholine (PC) is significantly increased in the lungs of obese mice compared with regular weight mice. The ratio of GPC/PC is further elevated in the lungs of obese group by cigarette smoke exposure. Since GPC/PC ratio is a known biomarker for cancer, these results may suggest that obese group is more susceptible to lung cancer when exposed to cigarette smoke.« less

  7. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  8. Identification of the nuclear export signals that regulate the intracellular localization of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Akiko; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken. E-mail: kitajima@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    The CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSS) catalyzes the activation of sialic acid (Sia) to CMP-Sia which is a donor substrate of sialyltransferases. The vertebrate CSSs are usually localized in nucleus due to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) on the molecule. In this study, we first point out that a small, but significant population of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase (mCSS) is also present in cytoplasm, though mostly in nucleus. As a mechanism for the localization in cytoplasm, we first identified two nuclear export signals (NESs) in mCSS, based on the localization studies of the potential NES-deleted mCSS mutants as well as the potential NES-tagged eGFP proteins. These two NESs are conserved among mammalian and fish CSSs, but not present in the bacterial or insect CSS. These results suggest that the intracellular localization of vertebrate CSSs is regulated by not only the NLS, but also the NES sequences.

  9. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging Showing Reduced Unsaturated Lipid Content in the Hippocampus of a mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leskovjan, A.C.; Kretlow, A.; Miller, L.M.

    2010-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential to brain functions such as membrane fluidity, signal transduction, and cell survival. It is also thought that low levels of unsaturated lipid in the brain may contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk or severity. However, it is not known how accumulation of unsaturated lipids is affected in different regions of the hippocampus, which is a central target of AD plaque pathology, during aging. In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) to visualize the unsaturated lipid content in specific regions of the hippocampus in the PSAPP mouse model of AD as a function of plaque formation. Specifically, the unsaturated lipid content was imaged using the olefinic {double_bond}CH stretching mode at 3012 cm{sup -1}. The axonal, dendritic, and somatic layers of the hippocampus were examined in the mice at 13, 24, 40, and 56 weeks old. Results showed that lipid unsaturation in the axonal layer was significantly increased with normal aging in control (CNT) mice (p < 0.01) but remained low and relatively constant in PSAPP mice. Thus, these findings indicate that unsaturated lipid content is reduced in hippocampal white matter during amyloid pathogenesis and that maintaining unsaturated lipid content early in the disease may be critical in avoiding progression of the disease.

  10. Final Report of project entitled "A metabolomics and mouse models approach to study inflammatory and immune responses to radiation"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornace, Albert J.; Li, Henghong

    2013-12-02

    The three-year project entitled ?A Metabolomics and Mouse Models Approach to Study Inflammatory and Immune Responses to Radiation? was initiated in September 2009. The overall objectives of this project were to investigate the acute and persistent effects of low dose radiation on T cell lymphocyte function and physiology, as well the contributions of these cells to radiation-induced inflammatory responses. Inflammation after ionizing radiation (IR), even at low doses, may impact a variety of disease processes, including infectious disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other potentially inflammatory disorders. There were three overall specific aims: 1. To investigate acute and persistent effects of low dose radiation on T cell subsets and function; 2. A genetic approach with mouse models to investigate p38 MAPK pathways that are involved in radiation-induced inflammatory signaling; 3. To investigate the effect of radiation quality on the inflammatory response. We have completed the work proposed in these aims. Below are our major accomplishments: ? Our data show that T cells from low dose irradiated animals have lower proliferation potency and cytokine production upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. This effect was observed as early as 4 hours after radiation, and lasted up to two weeks. ? Using our ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with highly sensitive time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF) metabolomics method, we demonstrated the global changes of metabolites in T cells upon TCR stimulation in a time-dependent pattern. ? We found that the TCR activation induced metabolome changes are remarkably altered in a dose-dependent manner after radiation. At a dose of 0.5 Gy and above, IR mitigated TCR activation induced metabolome changes while at the dose of as low as 0.1Gy IR had a mild stimulatory effect on some of the metabolome changes. ? We revealed the mechanism for how radiation affects T cell activation by showing that the energy supply pathways in activated T cells are greatly compromised after radiation. ? We demonstrated that low dose ionizing radiation has a variety of effects on different T cell subsets, and p38 plays an important role in these effects. ? The study with low dose proton radiation shows similar effects on T cell proliferation upon TCR activation. Our dose rate study with proton radiation indicates that at low dose rates, proton exposure has less detrimental effects on T cell activation. ? We have one published paper and several manuscripts submitted or in preparation. ? We presented our findings at multiple DOE low dose program workshops, RRS annual meetings and other conferences. Our project is the first to apply a cutting-edge metabolomics approach to study the effects of radiation on immune cell function. Our findings demonstrate that metabolomics is a powerful method, which not only has higher sensitivity than the classical immune cell biology endpoints, but also helps to reveal the underlying mechanisms providing evidence that T cell activation is a metabolically dynamic process. Our T cell subset study sheds light on the effects of radiation on different T cell subsets and relevant signaling pathways mediating these effects. We have proved that our metabolomics platform and the T cell subset differentiation methods are useful and informative approaches for investigation and assessment of immune cell function after radiation. Our mechanistic findings on metabolic pathways may help to identify potential targets for intervention.

  11. Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor alters levels of key sex steroids and steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@gmail.co [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Leslie, Traci C., E-mail: traci.leslie@gmail.co [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Hatfield, Kimberly P., E-mail: kpm9786@yahoo.co [Program in Toxicology and Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@illinois.ed [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.ed [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by decreasing antral follicle numbers and increasing follicular death. MXC is metabolized in the body to mono-hydroxy MXC (mono-OH). Little is known about the effects of mono-OH on the ovary. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that mono-OH exposure decreases production of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) by cultured mouse antral follicles. Antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mice (age 35-39 days) and exposed to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or mono-OH (0.1-10 {mu}g/mL) for 96 h. Media and follicles were collected for analysis of sex steroid levels and mRNA expression, respectively. Mono-OH treatment (10 {mu}g/mL) decreased E{sub 2} (DMSO: 3009.72 {+-} 744.99 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1679.66 {+-} 461.99 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 1752.72 {+-} 532.41 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 45.89 {+-} 33.83 ng/mL), testosterone (DMSO: 15.43 {+-} 2.86 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 17.17 {+-} 4.71 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 13.64 {+-} 3.53 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 1.29 {+-} 0.23 ng/mL), androstenedione (DMSO: 1.92 {+-} 0.34 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1.49 {+-} 0.43 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 0.64 {+-} 0.31 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 0.12 {+-} 0.06 ng/mL) and progesterone (DMSO: 24.11 {+-} 4.21 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 26.77 {+-} 4.41 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 20.90 {+-} 3.75 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 9.44 {+-} 2.97 ng/mL) levels. Mono-OH did not alter expression of Star, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1 and Cyp1b1, but it did reduce levels of Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 mRNA. Collectively, these data suggest that mono-OH significantly decreases levels of key sex steroid hormones and the expression of enzymes required for steroidogenesis.

  12. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren; Takahashi, Miyuki; Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-?B)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-?B inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-?B signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-?B. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-?B signaling pathway.

  13. Identification of the human ERK gene as a putative receptor tyrosine kinase and its chromosomal localization to 1p36.1: A comparative mapping of human, mouse, and rat chromosomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Toshiyuki; Matsuda, Yoichi; Hori, Tada-aki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [and others] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); and others

    1995-03-20

    From a newly determined cDNA sequence of the human ERK gene, a highly hydrophobic portion was identified upstream of the putative tyrosine kinase domain. This is the first evidence that the ERK protein possesses a receptor-like membrane-spanning structure. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of R-banded metaphase chromosomes revealed that the ERK gene is located in chromosome region 1p36.1. This locus is near the frequent translocation breakpoint or deletion region of neuroblastoma and some other cancers. A comparative mapping study of the mouse and rat homologues indicated that each counterpart maps to the mouse chromosome 4D2.2-D3 and rat chromosome 5q36.13 regions, both of which have conserved linkage homology to human chromosome 1p. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Bisphenol A down-regulates rate-limiting Cyp11a1 to acutely inhibit steroidogenesis in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peretz, Jackye, E-mail: peretz@illinois.edu [2001 South Lincoln Ave, 3211 VMBSB, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu [2001 South Lincoln Ave, 3223 VMBSB, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the backbone of polycarbonate plastic products and the epoxy resin lining of aluminum cans. Previous studies have shown that exposure to BPA decreases sex steroid hormone production in mouse antral follicles. The current study tests the hypothesis that BPA first decreases the expression levels of the steroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse antral follicles, leading to a decrease in sex steroid hormone production in vitro. Further, the current study tests the hypothesis that these effects are acute and reversible after removal of BPA. Exposure to BPA (10 ?g/mL and 100 ?g/mL) significantly decreased expression of Cyp11a1 and StAR beginning at 18 h and 72 h, respectively, compared to controls. Exposure to BPA (10 ?g/mL and 100 ?g/mL) significantly decreased progesterone levels beginning at 24 h and decreased androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels at 72 h and 96 h compared to controls. Further, after removing BPA from the culture media at 20 h, expression of Cyp11a1 and progesterone levels were restored to control levels by 48 h and 72 h, respectively. Additionally, expression of StAR and levels of androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol never decreased compared to controls. These data suggest that BPA acutely decreases expression of Cyp11a1 as early as 18 h and this reduction in Cyp11a1 may lead to a decrease in progesterone production by 24 h, followed by a decrease in androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol production and expression of StAR at 72 h. Therefore, BPA exposure likely targets Cyp11a1 and steroidogenesis, but these effects are reversible with removal of BPA exposure. - Highlights: • BPA may target Cyp11a1 to inhibit steroidogenesis in antral follicles. • BPA may decrease the expression of Cyp11a1 prior to inhibiting steroidogenesis. • The adverse effects of BPA on steroidogenesis in antral follicles are reversible.

  15. Pregnenolone co-treatment partially restores steroidogenesis, but does not prevent growth inhibition and increased atresia in mouse ovarian antral follicles treated with mono-hydroxy methoxychlor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@illinois.edu; Hannon, Patrick R., E-mail: phannon2@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2013-11-01

    Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor (mono-OH MXC) is a metabolite of the pesticide, methoxychlor (MXC). Although MXC is known to decrease antral follicle numbers, and increase follicle death in rodents, not much is known about the ovarian effects of mono-OH MXC. Previous studies indicate that mono-OH MXC inhibits mouse antral follicle growth, increases follicle death, and inhibits steroidogenesis in vitro. Further, previous studies indicate that CYP11A1 expression and production of progesterone (P{sub 4}) may be the early targets of mono-OH MXC in the steroidogenic pathway. Thus, this study tested whether supplementing pregnenolone, the precursor of progesterone and the substrate for HSD3B, would prevent decreased steroidogenesis, inhibited follicle growth, and increased follicle atresia in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. Mouse antral follicles were exposed to vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide), mono-OH MXC (10 ?g/mL), pregnenolone (1 ?g/mL), or mono-OH MXC and pregnenolone together for 96 h. Levels of P{sub 4}, androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), estrone (E{sub 1}), and 17?-estradiol (E{sub 2}) in media were determined, and follicles were processed for histological evaluation of atresia. Pregnenolone treatment alone stimulated production of all steroid hormones except E{sub 2}. Mono-OH MXC-treated follicles had decreased sex steroids, but when given pregnenolone, produced levels of P{sub 4}, A, T, and E{sub 1} that were comparable to those in vehicle-treated follicles. Pregnenolone treatment did not prevent growth inhibition and increased atresia in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. Collectively, these data support the idea that the most upstream effect of mono-OH MXC on steroidogenesis is by reducing the availability of pregnenolone, and that adding pregnenolone may not be sufficient to prevent inhibited follicle growth and survival. - Highlights: • Mono-OH MXC inhibited antral follicle steroidogenesis, growth, and survival. • Pregnenolone partially restored steroidogenesis in mono-OH MXC-treated follicles. • Pregnenolone did not prevent mono-OH MXC-induced inhibition of growth and survival.

  16. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan) [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Department of Pharmacy, Nara Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, 1248-1 Ikoma, Nara 630-0293 (Japan); Tsubaki, Masanobu [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yamazoe, Yuzuru [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Ogaki, Mitsuhiko [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan); Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Kusunoki, Takashi [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Shozo, E-mail: nishida@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  17. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Nunes-Correia, Isabel [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Flow Cytometry Unit, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Santos, Armanda E., E-mail: aesantos@ci.uc.pt [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Custódio, José B.A. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  18. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jiying [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)] [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko, E-mail: k.ohno.oph@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)] [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)] [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas age-matched mice fed standard rodent chow diet did not. Activities and mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase were significantly lower in native RPE cells freshly isolated from cholesterol-enriched chow fed mice compared to standard rodent chow fed mice. These findings suggest that cholesterol enhances subretinal A{beta} accumulation by modulating the activities of enzymes degrading and processing A{beta} in RPE cells in senescent subjects.

  19. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment alters eicosanoid levels in several organs of the mouse in an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bui, Peter; Solaimani, Parrisa [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Wu, Xiaomeng [Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hankinson, Oliver, E-mail: ohank@mednet.ucla.edu [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States) [Molecular Toxicology Program, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Dept of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) adversely affects many mammalian organs and tissues. These effects are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 are upregulated by the liganded AHR. These (and other) cytochromes P450 can metabolize arachidonic acid into a variety of bioactive eicosanoids. Towards investigating a potential role of eicosanoids in TCDD toxicity, arachidonic acid, two other unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, and up to twenty-five eicosanoids were measured in five organs/tissues of male and female wild-type and Ahr null mice treated or untreated with TCDD. TCDD generally increased the levels of the four dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and (where measured) 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and 18-, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (HETEs) in the serum, liver, spleen and lungs, but not the heart, of both sexes, and increased the levels in the serum, liver and spleen of several metabolites that are usually considered products of lipoxygenase activity, but which may also be generated by cytochromes P450. TCDD also increased the levels of the esterified forms of these eicosanoids in the liver in parallel with the corresponding free forms. The levels of prostanoids were generally not affected by TCDD. The above changes did not occur in Ahr null mice, and are therefore mediated by the AHR. TCDD increased the mRNA levels of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1 and the Pla2g12a form of phospholipase A{sub 2} to varying degrees in the different organs, and these increases correlated with some but not all the changes in eicosanoids levels in the organs, suggesting that other enzymes may also be involved. -- Highlights: ? TCDD treatment increases the levels of many eicosanoids in several mouse organs. ? Products of both the cytochrome P450 and classical lipoxygenase pathways are increased. ? These increases are dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. ? Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 appear to be responsible for much but not all of the increases.

  20. 9. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  1. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karman, Bethany N., E-mail: bklement@illinois.edu; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S., E-mail: mbshivapur@gmail.com; Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2012-05-15

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 h to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1–100 nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, and expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10 ?M) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 3–4 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. -- Highlights: ?TCDD disrupts sex steroid hormone levels, but not growth of antral follicles. ?Pregnenolone co-treatment by-passes TCDD-induced steroid hormone disruption. ?TCDD affects steroid hormone levels through an AHR pathway in antral follicles.

  2. In vitro cytotoxicity tests of ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based varistor fabricated from ZnO micro and nanoparticle powders on L929 mouse cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sendi, Rabab Khalid, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com; Mahmud, Shahrom, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com; Munshi, Ayman, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com [Nano-optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R.), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Penang (Malaysia); Seeni, Azman, E-mail: azanseeni@gmail.com [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute (AMDI), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 13200, Bertam, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The present study investigated the cytotoxicity of ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-varistors. To this effect, ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} varistors fabricated from ZnO micro-and nanoparticle powders are prepared via conventional ceramic processing method. The effects of ZnO particle size on the properties of ZnO varistors are also investigated. The strong solid-state reaction during sintering may be attributed to the high surface area of the 20 nm ZnO nanoparticles that promote strong surface reaction. The intensity of XRD peaks reflected the high degree of crystallinity of the ZnO nanoparticles. However, the width of the peaks in case of ZnO nanoparticles has increased due to the quantum size effect. The cytotoxicity evaluation of ZnO varistor was conducted on mouse connective tissue fibroblast cells (L929) using Trypan Blue Exclusion Assay analysis. The results show that the four types of varistor samples lead to cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, morphological modifications and apoptosis at the various concentration range and the toxic effects are obviously displayed in high concentration samples. 20nm-VDR is the most toxic materials followed by 40nm-VDR, P8-VDR, and W4-VDR in a descending order.

  3. Absence of correlation between Sry polymorphisms and XY sex reversal caused by the M.m. domesticus Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, C.; Nagamine, C.M. [Vanderbilt Univ., School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [Vanderbilt Univ., School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Winkinig, H.; Weichenhan, D. [Medizinische Universitaet Zu Luebeck (Germany)] [Medizinische Universitaet Zu Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    Mus musculus domesticus Y chromosomes (Y{sup DOM} Chrs) vary in their ability to induce testes in the strain C57BL/6J. In severe cases, XY females develop (XY{sup DOM} sex reversal). To identify the molecular basis for the sex reversal, a 2.7-kb region of Sry, the testis-determining gene, was sequenced from Y{sup DOM} Chrs linked to normal testis determination, transient sex reversal, and severe sex reversal. Four mutations were identified. However, no correlation exists between these mutations and severity of XY{sup DOM} sex reversal. RT-PCR identified Sry transcripts in XY{sup DOM} sex-reversed fetal gonads at 11 d.p.c., the age when Sry is hypothesized to function. In addition, no correlation exists between XY{sup DOM} sex reversal and copy numbers of pSx1, a Y-repetitive sequence whose deletion is linked to XY sex reversal. We conclude that SRY protein variants, blockade of Sry transcription, and deletion of pSx1 sequences are not the underlying causes of XY{sup DOM} sex reversal. 63 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Depeartment of Pharmacy, Sakai Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, Sakai, Osaka 590-0132 ; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ? We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ? YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ? YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ? YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment in osteosarcoma.

  5. Sound Production in the Isolated Mouse Larynx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berquist, Sean

    2013-01-01

    of sound production. Sound traveling in a helium medium,production have been inconclusive, with one study using the effects of helium

  6. Dact genes in mouse kidney development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wen-Chin

    2009-01-01

    cultures, I hypothesize that Dact1 regulates cell proliferation while Dact2 governs cell migration. Experiments including siRNA transfection, BrdU proliferation assay, generation of stable cell lines expressing Dact2 shRNA and wound assay, are designed...

  7. Mouse models of osteoarthritis and joint injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avedillo, Jose Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 21 million Americans are affected by osteoarthritis, a complex disease characterized by degenerative lesions to the articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the joints. The complexity of the disease makes the use ...

  8. MICRON MOUSE IMAGING SYSTEM The Micron Mouse Imaging System is a Core Resource for the Moran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc, Robert E.

    light source/power supply (K) Micron camera base and mounting arm (E) Micron custom light guide (L, amplifier, light source, monitor power cables #12;3 SYSTEM PARTS LIGHT SOURCE CAMERA AMPLIFIER Quick keyB steps Press DISP to exit CAMERA NEUTRAL DENSITY KNOB LIGHT GUIDE DO NOT TOUCH LIGHT GUIDE CONNECTOR

  9. Computational, Integrative, and Comparative Methods for the Elucidation of Genetic Coexpression Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baldwin, Nicole E.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Kirov, Stefan; Langston, Michael A.; Snoddy, Jay R.; Williams, Robert W.; Zhang, Bing

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression microarray data can be used for the assembly of genetic coexpression network graphs. Using mRNA samples obtained from recombinant inbredMus musculusstrains, it is possible to integrate allelic variation with molecular and higher-order phenotypes. The depth of quantitative genetic analysis of microarray data can be vastly enhanced utilizing this mouse resource in combination with powerful computational algorithms, platforms, and data repositories. The resulting network graphs transect many levels of biological scale. This approach is illustrated with the extraction of cliques of putatively co-regulated genes and their annotation using gene ontology analysis andcis-regulatory element discovery. The causal basis for co-regulationmore »is detected through the use of quantitative trait locus mapping.« less

  10. Blue whale response to underwater noise from commercial ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenna, Megan Frances

    2011-01-01

    hydrodynamics and energetics of blue whale lunge feeding:2010. Association between Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)and calling behavior of blue whales from a suction-cup-

  11. 2006 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Robert M. Wagner Oak Ridge National Laboratory (PDF 520 KB) Visualization of Unburned Hydrocarbon Emissions for Low-Temperature Diesel Engine Combustion Mark P.B. Musculus...

  12. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ? 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody-drug conjugates. Further exploration using the model will examine binding and radioisotope residence as antibody dose is increased to antigen saturation. The Center for Targeted Radioimmunotherapy and Theranostics, Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK), NIH (R25-CA096945). Technical services provided by the MSK Small-Animal Imaging Core Facility were supported by the NIH (R24-CA83084, P30-CA08748, and P50-CA92629; Zanzonico). NCI, Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparity (R21 CA153177-03; Osborne)

  13. Observations on feeding behavior in the vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Robert M.; Vriesendorp, Corine

    2003-04-01

    C77C97C109C109C46 C98C105C111C108C46 C54C56 C40._C50C48C48C51C41 C49C50C54C177C49C50C56 C77C97C109C109C97C108C105C97C110 C66C105C111C108C111C103C121 C227 C85C114C98C97C110 C38 C70C105C115C99C104C101C114 C86C101C114C108C97C103 C104C116C116C112C58C47C...47C119C119C119C46C117C114C98C97C110C102C105C115C99C104C101C114C46C100C101C47C106C111C117C114C110C97C108C115C47C109C97C109C109C98C105C111C108 C90C101C105C116C115C99C104C114C105C102C116 C102C117C200C114C83C97C200C117C103C101C116C105C101C114C107C117C110C...

  14. interactionsJanuary+February2011 Soft-Spiky Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Chris

    of the energy). One usage scenario is giving the Energy Memento as a gift of one's own energy. Energy Mementos-3438. Heekyoung Jung | School of Informatics and Computing.(HCI Design), Indiana University Bloomington | jung5@indiana.edu Altieri Youngsuk | School of Fine Arts (Digital Art), Indiana University Bloomington

  15. Characterization of Neuropeptide Y Expressing Cells in the Mouse Retina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nirenberg, Sheila

    the reporter enzyme, -galactosidase, in the NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR) cells. We found that NPY-IR cells were their processes in the sublamina of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) closest to the INL/IPL border, the presumptive OFF sublamina, and the cells in the GCL extended their processes in the sublamina near the GCL/IPL

  16. Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramhall, Naomi F

    2012-01-01

    Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

  17. Laminar circuit organization and response modulation in mouse visual cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivas, Nicholas D; Quintanar-Zilinskas, Victor; Nenadic, Zoran; Xu, Xiangmin

    2012-01-01

    Callaway, E. M. (2000). Laminar sources of synap- tic inputSvoboda, K. , et al. (2011). Laminar analysis of excitatoryand Svoboda, K. (2005). Laminar and columnar organization of

  18. A robust automated system elucidates mouse home cage behavioral structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiggins, Francis

    sys- tems (e.g., energy balance, thermal status, osmotic/volume status, sleep, reproduction, defense processes. However, the capacity to identify and examine these patterns in terms of their discrete levels in mice with single gene mutations altering energy balance. The robust, automated, reproducible

  19. Neurogenomics in the mouse model : multivariate statistical methods and analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapala, Matthew Alan

    2007-01-01

    P -value proportion of variation in pair-wiseP -value proportion of variation explained abovevalue proportion of variation explained = 0.35;

  20. Characterisation of epithelial progenitor cells for human and mouse thymus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farley, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The thymus is a complex cellular structure made up of several interdependent cell types and is the primary site for T cell development. A population of fetal thymic epithelial cells (TEC), marked by MTS20 and MTS24, when ...

  1. Mitochondrial bioenergetic deficit precedes Alzheimer's pathology in female mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    Ewen, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, and approved June 29, 2009 (received for review April 2, 2009 synthesis (5). Further, in AD there is a generalized shift from glycolytic energy production toward use of an alternative fuel, ketone bodies. This is evidenced by a 45% reduction in cerebral glucose utilization in AD

  2. Interferon-Stimulated Genes in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilford, Sarah

    2008-08-24

    (7034):772-777. 44. Colina R, Costa-Mattioli M, Dowling RJO, Jaramillo M, Tai L-H, Breitbach CJ, Martineau Y, Larsson O, Rong L, Svitkin YV et al: Translational control of the innate immune response through IRF-7. Nature 2008. 45. Bratton DL, Fadok VA, Richter DA... in the maintenance of pregnancy [23]. 11 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (Oas2) Oas2 has an important role in viral RNA degradation, namely OAS2 cleaves viral mRNA from rRNA [55]. Other cellular roles include apoptosis induction and growth...

  3. Effects of Systemic Inflammation on Synaptogenesis in Developing Mouse Hippocampus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloniowski, Slawomir

    2011-01-01

    Sci USA López-Muñoz F, Alamo C. 2009. Historical evolution5-6):141- López-Muñoz F, Alamo C. 2009. Historical evolution4041. López-Muñoz F, Alamo C. 2009. Historical evolution of

  4. Neurogenomics in the mouse model : multivariate statistical methods and analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapala, Matthew Alan

    2007-01-01

    development of the rat hypothalamus. Adv Anat Embryol Cellmidbrain, excluding hypothalamus (DiE-MD), entorhinalformation (HiF), hypothalamus (Hy), inferior colliculus (

  5. Transgenic mouse models of childhood-onset psychiatric disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Holly Rochelle

    Childhood-onset psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), mood disorders, obsessive compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSD), and schizophrenia (SZ), affect ...

  6. Mammalian genetics pioneer Liane Russell writes Mouse House history...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    history William and Liane Russell started groundbreaking program not long after World War II. William and Liane Russell in the early days of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's...

  7. Current Concepts : Mouse Models of Sjögren’s Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Cuong Q.

    Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) is a complex chronic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology which primarily targets the exocrine glands, resulting in eventual loss of secretory function. The disease can present as either primary ...

  8. The development of direction selectivity in the mouse retina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elstrott, Justin Blake

    2009-01-01

    286. McLaughlin, T. , and O'Leary, D.D. (2005). MolecularC.L. , Feller, M.B. , and O'Leary, D.D. (2003). Retinotopic2006; McLaughlin and O'Leary, 2005), DSGCs at the same D-V,

  9. Wiring cost and topological participation of the mouse brain connectome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinov, Mikail; Ypma, Rolf J. F.; Watson, Charles; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2015-07-27

    Brain connectomes are topologically complex systems, anatomically embedded in 3D space. Anatomical conservation of “wiring cost” explains many but not all aspects of these networks. Here, we examined the relationship between topology and wiring cost...

  10. Metabonomic Profiling of TASTPM Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Zeping; Browne, Edward R.; Liu, Tao; Angel, Thomas E.; Ho, Paul C.; Chun Yong Chan, Eric

    2012-12-07

    Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for the development of new therapies against and diagnosis of AD. In this study, non-targeted metabotyping of TASTPM transgenic AD mice was performed. The metabolic profiles of both brain and plasma of TASTPM mice were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to those of wild type C57BL/6J mice. TASTPM mice were metabolically distinct compared to wild type mice (Q28 Y = 0.587 and 0.766 for PLS-DA models derived from brain and plasma, respectively). A number of metabolites were found to be perturbed in TASTPM mice in both brain (D11 fructose, L-valine, L-serine, L-threonine, zymosterol) and plasma (D-glucose, D12 galactose, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and D-gluconic acid). In addition, enzyme immunoassay confirmed that selected endogenous steroids were significantly perturbed in brain (androstenedione and 17-OH-progesterone) and plasma (cortisol and testosterone) of TASTPM mice. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that perturbations related to amino acid metabolism (brain), steroid biosynthesis (brain), linoleic acid metabolism (plasma) and energy metabolism (plasma) accounted for the differentiation of TASTPM and wild-type

  11. Transcriptome signature of the adult mouse choroid plexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    glycolysis/gluconeogenesis) and in ribosomal function, whichdisorders Glycolysis/Gluconeogenesis Galactose metabolism

  12. Quantitative mouse renal perfusion using arterial spin labeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajendran, R; Lew, SK; Yong, CX; Tan, J; Wang, DJJ; Chuang, KH

    2013-01-01

    NF, Graf H, ClaussenCD, Schick F. Magnetic resonanceNI, Kramer U, Claussen CD, Schick F. Perfusion MR imagingH, Claussen CD, Schlemmer HP, Schick F. High resolution MR

  13. SHAPE Analysis of 5’ Untranslated Region of Mouse Hepatitis Virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masud, Faryal 1989-

    2011-04-18

    Benchtop SHAPE experiment ........................................... 19 Molecular cloning of A fragment ...................................... 20 Labeling primers with fluorescent dyes... Page 1 Forward and reverse PCR primers ....................................................................... 17 2 Sequencing primers .............................................................................................. 17 3 Single...

  14. Elastic and Viscoelastic Characterization of Mouse Oocytes Using Micropipette Indentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    ,1 JIAYI SHI,2 ZONG ZONG,2 KAI-TAK WAN,2 and YU SUN 3 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mc(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) cell holding device and a sub-pixel computer vision tracking algorithm, is utilized for measuring(dimeth- ylsiloxane) (PDMS) cell holding device and a sub-pixel computer vision tracking algorithm, to measure

  15. Geometrically Decoupled Phased Array Coils for Mouse Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sahil

    2010-07-14

    Phased array surface coils offer high SNR over a large field of view. Phased array volume coils have high SNR at the surface and centre of the volume. Most array coil designs typically employ a combination of geometrical and additional techniques...

  16. The development of direction selectivity in the mouse retina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elstrott, Justin Blake

    2009-01-01

    at each stage of visual processing- retinal, subcortical andvisual processing stream is combined with other retinalof visual processing. On-Off direction selective retinal

  17. Electrophysiological Characterization of Chemosensory Neurons from the Mouse Vomeronasal Organ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corey, David P.

    component was TTX-sensitive (Ki 3.6 nM). The outward K current activates at 30 mV with kinetics 10 times- duction; patch-clamp; voltage-gated channel; cyclic nucleotide-gated channel Chemosensation in terrestrial

  18. Protocol: Mouse Perfusion, CASL RARE, Page 1 of 3 Author: rgb 3/16/2012 Protocol: Mouse Perfusion, CASL RARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    and to estimate the bregma position. 4. Acquire an angiogram by locating the slice package posterior from isocenter, this would be labeled "Pos -7.88 mm." 5. Enter the tagging plane position in the ASL scan with "Edit Scan -> Research -> CASL -> `Labelling->Isocenter Distance'." Good results have been

  19. Jazz Concentration (37 credits + 3) Rev. 6-26-08 Freshman Year Prerequisite course: 2nd semester credits 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Jazz Concentration (37 credits + 3) Rev. 6-26-08 Freshman Year ­ Prerequisite course: 2nd semester credits 3 MUS 0100 Fundamentals of Western Music 3 Sample Course Sequence Year 1 1st semester credits 2nd 1 Year 2 1st semester credits 2nd semester credits 16 MUS 0418 Musicianship III 1 MUS 0420

  20. Bachelor of Music in Performance: Instrumental Freshman Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharf, Fred

    Bachelor of Music in Performance: Instrumental Freshman Year ___ MUS 111 Theory I 2 ___ MUS 112 audition (see V., B., 2.). Required courses in upper applied music are available only to students who have ___ Basic Studies Course 3 ___ MUS 371 Instrumental Pedagogy 3 ___ Music Electives** 2 TOTAL 15 TOTAL 17

  1. Graduate Curriculum Approved by Graduate Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    SEMINAR IN CHORAL MUSIC: PERFORMANCE PRACTICES AND STYLES - Delete MUS 506 SEMINAR IN INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC: PERFORMANCE PRACTICES AND STYLES - Delete MUS 551 SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL THROUGH BAROQUE PERFORMANCE PRACTICES - Delete MUS 552 SEMINAR IN MODERN MUSIC: FORM AND STYLE: (1750-1980) 2a-d. Proposal from the School

  2. Music, Performance BM, Wind/Brass/Percussion Option, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Music, Performance BM, Wind/Brass/Percussion Option, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number, and Applied Sciences course 3-4 DLV MUS 100 Introduction to Music 3 DLL Literature and Humanities 3-4 DLS, 219, 220 Materials of Music 12 MUS 121, 122, 221, 222 Ear Training 4 CID MUS 202 Music Communications

  3. Cleaner, More Efficient Diesel Engines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Musculus, Mark

    2014-02-26

    Mark Musculus, an engine combustion scientist at Sandia National Laboratories, led a study that outlines the science base for auto and engine manufacturers to build the next generation of cleaner, more efficient engines using low-temperature combustion. Here, Musculus discusses the work at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility.

  4. Cleaner, More Efficient Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musculus, Mark

    2013-08-13

    Mark Musculus, an engine combustion scientist at Sandia National Laboratories, led a study that outlines the science base for auto and engine manufacturers to build the next generation of cleaner, more efficient engines using low-temperature combustion. Here, Musculus discusses the work at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility.

  5. National Marine Fisheries Service/NOAA, Commerce 224.103 Where listed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or finback whale (Balaenoptera physalus); Hawaiian monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi); Humpback whale mammals. Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus); Bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus); Caribbean monk seal to listing or their captive born prog- eny; Mediterranean monk seal (Monachus monachus); Right whales

  6. Behavioral context of call production by eastern North Pacific blue whales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Erin M; Calambokidis, J; Burgess, W C; McDonald, M A; LeDuc, C A; Hildebrand, J A

    2007-01-01

    by eastern North Pacific blue whales Erin M. Oleson 1, *,context of calls produced by blue whales Balaenoptera mus-North Pacific population of blue whales (Thompson 1965,

  7. Dielectric Elastomers for Actuation and Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brochu, Paul

    2012-01-01

    superelastic carbon nanotube aerogel muscles. Science, 323:novel giant-stroke, super-elastic CNT aerogel mus- cles. [64] The CNT aerogel sheets are fabricated from highly

  8. Neutrino Flavor Ratios Modified by Cosmic Ray Re-acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawanaka, Norita

    2015-01-01

    Re-acceleration of $\\pi$'s and $\\mu$'s modifies the flavor ratio at Earth (at astrophysical sources) of neutrinos produced by $\\pi$ decay, $\

  9. Fish Bulletin No. 35. A Distributional List of the Species of Freshwater Fishes Known to Occur in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evermann, Barton Warren; Clark, Howard Walton

    1931-01-01

    synopsis of the Family Catostomidae. Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus. ,of Cyprinidæ and Catostomidæ described by Dr. Charles Girardthe distribution of the Catostomidæ in the region under

  10. Axons Mediate the Distribution of Arylsulfatase A within the Mouse Hippocampus upon Gene Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongarzone, Ernesto R.

    Naldini,1,2 and Ernesto R. Bongarzone1,y 1 Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy, San Raffaele Scientific-time observation and tracking of axon­dendritic transport of the enzyme after lentiviral gene therapy. Tagged ARSA brain after direct gene therapy, demonstrating the use of neural processes for enzyme transport. Key

  11. Carbamazepine suppresses calpain-mediated autophagy impairment after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse livers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: Jae.Kim@surgery.ufl.edu; Wang, Jin-Hee, E-mail: jin-hee.wang@surgery.ufl.edu; Biel, Thomas G., E-mail: Thomas.Biel@surgery.ufl.edu; Kim, Do-Sung, E-mail: do-sung.kim@surgery.med.ufl.edu; Flores-Toro, Joseph A., E-mail: Joseph.Flores-Toro@surgery.ufl.edu; Vijayvargiya, Richa, E-mail: rvijayvargiya@ufl.edu; Zendejas, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.zendejas@surgery.ufl.edu; Behrns, Kevin E., E-mail: Kevin.Behrns@surgery.ufl.edu

    2013-12-15

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays a causative role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Current therapeutic strategies for reducing reperfusion injury remain disappointing. Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated, catabolic process that timely eliminates abnormal or damaged cellular constituents and organelles such as dysfunctional mitochondria. I/R induces calcium overloading and calpain activation, leading to degradation of key autophagy-related proteins (Atg). Carbamazepine (CBZ), an FDA-approved anticonvulsant drug, has recently been reported to increase autophagy. We investigated the effects of CBZ on hepatic I/R injury. Hepatocytes and livers from male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to simulated in vitro, as well as in vivo I/R, respectively. Cell death, intracellular calcium, calpain activity, changes in autophagy-related proteins (Atg), autophagic flux, MPT and mitochondrial membrane potential after I/R were analyzed in the presence and absence of 20 ?M CBZ. CBZ significantly increased hepatocyte viability after reperfusion. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBZ prevented calcium overloading, the onset of the MPT and mitochondrial depolarization. Immunoblotting and fluorometric analysis showed that CBZ blocked calpain activation, depletion of Atg7 and Beclin-1 and loss of autophagic flux after reperfusion. Intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mice demonstrated that CBZ substantially reversed autophagic defects and mitochondrial dysfunction after I/R in vivo. In conclusion, CBZ prevents calcium overloading and calpain activation, which, in turn, suppresses Atg7 and Beclin-1 depletion, defective autophagy, onset of the MPT and cell death after I/R. - Highlights: • A mechanism of carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced cytoprotection in livers is proposed. • Impaired autophagy is a key event contributing to lethal reperfusion injury. • The importance of autophagy is extended and confirmed in an in vivo model. • CBZ is a potential agent to improve liver function after liver surgery.

  12. Inhibition of Notch Signaling During Mouse Incisor Renewal Leads to Enamel Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in PBS and stained in 2% uranyl acetate in water for 2 hoursReynold’s lead citrate and 2% uranyl acetate in 50% ethanol

  13. Disentangling mental disorders: a mouse model for 15q duplication towards understanding the pathophysiology of autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    the pathophysiology of autism Toru Takumi, MD, PhD. RIKEN Brain Science Institute Autism is a complex psychiatric suggests that chromosomal abnormalities including copy number variations contribute to autism risk. The duplication of human chromosome 15q11-13 is known to be the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in autism

  14. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Institute of Oncology of Asturias (IUOPA), HUCA, Universidada del Principado de Asturias (IUOPA), HUCA, Universidad de

  15. Scientific Abstract -Scientific Posters & Demonstrations Enhancing Medical Image Interaction By Specializing the Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLean, Karon

    more quickly without reducing accuracy or thoroughness, and improving ergonomics at the same time. Evaluation: Early prototyping and participatory design: We observed several radiologists performing

  16. Quantifying the interactions between eye and mouse movements on spatial visual interfaces through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çöltekin, Arzu

    trajectory visualisations Urska Demsar1 , Arzu Çöltekin 2 1 Centre for Geoinformatics, School of Geography

  17. ANTI-Mac-1 SELECTIVELY INHIBITS THE MOUSE AND HUMAN TYPE THREE COMPLEMENT RECEPTOR*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springer, Timothy A.

    ; GVB, gelatin- containing veronal-buffered saline; HBSS, Hanks' balanced salt solution; MAb, monoclonal, CA) or A/St mice (West Seneca Laboratories, Buffalo, NY) by injection of 1.5 ml of protease peptone 3 d before cell harvest. PEC were harvested with Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS) with 10 mM Hepes

  18. Multiscale structural analysis of mouse lingual myoarchitecture employing diffusion spectrum magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelward, Bevin

    structural autocorrelation TPM , respectively. Mesoscale myofi- ber tracts were generated by alignment the properties of the respective ODFs and the virtual super- imposition of the distributed mesoscale myofiber tracts. The identifi- cation of a mesoscale anatomical construct, which specifically links

  19. Spectral Markers in Preneoplastic Intestinal Mucosa: An Accurate Predictor of Tumor Risk in the MIN Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young L.

    with celecoxib 1,500 ppm. Results: Spectral slope, fractal dimension, and principal component 3 were dramatically > colon). Short-term treatment with the potent chemopreventive agent, celecoxib, resulted in near, the reversal of spectral markers by celecoxib treatment supports the neoplastic relevance. (Cancer Epidemiol

  20. Inhibition of Notch Signaling During Mouse Incisor Renewal Leads to Enamel Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    is an emerging model for the study of renewal of mineralizedmodel for the study of tooth development and renewal. Thismodel system to dissect Jag-Notch signaling mechanisms in the context of mineralized tissue renewal.

  1. Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Atlas In Vector Graphics For Enhanced Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jinho

    2013-07-17

    loading time. Furthermore, we employed an open-source mapping JavaScript library, OpenLayers API [12], to visualize the KESM data sets on the web in place of the Google Maps API. Just like Google Maps API, OpenLayers API provides essential functions... and implemented the graphical user interface (GUI) using Flash, Java and AJAX (dHTML and JavaScript). As a result, they provide rapid web-based 19 navigation and visualization, aiming to provide a virtual microscopy service. They also provide 3D visualization...

  2. The effect of insulin deficiency on tau and neurofilament in the insulin knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, Ruben [William K. Warren Medical Research Institute, University of Oklahoma Medical Health Science Center, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); E-mail: ruben.schechter@okstate.edu; Beju, Delia [William K. Warren Medical Research Institute, University of Oklahoma Medical Health Science Center, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States); Miller, Kenneth E. [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science, Tulsa, OK 74107 (United States)

    2005-09-09

    Complications of diabetes mellitus within the nervous system are peripheral and central neuropathy. In peripheral neuropathy, defects in neurofilament and microtubules have been demonstrated. In this study, we examined the effects of insulin deficiency within the brain in insulin knockout mice (I(-/-)). The I(-/-) exhibited hyperphosphorylation of tau, at threonine 231, and neurofilament. In addition, we showed hyperphosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK-3 {beta}) at serine 9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK 1) showed decrease in phosphorylation, whereas ERK 2 showed no changes. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated swollen mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus, and dispersion of the nuclear chromatin. Microtubules showed decrease in the number of intermicrotubule bridges and neurofilament presented as bunches. Thus, lack of insulin brain stimulation induces JNK hyperphosphorylation followed by hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofilament, and ultrastructural cellular damage, that over time may induce decrease in cognition and learning disabilities.

  3. Development, characterization and transcriptional profiling of a mouse model of fatal infectious diarrhea and colitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenshtein, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a naturally occurring murine bacterial pathogen which is used to model human diarrheagenic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC) infections in mice. C. rodentium causes colonic hyperplasia and a variable degree ...

  4. Mechanisms of ocular dominance plasticity in the juvenile and adult mouse visual cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khibnik, Lena A

    2011-01-01

    Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity is a classic example of bidirectional experience-dependent plasticity in the primary visual cortex. This form of plasticity is most robust during early postnatal development (termed the ...

  5. A new mouse model to probe the role of aflatoxin B? in liver carcinogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouhenguel, Jason T

    2010-01-01

    One and a half million new cancer cases are reported each year in the United States. Despite this overwhelming burden of disease, current preventative treatments and early detection techniques are inadequate. With cancers, ...

  6. Cortical Processing of Frequency Modulated Sweeps in a Mouse Model of Presbycusis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trujillo, Michael

    2012-01-01

    age in C57BL/6, but not CBA/CaJ, mice. Hear Res 112: 158-of hair cell loss in CBA and C57BL/6 mice throughout theiryoung and aging C57BL/6J and CBA/J mice. Hear Res 53: 78-94,

  7. Investigating the consequences of chromosome abnormalities arising during pre-implantation development of the mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Helen Louise

    2014-02-04

    . 16 5 4.2.3 Culture in low -energy KSOM ??????????????????????????????? ??5 4.2.4 Immunocytochemistry , TUNEL staining and confocal imaging?.???????????. ??6 4.2.5 Induction of DNA damage with ionizing radiation ???????????????????? ??6 4... sensitive to adverse culture conditions???????????????????????????????????? 17 1 4.3.3 Evaluating the DNA damage hypothesis ????????????????? ???????. ??4 4.3 .3.1 The atypical distribution of DDR foci throughout pre - implantation development...

  8. Mickey and the Mouse: The Motion Picture and Television Industry's Copyright Concerns on the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torpoco, Mark S.

    1997-01-01

    on-line services from liability for infringing transmissionsline service providers from direct or vicarious copyright liability for transmissions

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rescues synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    initial potentiation to WTs, but the effect decayed for 1 hof slices from Fmr1-KOs and WTs that had been sectionedcomparable to that in the WTs. Significant group differences

  10. Abnormal Response of the Neuropeptide Y-Deficient Mouse Reproductive Axis to Food Deprivation But

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Nader G.

    types (WTs) in weight regulation and food consumption. Large-litter mothers had longer anestrous periods and smaller pups at weaning, but NPY KOs and WTs did not differ in either respect. We also examined the LH not. In contrast, WTs consistently showed fasting-induced suppression of LH. Our findings suggest

  11. Alterations of Thalamostriatal and Corticostriatal Projections in Mouse Models of Huntington’s Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parievsky, Anna

    2015-01-01

    and BACHD mice compared to WTs. Thus, PLTS interneurons areusing optogenetics in both WTs and R6/2s, responses to PVR6/2 mice compared to WTs. Similarly, selective optogenetic

  12. Identification and Characterization of Modulators of Chemotherapeutic Response in Mouse Models of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doles, Jason (Jason David)

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug resistance is a major cause of cancer treatment failure. While much attention has been focused on the genetics of tumor development, less is known about the genetic determinants of therapeutic outcome. ...

  13. EE7700 -Semester Project Report Kazim Sekeroglu Virtual Mouse Using a Webcam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koppelman, David M.

    EE7700 -Semester Project Report Kazim Sekeroglu and the center of the pointer and draw a bounding box around it #12;EE7700 -Semester Project Report Kazim

  14. Cell-cell and cell-medium interactions in the growth of mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Nikhil, 1979-

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells serve as powerful models for the study of development and disease and hold enormous potential for future therapeutics. Due to the potential for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to provide a variety of tissues ...

  15. THE DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LANGERHANS CELLS AND INTRAEPIDERMAL NERVE FIBERS IN THE MOUSE AND RAT FOOTPAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Argenia Lanisha Necole

    2011-12-31

    Skin disorders are often associated with immune and nervous system dysfunction. Intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) detect mechanical, thermal, and noxious stimuli. Although immune cells such as mast and T cells can alter ...

  16. TLE proteins in mouse embryonic stem cell self renewal and early lineage specification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laing, Adam

    2011-11-24

    TLE proteins are a closely related family of vertebrate corepressors. They have no intrinsic DNA binding ability, but are recruited as transcriptional repressors by other sequence specific proteins. TLE proteins and their ...

  17. Acquisition of renogenic competence in the early mouse embryo and embryonic stem cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganeva, Veronika Veskova

    2011-11-25

    The acquisition of renogenic competence (the ability to give rise to kidney) during embryonic development is not yet fully understood. Clarifying the temporal and molecular aspects of this process is equally essential ...

  18. Effects of age and Pax6 deficiency on mouse limbal stem cell function 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douvaras, Panagiotis

    2010-01-01

    The conventional view for corneal epithelial maintenance suggests that a stem cell population found in the limbus (at the rim of the cornea) produces daughter cells, called transient amplifying cells, which migrate ...

  19. Genome wide gene expression analysis of two ENU mouse models of major mental illness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sarah Mills

    2011-01-01

    Major mental illness is now recognised as one of the leading causes of adult morbidity. Of the adult onset psychiatric disorders, the functional psychoses (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and recurrent major depression) ...

  20. DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION OF THE DRUG-PROCESSING GENOME IN MOUSE LIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yue

    2010-07-29

    Despite the recent progress in understanding the expression patterns and regulatory mechanisms of drug-processing genes, namely phase-I and -II drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in adults, very little is known of ...

  1. Mouse models of lung cancer : understanding the molecular and cellular basis of lung tumorigenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Erica L. (Erica Lynn), 1973-

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Patients are typically diagnosed with advanced disease and have a high fatality:case ratio. Despite its prevalence, the identity of the cell of origin, precursor ...

  2. Progressive Genomic Instability in the FVB/Kras[superscript LA2] Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacks, Tyler E.

    Alterations in DNA copy number contribute to the development and progression of cancers and are common in epithelial tumors. We have used array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to visualize DNA copy number alterations ...

  3. Response and Resistance to NF-?B Inhibitors in Mouse Models of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Wen

    Lung adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. We recently showed that genetic inhibition of the NF-?B pathway affects both the initiation and the maintenance of lung cancer, identifying this pathway as ...

  4. Requirement for NF-?B signalling in a mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meylan, Etienne

    NF-?B transcription factors function as crucial regulators of inflammatory and immune responses as well as of cell survival. They have also been implicated in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. However, despite ...

  5. Core modular blood and brain biomarkers in social defeat mouse model for post traumatic stress disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    1998, 21(1):127–148. 45. Sriram K, Rodriguez-Fernandez M,301–320. 47. Yang R, Sriram K, Doyle FJ: Control circuitry

  6. UPTAKE OF [3H]-COLCHICINE INTO BRAIN AND LIVER OF MOUSE, RAT, AND CHICK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Piscataway, NJ. Anisomycin (ANI) was purchased from Pfizerbehavioral studies (6), ANI was administered subcutaneouslyml of 0.9% NaCl. ments, ANI was not administered; results

  7. Genomic Imprinting Variations in the Mouse Type 3 Deiodinase Gene Between Tissues and Brain Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, M. Elena; Charalambous, Marika; Saferali, Aabida; Fiering, Steven; Naumova, Anna K.; St. Germain, Donald; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Hernandez, Arturo

    2014-09-18

    , Midbrain and pons; Th, thalamus; Cx#3;St#3;Hi, cortex, striatum and hippocampus; OB, olfactory bulb; CoC, corpus colliculus; H, hypothalamus. Data represent the mean #5; SEM of 8 determinations. *, #, P #4; .01 vs Dio3 #3;/#3; or Dio3 m-/p#3;, respectively...

  8. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    PLoS One 2009; 2: e895. Song CX, Szulwach KE, Fu Y, Dai Q,Szulwach KE, Li X, Li Y, Song CX, Wu H, Dai Q, et al. 5-hmC-cells), cerebral cortex (CX, CA1, CA3 and den- tate gyrus)

  9. FUNCTIONAL AND MECHANISTIC STUDY OF DOT1L IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC HEMATOPOIESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yi

    2012-12-31

    DOT1 is the histone 3 lysine 79 methyltransferase with both unique structure and substrate specificity. It plays critical role in telomere silencing maintenance, transcription regulation, DNA repair, and cell cycle regulation. DOT1L in mammals...

  10. Practical Vessel Imaging by Computed Tomography in Live Transgenic Mouse Models for Human Tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    delivered by a generic fish tank pump. Volumetric CT of anesthetized mice was per- formed at 93 mm3 voxel

  11. Reflectance and Fluorescence Confocal Microscope for Imaging of the Mouse Colon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldua, Meagan Alyssa

    2012-02-14

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Kristen Carlson Maitland Committee Members, Javier Jo Robert Chapkin Head of Department, Gerard L. Cot? December 2010 Major... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank my committee chair, Dr. Kristen Maitland, and my committee members, Dr. Javier Jo, and Dr. Robert Chapkin, for their guidance and support throughout the course of this research. I also want to thank my mother and father...

  12. Photo-environment affects disease progression in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) Huntington s disease mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HUEI-BIN, WANG,

    2015-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles Photo-environment affects diseaseABSTRACT OF THE THESIS Photo-environment affects diseaseshow that inappropriate photo-environment such as constant

  13. PHOTOACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY OF MALIGNANT MELANOMA IN THE IN VIVO MOUSE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staley, Jacob W.

    2010-07-15

    was struck by modulated light a perceptible sound was generated 35 . This phe- nomenon was later discovered to exist in other materials including liquid, gaseous, and biological tissue. As laser technology advanced, the field of photoacoustic spectroscopy... ? is the thermal conductivity of the the medium (?0.14 mm 2 s ?1 in tissue 38 ), we can conclude instantaneous heating of the medium since thermal diffusion can be ignored 39 . The second condition, stress confinement, describes the time for the stress generated...

  14. A mouse Mecp2-null mutation causes neurological symptoms that mimic Rett syndrome 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guy, Jacky; Hendrich, Brian; Holmes, Megan; Martin, Joanne E; Bird, Adrian P

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an inherited neurodevelopmental disorder of females that occurs once in 10,000–15,000 births1,2. Affected females develop normally for 6–18 months, but then lose voluntary movements, including ...

  15. Functional and biochemical analysis of ERK2 in mouse embryonic stem cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, William

    2011-11-24

    The ERK-MAPK pathway is a dynamic signaling module, conserved across Eukarya, and capable of processing a myriad of environmental and cellular signals. It has been implicated in controlling important cell fate decisions ...

  16. Geometric representation of neuroanatomical data observed in mouse brain at cellular and gross levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Wonryull

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation studies two problems related to geometric representation of neuroanatomical data: (i) spatial representation and organization of individual neurons, and (ii) reconstruction of three-dimensional neuroanatomical ...

  17. Cholinergic neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate mouse brown adipose tissue metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Dong Kun; Blouet, Clémence; Ruiz, Henry H.; Buettner, Christoph; Chua, Streamson Jr; Schwartz, Gary J.; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2015-04-11

    Objective: Brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is critical in maintaining body temperature. The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) integrates cutaneous thermosensory signals and regulates adaptive thermogenesis. Here, we study the function...

  18. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    putamen, substantia nigra, hypothalamus, globus pallidus andÀ 0.90 to À 0.95), hypothalamus ( À 0.82), globus pallidus (

  19. Effects of melatonin and age on gene expression in mouse CNS using microarray analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, SC; Sharman, EH; Sharman, KZ; Lahiri, D; Cotman, CW; Perreau, VM

    2007-01-01

    gene expression in the hypothalamus and cortex of mice. Procovine pre-mammillary hypothalamus: day-night variation innucleus of the hypothalamus (von Gall et al. , 2002), the

  20. Efferent Projections of Prokineticin 2 Expressing Neurons in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chengkang; Truong, Kimberly K.; Zhou, Qun-Yong

    2009-01-01

    the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus: a reexaminationnucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus is the predominantnucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The SCN drives the

  1. Associations Between Paternal Responsiveness and Stress Responsiveness in the Biparental California Mouse, Peromyscus californicus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauke, Miyetani

    2012-01-01

    nucleus of the hypothalamus (mPVN), (C) central nucleus ofnucleus of the hypothalamus (mPVN) and the bed nucleus ofimmunoreactivity in the hypothalamus of lactating rats. J

  2. Effects of melatonin and age on gene expression in mouseCNS using microarray analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

    2007-01-01

    on gene expression in the hypothalamus and cortex of mice.ovine pre-mammillary hypothalamus: day–night variation innucleus of the hypothalamus (von Gall et al. , 2002), the

  3. The Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villanueva, Elizabeth Mary

    2013-02-04

    origin comes from alternations to the molecular mechanisms controlling development. In this study, we examined how gene regulation is affected when alcohol is introduced into the environment by looking at genomic imprints. Genomic imprinting is the unique...

  4. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    male germ cells handle DNA damage? Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.strand breaks and DNA base damage at different cellularrelationship to genetic damage, Mutat. Res. 216 (1989) 221-

  5. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    male germ cells handle DNA damage? Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.strand breaks and DNA base damage at different cellularrelationship to genetic damage, Mutat. Res. 216 (1989) 221-

  6. Systematic review and meta-analysis of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egan, Kieren

    2014-07-05

    The increasing prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease poses a considerable socioeconomic challenge in the years ahead. There are few clinical treatments available and none capable of halting or slowing the progressive nature ...

  7. Sex-specific gene expression in embryonic mouse germ cells during commitment to spermatogenesis or oogenesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Luke John Emel

    2011-07-05

    The default developmental choice for both female and male Murine Germ Cells (GCs) is to commit to oogenesis and begin meiosis, which occurs in vivo in the developing ovary, and in vitro, at E12.5-E13.5. Prior to this commitment, female and male GCs...

  8. Suppression of Notch Signaling in the Neonatal Mouse Ovary Decreases Primordial Follicle Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayo, Kelly E.

    Daniel J. Trombly, Teresa K. Woodruff, and Kelly E. Mayo Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology

  9. Genome Patterns of Selection and Introgression of Haplotypes in Natural Populations of the House Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrov, Dmitri

    ), homologues of human genes involved in adaptations (e.g. alpha-amylase genes) or in genetic diseases (e

  10. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of mouse UPR responsive protein P58(IPK) TPR fragment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Jiahui; Wu, Yunkun [Department of Cell Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Ron, David [Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Sha, Bingdong, E-mail: bdsha@uab.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the ER, a P58(IPK) TPR fragment without the C-terminal J-domain has been crystallized. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), which can promote protein folding and misfolded protein degradation and attenuate protein translation and protein translocation into the ER. P58(IPK) has been proposed to function as a molecular chaperone to maintain protein-folding homeostasis in the ER under normal and stressed conditions. P58(IPK) contains nine TPR motifs and a C-terminal J-domain within its primary sequence. To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the ER, a P58(IPK) TPR fragment without the C-terminal J-domain was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 2.5 Å resolution using a synchrotron X-ray source. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.53, b = 92.75, c = 84.32 Å, ? = 90.00, ? = 119.36, ? = 90.00°. There are two P58(IPK) molecules in the asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 60%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  11. Biophysical Probes of Iron Metabolism in Yeast Cells, Mitochondria, and Mouse Brains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes-Hampton, Gregory

    2012-10-19

    Iron is essential in nearly all organisms. It is a cofactor in many proteins and enzymes. This transition metal can also be toxic because it participates in reactions which produce reactive oxygen species. To avoid these ...

  12. The role of retinoic acid in germ cell development in embryonic mouse gonads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubová, Jana C

    2007-01-01

    Germ cells are the only cell type to undergo meiosis, a specialized cell division process necessary for the formation of haploid gametes. Timing of this process is sex-specific. Ovarian germ cells initiate meiosis during ...

  13. Zfp322a Regulates Mouse ES Cell Pluripotency and Enhances Reprogramming Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    binds to Pou5f1 and Nanog promoters and regulates their transcription. These data along with the results Engineering, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, 3 Howard Hughes Medical Department of Biomedical Engineering and Center for BioDynamics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts

  14. Statistical approach for detection and localization of a fluorescing mouse tumor in Intralipid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a tissue-simulating lipid suspension. © 2005 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 170.6280, 290.7050, 100

  15. Photo-environment affects disease progression in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) Huntington s disease mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HUEI-BIN, WANG,

    2015-01-01

    to the negative impact of light pollution and may be able tocan be considered as light pollution. The hypothesis whetherexposed to such light pollution because they spend more time

  16. Reproductive strategies and natural history of the arboreal Neotropical vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Andrea; Timm, Robert M.

    2013-10-01

    orifice, an enlarged uterus, or placen- tal/uterine scars were considered reproductive. We used a binary logistic regression to predict the probability of female reproductive state based on mass. Model fit was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test... to be reproductive. The binary logistic regression was found to be significant, with all coefficients in the model non-zero (log likelihood test, G1?=?43.884, p?

  17. Mouse Models for Studying Depression-Like States and Antidepressant Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    . Bergner, Amanda N. Smolinsky, Peter C. Hart, Brett D. Dufour, Rupert J. Egan, Justin L. LaPorte, and Allan- sistent behavioral measurement, standardization of experimental protocols, and increased throughput

  18. Endogenous retrovirus and radiation-induced leukemia in the RMF mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, R.W.; Boone, L.R.; Lalley, P.; Yang, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of myeloid leukemia in irradiated RFM/Un mice has been associated with retrovirus infection. However, two characteristics of this strain complicate efforts to define the role of the virus. This strain possesses only one inducible host range class of endogenous virus and a unique gene, in addition to the Fv-1/sup n/ locus, which specifically restricts exogenous infection by endogenous viruses. These characteristics possibly account for absence of recombinant viruses in this strain, even though virus is amply expressed during most of the animal's life span. We have examined further the distribution of retrovirus sequences and the chromosomal locus of the inducible virus in this strain. This report describes evidence for additional viral sequences in cells of a radiation-induced myeloid leukemia line and discusses the possible origin of these added copies.

  19. Comparing performance of keyboarding/mousing tasks using notebook computer flat panel displays vs. CRT monitors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ventrca, Rachel Lynn

    2001-01-01

    cathode ray tube (CRT) computer monitors vs. a notebook computer flat panel display (FPD). Six combinations of typical CRT workstation configurations were presented to twenty-four subjects according to a Latin Square Crossover Design. The treatments...

  20. Parkin expression in the adult mouse brain Christine C. Stichel,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lübbert, Hermann

    represent a genetic risk factor for the development of sporadic Parkinson's disease (Satoh & Kuroda, 1999-51377 Leverkusen, Germany Keywords: gene expression, neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson's disease studies suggest that Parkin contributes to the pathophysiol- ogy of Parkinson's disease. In patients

  1. Analysis of the Mouse Immunome Reactive against Schistosoma mansoni Egg Antigens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erder, Annalisa Augusta

    2014-09-12

    . If an anti-pathology vaccine were created, the rate of infection and reinfection of schistosomiasis would be significantly reduced. Humans with asymptomatic intestinal schistosomiasis and mice with moderate splenomegaly syndrome (MSS) share certain cross...

  2. A Novel Sensitive Method of Detecting Mnemonic Decline in Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Rebecca

    2011-01-11

    be used as an early diagnostic tool for such decline, and a rodent model that is sensitive to this deficit could be valuable in the search for therapies to prevent or reverse such impairments. The goal of this study is to develop an analogous animal model...

  3. Cortical Processing of Frequency Modulated Sweeps in a Mouse Model of Presbycusis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trujillo, Michael

    2012-01-01

    79 Figure 3.7 RTI is influenced by sweepHigh frequency inhibition RTI: Rate Tuning Index SP: Slow-the rate tuning index (RTI) was calculated for each neuron

  4. Auditory Processing and Ultrasonic Vocalization Production in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotschafer, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    A rate tuning index (RTI) was quantified to determine theTrujillo et al. , 2011): RTI = [(n /(n-1)] x [1 – (mean/The rate tuning index (RTI) was used as a measure of FM rate

  5. Precision cancer mouse models through genome editing with CRISPR-Cas9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Haiwei

    The cancer genome is highly complex, with hundreds of point mutations, translocations, and chromosome gains and losses per tumor. To understand the effects of these alterations, precise models are needed. Traditional ...

  6. Semi-Automated Reconstruction of Vascular Networks in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dileepkumar, Ananth

    2014-08-14

    , vascular reconstruction techniques focus either on tracing vessels at the macro-level in a whole brain or tracing micro vessels in a small section of the brain. In this thesis, I attempt to develop a new, more targeted approach to semi-automatically trace a...

  7. The mouse and human Ah receptor differ in recognition of LXXLL motifs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdew, Gary

    . All rights reserved. Keywords: Ah receptor; LXXLL; Coactivators; TCDD; Glutamine-rich; Dioxin The aryl ligands such as carbaryl and myristicin [1]. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin (TCDD) is considered hydrocarbon receptor; TCDD, 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; ARNT, AhR nuclear translocator; DRE, dioxin

  8. Scanning Tranmission X-ray Microscopic Analysis of Purifed Melanosomes of the Mouse Iris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson,M.; Haraszti, T.; Peterson, G.; Wirick, S.; Jacobsen, C.; John, S.; Grunze, M.

    2006-01-01

    Melanosomes are specialized intracellular membrane bound organelles that produce and store melanin pigment. The composition of melanin and distribution of melanosomes determine the color of many mammalian tissues, including the hair, skin, and iris. However, the presence of melanosomes within a tissue carries potentially detrimental risks related to the cytotoxic indole-quinone intermediates produced during melanin synthesis. In order to study melanosomal molecules, including melanin and melanin-related intermediates, we have refined methods allowing spectromicroscopic analysis of purified melanosomes using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. Here, we present for the first time absorption data for melanosomes at the carbon absorption edge ranging from 284 to 290 eV. High-resolution images of melanosomes at discrete energies demonstrate that fully melanized mature melanosomes are internally non-homogeneous, suggesting the presence of an organized internal sub-structure. Spectra of purified melanosomes are complex, partially described by a predominating absorption band at 288.4 eV with additional contributions from several minor bands. Differences in these spectra were detectable between samples from two strains of inbred mice known to harbor genetically determined melanosomal differences, DBA/2J and C57BL/6J, and are likely to represent signatures arising from biologically relevant and tractable phenomena.

  9. Evaluation of unmarked deletion mutants as improved Brucella vaccine strains in the mouse and goat models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahl, Melissa Marie

    2006-10-30

    Historical data suggests that prolonged survival of Brucella vaccine organisms in the target host enhances immune protection. Recent research has focused upon the development of rough vaccine strains to avoid interference ...

  10. Embryotoxic and histopathologic effects of aflatoxin B1 during early pregnancy in the mouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia-Hsu, Ying

    1990-01-01

    %, respectively. AFB1 reduced body weight in both pregnant and nonpregnant female mice. The target organs for AFB1 toxicity on female mice include liver and kidney. Histologic alteration on liver is characterized by loss of outline of lobules, closing sinusoids.... . . . . . . . . . Criteria for Histologic Evaluation . . Statistical Methods Page nl V1 vn 1x X1 22 22 23 24 24 25 26 34 IV RESULTS General Embryo toxicity 35 35 35 CHAPTER Results of Weight Measurements . . Histopathologic Examination...

  11. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Felicia S. L.; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-11-26

    -pairs with significant offset C Figure 2. Motif-pairs with preferential spacing are prevalent in haematopoietic TF-bound regions. (A) The pie chart shows all genomic regions in this study bound by at least one TF and the proportion of regions containing motifs or motif... as significant matches to de novo motifs in Figure 1A (step II). These motifs were used to scan TF-bound regions for binding sites and the pie chart highlights the proportion that participates in motif-pairs (with and without significant spacing). relevant...

  12. The Use of Mouse Models for Understanding the Pathogenesis of Anemia of Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Airie

    2013-01-01

    for events related to ovarian cancer. Carcinogenesis, 2000.lung cancer [53], and ovarian cancer [54]. Other cancers,slow-growing model of ovarian cancer developed a frank iron-

  13. Correlation between induction of meiotic delay and aneuploidy in male mouse germ cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, I.D.; Gassner, P.; Schriever-Schwemmer, G.; Min, Zhou Ru [Institut fuer Sauugetiergenetik, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    No aneuploidy assays are prescribed in any international guidelines for chemical safety testing up to now. The CEC-sponsored Aneuploidy Project has the aim to validate test methods for aneuploidy induction which could be used as screening tests. Furthermore, one of the major goals is to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which aneuploidy is induced. The present paper describes the investigation of meiotic delay and aneuploidy induction with the drug diazepam (DZ), the environmentally important mutagen acrylamide (AA) and the spindle poison colchicine (COL), which is used as a positive control. The time course of events was investigated. It is concluded that the assessment of meiotic delay can be used to preselect chemicals which require evaluation of aneuploidy induction during MMI in male germ cells.

  14. Investigations into arsenate-induced neural tube defects in a mouse model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Denise Suzanne

    2009-05-15

    . Of the many environmental agents considered to potentially contribute to NTD risk, arsenic is one that is surrounded in controversy. We have developed a model system utilizing maternal intraperitoneal (I.P.) exposure on E7.5 and E8.5 to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium...

  15. Phenotypic Evolution of Therapeutic Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium after Invasion of TRAMP Mouse Prostate Tumor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choe, Elizabeth

    Salmonella has been of interest in cancer research due to its intrinsic ability to selectively target and colonize within tumors, leading to tumor cell death. Current research indicates promising use of Salmonella in regular ...

  16. In situ mechanical characterization of mouse oocytes using a cell holding Xinyu Liu,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    ,a Roxanne Fernandes,b Andrea Jurisicova,b Robert F. Casperb and Yu Sun*ac Received 29th March 2010, Accepted and a sub-pixel computer vision tracking algorithm to resolve cellular forces in real time with a nanonewton been used for characterizing cellular traction forces by visually tracking local deformations

  17. Eye-opening and control of visual synapse development in the mouse superior colliculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Marnie A. (Marnie Ann)

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian superior colliculus (SC) coordinates visual, somatosensory, and auditory stimuli to guide animal behavior. The superficial layers (sSC) receive visual information via two major afferent projections: 1) A ...

  18. The use of mouse models to elucidate the genetic and environmental components of neural tube defects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gefrides, Lisa Anne

    1998-01-01

    Neural tub defects (NTDs) rank among the most common phics. congenital anomalies affecting human infants worldwide. Unfortunately, the: etiology is poorly understood accuse the genetic and environmental components contributing to their expression...

  19. Metabolism of vitamin K in Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terryl Marie

    1985-01-01

    the carboxylation of blood proteins, induce GLU VITAMIN K CYCLE GLA K Carboxylase K Epoxidase HHO I I II -N-C-C- + CO~+ 0~ I H-C-H I H-C-H I COOH H HO I I II -N-CM- I H-C-H I H-C HOOC COOH / X CHs OH K red. K Epoxide Reductase 0 CHs...

  20. Genes methylated by DNA methyltransferase 3b are similar in mouse intestine and human colon cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steine, Eveline J.

    Human cancer cells frequently have regions of their DNA hypermethylated, which results in transcriptional silencing of affected genes and promotion of tumor formation. However, it is still unknown whether cancer-associated ...

  1. Killing of Targets by CD8+ T Cells in the Mouse Spleen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Boer, Rob J.

    , Knoxville, Tennessee, United States of America, 2 National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Massachusetts, United States of America, 3 Theoretical Biology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract.e., the death rate of individual target cells remains proportional to the frequency (or the total number

  2. INTRODUCTION The mouse Hox complex contains 39 genes distributed in four

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    examined for skeletal, muscular and neural abnormalities. Mutant mice exhibit alterations in the vertebral column and in the bones of the hindlimb. Sacral vertebrae beginning at the level of S2 exhibit homeotic

  3. Nature Methods Chronic in vivo imaging in the mouse spinal cord using an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Chris B.

    the vertebral column and provided long-term optical access to the spinal cord. Supplementary Figure 2 A custom spinal chamber implant was mounted via a custom delivery system onto the vertebral column and provided to the ER90B right-angle adaptors. Shown mounted here is a vertebral clamp for acute imaging where a chronic

  4. Functional studies of signaling pathways in peri-implantation development of the mouse embryo by RNAi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soares, Miguel L.; Haraguchi, Seiki; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena; Kalmar, Tibor; Carpenter, Lee; Bell, Graham; Morrison, Alastair; Ring, Christopher J. A.; Clarke, Neil J.; Glover, David M.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2005-12-28

    -down and the rate of mRNA recovery are target dependent. Thus, factors such as the level of expres- sion, turnover rate of mRNA species, and protein product stability/degradation might dictate the extent of the RNAi phenotype. Our results have shown novel phenotypes... Alexa Fluor 594-succinimidyl ester (Molecular Probes) in DMSO. After phenol/chloroform extraction and iso- propanol precipitation, the dsRNA was further purified through BioRad P30 MicroBiospin columns (10 mM Tris pH7.4) and an additional phenol...

  5. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    toxicity studies of 1,3-butadiene in rodents, Environ.developmental toxicity of 1,3-butadiene, Toxicology 113 (response study for 1,3- butadiene-induced dominant lethal

  6. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    toxicity studies of 1,3-butadiene in rodents, Environ.developmental toxicity of 1,3-butadiene, Toxicology 113 (response study for 1,3- butadiene-induced dominant lethal

  7. A Structurally Based Investigation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Mouse Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Melissa

    2012-02-14

    parameters of the two vessels that experience AAAs in different models, but also the effects of three major components of AAA formation. Biaxial mechanical tests were performed using a modified computer- controlled device. We examined the solid mechanics...

  8. Adipose-Derived Perivascular Stem Cells Heal Critical Size Mouse Calvarial Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megerdichian, Silva

    2013-01-01

    stromal  cells  derived  from  the  infrapatellar  fat  C.  M.   et  al.  Adipose-­?derived  adult  stromal  cells  Human  bone  marrow-­? derived  mesenchymal  stem  cells  

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rescues synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    in mice lacking brain- derived neurotrophic factor. Procterm potentiation by brain- derived neurotrophic factor. JCM, Simmons DA (2007b) Brain-derived neurotrophic factor

  10. Automated Microinjection of Recombinant BCL-X into Mouse Zygotes Enhances Embryo Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    therapies for infertility intervention. However, systematic evaluation of molecular targets has been preimplantation embryo development. This approach may lead to a possible treatment option for patients

  11. Neonatal Exposure to Estrogens Suppresses Activin Expression and Signaling in the Mouse Ovary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayo, Kelly E.

    treatment may alter activin signaling in the neonatal ovary. Therefore, this study was designed to ex- amine in ovulation and/or follicle develop- ment (12­15). ER -knockout mice are infertile, and ovarian follicles fail or infertile, and ovarian follicles are relatively normal, although the numbers of large antral follicles

  12. Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummaryDIST OFMEAG, Dalton2ProgramAreaLaboratoryThisPolice cars inA look

  13. RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintas EnergyRAPID/About/FAQ

  14. RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintas

  15. Microsoft Word - FINAL 2010_SPFPA_CBA With MOUs.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA.MOX Adventure6 Fed.2009, has1531-15445,

  16. An Anisotropic Fluid-Solid Model of the Mouse Heart (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563AbuseConnect Technicalof PDEs with Random Input(Conference)

  17. The Crystal Structure of Mouse Exo70 Reveals Unique Features of the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACEConnect Conference:ConnectMammalian

  18. Music BA Curriculum (37 credits + 3) Rev. 5-1-08 Freshman Year Prerequisite course: 2nd semester credits 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Music BA Curriculum (37 credits + 3) Rev. 5-1-08 Freshman Year ­ Prerequisite course: 2nd semester credits 3 MUS 0100 Fundamentals of Western Music 3 Sample Course Sequence Year 1 1st semester credits 2nd lessons 1 Ensemble 1 Year 3 1st semester credits 2nd semester credits 8 MUS 1904 Senior Seminar 3 Senior

  19. Music, Composition BM, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Music, Composition BM, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed 3-4 DLV MUS 100 Introduction to Music 3 DLL Literature and Humanities 3-4 DLS Social Sciences course in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 MUS 119, 120, 219, 220 Materials of Music

  20. Music, Performance BM, Bowed String Option, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Music, Performance BM, Bowed String Option, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 3-4 DLV MUS 100 Introduction to Music 3 DLL Literature and Humanities 3-4 DLS Social Sciences course in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 MUS 119, 120, 219, 220 Materials of Music

  1. Music, Performance BM, Piano Option, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Music, Performance BM, Piano Option, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 3-4 DLV MUS 100 Introduction to Music 3 DLL Literature and Humanities 3-4 DLS Social Sciences course in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 MUS 119, 120, 219, 220 Materials of Music

  2. Music, Performance BM, Voice Option, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Music, Performance BM, Voice Option, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 3-4 DLV MUS 100 Introduction to Music 3 DLL Literature and Humanities 3-4 DLS Social Sciences course in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 MUS 119, 120, 219, 220 Materials of Music

  3. Bachelor of Music, Music Education, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Music, Music Education, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency, and Applied Sciences course DLV MUS 100 Introduction to Music DLL Literature and Humanities DLS ED-CIFS 201 and Foundational Studies for more information. 1 4 3 MUS 119*, 120, 219, 220 Materials of Music (*with grade of C

  4. Music BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Music BA, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed In Progress Future ENGL Introduction to Music 3 DLL Literature and Humanities 3-4 DLS Social Sciences course in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 MUS 119, 120, 219, 220 Materials of Music 12 MUS 121, 122 221

  5. Section Enrollment Report (CENSUS) -Table of Contents Subject Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Cmity Service EXPL EXPL-Exploratory Studies FNR FNR-Forestry&Natural Resources FR FR-French FS FS-Clinical Pharmacy CMCI CMCI-CIC Common Market CMPL CMPL-Comparative Literature CNIT CNIT-Computer & Info Tech COM-Military Science & Ldrshp MUS MUS-Music History & Theory NRES NRES-Natural Res & Environ Sci #12;Section Enrollment

  6. MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 664, pp. 18, 3 figs. Reithrodon auritus. By Ulyses F. J. Pardin~as and Carlos A. Galliari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayssen, Virginia

    . Reithrodon Waterhouse, 1837 Mus Fischer, 1814:71 (part, not Linnaeus, 1758). Type species Mus auritus Fischer- sion on Zoological Nomenclature, 1985, Art. 68c) antedating cuniculoides, designated type by Coues 1999). Reithrodon auritus (Fischer, 1814) Rata Conejo Rat oreillard Azara, 1801:91. Type locality ``les

  7. Special Publication No. 3, Ticks And Tickborne Diseases, III. Checklist Of Families, Genera, Species, And Subspecies Of Ticks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Anastos, George

    1977-01-01

    ) ). 1871: Ixodes 1958: Aponomma (Santos Dias, J. A. T., Meni. Estud. Mus. Zool. Mus. Zool. Univ. Coimbra (250), pp. 9,12,14). Thus, anyone seeking complete information con- cerning this species must check the Parasite Cata- logue under two combinations...+-5 (Parasitology, v. 6 (2)) I913 : Haemaphysalis aciculifer rugosa Santos Dias, J. ?. ?., (1956L), 5?8, fig. U (Mem. Estud. Mus. Zool. Univ. Coimbra (2l+2)) 1956 : Haemaphysalis acinus Whittick, R. J., (1938A), 333-338, figs. 1-7 (Parasitology, v. 30 (3...

  8. Pulse-shape discrimination with PbWO$_4$ crystal scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Bardelli; M. Bini; P. G. Bizzeti; F. A. Danevich; T. F. Fazzini; V. V. Kobychev; N. Krutyak; P. R. Maurenzig; V. M. Mokina; S. S. Nagorny; M. Pashkovskii; D. V. Poda; V. I. Tretyak; S. S. Yurchenko

    2007-06-16

    The light output, $\\alpha/\\beta$ ratio, and pulse shape have been investigated at $-25^\\circ$ C with PbWO$_4$ crystal scintillators undoped, and doped by F, Eu, Mo, Gd and S. The fast $0.01-0.06 \\mu$s and middle $0.1-0.5 \\mu$s components of scintillation decay were observed for all the samples. Slow components of scintillation signal with the decay times $1-3 \\mu$s and $13-28 \\mu$s with the total intensity up to $\\approx50%$ have been recognized for several samples doped by Molybdenum. We found some indications of a pulse-shape discrimination between $\\alpha$ particles and $\\gamma$ quanta with PbWO$_4$ (Mo doped) crystal scintillators.

  9. Approved 5/05/08 *Action Items

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Council Minutes 4.21.08.doc University Graduate Council April 21, 2008 Minutes Present: K. Klomparens (TGS (MUS), D. Garling for Campa (CANR/TGS), M. Noel (CHM), C. Petty (EGR), S. Dilley (BUS), J. Lindquist

  10. Approved Jan 28, 2008 University Graduate Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (TGS), F. Ravitch (COL), C. Petty (ENG), W. Li (CANR), C. Zheng (COGS), K. Lowerre (MUS), J. Gerlach for S. Cendrowski (CNS), J. Rowan (COM), R. Campa (CANR, TGS), J. Lindquist (CAL), J. Lonstein (CSS), S

  11. APPROVED 12/17/07 University Graduate Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPROVED 12/17/07 University Graduate Council October 8, 2007 Minutes Present: K. Klomparens (TGS (MUS), R. Campa (CANR/TGS), L. Kielman (CON), M. Noel (CHM), C. Petty (EGR), S. Dilley (BUS), J

  12. PEOPLE PORTRAIT futurPrixNobeltouslesdeux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    pour ajouter une corde à son arc: un pro- gramme en management et administrationàl'Université de interuniversi- taires. Après un séjour Eras- mus au Centre Hospitalier UniversitairedeGrenoble,il a enseigné et

  13. Grape-derived polyphenolics prevent A? oligomerization and attenuate cognitive deterioration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    153:185–192. nisms of green tea polyphenols in Alzheimer’sGreen CE, Krafft GA, Klein WL (1998) Diffusible, nonfibrillar ligands derived tea

  14. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  15. Essential role of RGS-PX1/sorting nexin 13 in mouse development and regulation of endocytosis dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    were stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate. (Scale1 h, stained en-bloc in 1% uranyl acetate in 10% ethanol forsections were stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate

  16. Title: Overexpression of Follistatin in the Mouse Epididymis Disrupts Fluid Resorption and Sperm Transit in Testicular Excurrent Ducts.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Sperm Transit in Testicular Excurrent Ducts. Short Title: Elevated follistatin causes epididymal ducts and initial segment of the epididymis, as indicated by accumulation of fluid and sperm stasis is essential for normal testicular excurrent duct function and that its blockade impairs fertility

  17. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  18. LAIDLAW ET AL: VISUALIZING DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGES OF THE MOUSE SPINAL CORD 101 Visualizing Diffusion Tensor Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­Sinai Medical Center Abstract--- Within biological systems water molecules undergo con­ tinuous stochastic con­ cepts from oil painting to represent the seven­valued data with multiple layers of varying brush oil painting to represent the seve

  19. Specific sulphation modifications of heparan sulphate regulate distinct aspects of axon guidance in the developing mouse central nervous system. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conway, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Development of the visual system involves the precise orchestration of neural connections between the retina of the eye, the thalamus (dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus; dLGN) and the superior colliculus (SC). During early ...

  20. Changes in temporal acuity with age and with hearing impairment in the mouse: A study of the acoustic startle reflex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makous, Walter

    in CBA/CaJ and CBA C57BL F1-hybrid mice, which show no apparent change in sensory function at these ages-characterized age- related hearing loss, and two others, the CBA/CaJ and the F1 hybrid of a C57 and the CBA, because

  1. Embryoid Body Formation is Required for Differentiation of Insulin-Producing Cell Clusters from Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caneda, Christa

    2013-01-01

    culture formation IPCC5 on gelatin IDSTO5 —b T. j’ T’ S daysplates coated with 0.1% gelatin in differentiation media (samples: ESCs cultured on gelatin as an undif- ferentiated

  2. Genetic Removal of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Rescues the Symptoms of Fragile X Syndrome in a Mouse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidhu, Harpreet Kaur

    2013-01-01

    type IV collagen and gelatin components of the extracellularorthologs to date. It cleaves gelatin and collagen types I,types I, II and III, gelatin, fibronectin, vitronectin,

  3. CXCR2 Signaling Protects Oligodendrocytes and Restricts Demyelination in a Mouse Model of Viral-Induced Demyelination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosking, Martin P.; Tirotta, Emanuele; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    the MHV model of multiple sclerosis. Exp Neurol 187: Junein a viral model of multiple sclerosis. J Immunol 167: 5.recovery in models of multiple sclerosis. Exp Neurol. 6.

  4. Physiological Activation of Synaptic Rac > PAK Signaling Is Defective in a Mouse Model of Fragile-X Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    3C,D). In contrast to the WTs, TBS failed to increase theto the effects seen in WTs (p=0.017). Factors contributinga slower rate than found in WTs. Time course analyses showed

  5. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and its effects on elemental distributions in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells in x-ray fluorescence microanalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, Qiaoling; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Deng, Junjing; Mak, Rachel; Moonier, Nena; et al

    2015-02-23

    Rapidly-frozen hydrated (cryopreserved) specimens combined with cryo-scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy provide an ideal approach for investigating elemental distributions in biological cells and tissues. However, because cryopreservation does not deactivate potentially infectious agents associated with Risk Group 2 biological materials, one must be concerned with contamination of expensive and complicated cryogenic x-ray microscopes when working with such materials. We employed ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to decontaminate previously cryopreserved cells under liquid nitrogen, and then investigated its effects on elemental distributions under both frozen hydrated and freeze dried states with x-ray fluorescence microscopy. We show that the contents and distributions of most biologicallymore »important elements remain nearly unchanged when compared with non-ultraviolet-irradiated counterparts, even after multiple cycles of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and cryogenic x-ray imaging. This provides a potential pathway for rendering Risk Group 2 biological materials safe for handling in multiuser cryogenic x-ray microscopes without affecting the fidelity of the results.« less

  6. Development and characterization of a novel variable low-dose rate irradiator for in vivo mouse studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Matthew Allen

    Radiation exposure of humans generally results in low doses delivered at low dose rate. Our limited knowledge of the biological effects of low dose radiation is mainly based on data from the atomic bomb Life Span Study ...

  7. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Development and the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program.in vivo by low doses of gamma radiation. Rad Res 156, 324-7.

  8. Chronic cisplatin treatment promotes enhanced damage repair and tumor progression in a mouse model of lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Trudy Gale

    Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment, yet the mechanisms of response to specific therapies have been largely unexplored in vivo. Employing genetic, genomic, and imaging approaches, we examined ...

  9. Dual-Energy Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Radiation-Induced Vascular Changes in Primary Mouse Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moding, Everett J. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ghaghada, Ketan [The Edward B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States)] [The Edward B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Johnson, G. Allan [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States) [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Badea, Cristian T., E-mail: cristian.badea@duke.edu [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4) with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4 (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between CT measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R{sup 2}=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R{sup 2}=0.63) on day 4, respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment.

  10. Development of the mouse as a laboratory animal model for the study of Corynebacterium equi pneumonia in foals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Joanne Marie

    1979-01-01

    . There is an increase in pulse, respiration and tempera- ture. A cough, with accompanyinq moist rales, develops shortly after onset. Nasal discharge may or may not be present. The course of the disease varies from a few days to several weeks. The pathogenesis... had a nasal discharge, cough and increased vesicular sounds in the lungs. Within 1 week, the foal exhibited signs of recovery. Fecal, tracheal wash, blood and nasal cultures were neqa- tive for C. equi and radiographically the lung was clearing. Z7...

  11. The role of acetate in alcohol-induced alterations of uterine glucose metabolism in the mouse during pregnancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simm, B. ); Murdoch, R.N. )

    1990-01-01

    The acute exposure of mice to ethanol during post-implantation pregnancy has been reported to cause alterations in the levels of several glycolytic intermediates in the uterus, suggesting a possible indirect mechanism of alcohol embryo-toxicity. The present study was undertaken to assess whether the ethanol metabolite, acetate is implicated in this phenomenon. Blood and uterine alcohol concentrations in day 9 - pregnant Quackenbush Swiss mice were maximal 15 minutes after the intraperitoneal injection of ethanol, and fell to almost negligible levels 6 hours later. In response to this treatment, the levels of blood and uterine acetate increased, liver glycogen decreased, plasma glucose increased, and uterine glucose, glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P), fructose-6-phosphate (F-6-P), and citrate increased. When acetate was administered to pregnant mice in amounts approximating those generated by exposure to alcohol, the levels of uterine F-6-P and citrate increased while other metabolic parameters remained unaffected. The administration of 4-methylpyrazole to mice subsequently treated with alcohol produced conditions of alcohol exposure in the absence of ethanol-derived acetate and depressed the ethanol-induced rise in uterine G-6-P and citrate.

  12. Role of Delta Subunit-Containing GABAA Receptors in Hippocampus Tonic Inhibition and Epileptogenesis within Transgenic Mouse Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Chase M

    2015-04-27

    Epilepsy is associated with marked alterations in the structure and function of GABAA receptors in the hippocampus, a key structure for the genesis of epilepsy. Two types of inhibition are mediated via distinct GABAA ...

  13. Precise pattern of recombination in serotonergic and hypothalamic neurons in a Pdx1-cre transgenic mouse line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honig, Gerard; Liou, Angela; Berger, Miles; German, Michael S; Tecott, Laurence H

    2010-01-01

    olive nucleus. In the adult hypothalamus, recombination wasnucleus and dorsomedial hypothalamus. Recombination was notneurons; in the hypothalamus; and in non-serotonergic

  14. A learning deficit related to age and b-amyloid plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guiquan; Chen, Karen S; Knox, Jane H; Inglis, Jennifer; Bernard, Andrew; Martin, Stephen J; Justice, Alan; McConlogue, Lisa; Games, Dora; Freedman, Stephen B; Morris, Richard G M

    2000-12-21

    Mice that overexpress the human mutant amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) show learning deficits, but the apparent lack of a relationship between these deficits and the progressive b-amyloid plaque formation that the hAPP ...

  15. Iron and Lactoferrin Levels Remain Unchanged in Parkin Deficient Mouse Brains: Implications for Parkinson’s Disease Etiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    uses solutions of potassium ferrocyanide and acid to stain2% HCl and 2% Potassium Ferrocyanide for 30 minutes, wash in

  16. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Kastan, M. B. (1997). DNA damage induces phosphorylation ofby ATM in response to DNA damage. Science 281, Barber, R. ,Nussenzweig, A. (2002). DNA damage-induced G2-M checkpoint

  17. Examining mechanisms underlying the selective vulnerability of motor units in a mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, Sophie Rose

    2014-06-28

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a childhood form of motor neuron disease that causes a progressive paralysis that, in its most severe form, results in death before two years of age. There is currently no cure or treatment ...

  18. Autophagy induction reduces mutant ataxin-3 levels and toxicity in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzies, Fiona M.; Huebener, Jeannette; Renna, Maurizio; Bonin, Michael; Riess, Olaf; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2009-12-09

    ’s protocol. Total brain lysates were prepared by homogenising in buffer B (50 mM Tris pH 7.5, 10% glycerol, 5 mM magnesium acetate, 0.2 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 0.5 mM dithiothreitol and protease inhibitor) at 4?C. The homogenate was centrifuged... in Rubinsztein, 2006). Treatment of proteinopathies with drugs that up-regulate autophagy has shown tantalizing results in a small trial of another human disease associated with intracytosolic inclusion formation, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Lithium induces...

  19. Analysis of the mouse embryonic stem cell regulatory networks obtained by ChIP-chip and ChIP-PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Divya

    Background: Genome-wide approaches have begun to reveal the transcriptional networks responsible for pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed either by hybridization to a ...

  20. Spatio-temporal organization of Vam6P and SNAP on mouse spermatozoa and their involvement in spermzona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Nader G.

    Reproduction Unit, School of Life Sciences, Devi Ahilya University, Vigyan Bhawan, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001

  1. The role of p53 in normal development and teratogen-induced apoptosis and birth defects in mouse embryos 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosako, Hiromi

    2009-05-15

    In the studies described in this dissertation, we investigated the roles of p53 in normal development, teratogen-induced apoptosis, and birth defects. In the first study, the activation of p53 and its target genes, p21, ...

  2. Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Feasibility study in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieck, Birgit; Bates, David; Pichardo, Samuel E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Curiel, Laura E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Zhang, Kunyan; Escott, Nicholas; Mougenot, Charles

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. Methods: 50?l of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 5} colony forming units (cfu)/?l was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5?°C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Results: Macroscopic evaluation of treated abscess indicated a diminution of external size of abscess 1 day after treatment. Treatment did not cause open wounds. The median (lower to upper quartile) bacterial count 1 day after treatment was 6.18 × 10{sup 3} (0.76 × 10{sup 3}–11.18 × 10{sup 3}), 2.86 × 10{sup 3} (1.22 × 10{sup 3}–7.07 × 10{sup 3}), and 3.52 × 10{sup 3} (1.18 × 10{sup 3}–6.72 × 10{sup 3}) cfu/100 ?l for control, MT and HT groups, respectively; for the 4-day end point, the count was 1.37 × 10{sup 3} (0.67 × 10{sup 3}–2.89 × 10{sup 3}), 1.35 × 10{sup 3} (0.09 × 10{sup 3}–2.96 × 10{sup 3}), and 0.07 × 10{sup 3} (0.03 × 10{sup 3}–0.36 × 10{sup 3}) cfu/100 ?l for control, MT and HT, showing a significant reduction (p = 0.002) on the bacterial load four days after focused ultrasound treatment when treating at high temperature (HT). The MPO amount remained unchanged between groups and days, indicating no change on local neutrophil recruitment in the abscess caused by the treatment. The white blood cell count remained unchanged between groups and days indicating that no systemic inflammatory response was caused by the treatment. Conclusions: Focused ultrasound induces a therapeutic effect in abscesses induced by MRSA. This effect is observed as a reduction of the number bacteria without significantly altering the amount of MPO at the site of a MRSA-induced abscess. These initial results suggest that focused ultrasound is a viable option for the treatment of localized MRSA-related infections.

  3. Effect of docosahexaenoic acid on ras post-translational processing and localization in a transgenic mouse colonic cell line 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, Esther Dick

    2000-01-01

    The acquisition of a chronically activated ras gene is a critical early step in colon cancer development, with membrane localization being a prerequisite for malignant transformation. Fish oil supplemented diets, containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA...

  4. nAture methods | VOL.8 NO.12 | DECEMBER2011 | 1071 Genome-wide mutagenesis in mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    , we used V6.5 F1 hybrid ESCs derived from C57BL/6 × 129S4/SvJae F1 mice6, allowing rapid screen- ing engineered the Blm and Gt(ROSA)26Sor (Rosa26) loci of V6.5 cells (Fig. 1b). 1Department of Social

  5. Analysis of transcriptional responses in the mouse dorsal striatum following acute MDMA (Ecstasy): identification of ERK-controlled genes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ): identification of ERK-controlled genes. J. Salzmann, C. Canestrelli, F. Noble*, and C. Marie-Claire. Université rewarding effects in mice were dependent upon ERK activation and that dorsal striatum was a critical region for mediating ERK-dependent Egr1 MDMA-induced transcription. Here, we extend these findings by showing that MDMA

  6. Maternal diet-induced obesity programmes cardiovascular dysfunction in adult male mouse offspring independent of current body weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackmore, Heather L.; Niu, Youguo; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Giussani, Dino A.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2014-07-18

    , Siggens L, et al. The pro- gramming of cardiac hypertrophy in the offspring by maternal obe- sity is associated with hyperinsulinemia, AKT, ERK, and mTOR activation. Endocrinology. 2012;153(12):5961–5971. 14. Fan X, Turdi S, Ford SP, et al. Influence...

  7. Maternal Diet-induced Obesity Programs Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Adult Male Mouse Offspring Independent of Current Body Weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackmore, Heather L.; Niu, Youguo; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Giussani, Dino A.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2014-07-22

    , Siggens L, et al. The pro- gramming of cardiac hypertrophy in the offspring by maternal obe- sity is associated with hyperinsulinemia, AKT, ERK, and mTOR activation. Endocrinology. 2012;153(12):5961–5971. 14. Fan X, Turdi S, Ford SP, et al. Influence...

  8. Dietary composition modulates brain mass and amyloid beta levels in a mouse model of aggressive Alzheimer's amyloid pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedrini, Steve; Thomas, Carlos; Brautigam, Hannah; Schmeidler, James; Ho, Lap; Fraser, Paul; Westaway, David; St George Hyslop, Peter; Martins, Ralph N.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Pasinetti, Giulio M.; Dickstein, Dara L.; Hof, Patrick R.; Ehrlich, Michelle E.; Gandy, Sam

    2009-10-21

    /LC diet on the brains of nontransgenic mice. The "encephalization quotient" (EQ; brain weight/body weight) is modulated by both genetic and dietary factors during brain development [22,23], but the effect of diet on EI in adult animals is less well... lifetime." Sir Paul Nurse, Cancer Research UK Your research papers will be: available free of charge to the entire biomedical community peer reviewed and published immediately upon acceptance cited in PubMed and archived on PubMed Central Molecular...

  9. High concentrations of morphine sensitize and activate mouse dorsal root ganglia via TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, Alexander B.; Reeh, Peter; Messlinger, Karl; Fischer, Michael J. M.

    2009-04-16

    . Methods Animals Animal care and treatment were in accordance with the guidelines of the International Association for the Study of Pain [39]. Adult C57Bl/6, TRPV1-/- and TRPA1-/- as well as TRPV1-/-TRPA1-/- double knockout mice were used. Breeding pairs... lifetime." Sir Paul Nurse, Cancer Research UK Your research papers will be: available free of charge to the entire biomedical community peer reviewed and published immediately upon acceptance cited in PubMed and archived on PubMed Central Molecular Pain...

  10. Biomechanics of common carotid arteries from mice heterozygous for mgR, the most common mouse model of Marfan syndrome 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taucer, Anne Irene

    2009-05-15

    complications affecting the normal population, including hypertension and atherosclerosis. Therefore, it is imperative to gather biomechanical data from the Marfan vasculature so that clinicians may predict the effects of vascular complications in Marfan...

  11. To appear in: Mouse Models for Drug Discovery Eds: G. Proetzel and M. Wiles, Humana Press, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    . Smolinsky1 , Peter C. Hart1 , Brett D. Dufour2 , Rupert J. Egan1 , Allan V. Kalueff 1,3* 1 Department, standardization of experimental protocols, and increased throughput and testing. 2. Materials and Methods 2

  12. To appear in: Mouse Models for Drug Discovery Eds: G. Proetzel and M. Wiles, Humana Press, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Experimental models of anxiety for drug discovery and brain research Peter C. Hart1 , Carisa L. Bergner1 and anxiogenic drugs. Detailed protocols will be provided for these paradigms, and possible confounds discuss how these protocols can be applied correctly, in order to avoid confounding experimental data. 2

  13. Behavioural, genetic and epigenetic determinants of white matter pathology in a new mouse model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsenkina, Yanina

    2013-07-06

    Recent clinical studies suggest that white matter pathology rather than grey matter abnormality is the major neurobiological substrate of age- related cognitive decline during “healthy” aging. According to this hypothesis, ...

  14. Identification and Evaluation of Brucella Recombinant Outer Membrane Proteins as Subunit Vaccinogen Candidates in the Mouse Model of Brucellosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Gabriel

    2013-02-26

    Despite being amongst the most common zoonotic diseases in the world, brucellosis is a neglected disease for which an approved vaccine for human use does not exist. Thus far, the traditional approaches to Brucella antigen selection for subunit...

  15. Proteomic and transcriptional analysis of components of the DNA replication and repair machinery in mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellami, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC) mediates histone 3 lysine 4transcription. Silence of the ORCs. Curr. Biol. CB 4, 238–Rbf1 interacts with ORC and associates with chromatin in an

  16. A comparative metabolomic study of NHR-49 in Caenorhabditis elegans and PPAR-a in the mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miska, Eric

    in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis. Ó 2008 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Pub- lished by Elsevier B

  17. Neural Stem Cell Grafts and the Influence of Apolipoprotein E in a Mouse Model of Global Ischaemia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Andrew M S

    2007-01-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation is a promising therapy for the treatment of brain damage. Although the “proof of principle” for NSC transplantation therapy has been demonstrated in a variety of animal models of brain ...

  18. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and its effects on elemental distributions in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells in x-ray fluorescence microanalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Qiaoling; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Deng, Junjing; Mak, Rachel; Moonier, Nena; Jacobsen, Chris; Brody, James P.

    2015-02-23

    Rapidly-frozen hydrated (cryopreserved) specimens combined with cryo-scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy provide an ideal approach for investigating elemental distributions in biological cells and tissues. However, because cryopreservation does not deactivate potentially infectious agents associated with Risk Group 2 biological materials, one must be concerned with contamination of expensive and complicated cryogenic x-ray microscopes when working with such materials. We employed ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to decontaminate previously cryopreserved cells under liquid nitrogen, and then investigated its effects on elemental distributions under both frozen hydrated and freeze dried states with x-ray fluorescence microscopy. We show that the contents and distributions of most biologically important elements remain nearly unchanged when compared with non-ultraviolet-irradiated counterparts, even after multiple cycles of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and cryogenic x-ray imaging. This provides a potential pathway for rendering Risk Group 2 biological materials safe for handling in multiuser cryogenic x-ray microscopes without affecting the fidelity of the results.

  19. Cerebellar Purkinje cell death in the P/Q -type voltage-gated calcium ion channel mutant mouse, leaner 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank-Cannon, Tamy Catherine

    2006-04-12

    . The leaner mutation causes reduced calcium ion influx upon activation of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels. This disrupts calcium homeostasis and leads to a loss of cerebellar neurons, including cerebellar Purkinje cells. Because of its similarities...

  20. Low-level Laser Therapy to the Mouse Femur Enhances the Fungicidal Response of Neutrophils against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, Eva

    Neutrophils (PMN) play a central role in host defense against the neglected fungal infection paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), which is caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb). PCM is of major importance, ...

  1. Identification and characterisation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor expressing cells using a new transgenic mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Paul; Parker, Helen E.; Adriaenssens, Alice E.; Hodgson, Joshua M.; Cork, Simon C.; Trapp, Stefan; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2013-12-02

    containing E.coli DH10B clone with the PCR product and the plasmid pSC101-BAD-gbaA, which provides the recombination enzymes (Genebridges). Positive recombinants were isolated using appropriate antibiotic selection and characterised by PCR and restriction... ) and dissolved at ~1-2 ng/?l in injection buffer containing (mM): 10 Tris-HCl pH 7.5, 0.1 EDTA, 100 NaCl, 0.03 spermine, 0.07 spermidine. Pronuclear injection into ova derived from C57B6/CBA F1 parents and reimplantation of embryos into pseudopregnant females...

  2. p53 constrains progression to anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in a Braf-mutant mouse model of papillary thyroid cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, David Glenn

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) has among the worst prognoses of any solid malignancy. The low incidence of the disease has in part precluded systematic clinical trials and tissue collection, and there has been little ...

  3. Investigation of T cell-mediated immune surveillance against tumor-specific antigens in genetically engineered mouse models of cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du Page, Michel Justin Porter

    2011-01-01

    The association of tumor cells and lymphocytes has led to the hypothesis that our immune system actively inhibits the formation and progression of cancer, a phenomenon called tumor immune surveillance. T cells specific to ...

  4. Conditional inactivation of Brca1 in the mouse ovarian surface epithelium results in an increase in preneoplastic changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark-Knowles, Katherine V. . E-mail: kclar075@uottawa.ca; Garson, Kenneth; Jonkers, Jos; Vanderhyden, Barbara C.

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is thought to arise from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE); however, the molecular events underlying this transformation are poorly understood. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene result in a significantly increased risk of developing EOC and a large proportion of sporadic EOCs display some sort of BRCA1 dysfunction. Using mice with conditional expression of Brca1, we inactivated Brca1 in the murine OSE and demonstrate that this inactivation results in the development of preneoplastic changes, such as hyperplasia, epithelial invaginations, and inclusion cysts, which arise earlier and are more numerous than in control ovaries. These changes resemble the premalignant lesions that have been reported in human prophylactic oophorectomy specimens from women with BRCA1 germline mutation. We also report that inactivation of Brca1 in primary cultures of murine OSE cells leads to a suppression of proliferation due to increased apoptosis that can be rescued by concomitant inactivation of p53. These observations, along with our finding that these cells display an increased sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent cisplatin, indicate that loss of function of Brca1 in OSE cells impacts both cellular growth control and DNA-damage repair which results in altered cell behavior manifested as morphological changes in vivo that arise earlier and are more numerous than what can be attributed to ageing.

  5. Myocardial and cerebral perfusion studies in animal models S65 In-vivo phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endothelial Growth Factor gene(Vegf/ mice) develop motor neurodegeneration reminiscent for Amyotrophic Lateral Tesla setup J. Pfeuffer1 , H. Merkle2 , N. K. Logothetis1 ; 1 Dep. Physiology of Cognitive Processes

  6. The expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase during postnatal development in the leaner and tottering mouse cerebella 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeve, Daniel Richard

    2013-02-22

    to be directed in some part by nitric oxide (NO), which is regulated through control of its production by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (neuronal NOS). The expression of neuronal NOS/NO is regulated by calcium ion signaling and it has been shown that abnormal...

  7. RAPID 3D TRACING OF THE MOUSE BRAIN NEUROVASCULATURE WITH LOCAL MAXIMUM INTENSITY PROJECTION AND MOVING WINDOWS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Dong Hyeop

    2011-10-21

    , I introduce an e ective and e cient ber tracing algorithm for 2D and 3D data. In 2D tracing, I have implemented a Moving Window (MW) method which leads to a mathematical simpli cation and noise robustness in determining the trace di- rection... contributions of this research are as follows. My 2D tracing algorithm is fast enough to analyze, with linear processing time based on ber length, large volumes of biological data and is good at handling branches. The new local MIP approach for 3D tracing...

  8. Grape-derived polyphenolics prevent A? oligomerization and attenuate cognitive deterioration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    also re- ported that resveratrol, a natural polyphe- nolP, Zhao H, Davies P (2005) Resveratrol promotes clearance of

  9. Inhibitory actions of Ah receptor agonists and indole-containing compounds in breast cancer cell lines and mouse models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kelcey Manae Becker

    2005-08-29

    activities such as flavonoids, carotenoids, indole-3-carbinol and resveratrol (Bjeldanes et al., 1991; Jellinck et al., 1993; Chen et al., 1996; Gasiewicz et al., 1996; Gradelet et al., 1997; Casper et al., 1999; Seidel et al., 2000). 23 Inhibitory Ah...

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor restores synaptic plasticity in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    term potentiation by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. JNeurobiology of Disease Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factorbe rescued with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

  11. Transplantation of Adult Mouse iPS Cell-Derived Photoreceptor Precursors Restores Retinal Structure and Function in Degenerative Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    the phenomenon of HESC-derived RPE: anatomy of cell genesis,population of donor-derived photoreceptor cells (indicatedof human embryonic stem cell-derived photoreceptors restores

  12. Bachelor of Music, Music Education, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Music, Music Education, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency Sciences course DLV MUS 100 Introduction to Music DLL Literature and Humanities DLS ED-CIFS 201 Foundations for more information. 3 3 3 3 3-4 4 3-4 3 3-4 3 3 1 4 3 MUS 119*, 120, 219, 220 Materials of Music (*with

  13. Bachelor of Music, Music Education, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Music, Music Education, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency Sciences course DLV MUS 100 Introduction to Music DLL Literature and Humanities DLS ED-CIFS 201 Foundations for more information. 3 3 3 3 3-4 4 3-4 3 3-4 3 3 1 4 3 MUS 119*, 120, 219, 220 Materials of Music (*with

  14. Modeling hematopoietic cell development and chronic myeloid with human embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusert, Jessica Marie

    2012-01-01

    of self-renewal in an inducible transgenic mouse model 14 .mouse models, BCR-ABL reduced the self-renewal capacity of

  15. Intracranial mobility in Kansas mosasaurs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callison, G.

    1967-11-30

    next to the names of the muscles. Musculus levator angularis oris (trigeminal nerve). Origin.—From fascia covering posterior and external adductors and from anterior surface of quadrate. Insertion.—On Mundplatte (connective tissue mass at angle of mouth... view of proximal end; 4b, medial view. m. adductor externus (undivided) m. protractor pterygoidei m. adductor posterior m. pterygoideus quadrate muscle in. levntor angularis oris 10 The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions—Paper 26 FIG. 9...

  16. Formulation of a Medical Food Cocktail for Alzheimer's Disease: Beneficial Effects on Cognition and Neuropathology in a Mouse Model of the Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parachikova, Anna; Green, Kim N.; Hendrix, Curt; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    the neuroprotective actions of the green tea polyphenol (-)-is an active ingredient of green tea. It exhibits potent

  17. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research used to be about the ergonomics of interfaces and, interfaces used to consist of a keyboard, a mouse and whatever could

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Preface Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research used to be about the ergonomics of interfaces and with us. In the past, physiological sensors have been used to evaluate user interfaces. How does the user

  18. Whole mouse blood microRNA as biomarkers for exposure to c-rays and THOMAS TEMPLIN, SALLY A. AMUNDSON, DAVID J. BRENNER, &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    as samples exposed to low doses of radiation from samples exposed to high doses. Additionally, functional as biomarkers for exposures to radiation with low and high linear energy transfers. Materials and methods: Mice signatures were radiation type-specific and dose- and time-dependent. The differentially expressed miRNA were

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of MOG-IDAC and PLP-PEG-B7AP Molecules for Efficacy Evaluation in the EAE mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, John Micheal

    2012-05-31

    Exp Immunol. 2010; 162: 1–11. 2. Kobayashi N, Kobayashi H, Gu L, Malefyt T, Siahaan TJ. Antigen-specific suppression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by a novel bifunctional peptide inhibitor. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2007; 322: 879–886. 3... screen for multiple sclerosis underscores a role for the major histocompatability complex. The Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Group. Nat Genet. 1996; 13: 469–471. 34 6. Mohr DC, Hart SL, Julian L, Cox D, Pelletier D. Association between stressful life...

  20. Supplementary information for Y Huang et al., Distinct roles of Tet1 and Tet2 in mouse embryonic stem Supplementary experimental procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steve

    ng genomic DNA samples were sheared using 18 gauge needle and treated with sodium bisulfite. 2-fold by addition of an equal volume of cold 2M ammonium acetate (pH 7.0) on ice for 10 min. Denatured DNA samples

  1. Parity induces differentiation and reduces Wnt/Notch signaling ratio and proliferation potential of basal stem/progenitor cells isolated from mouse mammary epithelium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Krt17 Nptx1 OTTMUSG00000002043 Btc Kcnip3 S100a14 Gdpd1 Gjb4Areg, growth promoting Wnt4 Btc, growth promoting Dsc2, ECMAreg, betacellulin Btc, tumor- associated calcium signal

  2. Fibrin depletion decreases inflammation and delays the onset of demyelination in a tumor necrosis factor transgenic mouse model for multiple sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society Research Grantmouse model for multiple sclerosis Katerina Akassoglou* †‡ ,June 20, 2003) In multiple sclerosis, in which brain tissue

  3.  ?2-Adrenergic receptor agonist ameliorates phenotypes and corrects microRNA-mediated IGF1 deficits in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellios, Nikolaos

    Rett syndrome is a severe childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in methyl-CpG–binding protein 2 (MECP2), with known disturbances in catecholamine synthesis. Here, we show that treatment with the ...

  4. Increased hepatic oxidative metabolism distinguishes the action of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta from Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the ob/ob mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Lee D.; Hassall, David G.; Winegar, Deborah A.; Haselden, John N.; Nicholls, Andrew W.; Griffin, Julian L.

    2009-12-07

    time point. Glucose concentrations were collected at 15, 30, 60 and 90 minute intervals. All time points were collected via tail snips. Tissue collection and extraction All animal studies were performed within the relevant local legislation. Two... components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discri- minate analysis (PLS-DA). Metabolite changes responsible for clustering or regression trends within the pattern recog- nition models were identified by interrogating the corres- ponding loadings plot...

  5. Bisphenol A at a low concentration boosts mouse spermatogonial cell proliferation by inducing the G protein-coupled receptor 30 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Huang, Wei; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Zhu, Ben-Zhan

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most prevalent chemicals in daily-use materials, therefore, human exposure to BPA is ubiquitous. We found that low concentrations of BPA stimulate the spermatogonial GC-1 cells proliferation by G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30)-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-c-Fos pathway. However, through the same pathway GPR30 expression has been shown to be induced by EGF, an EGFR ligand. Thus, we want to know if low concentrations of BPA are able to induce the GPR30 expression and the possible mechanism(s) in GC-1 cells. By transient transfection with expression plasmids, 10{sup ?9} M BPA significantly transactivates the Gpr30-5?-flanking region through activating the GPR30, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), estrogen receptor-? (ER-?), and EFGR-ERK pathways. Furthermore, an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site located within this region is found to be responsible for the transactivation of BPA. Expectedly, through the same pathways, BPA significantly induces the gene and protein expression of GPR30. c-Fos is further observed to be strongly recruited to the AP-1 site in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and its dysfunction on the AP-1 site markedly suppresses the expression of GPR30, p-ERK1/2, p-Ser118-ER-? and cell proliferation by BPA. Our results demonstrate that a low-concentration BPA induces GPR30 expression through the GPR30-EFGR-ERK-c-Fos, ER-?, and PKG pathways, presumably boosting the cells proliferation via a regulatory loop. The present study provides a novel insight into the potential role of GPR30 in the initiation and progression of male germ cell cancer induced by environmentally relevant BPA. - Highlights: ? Low concentrations of BPA activate the PKG and GPR30-EFGR-ERK-ER-? pathways. ? Low concentrations of BPA activate the AP-1 site of Gpr30-5?-flanking region. ? Low concentrations of BPA induce the expression of GPR30 gene and protein. ? Low concentrations of BPA boost GC-1 cells proliferation via a regulatory loop.

  6. Characterisation of a novel culture condition for the establishment and maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cells and implications for the mechanisms of self-renewal. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Jason Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotency is defined as the ability of a cell to give rise to all the cell types of the adult organism. In vivo this property is possessed transiently by the cells of the epiblast in the developing embryo but it can ...

  7. Striatal expression of a calmodulin fragment improved motor function, weight loss and neuropathology in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Ying; Dudek, Nichole; Li, Qian; Fowler, Stephen C.; Muma, Nancy A.

    2009-09-09

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein (htt). Increasing evidence suggests that transglutaminase (TGase) plays a critical ...

  8. Striatal expression of a calmodulin fragment improved motor function, weight loss and neuropathology in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Ying; Dudek, Nichole; Li, Qian; Fowler, Stephen C.; Muma, Nancy A.

    2009-09-16

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein (htt). Increasing evidence suggests that transglutaminase (TGase) plays a critical ...

  9. Inhibition of Amyloid-? (A?) Peptide-Binding Alcohol Dehydrogenase-A? Interaction Reduces A? Accumulation and Improves Mitochondrial Function in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Jun; Du, Heng; Yan, Shiqiang; Fang, Fang; Wang, Chaodong; Lue, Lih-Fen; Guo, Lan; Chen, Doris; Stern, David M.; Moore, Frank J. Gunn; Chen, John Xi; Arancio, Ottavio; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2011-02-09

    Amyloid-? (A?) peptide-binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD), an enzyme present in neuronal mitochondria, exacerbates A?-induced cell stress. The interaction of ABAD with A? exacerbates A?-induced mitochondrial and neuronal ...

  10. Characterisation of a mouse model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and its application to investigating the impact of hypoperfusion on the development of Alzheimer’s disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coltman, Robin Bruce

    2012-06-22

    The integrity of brain white matter is vital for the interneuronal signalling between distinct brain regions required for normal cognitive function. White matter integrity is compromised with ageing and could contribute ...

  11. Motor Neuron-Specific Restoration of SMN in Two SMA Mouse Models: Insights into the Role of Motor Neurons in Spinal Muscular Atrophy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paez, Ximena

    2014-06-02

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) results from ?-motor neuron loss in the spinal cord due to low levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, required for proper spliceosome assembly. The reduced levels of SMN cause muscle atrophy...

  12. AAV-mediated delivery of the transcription factor XBP1s into the striatum reduces mutant Huntingtin aggregation in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuleta, Amparo [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile) [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vidal, Rene L. [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile) [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile); Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey [Department of Molecular Biology, Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Biology, Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Hetz, Claudio, E-mail: chetz@med.uchile.cl [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile) [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, 651 Huntington Av., Boston, MA 02446 (United States); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contribution of ER stress to HD has not been directly addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of XBP1s using AAVs decreases Huntingtin aggregation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a new in vivo model of HD based on the expression of a large fragment of mHtt-RFP. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutations that expand a polyglutamine region in the amino-terminal domain of Huntingtin (Htt), leading to the accumulation of intracellular inclusions and progressive neurodegeneration. Recent reports indicate the engagement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in human HD post mortem samples and animal models of the disease. Adaptation to ER stress is mediated by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an integrated signal transduction pathway that attenuates protein folding stress by controlling the expression of distinct transcription factors including X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Here we targeted the expression of XBP1 on a novel viral-based model of HD. We delivered an active form of XBP1 locally into the striatum of adult mice using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs) and co-expressed this factor with a large fragment of mutant Htt as a fusion protein with RFP (Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP) to directly visualize the accumulation of Htt inclusions in the brain. Using this approach, we observed a significant reduction in the accumulation of Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP intracellular inclusion when XBP1 was co-expressed in the striatum. These results contrast with recent findings indicating a protective effect of XBP1 deficiency in neurodegeneration using knockout mice, and suggest a potential use of gene therapy strategies to manipulate the UPR in the context of HD.

  13. TBX3 over-expression causes mammary gland hyperplasia and increases mammary stem-like cells in an inducible transgenic mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jing; Esmailpour, Taraneh; Shang, Xiying; Gulsen, Gultekin; Liu, Andy; Huang, Taosheng

    2011-01-01

    al. : TBX3 over-expression causes mammary gland hyperplasiaAccess TBX3 over-expression causes mammary gland hyperplasiahaploinsufficiency of TBX3 causes Ulnar Mammary Syndrome (

  14. A physical map of the mouse genome Simon G. Gregory*, Mandeep Sekhon, Jacqueline Schein, Shaying Zhao, Kazutoyo Osoegawak, Carol E. Scott*, Richard S. Evans*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saeedi, Parvaneh

    Carter, Tony Gaige, Sara Jaeger, Colin Kremitzki, Dan Layman, Jason Maas, Rebecca McGrane, Kelly Mead

  15. Lupeol induces p53 and cyclin-B-mediated G2/M arrest and targets apoptosis through activation of caspase in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigam, Nidhi Prasad, Sahdeo; George, Jasmine; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-04-03

    Lupeol, present in fruits and medicinal plants, is a biologically active compound that has been shown to have various pharmacological properties in experimental studies. In the present study, we demonstrated the modulatory effect of lupeol on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced alterations on cell proliferation in the skin of Swiss albino mice. Lupeol treatment showed significant (p < 0.05) preventive effects with marked inhibition at 48, 72, and 96 h against DMBA-mediated neoplastic events. Cell-cycle analysis showed that lupeol-induced G2/M-phase arrest (16-37%) until 72 h, and these inhibitory effects were mediated through inhibition of the cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p53, p21/WAF1, cdc25C, cdc2, and cyclin-B gene expression. Further lupeol-induced apoptosis was observed, as shown by an increased sub-G1 peak (28%) at 96 h, with upregulation of bax and caspase-3 genes and downregulation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 and survivin genes. Thus, our results indicate that lupeol has novel anti-proliferative and apoptotic potential that may be helpful in designing strategies to fight skin cancer.

  16. A new mouse model to explore the initiation, progression, and therapy of BRAF(V600E)-induced lung tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dankort, David; Filenova, Elena; Collado, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Jones, Kirk; McMahon, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Collado, Manuel Serrano, Kirk Jones and Martin McMahon3 Manuel Serrano, 3 Kirk Jones, 2 and Martin McMahon 1,4

  17. Cell-to-cell variability and culture conditions during self-renewal reversibly affect subsequent differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Jit Hin

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell variability in clonal populations is reflected in a distribution of mRNA and protein levels among individual cells, including those of key transcription factors governing embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency ...

  18. Mouse oocytes fertilised by ICSI during in vitro maturation retain the ability to be activated after refertilisation in metaphase II and can generate Ca2+ oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedrusik, Agnieszka; Ajduk, Anna; Pomorski, Pawel; Maleszewski, Marek

    2007-06-20

    of experiment for about 24 h at 37.5°C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air. In vitro culture was carried out in droplets of medium under mineral oil in plastic dishes (35 × 10 mm, Falcon, Becton Dickinson, USA) at 37.5°C in a humidified atmosphere of 5... ://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-213X/7/72 up to MII stage ("no ICSI and no IVF" variant). Oocytes from all three variants were cultured for 7 – 8 h and were examined for the signs of activation (i.e. extrusion of the second polar body (PB2) and formation of pronuclei...

  19. The Distribution of Radioactivity in the Mouse Following Administration of Dibenzanthracene Labeled in the 9 and 10 Positions with Carbon Fourteen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidelberger, Charles

    2010-01-01

    National Laboratory Atomic Energy Commission, 1iiashingtonfrom the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission of the long livedEng-48 with the Atomic Energy Commission in connection with

  20. Antitumor effects of L-BLP25 Antigen-Specific tumor immunotherapy in a novel human MUC1 transgenic lung cancer mouse model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Greenberg BE, Griffey S, Gutierrez A, Bell KE, McCall JL,T Wurz 1 , Audrey M Gutierrez 1 , Brittany E Greenberg 1 ,DeGregorio M, Wurz GT, Gutierrez A, Wolf M: L-BLP25 vaccine

  1. Effects of Chronic Nicotine Exposure and Lack of High Affinity Nicotinic Receptors on Cortico-Hippocampal Areas in the Aging Mouse Brain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Pei-San

    2012-07-16

    performance. Epidemiology studies show that smoking is negatively correlated with the incidence of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Postmortem research and neuroimaging studies show that loss of nicotinic binding sites in the brain is the major...

  2. Systematic implications of mtDNA sequence variation in a deer mouse species endemic to islands in the Gulf of California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Ashli Francille

    2013-02-22

    whole (Carleton 1989). Of the more than 50 species of Peromyscus, none is more widely distributed nor intensively studied than is P. maniculatus and the closely related species in the P. maniculatus species group. The monophyly of the P. maniculatus... group and the systematic relationships of its major taxa (P. maniculatus, P. polionotus, and P. melanotis) are well supported by morphologic, cytogenetic and molecular data (reviewed by Carleton 1989). Within this group, however, the phylogenetic...

  3. A lentiviral system for RNAi transgenesis and the Ena/VASP triple-knockout defines neuronal and non-neuronal functions in mouse development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinson, Douglas A. (Douglas Adam), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian development extends and exploits signaling pathways that function exclusively in axon guidance in lower organisms. This emerging paradigm employs complex expression patterns of expanded protein families to achieve ...

  4. Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Causes Long-Term Increase in Serum Estradiol and Activation of PI3K-Akt Signaling Pathway in Mouse Mammary Gland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Johnson, Michael D.; Fornace, Albert J.; Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC ; Datta, Kamal

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Exposure to ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Radiation exposure during infancy, childhood, and adolescence confers the highest risk. Although radiation is a proven mammary carcinogen, it remains unclear where it acts in the complex multistage process of breast cancer development. In this study, we investigated the long-term pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation at a dose (2 Gy) relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Adolescent (6-8 weeks old; n = 10) female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy total body {gamma}-radiation, the mammary glands were surgically removed, and serum and urine samples were collected 2 and 12 months after exposure. Molecular pathways involving estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling were investigated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: Serum estrogen and urinary levels of the oncogenic estrogen metabolite (16{alpha}OHE1) were significantly increased in irradiated animals. Immunostaining for the cellular proliferative marker Ki-67 and cyclin-D1 showed increased nuclear accumulation in sections of mammary glands from irradiated vs. control mice. Marked increase in p85{alpha}, a regulatory sub-unit of the PI3K was associated with increase in Akt, phospho-Akt, phospho-BAD, phospho-mTOR, and c-Myc in irradiated samples. Persistent increase in nuclear ER{alpha} in mammary tissues 2 and 12 months after radiation exposure was also observed. Conclusions: Taken together, our data not only support epidemiologic observations associating radiation and breast cancer but also, specify molecular events that could be involved in radiation-induced breast cancer.

  5. Muscle-Specific SIRT1 Gain-of-Function Increases Slow-Twitch Fibers and Ameliorates Pathophysiology in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalkiadaki, Angeliki

    SIRT1 is a metabolic sensor and regulator in various mammalian tissues and functions to counteract metabolic and age-related diseases. Here we generated and analyzed mice that express SIRT1 at high levels specifically in ...

  6. The pro-apoptotic K-Ras 4A proto-oncoprotein does not affect tumorigenesis in the ApcMin/+ mouse small intestine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patek, Charles E.; Arends, Mark J.; Rose, Lorraine; Luo, Feijun; Walker, Marion; Devenney, Paul S.; Berry, Rachel L.; Lawrence, Nicola J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Sansom, Owen J.; Hooper, Martin L.

    2008-06-13

    -actin transcripts were 185 bp, 158 bp and 148 bp respectively. The specificities of the PCR reactions were confirmed by dissociation curve analysis and 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. All PCR products were analysed when in the exponential phase of PCR amplification... of uncensored observations. 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Age (days) K ap la n- M ei er s ur vi va l f un ct io nPage 6 of 9 (page number not for citation purposes) complex relationship between apoptosis and cancer...

  7. Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D.

    2012-08-20

    We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

  8. Process for recovery of hydrogen and

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Brian R. (Vancouver, CA); Li-Lee, Chung (Vancouver, CA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    on of sulfur Abstract A process of abstracting sulfur from H.sub.2 S and generating hydrogen is disclosed comprising dissolving Pd.sub.2 X.sub.2 (.mu.-dppm).sub.2 in a solvent and then introducing H.sub.2 S. The palladium complex abstracts sulfur, forming hydrogen and a (.mu.-S) complex. The (.mu.-S) complex is readily oxidizable to a (.mu.-SO.sub.2) adduct which spontaneously loses SO.sub.2 and regenerates the palladium complex.

  9. Abstract--Whole-gear efficiency (the proportion of fish passing between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    278 Abstract--Whole-gear efficiency (the proportion of fish passing between the otter doors elassodon), rex sole (Glyptocephalus zachirus), and Dover sole (Microsto- mus pacificus). Whole-gear, flathead sole, and rex sole. For Dover sole, how- ever, whole-gear efficiency declined from a maximum of 33

  10. Bachelor of Music with Major in Commercial Music Music Technology Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Bachelor of Music with Major in Commercial Music Music Technology Concentration Student Name: Commercial Music Core Prefix Credits Pre-Reqs/Co-Req Grade Semester American Popular Music and Culture MUH 2520 3 MUS 2101 Introduction to Music Business MUM 3301 3 Legal Issues for the Musician MUM 3303 3

  11. Bachelor of Music with Major in Commercial Music Commercial Music Composition Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Bachelor of Music with Major in Commercial Music Commercial Music Composition Concentration Student Name: Commercial Music Core Prefix Credits Pre-Reqs/Co-Reqs Grade Semester American Popular Music and Culture MUH 2520 3 MUS 2101 Introduction to Music Business MUM 3301 3 Legal Issues for the Musician MUM

  12. Detoxification of Organophosphate Nerve Agents by Immobilized Escherichia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    et al., 1989). In the United States over 40 million kilograms of organo- phosphate pesticides, in ap- proximately 100 min, at a specific rate of 0.160 mM min-1 (g cell dry wt)-1 . The immobilized with mus- cular responses, and in vital organs produces serious symp- toms and eventually death (Donarski

  13. Observation and Study of Low-Frequency Oscillations in a 1.5-MW 110-GHz Gyrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerfon, Antoine J.

    We report the observation of low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) in the range 165-180 MHz in a 1.5-MW 110-GHz gyrotron operating in 3-mus pulses. The oscillations have been measured by a capacitive probe located just before ...

  14. A VME timing system for the tokamak ISTTOK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varandas, C.A.F.; Carvalho, B.; Fernandes, H.; Sousa, J.; Cabral, J.A.C.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the ISTTOK timing system, which was built under a centralized philosophy based on a locally developed 16 channel, 1 {mu}s maximum resolution, VME unit. The trigger options for each channel are provided, following an innovatory approach, by a programmable pulse multiplexer. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. IT Shop stock items USB A-B Cable 2m (PC to Printer) 0.90

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    £12.50 External CD/DVD drive £23.20 USB-Ethernet adapter £21.20 TP-Link wireless modem router £20 adapter £5.00 Keyboard/Mice Wired USB mouse £4.80 Wired USB 5 button mouse £11.10 Wireless mouse £9.70 Wireless mouse - Premium (Logitech M280) £19.00 Wireless mouse - Mini (Logitech M187) £14.10 Wired USB

  16. Use of bioluminescent imaging to assay the transplantation of immortalized human fetal hepatocytes into mice.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    lentiviral vectors in a NOD-SCID mouse model transplantedinjected into the spleens of NOD-SCID mice pre- treated withfusion vector system in a NOD-SCID mouse model transplanted

  17. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Xiu R

    2009-01-01

    map (modified from IPA), all genes that were modulated in the mouse brain by exposure to ionizing radiationmap (modified from IPA), the genes that were modulated in the mouse brain by exposure to ionizing radiation

  18. Adaptive Generation of Multimaterial Grids from imaging data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    this problem, and illustrate the approach with a 3D fluid-solid mesh of the mouse heart. An MRI perfusion-fixed dataset of a mouse heart with 50m isotropic resolution was...

  19. Iosif Vaisman Email: ivaisman@gmu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaisman, Iosif

    , command line Web-based GUI form Output format Html, text, spreadsheet Html, text Html, text, spreadsheet Html, text, spreadsheet Organisms Human, mouse, rat Human, mouse, rat and many other species Human

  20. Tracking multiple mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Stav

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring mouse social behaviors over long periods of time is essential for neurobehavioral analysis of social mouse phenotypes. Currently, the primary method of social behavioral plienotyping utilizes human labelers, ...

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VISUALIZATION AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS, VOL. X, NO. X, MONTH 200X 1 Data Driven Grasp Synthesis using Shape Matching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Nancy

    . The poses displayed are from a grasp of a mouse, a jelly jar, and a lightbulb (left to right). Finally

  2. Fermilab | Director's Policy Manual | Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Financial Management Freedom of Information Act Requests Inclement Weather and Snow Policy Interactions with Legislators Issues Management Maintenance MOUs Between...

  3. Carcinogenesis vol.30 no.11 pp.19101915, 2009 doi:10.1093/carcin/bgp224

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazquez, Alexei

    embryonic development as well as oncogenesis. Whereas the p53 null mouse is viable and prone to oncoge

  4. Gastric colonisation with a restricted commensal microbiota replicates the promotion of neoplastic lesions by diverse intestinal microbiota in the Helicobacter pylori INS-GAS mouse model of gastric carcinogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lertpiriyapong, Kvin

    Objectives: Gastric colonisation with intestinal flora (IF) has been shown to promote Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-associated gastric cancer. However, it is unknown if the mechanism involves colonisation with specific or diverse ...

  5. Mapping of the receptor protein-tyrosine kinase 10 to human chromosome 1q21-q23 and mouse chromosome 1H1-5 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Lai, C.

    1995-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play a critical role in the transduction of signals important to cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Mutations affecting the expression of receptor PTK genes have been associated with a number of vertebrate and invertebrate developmental abnormalities, and the aberrant regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation is implicated in a variety of neoplasias. One estimate suggests that approximately 100 receptor PTK genes exist in the mammalian genome, about half of which have been identified. The tyro-10 receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, first identified in a PCR-based survey for novel tyrosine kinases in the rat nervous system, defines a new subfamily of PTKs. It exhibits a catalytic domain most closely related to those found in the trk PTK receptor subfamily, which transduces signals for nerve growth factor and the related molecules brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3, and neurotrophin-4 (NT-3 and NT-4). Trk and the related PTK receptors trkB and trkC play a critical role in the neurotrophin-dependent survival of subsets of sensory and motor neurons. The predicted tyro-10 extracellular region is, however, distinct from that of the trk subfamily and is unique except for a domain shared with the blood coagulation factors V and VIII, thought to be involved in phospholipid binding. Although tyro-10 RNA is most abundant in heart and skeletal muscle in the adult rat, it is expressed in a wide variety of tissues, including the developing and mature brain. Tyro-10 appears identical to the murine TKT sequence reported by Karn et al. and exhibits a high degree of similarity with the CaK, DDR, and Nep PTKs. A ligand for tyro-10 has not yet been identified. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  6. High-throughput phenotyping of mouse grooming E. Kyzar1, S. Gaikwad1, J. Green1, M. Pham1, A. Stewart1, A. Roth1, Y. Liang2, V. Kobla2 and A. Kalueff1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    mice were housed 3-5 animals per cage on a 12:12 h light:dark cycle. The animals were transferred neurophenotyping using various animal models. Here, we have successfully applied the HomeCageScan software (Clever Grants. CleverSys, Inc. provided video-tracking software, performed necessary modifications, optimized

  7. African Rue Biology and Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.

    2002-10-17

    s , apply V elpar L?, a herbicid e tha t mus t p enet r a te into the root zone . A pply i t undilu ted to the s o il dir e c tly b e low the plant canopy . V elpar L? is nons e- lec t i v e and will kill gr ass es in the immedia te applica t ion ar ea... t r ea t smaller ar eas or spars ely sca t ter ed plant s , apply V elpar L?, a herbicid e tha t mus t p enet r a te into the root zone . A pply i t undilu ted to the s o il dir e c tly b e low the plant canopy . V elpar L? is nons e- lec t i v e...

  8. Development of high-voltage pulse-slicer unit with variable pulse duration for pulse radiolysis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, J.; Sharma, M. L.; Navathe, C. P. [Laser Electronic Support Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Toley, M. A.; Shinde, S. J.; Nadkarni, S. A.; Sarkar, S. K. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2012-02-15

    A high-voltage pulse-slicer unit with variable pulse duration has been developed and integrated with a 7 MeV linear electron accelerator (LINAC) for pulse radiolysis investigation. The pulse-slicer unit provides switching voltage from 1 kV to 10 kV with rise time better than 5 ns. Two MOSFET based 10 kV switches were configured in differential mode to get variable duration pulses. The high-voltage pulse has been applied to the deflecting plates of the LINAC for slicing of electron beam of 2 {mu}s duration. The duration of the electron beam has been varied from 30 ns to 2 {mu}s with the optimized pulse amplitude of 7 kV to get corresponding radiation doses from 6 Gy to 167 Gy.

  9. Numerical investigation of pulse-modulated atmospheric radio frequency discharges in helium under different duty cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Jizhong; Ding Zhengfen; Li Xuechun; Wang Dezhen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Wang Qi [Dalian Institute of Semiconductor Technology, School of Electronics Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Experiments observed that the pulse duty cycle has effects on the plasma homogeneity in pulse-modulated radio frequency (rf) discharges. In this paper, pulse-modulated rf (13.56 MHz) helium discharges are theoretically investigated using a two dimensional fluid model. With the pulse period being fixed to 15 {mu}s, it is found that when the pulse-on duration is over 4 {mu}s, i.e., the duty cycle is larger than approximately 27%, the discharge transits from an inhomogeneous to a homogeneous mode in every specific part of each pulse cycle under currently-used simulation parameters. More quantitative analysis shows that the discharge becomes more homogeneous as the duty cycle is increased but does not reach complete homogeneity. Possible reasons for the homogeneity improvement are discussed.

  10. Fluorine-19 MRI for Visualization and Quantification of Cell Migration in a Diabetes Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, David

    by these infiltrates. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a widely studied model of human T1D and shares many to animal model studies, such as in the NOD mouse. Imaging immune cells in the early and late phases of T1D-cell migration (10­12). In the NOD mouse, islet transplanta- tion and pancreatic inflammation have been

  11. How are pluripotent cells captured in culture?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinoshita, Masaki

    2014-12-03

    cells (PGCs) firstly emerge around the pre-gastrulation stage as a few Blimp1 Fig. 1 Pluripotent cells in culture and their origin in embryos a E4.5 mouse embryo. a’ Mouse embryonic stem cell cultured in 2i and LIF on a gelatin-coated plate. b E5.5 mouse...

  12. Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2013-11-05

    A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

  13. Laser synchronized high-speed shutter for spectroscopic application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Paul C. (Tracy, CA); Porter, Eldon L. (Tracy, CA); Prast, Thomas L. (Livermore, CA); Sunnarborg, Duane A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A fast mechanical shutter, based on rotating chopper wheels, has been designed and implemented to shutter the entrance slit of a spectrograph. This device enables an exposure time of 9 .mu.s to be achieved for a 0.8 mm wide spectrograph entrance slit, achieves 100% transmission in the open state, and an essentially infinite extinction ratio. The device further incorporates chopper wheel position sensing electronics to permit the synchronous triggering of a laser source.

  14. Research needs to address ASR challenges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    and regulatory needs. These recom- mendations along with the full report may be read at http://www.nap.edu/catalog. php?record_id=12057. One overall recommendation of the NRC committee is the creation by water agencies of ?an independent advisory panel..., the National Research Council (NRC) convened a Committee on Sustainable Underground Storage of Recoverable Water to evaluate past experiences with ASR, or what the committee called managed underground storage (MUS) of recoverable water. Another committee...

  15. High-performance and power-efficient 2${\\times}$2 optical switch on Silicon-on-Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Zheng; Checoury, Xavier; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Boucaud, Philippe; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    A compact (15{\\mu}m${\\times}${\\mu}m) and highly-optimized 2${\\times}$2 optical switch is demonstrated on a CMOS-compatible photonic crystal technology. On-chip insertion loss are below 1dB, static and dynamic contrast are 40dB and >20dB respectively. Owing to efficient thermo-optic design, the power consumption is below 3 mW while the switching time is 1 {\\mu}s.

  16. A High-resolution Spectrum of the R CrB Star V2552 Ophiuchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kameswara Rao; David L. Lambert

    2003-08-25

    Photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy have added V2552 Oph to the rare class of R Coronae Borealis variables. We confirm this classification of V2552 Oph through a comparison of our high-resolution optical spectrum of this star and that of R CrB and other F-type members of the class. We show that V2552 Oph most closely resembles Y Mus and FH Sct, stars in which Sr, Y, and Zr are enhanced.

  17. A 120kV IGBT modulator for driving a pierce electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earley, L. M.; Brown, R. W.; Carlson, R. L.; Ferguson, P.; Haynes, W. B.; Kirbie, H. C.; Russell, S. J.; Sigler, F. E.; Smirnova, E. I.; Wheat, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    An IGBT modulator has been developed to drive a 120 kV, 23 A Pierce electron gun. The modulator is capable of producing pulses up to 10 {mu}s in width at repetition rates up to 10Hz with no active reset. The pulse rise time on the electron gun will be approximately 2 {mu}s and the remaining 8 {mu}s of flattop is tuned to have a ripple of less than 1 percent rms. The modulator technology was developed from a previous 50 kV prototype. The modulator consists of six boards, each with one EUPEC IGBT that drives a single common step-up transformer wound on METGLAS 2605SC cores. The six transformer cores share a common bi-filar output secondary winding. The modulator uses a fiber optic trigger system and has a high voltage cable output with an epoxy receptacle on the oil end and a ceramic receptacle on the vacuum end. The 120 kV electron gun was manufactured by MDS Co. and will be used to generate sheet electron beams from the standard pencil beam produced by the Pierce electron gun.

  18. Origin of the energetic ion beams at the substrate generated during high power pulsed magnetron sputtering of titanium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maszl, Christian; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2013-01-01

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) plasmas generate energetic metal ions at the substrate as a major difference to conventional direct current magnetron sputtering. The origin of these energetic ions in HiPIMS is still an open issue, which is unraveled by using three fast diagnostics: time resolved mass spectrometry with a temporal resolution of 2 $\\mu$s, phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy with 1 $\\mu$s and the rotating shutter experiment with a resolution of 50 $\\mu$s. A power scan from dcMS-like to HiPIMS plasmas was performed, with a 2-inch magnetron and a titanium target as sputter source and argon as working gas. Clear differences in the transport as well in the energetic properties of Ar$^+$, Ar$^{2+}$, Ti$^+$ and Ti$^{2+}$ were observed. For discharges with highest peak power densities a high energetic group of Ti$^{+}$ and Ti$^{2+}$ could be identified. A cold group of ions is always present. It is found that hot ions are observed only, when the plasma enters the spokes regime, ...

  19. A 500 MW annular beam relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; Carlsten, B.E.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the experimental development of a long pulse, high current, annular beam relativistic klystron amplifier. The desired performance parameters are 1 GW output power and 1 {mu}s pulse length with an operating frequency of 1.3 GHz. The electron beam voltage and current are nominally 600 kV and 5 kA. Peak powers approaching 500 MW have been achieved in pulses of 1 {mu}s nominal baseline-to-baseline duration. The half power pulse width is 0.5 {mu}s. These pulses contain an energy of about 160 J. The design of this class of tube presents some unique challenges, particularly in the output cavity. The output cavity must exhibit a very low gap shunt impedance in order to obtain reasonable conversion efficiency from the low impedance modulated electron beam to microwave power, while still maintaining a reasonable loaded Q for mode purity. The physics of this device is dominated by space charge effects which strongly impact the design. Current experimental results and theoretical design considerations for this class of tube, and scaling to higher frequency operation, suitable for the Next Linear Collider are discussed.

  20. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the ORNL campus. The groundbreaking technique helped established a "clean," or pathogen-free, mouse colony that could be used in other research programs. The University...

  1. Treatment of Hidradenitis Supprurativa Associated Pain with Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Acetaminophen, Celecoxib, Gabapentin, Pegabalin, Duloxetine, and Venlafaxine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2013-01-01

    of duloxetine and celecoxib in osteoarthritis patients.Curranalgesia of duloxetine and celecoxib in the mouse formalinDrugs, Acetaminophen, Celecoxib, Gabapentin, Pegabalin,

  2. Proteomic Study of Oral Cancer Stem-Like Cells and Bone Marrow Cell Treatment for Sjögren's Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misuno, Kaori

    2013-01-01

    the salivary gland function in NOD mice. Using quantitativedamaged salivary glands of NOD mice. REFERENCES Steiniger,of the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model for Sjögren

  3. A CD19/Fc fusion protein for detection of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptors.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Oliveira, Satiro N; Wang, Jiexin; Ryan, Christine; Morrison, Sherie L; Kohn, Donald B; Hollis, Roger P

    2013-01-01

    NSG mice, pups from the strain NOD/SCID/?c Null (NSG) wereNSG: Mouse strain strain NOD/SCID/?c Null ; PBMC: Peripheral

  4. Contribution of human hematopoietic stem cells to liver repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Ping; Wirthlin, Louisa; McGee, Jeannine; Annett, Geralyn; Nolta, Jan

    2009-01-01

    mucopolysaccharidosis type VII NOD/ nonobese diabetic/severecombined immunode- ficient (NOD/SCID) recipients. CD34+use of a new mouse model, the NOD/SCID/mucopolysaccharidosis

  5. Role of C-Terminal Tails of G Protein Coupled Receptors on Beta-Arrestin 1/2 Dependent Signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Kasturi

    2013-01-01

    and transwell migration assays using primary leukocytes frommigration. In the experiments that have been carried out so far, we have used mouse primary

  6. Spatiotemporal regulation of protein kinase C signaling : control of normal cellular dynamics and mis-regulation in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon

    2009-01-01

    preparation and migration assay—Primary astrocyte culturesrearrangements during migration of primary astrocytes. Inand contributes to migration of primary mouse astrocytes.

  7. A Sensor-Based Interactive Digital Installation System for Virtual Painting Using MAX/MSP/Jitter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenas, Anna G.

    2010-01-16

    The JitterListener tutorial patch ............................................................... 68 45 A hardware-based patch for OpenGL line drawing based on mouse movement...

  8. Functional gene screening in embryonic stem cell implicates Wnt antagonism in neural differentiation. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubert, Jerome; Dunstan, Hannah; Chambers, Ian; Smith, Austin G

    2002-01-01

    The multilineage differentiation capacity of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells offers a potential testing platform for gene products that mediate mammalian lineage determination and cellular specialization. Identification ...

  9. EA-1175-A-FEA-2003.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Engineering Technology Facility, and the new facility for the Mouse Genetics and Genomics Program. These facilities should be completed by September 2003. ORR Conservation...

  10. Open access: Sharing your data is easier than you think Below is the correspondence that I sent to Nature in May 2014; it was edited and subse-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    , 33; 2014) http://dx.doi. org/10.1038/509033b [2] A mesoscale connectome of the mouse brain (Nature

  11. RFamide Peptides and Ovulation: Circadian Control and Environmental Disruptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, III, Wilbur

    2011-01-01

    DMH, SON and PVN of the hypothalamus (Lambert et al. , 1995;kisspeptin neurons in mouse hypothalamus; sexual dimorphismin the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus following

  12. Sex differences in hypothalamic astrocyte response to estradiol stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuo, John; Hamid, Naheed; Bondar, Galyna; Dewing, Phoebe; Clarkson, Jenny; Micevych, Paul

    2010-01-01

    kisspeptin neurons in mouse hypothalamus; sexual dimorphismfunctions controlled by the hypothalamus are highly sexuallyGnRH release from the hypothalamus and gonadotropin release

  13. The Role of the Circadian System in Reproductive, Neural, and Immune Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Erin Marie

    2011-01-01

    of the GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus rather than at theto the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) in hamsters, rats, andkisspeptin neurons in mouse hypothalamus; sexual dimorphism

  14. Molecular Aspects of the Regulation of Female Sexual Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    and developmental expression in hypothalamus. J Comp Neurolventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. In: Society forof the newborn mouse hypothalamus and preoptic area in

  15. Caloric restriction reduces cell loss and maintains estrogen receptor-alpha immunoreactivity in the pre-optic hypothalamus of female B6D2F1 mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghmaie, F; Saeed, O; Garan, S A; Freitag, W; Timiras, Paola S; Sternberg, H

    2005-01-01

    mechanism of aging in: Hypothalamus, Pituitary and Aging.Davis PJ. Aging and the Hypothalamus: research perspectives.maps of the mouse hypothalamus using an automated imaging

  16. Extending Dynamics to Tree Graph Domains: Two Examples from Math Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathinam, Muruhan

    theory and dendritic trees (Pyramidal cell from mouse cortex; by Santiago Ramon) 2. Population persistence in advection-dominated environments (river networks) (Amazon river basin: courtesy of Hideki

  17. Mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias: From molecular fluctuations to electrical turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Z; Weiss, JN; Weiss, JN

    2015-01-01

    DJ. 2009. Dynamical mechanism for subcellular alternans inet al. 2007. Arrhythmogenic mechanisms in a mouse model ofElectrophysiological mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias

  18. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    embedded (list view) or viewable via mouse-over (calendar view) Optimization for use on mobile devices The procedure for adding, deleting or changing events in the labwide...

  19. Cell-Autonomous Death of Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons with Autophagy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Matthew

    mouse strains, C57BLKS/J spm [13] and BALB/c npc1nih [14], both of which harbor spontaneous mutations

  20. Structural and functional roles of nebulin in skeletal muscle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gokhin, David Samuel

    2009-01-01

    knockout mouse. The bioengineering of a successful geneof Philosophy in Bioengineering by David Samuel Gokhinpapers. xiii VITA B.S.E. , Bioengineering, summa cum laude

  1. Cosmic ray neutron background reduction using localized coincidence veto neutron counting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Bourret, Steven C. (Los Alamos, NM); Krick, Merlyn S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to both the apparatus and method for increasing the sensitivity of measuring the amount of radioactive material in waste by reducing the interference caused by cosmic ray generated neutrons. The apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of neutron detectors, each of the detectors including means for generating a pulse in response to the detection of a neutron; and (b) means, coupled to each of the neutrons detectors, for counting only some of the pulses from each of the detectors, whether cosmic ray or fission generated. The means for counting includes a means that, after counting one of the pulses, vetos the counting of additional pulses for a prescribed period of time. The prescribed period of time is between 50 and 200 .mu.s. In the preferred embodiment the prescribed period of time is 128 .mu.s. The veto means can be an electronic circuit which includes a leading edge pulse generator which passes a pulse but blocks any subsequent pulse for a period of between 50 and 200 .mu.s. Alternately, the veto means is a software program which includes means for tagging each of the pulses from each of the detectors for both time and position, means for counting one of the pulses from a particular position, and means for rejecting those of the pulses which originate from the particular position and in a time interval on the order of the neutron die-away time in polyethylene or other shield material. The neutron detectors are grouped in pods, preferably at least 10. The apparatus also includes means for vetoing the counting of coincidence pulses from all of the detectors included in each of the pods which are adjacent to the pod which includes the detector which produced the pulse which was counted.

  2. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, Mohy [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve [Institute of Combustion Technology, Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  3. Transcriptional profiling of fetal hypothalamic TRH neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Perez-Monter, Carlos; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Gutierrez-Rios, Rosa M.; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Perez-Martinez, Leonor; Charli, Jean-Louis

    2011-05-10

    in the GFP+ cells, we identified three transcription factors whose expression has not been previously reported within the hypothala- mus in vivo. These transcripts include the zinc finger domain-containing transcription factor Klf4 [29-32], the TGFb... °C (Klf4) for 1 min, a polymerization step at 72°C for 1 min and a final extension at 72°C for 10 min. PCR pro- ducts were electrophoresed in 2% agarose gel and bands stained with ethidium bromide. Acknowledgements We thank Affymetrix...

  4. Part 14, Authors: S To Shweig 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Judith M.; Hassall, Albert; Doss, Mildred A.

    1951-01-01

    de Qu?mica de la Universidad Na- cional Autonoma de M?xico. M?xico, D. F. Bol. Lab. Bacteriol. Tucuman (Rep. Argentina). [Not available.] Bol. Mus. Nac., Rio de Janeiro.?Boletim do Museo Nacional. Rio de Janeiro. Bol. Ofic. Acad. M?d.-Quir. Espa...?.?Bolet?n Oficial de la Academia M?dico-Quir?rgica Espa?ola. Madrid. Bol. San., Buenos Aires.?Bolet?n Sanitario. Departamento Nacional de Higiene. Ministerio del Interior. Rep?blica Argentina. Buenos Aires. INDEX-CATALOGUE OF MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ZOOLOGY...

  5. The prenatal origin of behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooker, Davenport

    1952-01-01

    is the heart beat. The early activity of the heart in vertebrates has been demonstrated to be myogenic in nature in many forms, that is to say, the rhythmic con tractility of its musculature is a property inherent in the cardiac muscle cells themselves.... There are three types of movement exhibited by mus cles—myogenic, neurogenic, and reflexogenic. As already noted, myogenic activity originates within the muscle tis sue itself, without benefit of a nervous or other impulse. Actually the term "myogenic" is used...

  6. Part 4, Authors: D to Dzunkovski 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, Gertrude B.; Doss, Mildred A.; Hassall, Albert; Taylor, Ruth M.; Bero, Dorothy

    1940-01-01

    ?. et Etrang. Anat. et Physiol.? Annales Fran?aises et Etrang?res d'Anat- omie et de Physiologie. Paris. Ann. ????. Sc. Phys.?Annales G?n?rales des Sciences Physiques. Bruxelles. Ann. Inst. Nat. Zootech. Roumaine.?Annales de l'Institut National...?d. et Nat. Bruxelles.? Annales de la Soci?t? Royale des Sciences M?dicales et Naturelles de Bruxelles. Bruxelles. Ann. Wien. Mus. Naturg.?Annalen des Wiener Museums der Naturgeschichte. Wien. Arcana Sc. and Art (Timbs).?Arcana of Science and Art...

  7. Clinical variation in epidermal features of ubiquitous plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabral, Adolfo Celestino

    1990-01-01

    epidermis attributes. Three dicots; Proso is ladulosa Torr. , Celtis ~1' t M'lid. , d ' ' ' M'll. , d f t B t*1 t' d 1 M' h . . ~t' d 1 El mus canadensis L. var. canadensis, Sti a leucotricha f . & R p . , d ~ h' h . . ~f (C. E. Hubb. ) Gould were... Quantitative Features. Observed Qualitative Features. . ~Sti a leucotricha. Observed Quantitative Features. 63 63 63 67 68 68 72 73 73 CHAP TER Observed Qualitative Features. . . 1 t'* t Observed Quantitative Features. . Observed Qualitative...

  8. Solid state switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  9. Subjects: Trematoda and Trematode Diseases, Part 6: Supergenera And Genera N-Q 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Roach, Katharine F.; Breen, Virginia L.

    1967-01-01

    .;Hadlow, W.J. ; & Hughes,L.E., 1954a,336(patho- genicity of Neorickettsia helmintheca). --Price, E. W., 1929j,866-867;1929a,290 (syn.:Distomulum oregonensis). ?Senger, ?.?. ; & Neiland, ?. A. , 1955a, 638(Mus- tela vison;Oregon). - -Shaw, J. N. ;Simms, B....;Higginbotham, J. W.; & Clary, J. W., 1941a, 38;1942a, 123(Natrix sipedon;Michi- gan). --Skrjabin, K. I. ; & Antipin, D. N. , 1957a,558,fig. 169. NATRIODERINAE Yamaguti, S. , 1958a, 434. NAVICULARIA Mendheim, ?. , 1943a, 175, 207-210,. 259 (Echinostomatidae...

  10. Individual addressing of trapped $^{171}$Yb$^+$ ion qubits using a MEMS-based beam steering system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Crain; E. Mount; S. Baek; J. Kim

    2014-09-18

    The ability to individually manipulate the increasing number of qubits is one of the many challenges towards scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. Using micro-mirrors fabricated with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, we focus laser beams on individual ions in a linear chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. We demonstrate sequential single qubit gates on multiple $^{171}$Yb$^+$ qubits and characterize the gate performance using quantum state tomography. Our system features negligible crosstalk to neighboring ions ($< 3\\times 10^{-4}$), and switching speed comparable to typical single qubit gate times ($<$ 2 $\\mu$s).

  11. Bioinformatics and Evolutionary Evolution of Genomes, Proteomes, Networks and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    knowledge (IBMB, GB, research projects, PhD students) · PLEASE: interrupt / ask questions when I am going does it look the way it does? #12;Why ? To do stuff! molecular biology and systems biology #12;But.han A.fum A.nid G.zea N.cra U.may C.neo P.chr L.bic R.ory E.cun D.mel H.sap M.mus C.ele E.hist D

  12. The relative efficiencies of various catalysts in the polymerization of unsaturated hydrocarbons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Robert Vincent

    1940-01-01

    , To ubilizs Chess i'or gasoline ym8ueCion ChsV musC bs subgsoCsg Co a oraeldz@ rsaotion. This in Cum lsags Co Che formaeion of some loe molsoulsr might oomyounQs along vdCh Cbs 6esireg yro@uoC~ pelpmerisRCion of Chsse fraoCions is assessors' fox' gasoline.... yarafftuio compounds. 'Zhs hsmperatures of distillation mare nosed, She refraohive index tsLS Csee~ bp an Ahba refraebossber, and the bro~4e number vms determined with a potassium bromide ? potassium bromaCe solution bp the ~bhod gf the Universal. Qii...

  13. Plume Image Profiling of UV Laser Desorbed Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrigan, T. L.; Hunniford, C.A.; McCullough, R. W. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Timson, D. J. [School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK, BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); Catney, M. [Andor Technology plc., 7 Millennium Way, Springvale Business Park, Belfast, UK, BT12 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-08

    An experimental system, based upon the techniques of UV and IR laser desorption with time of flight mass spectrometry, has been constructed to enable the production and characterization of neutral biomolecular targets. The feasibility of the laser desorption technique for the purpose of radiation interaction experiments is investigated here. Fluorescent dye tagging and laser induced fluorescence imaging has been used to help characterize the laser produced plumes of biomolecules revealing their spatial density profiles and temporal evolution. Peak target thicknesses of 2x10{sup 12} molecules cm{sup -2} were obtained 30 {mu}s after laser desorption.

  14. Cryogenic RF Material Testing with a High-Q Copper Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; Martin, David; Yoneda, Charles [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2010-11-04

    An X-band RF cryogenic material testing system has been developed in the past few years. This system employs a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom working under a TE{sub 013} like mode. By measuring the cavity Qs with a network analyzer, the system can characterize the surface resistance of different samples at different temperatures. Using a 50 MW 2{mu}s pulsed klystron, the system can measure the quenching H field for superconducting samples, up to 300-400 mT. In this paper, we will present the most recent developments of the system and testing results.

  15. A second report on the experimental progress of the one microsecond, one kilojoule per pulse L-band relativistic klystron at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, W.B.; Carlsten, B.E.; Faehl, R.J.; Fazio, M.V.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-02-01

    Work is continuing on a high-current relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) with the goal of producing 1 kJ per pulse with a 1 {mu}s pulsewidth and a peak power of 1 GW. The three cavity tube has already produced pulses with more than 150 J and over 450 MW peak power. The original output cavity was thought to be limiting the performance, and a new cavity has been designed, built, and is now on-line and being conditioned up towards high power. Current experimental results are presented.

  16. High-frequency rheological behaviour of a multiconnected lyotropic phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doru Constantin; Jean-François Palierne; Éric Freyssingeas; Patrick Oswald

    2015-04-08

    High-frequency (up to ${\\omega} = 6 \\, 10^4$ rad/s) rheological measurements combined with light-scattering investigations show that an isotropic and multiconnected phase of surfactant micelles exhibits a terminal relaxation time of a few {\\mu}s, much smaller than in solutions of entangled wormlike micelles. This result is explained in terms of the local hexagonal order of the microscopic structure and we discuss its relevance for the understanding of dynamic behaviour in related systems, such as wormlike micelles and sponge phases.

  17. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Eric F.; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur

    2010-10-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

  18. Hi-speed versatile serial crate controller for CAMAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horelick, D.

    1984-10-01

    A serial crate controller, primarily for use in the SLC CAMAC control system, has been designed, and has been in use for about 2 years. The design supports a party line approach, with up to 16 crates on a single twisted pair for data transfers, plus another pair for prompt L response. The bit rate is 5 megabits/s, and complete transaction times of about 10 ..mu..s are achieved for 16-bit data transfers over cables up to 1000 feet long. One of the primary objects of the design was simplicity - there are approximately 60 chips in the two-board unit.

  19. Individual addressing of trapped $^{171}$Yb$^+$ ion qubits using a MEMS-based beam steering system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crain, S; Baek, S; Kim, J

    2014-01-01

    The ability to individually manipulate the increasing number of qubits is one of the many challenges towards scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. Using micro-mirrors fabricated with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, we focus laser beams on individual ions in a linear chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. We demonstrate sequential single qubit gates on multiple $^{171}$Yb$^+$ qubits and characterize the gate performance using quantum state tomography. Our system features negligible crosstalk to neighboring ions ($< 3\\times 10^{-4}$), and switching speed comparable to typical single qubit gate times ($<$ 2 $\\mu$s).

  20. A Phylogenetic Analysis of Orlando Gibbons' Prelude in G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Windram, Heather; Charlston, Terence; Howe, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    –83. 14 T. Roos and Y. Zou, ‘Analysis of textual variation by latent tree structures’, Proceedings of 2011 International Conference on Data Mining, eds. D. Cook, J. Pei, W. Wang, O. Zaïane and X. Wu, (2011), pp.567–76. 15 For a review of the field see C. J... .chch.ox.ac.uk/music/page.php?set=Mus.+89, page last updated 2010, accessed 7 August 2014); A. Woolley, English Keyboard Sources and their Context, c.1660–1720 (PhD diss., U. of Leeds, 2008), Appendix B, pp.228–76; A. Woolley, ‘Manuscript additions to a copy of John Playford’s Select...