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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Norwegian house mice (Mus musculus musculus/domesticus): distributions, routes of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Norwegian house mice (Mus musculus musculus/domesticus): distributions, routes of colonization commensal subspecies of house mouse in Norway: Mus musculus domesticus and M. m. musculus. Five nuclear, reflecting passive human transport to Norway, probably during the Viking period. M. m. musculus may have

Nachman, Michael

2

New Behavioral Insights Into Home Range Orientation of the House Mouse (Mus musculus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home-range orientation is a necessity for an animal that maintains an area of daily activity. The ability to navigate efficiently among goals not perceived at the starting point requires the animal to rely on place recognition ...

Alexander, Blythe Elizabeth

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Blue Whale, Balaenoptera musculus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Blue Whale, Balaenoptera musculus SALLY A. MIZROCH, DALE W. RICE, and JEFFREY M. BREIWICK Introduction The blue whale, Balaenoptera mus- culus (Linnaeus, 1758), is not only the largest of the whales metric tons (t) (Mackintosh, 1942). Blue whales are entirely bluish-gray in color, except for the white

4

Assay for the detection of non-lethal changes that are expressed as a proliferative disadvantage in mouse (Mus musculus) embryo aggregation chimberas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates the potential utility of the chimera embryo assay in measuring the effects of a variety of non-lethal, potentially hazardous environmental agents on normal mammalian embryonic cells. The two major findings to have emerged from this investigation are, (1) relative cellular contribution per embryo in chimeras was found to depend on the strain of the partner embryo and this relationship apparently does not require cell to cell contact between the partner embryos of the chimera and is already apparent after only two cell cycles; and (2) within the same outbred strain, exposure of one partner embryo in the chimera to either X-irradiation or chlorpromazine, at dose levels that were lower than those previously found to be embryotoxic; such toxicity was revealed as a proliferative disadvantage that was also evident after only 2 cell cycles. Partner embryos in the chimera were distinguished by labelling one of them with the fluorescent dye, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), which was shown to have no detrimental effects on the proliferation rate of the labelled embryos.

Obasaju, M.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Measures of immune function of wild mice, Mus STEPHEN R. ABOLINS,* MICHAEL J. O. POCOCK,* JULIUS C. R. HAFALLA, ELEANOR M.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measures of immune function of wild mice, Mus musculus STEPHEN R. ABOLINS,* MICHAEL J. O. POCOCK of wild animals has been rather little studied. Wild animals' immune function may differ from interindividual variation in the immune function of wild animals. To begin to investigate this, we compared

Nachman, Michael

6

Transcriptional regulation at multiple steps of cortical development in Mus musculus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007; Mason et al. , 2009; Heng et al. , 2012). However,al. , 2007; Mason et al. , 2009; Heng et al. , 2012). It isNat Neurosci 5(4):308-315. Heng YH, Barry G, Richards LJ,

Betancourt, Jennifer A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Design and Fabrication of Ultralight Weight, Adjustable Multi-electrode Probes for Electrophysiological Recordings in Mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The number of physiological investigations in the mouse, mus musculus, has experienced a recent surge, paralleling the growth in methods of genetic targeting for microcircuit dissection and disease modeling. The introduction ...

Brunetti, Philip M.

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - algerian mice mus Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: algerian mice mus Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 21, 12961301, August 9, 2011 2011 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - accessing ns-mus side Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

accessing ns-mus side Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Access Guide to the Albert Sloman Library Location of the library and its main spaces Summary: , and grab rail on wall side -...

10

Photometric studies of three multiperiodic Beta Cephei stars: Beta CMa, 15 CMa and KZ Mus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out single and multi-site photometry of the three Beta Cephei stars Beta and 15 CMa as well as KZ Mus. For the two stars in CMa, we obtained 270 h of measurement in the Stromgren uvy and Johnson V filters, while 150 h of time-resolved Stromgren uvy photometry was acquired for KZ Mus. All three stars are multi-periodic variables, with three (Beta CMa) and four (15 CMa, KZ Mus) independent pulsation modes. Two of the mode frequencies of 15 CMa are new discoveries and one of the known modes showed amplitude variations over the last 33 years. Taken together, this explains the star's diverse behaviour reported in the literature fully. Mode identification by means of the amplitude ratios in the different passbands suggests one radial mode for each star. In addition, Beta CMa has a dominant l=2 mode while its third mode is nonradial with unknown l. The nonradial modes of 15 CMa, which are l KZ Mus is l=2, followed by the radial mode and a dipole mode. Its weakest known mode is nonradial with unknown l, confirming previous mode identifications for the star's pulsations. The phased light curve for the strongest mode of 15 CMa has a descending branch steeper than the rising branch. A stillstand phenomenon during the rise to maximum light is indicated. Given the low photometric amplitude of this nonradial mode this is at first sight surprising, but it can be explained by the mode's aspect angle.

R. R. Shobbrook; G. Handler; D. Lorenz; D. Mogorosi

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

The nature of biodiversity has long been a central focus in biology. This may not seem the case any longer,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restricted set of organisms--the house mouse (Mus musculus), the fruit fly (Drosophila spp.), the nematode of diversity is, in a sense, provided by"adaptation"to an "ecological niche." Adaptation results from the force of selection; and the notion of the ecological niche,to which the organism adapts,remains obscure and poorly

12

Asteroseismological studies of three Beta Cephei stars: IL Vel, V433 Car and KZ Mus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have acquired between 127 and 150 h of time-resolved multicolour photometry for each of the three Beta Cephei stars IL Vel, V433 Car and KZ Mus over a time span of four months from two observatories. All three objects are multiperiodic with at least three modes of pulsation. Mode identification from the relative colour amplitudes is performed. We obtain unambiguous results for the two highest-amplitude modes of IL Vel (both are l=1) and the three strongest modes of KZ Mus (l=2,0 and 1), but none for V433 Car. Spectroscopy shows the latter star to be a fast rotator (v sin i = 240 km/s), whereas the other two have moderate v sin i (65 and 47 km/s, respectively). We performed model calculations with the Warsaw-New Jersey stellar evolution and pulsation code. We find that IL Vel is an object of about 12 Msun in the second half of its main sequence evolutionary track. Its two dipole modes are most likely rotationally split components of the mode originating as p1 on the ZAMS; one of these modes is m=0. V433 Car is suggested to be an unevolved 13 Msun star just entering the Beta Cephei instability strip. KZ Mus seems less massive (about 12.7 Msun) and somewhat more evolved, and its radial mode is probably the fundamental one. In this case its quadrupole mode would be the one originating as g1, and its dipole mode would be p1. It is suggested that mode identification of slowly rotating Beta Cephei stars based on photometric colour amplitudes is reliable; we estimate that a relative accuracy of 3% in the amplitudes is sufficient for unambiguous identifications. Due to the good agreement of our theoretical and observational results we conclude that the prospects for asteroseismology of multiperiodic slowly rotating Beta Cephei star are good.

G. Handler; R. R. Shobbrook; F. F. Vuthela; L. A. Balona; F. Rodler; T. Tshenye

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

The PI3K regulatory subunits p55? and p50? regulate cell death in vivo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 0.4865   0.5429 Dscr1 Mus musculus Down syndrome critical region homolog 1 (human) (Dscr1), mRNA. 0.4901   0.3317 2310032D16Rik Mus musculus RIKEN cDNA 2310032D16 gene (2310032D16Rik), mRNA. 0.4929   0.4821 Slpi Mus musculus secretory leukocyte...

Pensa, S.; Neoh, K.; Resemann, H. K.; Kreuzaler, P. A.; Abell, K.; Clarke, N. J.; Reinheckel, T.; Kahn, C. R.; Watson, C. J.

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Genomic analysis of mouse tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences has spurred a growing interest in analyzing mouse models of human cancer using genomic techniques. Comparative genomic studies on mouse and human tumors can be ...

Tam, Mandy Chi-Mun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The ecology of anthrax and coinfection trade-offs from an immunological perspective: seasonal aspects of host susceptibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phodopus  sungorus.  Functional  Ecology  23:979–988.  Mus  musculus.  Molecular  Ecology   Abu-­?Raddad,  L.  J.  transmission  of  parasites?  Ecology  Letters  12:528– de  

Cizauskas, Carrie Ann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

SciTech Connect: Gametic selection as an evolutionary force:...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Gametic selection as an evolutionary force: the maintenance of lethal polymorphisms in wild populations of Mus musculus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gametic selection...

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - als3p protects mice Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to mice and rats. In Utah, house mice (Mus musculus) and Norway rats (Rattus... of house mice and Norway rats. House mice are ... Source: Berryman Institute, Department of...

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - acyltransferase-2 protects mice Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utah, house mice (Mus musculus) and Norway rats (Rattus... of house mice and Norway rats. House mice are ... Source: Berryman Institute, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Utah...

19

Sinkpad: A Malleable Mouse Pad Consisted of an Elastic Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mouse wheel, and moving the mouse. To solve this problem, it is necessary to augment conventional mouse. [9] described a two-ball mouse with an additional ball to capture angular movement to provide 3DOF

Tanaka, Jiro

20

10. international mouse genome conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

Meisler, M.H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic...

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid receptor-1 gene Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 17 BioMed Central Page 1 of 15 Summary: (Ttr), Homo sapiens (FLJ13180 fis), Mus musculus estrogen receptor 1 (Esr1). 12;BMC Bioinformatics... Proceedings...

23

Lyme disease in an experimental mouse model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antibody response, using RIA, to Borrelia burgdorferi B31 isolate in sera from C3H/HeJ strain mice, at a 1;10 dilution, following seven different routes of inoculation. . . . . Page 29 2 C3H/HeJ mouse showing arthus type reaction, 24 hours post intra..., 15 days post injection. . . , 5 Antibody Response, using RIA, to homologous Borrelia hurgdorferi isolates in sera from C3H/HeJ mouse strains, at a 1:10 serum dilution of 5 tail bleeds. . . . . . 34 37 6. C3H/HeJ mouse showing granulomatous skin...

Reddy, Sunitha

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Dazl regulates mouse embryonic germ cell development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the mouse, germ cells can undergo differentiation to become either oocytes or spermatozoa in response to sex of their gonadal environment. The nature of the germ cell-intrinsic aspects of this signaling have not been ...

Gill, Mark E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Construction of Anatomically Correct Models of Mouse Brain Networks 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Construction of Anatomically Correct Models of Mouse Brain Networks 1 B. H. McCormick a, W. Koh a Y and Public Health, Texas A&M University, 4458 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-4458 Abstract The Mouse Brain Web, a federated database, provides for the construction of anatomically correct models of mouse brain

Keyser, John

26

Structural Differences Mouse-over highlighting shows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regions accordingly · See individual nucleotides in the context· See individual nucleotides in the context· See individual nucleotides in the context· See individual nucleotides in the context of a sequence Finding motifs · Interactive mouse-over highlighting · Search for nucleotide or codon strings · Simple

Munzner, Tamara

27

alters mouse behavior: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(such as action-selection processes) provide script languages Ouhyoung, Ming 8 Mouse behavior recognition with the wisdom of crowd MIT - DSpace Summary: In this thesis, we...

28

Neutron issues in the JANUS mouse program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 25 years, the JANUS program in the Biological and Medical Research Division at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has compiled a database on the response of both sexes of an F{sub 1} hybrid mouse, the B6CF{sub 1} (C57BL/6 x BALB/c), to external whole- body irradiation by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and fission neutrons. Three basic patterns of exposure for both neutrons and {gamma}-rays have been investigated: single exposures, 24 equal once-weekly exposures, and 60 equal once-weekly exposures. All irradiations were terminated at predetermined total doses, with dose calculated in centigrays at the midline of the mouse. Three endpoints will be discussed in this paper: (1) life shortening, (2) a point estimate for cumulative mortality, and (3) the hazard function. Life shortening is used as an analysis endpoint because it summarizes, in a single index, the integrated effect of all injuries accumulated by an organism. Histopathological analyses of the mice used in the ANL studies have indicated that 85% of the deaths were caused by neoplasms. Connective tissue tumors were the dominant tumor in the B6CF{sub 1} mouse, with tumors of lymphoreticular origin accounting for approximately 80% of this class. The latter two endpoints will therefore be used to describe the life table experience of mice dying from the lymphoreticular class of tumors. Dose-response models will be applied to the three endpoints in order to describe the response function for neutron exposures, evaluate the effect of dose range and pattern of exposure on the response function for neutrons, and provide a set of neutron relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of the ANL database. 25 refs.

Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse white Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mouse white Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adult mouse white Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Boston University Computer Science...

30

Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by...

31

MUS. COMP. ZOOL OCCASIONAL PAPERS 3 1982  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and describe Ethcostoma baileiji, E. rafincsc/uci, and E. barrcncn.se. We hope, as did Kuehne and Small (1971

Hulsey, C. Darrin

32

Mouse Pointing Endpoint Prediction Using Kinematic Template Matching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mouse Pointing Endpoint Prediction Using Kinematic Template Matching Phillip T. Pasqual and Jacob O and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work

Wobbrock, Jacob O.

33

Characterization of the mouse pancreatic islet proteome and comparative analysis with other mouse tissues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pancreatic islets of Langerhans and insulin-producing beta cells in particular play a central role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and the islet dysfunction is associated with the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To contribute to the understanding of the biology of the pancreatic islets we applied proteomic techniques based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Here as an initial step we present the first comprehensive proteomic characterization of pancreas islets of the mouse, the commonly used animal model for diabetes research. Two-dimensional SCX LC/RP LC-MS/MS has been applied to characterize of the mouse islet proteome, resulting in the confident identification of 17,350 different tryptic peptides covering 2,612 proteins with at least two unique peptide identifications per protein. The dataset also allowed identification of a number of post-translational modifications including several modifications relevant to oxidative stress and phosphorylation. While many of the identified phosphorylation sites corroborates with previous known sites, the oxidative modifications observed on cysteinyl residues potentially reveal novel information related to the role of oxidation stress in islet functions. Comparative analysis of the islet proteome database with 15 available proteomic datasets from other mouse tissues and cells revealed a set of 68 proteins uniquely detected only in the pancreatic islets. Besides proteins with known functions, like islet secreted peptide hormones, this unique set contains a number of proteins with yet unknown functions. The resulting peptide and protein database will be available at ncrr.pnl.gov web site of the NCRR proteomic center (ncrr.pnl.gov).

Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Hinault, Charlotte; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Singhal, Mudita; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Smith, Richard D.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome and a key experimental tool for biomedical research. Here, we report the results of an international collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial comparative analysis of the mouse and human genomes, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the two sequences. We discuss topics including the analysis of the evolutionary forces shaping the size, structure and sequence of the genomes; the conservation of large-scale synteny across most of the genomes; the much lower extent of sequence orthology covering less than half of the genomes; the proportions of the genomes under selection; the number of protein-coding genes; the expansion of gene families related to reproduction and immunity; the evolution of proteins; and the identification of intraspecies polymorphism.

Waterston, Robert H.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Birney, Ewan; Rogers, Jane; Abril, Josep F.; Agarwal, Pankaj; Agarwala, Richa; Ainscough, Rachel; Alexandersson, Marina; An, Peter; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Attwood, John; Baertsch, Robert; Bailey, Jonathon; Barlow, Karen; Beck, Stephan; Berry, Eric; Birren, Bruce; Bloom, Toby; Bork, Peer; Botcherby, Marc; Bray, Nicolas; Brent, Michael R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Brown, Stephen D.; Bult, Carol; Burton, John; Butler, Jonathan; Campbell, Robert D.; Carninci, Piero; Cawley, Simon; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Church, Deanna M.; Clamp, Michele; Clee, Christopher; Collins, Francis S.; Cook, Lisa L.; Copley, Richard R.; Coulson, Alan; Couronne, Olivier; Cuff, James; Curwen, Val; Cutts, Tim; Daly, Mark; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Delehaunty, Kimberly D.; Deri, Justin; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dewey, Colin; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Diekhans, Mark; Dodge, Sheila; Dubchak, Inna; Dunn, Diane M.; Eddy, Sean R.; Elnitski, Laura; Emes, Richard D.; Eswara, Pallavi; Eyras, Eduardo; Felsenfeld, Adam; Fewell, Ginger A.; Flicek, Paul; Foley, Karen; Frankel, Wayne N.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Furey, Terrence S.; Gage, Diane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glusman, Gustavo; Gnerre, Sante; Goldman, Nick; Goodstadt, Leo; Grafham, Darren; Graves, Tina A.; Green, Eric D.; Gregory, Simon; Guigo, Roderic; Guyer, Mark; Hardison, Ross C.; Haussler, David; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Hinrichs, Angela; Hlavina, Wratko; Holzer, Timothy; Hsu, Fan; Hua, Axin; Hubbard, Tim; Hunt, Adrienne; Jackson, Ian; Jaffe, David B.; Johnson, L. Steven; Jones, Matthew; Jones, Thomas A.; Joy, Ann; Kamal, Michael; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Karolchik, Donna; Kasprzyk, Arkadiusz; Kawai, Jun; Keibler, Evan; Kells, Cristyn; Kent, W. James; Kirby, Andrew; Kolbe, Diana L.; Korf, Ian; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Kulbokas III, Edward J.; Kulp, David; Landers, Tom; Leger, J.P.; Leonard, Steven; Letunic, Ivica; Levine, Rosie; et al.

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer. Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer. Abstract: In...

36

Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated proteins including EGF domain-specific O-GlcNAc transferase Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain...

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - atdc5 mouse progenitor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

con- firmed for mouse brain glia... astrocytes and the other, oligodendro- cytes. Comparison of O-2A Progenitors from Rat Optic Nerve and Mouse... and co-workers reported that...

38

Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features Dorsal/Ventral dial.352.3139 Toll Free: 1.877.352.3275 ^^ci&ion Q)e&i^n^^^r ^esea/H^/i Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder 923B-1/07 #12;MODEL 923-B MOUSE GAS ANESTHESIA HEAD HOLDER The KOPF Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder

Kleinfeld, David

39

Systematic Enhancement of Polymerization of Recombinant Sickle Hemoglobin Mutants: Implications for Transgenic Mouse Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Transgenic Mouse Model for Sickle Cell Anemia By Xianfeng Li, Urooj A. Mirza, Brian T. Chait, and James M for sisting of HbS, Hb Antilles, and Hb D-Punjab. Normal mouse sickle cell anemia, we have expressed generation of the transgenic mouse model for sickle cell and polymerized in a linear manner at progressively

Chait, Brian T.

40

Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after Targeted Ablation of Hair Cells with Diphtheria Toxin Justin S. Golub,1 Ling Tong,1 Tot B. Ngyuen,1 Cliff R. Hume,1 Richard developed a transgenic mouse to permit conditional and selective ablation of hair cells in the adult mouse

Rubel, Edwin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mouse inbred strain differences in ethanol drinking to intoxication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mouse inbred strain differences in ethanol drinking to intoxication J. S. Rhodes*, , M. M. Ford , C described a simple procedure, Drinking in the Dark (DID), in which C57BL/6J mice self-administer ethanol to a blood ethanol concentration (BEC) above 1 mg/ml. The test consists of replacing the water with 20

Garland Jr., Theodore

42

Fundamental Ca2 Signaling Mechanisms in Mouse Dendritic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamental Ca2 Signaling Mechanisms in Mouse Dendritic Cells: CRAC Is the Major Ca2 Entry Pathway, Meyer B. Jackson, David E. Clapham,* and Gerard P. Ahern2 Although Ca2 -signaling processes are thought to underlie many dendritic cell (DC) functions, the Ca2 entry pathways are unknown. Therefore, we investigated

Clapham, David E.

43

Structure and Emergence of Specific Olfactory Glomeruli in the Mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the olfactory bulb. Connecting 1000 populations of OSNs to the 1800 glomeruli of the mouse bulb poses fluorescent protein (GFP) or a fusion of tau with GFP. We visualized OSNs and their axons in whole mounts-expressing OSNs occupies a large surface area of the bulb and coalesces abruptly into a proto- glomerulus

44

Biophysical Journal Volume 68 May 1995 1787-1795 Molecular Dynamics in Mouse Atrial Tumor Sarcoplasmic Reticulum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: ddt@ddt.biochem.umn.edu. Abbreviations used: SR, sarcoplasmic reticulum; MVSR, mouse ventricular SR

Thomas, David D.

45

Polar Biol (2007) 30:391394 DOI 10.1007/s00300-006-0204-8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pairs of thin-billed prions nests despite the presence of introduced ship rats, house mice and feral Pachyptila belcheri (Catry et al. 2003). Ship rats Rattus rattus, house mice Mus musculus and cats Felis em Eco-Etologia, Rua Jardim do Tabaco 44, Lisboa 1149-041, Portugal e-mail: paulo.catry@netc.pt P

46

Metformin prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of mouse Schwann cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methylglyoxal (MG) is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications via the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). To clarify whether the antidiabetic drug metformin prevents Schwann cell damage induced by MG, we cultured mouse Schwann cells in the presence of MG and metformin. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining, caspase-3 activity, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Intracellular ROS formation was determined by flow cytometry, and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation was also examined. MG treatment resulted in blunted cell proliferation, an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, and the activation of caspase-3 and JNK along with enhanced intracellular ROS formation. All of these changes were significantly inhibited by metformin. No significant activation of AMPK by MG or metformin was observed. Taken together, metformin likely prevents MG-induced apoptotic signals in mouse Schwann cells by inhibiting the formation of AGEs and ROS.

Ota, Kimiko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nakamura, Jiro [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Li, Weiguo [Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, School Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA (United States); Kozakae, Mika [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Watarai, Atsuko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuhisa [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yasuda, Yutaka [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nakashima, Eirtaro [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Naruse, Keiko [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Denistry, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya (Japan); Watabe, Kazuhiko [Department of Molecular Neuropathology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Kato, Koichi [Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetology, Department of Internal Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Aichi (Japan); Oiso, Yutaka [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Hamada, Yoji [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsuruma-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)]. E-mail: yhama@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

An Anisotropic Fluid-Solid Model of the Mouse Heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical challenge in biomechanical simulations is the spatial discretization of complex fluid-solid geometries created from imaging. This is especially important when dealing with Lagrangian interfaces, as there must be at a minimum both geometric and topological compatibility between fluid and solid phases, with exact matching of the interfacial nodes being highly desirable. We have developed a solution to this problem and applied the approach to the creation of a 3D fluidsolid mesh of the mouse heart. First, a 50 micron isotropic MRI dataset of a perfusion-fixed mouse heart was segmented into blood, tissue, and background using a customized multimaterial connected fuzzy thresholding algorithm. Then, a multimaterial marching cubes algorithm was applied to produce two compatible isosurfaces, one for the blood-tissue boundary and one for the tissue-background boundary. A multimaterial smoothing algorithm that rigorously conserves volume for each phase simultaneously smoothed the isosurfaces. Next we applied novel automated meshing algorithms to generate anisotropic hybrid meshes with the number of layers and the desired element anisotropy for each material as the only input parameters. As the meshes are scale-invariant within a material and include boundary layer prisms, fluid-structure interaction computations would have a relative error equilibrated over the entire mesh. The resulting model is highly detailed mesh representation of the mouse heart, including features such as chordae and coronary vasculature, that is also maximally efficient to produce the best simulation results for the computational resources available

Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; del Pin, Facundo; Einstein, Daniel R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergy mouse model Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CBMC proliferation... -cockroach, anti-mouse, and anti-dust mite IgE levels, wheeze, cough, eczema and asthma. Results: ... Source: Columbia University, Department of...

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - a140v mouse model Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Version 6. Official copy "Mouse" in Berkshire Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, W.S. Bainbridge (ed). 2004 by Berkshire Publishing Group. http:www.berkshirepublishing.c...

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse tissues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shanghai Institute of Biological Sciences Collection: Biology and Medicine 25 A gene atlas of the mouse and human protein-encoding transcriptomes Summary: information on the...

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse pancreas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mouse. Since there are human... expressed in the adult pancreas (data not ... Source: Brand, Paul H. - Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo...

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging mouse brain Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vol. 28, No. 19 OPTICS LETTERS 1739 Three-dimensional laser-induced photoacoustic tomography Summary: -induced photoacoustic tomography of mouse brain with the skin and skull...

53

Diarrhea as a cause of mortality in a mouse model of infectious colitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Comparative characterization of genome-wide transcriptional changes during infection can help elucidate the mechanisms underlying host susceptibility. In this study, transcriptional profiling of the mouse colon ...

Borenshtein, Diana

54

Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical properties of the mouse eye Ying Geng,1,2,* Lee Anne Schery,1 Robin Sharma,1,2 Alfredo, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627, USA 2 The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester indicate that the optical quality of the mouse eye assessed by measurement of its aberrations is remarkably

55

Semi-Automated Reconstruction of Vascular Networks in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The KnifeEdge Scanning Microscope (KESM) enables imaging of an entire mouse brain at sub-micrometer resolution. The data from KESM can be used in the reconstruction of neuronal and vascular structures in the mouse brain. Tracing the vascular network...

Dileepkumar, Ananth

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

56

Wild mouse open field behavior is embedded within the multidimensional data space spanned by laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wild mouse open field behavior is embedded within the multidimensional data space spanned- ius), while studies of wild-mouse behavior are relatively rare. An interesting question is the relationship between the phenotypes of M. laboratorius and the phenotypes of their wild ancestors

Golani, Ilan

57

Development of a Three-Dimensional Ball Rotation Sensing System using Optical Mouse Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the case of a ball wheel. The system measures surface speed by using two or more optical mouse sensorsDevelopment of a Three-Dimensional Ball Rotation Sensing System using Optical Mouse Sensors Masaaki Kumagai and Ralph L. Hollis Abstract-- Robots using ball(s) as spherical wheels have the advantage

58

Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

59

Transplantation of Adult Mouse iPS Cell-Derived Photoreceptor Precursors Restores Retinal Structure and Function in Degenerative Mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. ( 2007) Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model withan animal model of sickle cell anemia [36], or engraftment

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, ?-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Curated Databases in the Life Sciences: The Edinburgh Mouse Atlas Project   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This case study scopes and assesses the data curation aspects of the Edinburgh Mouse Atlas Project (EMAP), a programme funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC). The principal goal for EMAP is to develop an expression ...

Fairley, Elizabeth; Higgins, Sarah; Whyte, Angus

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

Conditional mouse lung cancer models using adenoviral or lentiviral delivery of Cre recombinase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of animal models of lung cancer is critical to our understanding and treatment of the human disease. Conditional mouse models provide new opportunities for testing novel chemopreventatives, therapeutics and ...

DuPage, Michel

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse cord Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

comparison with spinal cord described later in Fig. 8B). In addition to mouse brains... bulb, a small but significant amount of MAb 15G8 binding persisted even in the adult...

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse heart Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heart Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adult mouse heart Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology 18...

65

Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Stem Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Stem Cells. (December 2013) Alyssa Crocker Department of Animal Science Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Michael Golding Department of Veterinary Physiology...

Crocker, Alyssa

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

Biophysical Probes of Iron Metabolism in Yeast Cells, Mitochondria, and Mouse Brains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resonance, electronic absorption spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This integrated biophysical approach was applied to yeast cells, isolated yeast mitochondria, and mouse brains. We determined the concentration of Fe...

Holmes-Hampton, Gregory

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorates mouse liver Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: are abundant in iNKT cells.13-17 For example, mouse liver...

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged mouse ovaries Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ovaries Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aged mouse ovaries Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Reproduction and Fertility (1994)...

69

June 2004 283Notes DISTRIBUTION OF THE WHITE-ANKLED MOUSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nacional de las Cavernas de Carlsbad y localidades adyacentes en el extremo sureste de Nuevo Me). Much of our knowledge about the biology of this mouse in New Mexico comes from Carlsbad Caverns

70

A Novel Sensitive Method of Detecting Mnemonic Decline in Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Junior Scholars Thesis by REBECCA KAYE SIMMONS A NOVEL SENSITIVE METHOD OF DETECTING MNEMONIC DECLINE IN MOUSE MODEL OF ALZHEIMER?S DISEASE Approved by: Research... as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Junior Scholars Thesis by REBECCA KAYE SIMMONS iii ABSTRACT A Novel Sensitive Method of Detecting Mnemonic Decline in Mouse Models of Alzheimer?s Disease. (April 2009) Rebecca Kaye Simmons Department of Psychology...

Simmons, Rebecca

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL ON THE REGULATION OF IMPRINTED GENES IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS An Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis by ELIZABETH MARY VILLANUEVA Submitted to Honors and Undergraduate Research Texas A... ................................................................................................... 25 2 ABSTRACT The Effects of Alcohol on the Regulation of Imprinted Genes in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells. (May 2013) Elizabeth Mary Villanueva Department of Interdisciplinary Studies Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr...

Villanueva, Elizabeth Mary

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

72

MUS420/EE367A Lecture 7A Woodwind Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Reed Instruments Schematic Model Reed Bore Mouth Pressure Embouchure Tone-Hole Lattice Bell ( )np+ ( )np- ( )npm Model Bell Mouth Pressure Embouchure Offset Reed to Bell Delay ( )npm 2 BoreReed Reflection Filter

Smith III, Julius Orion

73

Mus(tidimensional autsresonant mode conversion L. Friedland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stagesby Bohm.and Foldy' in applications to relativistic particle accelerators. The term phase stability the gyroresonancecyclic accel- erator (GYRAC)6 and the spatial autoresonancecyclotron (SAC)7acceleratorarebasedon- nanceassociatedwith particle dynamicsandthat in resonant wave interactions. While in the former case the system

Friedland, Lazar

74

TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J. [Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Departments of Internal Medicine, Chemistry, and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •RECK is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in mouse liver. •The FXR response element is located within the intron 1 of RECK gene. •FXR agonist reverses the down-regulation of RECK in the liver in mouse NASH model. -- Abstract: Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver.

Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Lei, E-mail: yhchloech@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sorghum gene expression modulated by water deficit and cold stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] 2.4 IP1_69_A06_A002 Nucleoside diphosphate kinase III [A. thaliana] 2.4 ABA1_11_E02_A012 1200010K03Rik protein [Mus musculus] 2.4 OV1_27_H09_A002 VsaA-like protein [Oryza sativa] 2.4 RHOH1_28_A09 Histone H2A [Petroselinum crispum] 2...

Lim, Sanghyun

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Ultrastructural study of Rift Valley fever virus in the mouse model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed ultrastructural studies of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in the mouse model are needed to develop and characterize a small animal model of RVF for the evaluation of potential vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, the ultrastructural features of RVFV infection in the mouse model were analyzed. The main changes in the liver included the presence of viral particles in hepatocytes and hepatic stem cells accompanied by hepatocyte apoptosis. However, viral particles were observed rarely in the liver; in contrast, particles were extremely abundant in the CNS. Despite extensive lymphocytolysis, direct evidence of viral replication was not observed in the lymphoid tissue. These results correlate with the acute-onset hepatitis and delayed-onset encephalitis that are dominant features of severe human RVF, but suggest that host immune-mediated mechanisms contribute significantly to pathology. The results of this study expand our knowledge of RVFV-host interactions and further characterize the mouse model of RVF.

Reed, Christopher; Steele, Keith E.; Honko, Anna; Shamblin, Joshua; Hensley, Lisa E. [United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, MD (United States)] [United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, MD (United States); Smith, Darci R., E-mail: darci.smith1@us.army.mil [United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, MD (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Laser-Assisted In Vitro Fertilization Facilitates Fertilization of Vitrified-Warmed C57BL/6 Mouse Oocytes with Fresh and Frozen-Thawed Spermatozoa, Producing Live Pups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The utility of cryopreserved mouse gametes for reproduction of transgenic mice depends on development of assisted reproductive technologies, including vitrification of unfertilized mouse oocytes. Due to hardening of the ...

Woods, Stephanie E.

79

Inherited effects from mouse immature oocytes following low-dose irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Immature oocytes represent the genetic pool in female mice as well as in women and therefore are principal cells of concern for genetic studies. Previous studies have demonstrated that genetic effects in female mice can be masked by the hypersensitive plasma membrane lethality target of immature oocytes. Studies have also shown that genetic effects can be detected when the plasma mambrane is sufficiently spared. Here, new data obtained using the mouse preimplantation embryo chimera assay are presented and discussed in light of previous findings for irradiated mouse oocytes.

Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Khan, R.; Raabe, O.G.; Walsh, K.J.; Wiley, L.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Institute of Toxicology and Environmental Health

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550.12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550 deficits. Lithium is used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, and it has been used to treat mood dysregulation in individuals with FrX. Lithium has also been shown to reverse learning deficits and improve

Smith, Carolyn Beebe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT{sup Cre/+};ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

Pavone, Luigi Michele [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: pavone@dbbm.unina.it; Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mastellone, Vincenzo [Department of Experimental Medicine 'G. Salvatore', University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Avallone, Luigi [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Polyclonality of familial murine adenomas: Analyses of mouse chimeras with low tumor multiplicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyclonality of familial murine adenomas: Analyses of mouse chimeras with low tumor multiplicity) and homozygous for the tumor resistance allele of the Mom1 locus were established. These chimeras also display of patches in chimeras or mosaics heterotypic for a clonal lineage marker. The ability to detect

Dove, William

83

In vivo fluorescent imaging of the mouse retina using adaptive optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the retina of a mouse, using a microelectromechanical system membrane mirror and a Shack­Hartmann wave- front is a powerful tool that allows fol- lowing a single animal over time. A major problem with implementing (Dual Calypso laser, Co- bolt AB, Stockholm, Sweden). An entrance pupil is formed at the source

84

Helicobacter pylori tissue tropism: mouse-colonizing strains can target different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helicobacter pylori tissue tropism: mouse-colonizing strains can target different gastric niches-adapted Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 had supported an idea that infections by this pathogen start in the gastric diversity and genome evolution. INTRODUCTION Helicobacter pylori chronically infects the gastric mucosa

Cheverud, James M.

85

General anesthesia selectively disrupts astrocyte calcium signaling in the awake mouse cortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General anesthesia selectively disrupts astrocyte calcium signaling in the awake mouse cortex. However, the direct effect of general anesthesia on astrocyte signaling in awake animals has not pre, anesthesia affected calcium transients in both processes and soma and depressed spontaneous signals, as well

Newman, Eric A.

86

Evolutionary Conservation of Expression Profiles Between Human and Mouse Orthologous Genes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­array-based observations from many individual genes and imply the uselessness of mouse models for studying human genes­profiling technologies became available (Cavalieri, Townsend, and Hartl 2000; Enard et al. 2002; Oleksiak, Churchill all the technologies for producing transcriptome data, the DNA (oligonucleotide or cDNA) microarray

Zhang, Jianzhi

87

Ultramicroscopy: three-dimensional visualization of neuronal networks in the whole mouse brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultramicroscopy: three-dimensional visualization of neuronal networks in the whole mouse brain Hans entire neuronal networks for analysis in the intact brain has been impossible up to now. Techniques like in micro computer tomogrpahy and mMRI does not resolve individual cells1,2. On a microscopic scale

Cai, Long

88

SkyMouse: A smart interface for astronomical on-line resources and services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the development of network and the World Wide Web (WWW), the Internet has been growing and changing dramatically. More and more on-line database systems and different kinds of services are available for astronomy research. How to help users find their way through the jungle of information services becomes an important challenge. Although astronomers have been aware of the importance of interoperability and introduced the concept of Virtual Observatory as a uniform environment for future astronomical on-line resources and services, transparent access to heterogeneous on-line information is still difficult. SkyMouse is a lightweight interface for distributed astronomical on-line resources and services, which is designed and developed by us, i.e., Chinese Virtual Observatory Project. Taking advantage of screen word-capturing technology, different kinds of information systems can be queried through simple mouse actions, and results are returned in a uniform web page. SkyMouse is an easy to use application, aiming to show basic information or to create a comprehensive overview of a specific astronomical object. In this paper current status of on-line resources and services access is reviewed; system architecture, features and functions of SkyMouse are described; challenges for intelligent interface for on-line astronomical resources and services are discussed.

Chen-Zhou CUI; Hua-Ping SUN; Yong-Heng ZHAO; Yu LUO; Da-Zhi QI

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Circ Res . Author manuscript Nanobodies targeting mouse/human VCAM1 for the nuclear imaging of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wernery 7 , Vicky Caveliers 3 8 , Serge Muyldermans 4 5 , Tony Lahoutte 3 8 , Daniel Fagret 1 2 on mouse and human recombinant VCAM1 proteins and endothelial cells and inin vitro in vivo ApoE-deficient (ApoE ) mice. A nontargeting control nanobody was used in all experiments to demonstrate specificity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

Caspase Activation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle Exposed to Neomycin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Caspase Activation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle Exposed to Neomycin Lisa L. Cunningham, Alan exposure results in the apoptotic destruction of auditory and vestibular hair cells. This ototoxic hair, immunohistochemistry, and specific caspase inhibitors to determine which caspases are activated in the hair cells

Rubel, Edwin

91

Flow cytometry quantitation of dopamine receptor D2 loss as a sensitive measure of Huntington's Disease progression in mouse neurons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mouse models of Huntington's Disease (HD) are often used for testing potential therapeutic compounds. These experiments require substantial investments in time and resources, and have yet to produce any intervention that ...

Crook, Zachary R. (Zachary Ryan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Rapid Structural Remodeling of Thalamocortical Synapses Parallels Experience-Dependent Functional Plasticity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monocular lid closure (MC) causes a profound shift in the ocular dominance (OD) of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). Anatomical studies in both cat and mouse V1 suggest that large-scale structural rearrangements of ...

Coleman, Jason E.

93

The PanK2 Genes of Mouse and Human Specify Proteins with DistinctSubcellular Locations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis is initiated by pantothenatekinase (PanK) and CoA levels are controlled through differentialexpression and feedback regulation of PanK isoforms. PanK2 is amitochondrial protein in humans, but comparative genomics revealed thatacquisition of a mitochondrial targeting signal was limited to primates.Human and mouse PanK2 possessed similar biochemical properties, withinhibition by acetylCoA and activation by palmitoylcarnitine. Mouse PanK2localized in the cytosol, and the expression of PanK2 was higher in humanbrain compared to mouse brain. Differences in expression and subcellularlocalization should be considered in developing a mouse model for humanPanK2 deficiency. (c) 2007 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.Published by Elsevier B.V.

Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Lydikis, Athanasios; Stevens,Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Wenner, Brett R.; Bain, James R.; Newgard,Christopher B.; Rock, Charles O.; Jackowski, Suzanne

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A filtered database search algorithm for endogenous serum protein carbonyl modifications in a mouse model of inflammation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During inflammation, the resulting oxidative stress can damage surrounding host tissue, forming protein-carbonyls. The SJL mouse is an experimental animal model used to assess in vivo toxicological responses to reactive ...

Slade, Peter G.

95

The Consensus Coding Sequence (Ccds) Project: Identifying a Common Protein-Coding Gene Set for the Human and Mouse Genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but ...

Kellis, Manolis

96

FUNCTIONAL AND MECHANISTIC STUDY OF DOT1L IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC HEMATOPOIESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognized that two distinct populations of red cells circulate in the blood stream of mouse embryos. The first population, the “primitive” red cells, are extremely large, nucleated red cells, which originate from the yolk sac2. Shortly after that, a second... to our increasing knowledge over time. For example, at first the primitive red cells are thought to be always nucleated and have the same characteristics with the nucleated nonmammalian red cells. Also originally, people believed that definitive...

Feng, Yi

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Effect of gamma-linolenic acid on mouse macrophage prostaglandin E1 synthesis and phospholipid metabolism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in this study, the modulatory effect of dietary GLA on mouse peritoneal macrophage PGEI, PGE2 and PGI2 biosynthesis is presented. MATERIALS AND METHODS Materials All tissue culture media were purchased from Whitaker M. A. Bioproducts (Walkersville, MD... in the PGE2 RIA kit (Nuclear Magnetics, Cambridge, MA) was 100% and 50%, respectively, as determined by the manufacturer and confirmed by our preliminary test (Appendix II). Therefore, the apparent concentration of immunoreactive PGEI was multiplied by two...

Fan, Yang-Yi

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Lu, Fred G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Lerch, Jason P. [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada) [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Nieman, Brian J., E-mail: bjnieman@phenogenomics.ca [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Sertad1 encodes a novel transcriptional co-activator of SMAD1 in mouse embryonic hearts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •SERTAD1 interacts with SMAD1. •Sertad1 is expressed in mouse embryonic hearts. •SERTAD1 is localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus of cardiomyocytes. •SERTAD1 enhances expression of BMP target cardiogenic genes as a SMAD1 co-activator. -- Abstract: Despite considerable advances in surgical repairing procedures, congenital heart diseases (CHDs) remain the leading noninfectious cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Understanding the molecular/genetic mechanisms underlying normal cardiogenesis will provide essential information for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against CHDs. BMP signaling plays complex roles in multiple cardiogenic processes in mammals. SMAD1 is a canonical nuclear mediator of BMP signaling, the activity of which is critically regulated through its interaction partners. We screened a mouse embryonic heart yeast two-hybrid library using Smad1 as bait and identified SERTAD1 as a novel interaction partner of SMAD1. SERTAD1 contains multiple potential functional domains, including two partially overlapping transactivation domains at the C terminus. The SERTAD1-SMAD1 interaction in vitro and in mammalian cells was further confirmed through biochemical assays. The expression of Sertad1 in developing hearts was demonstrated using RT-PCR, western blotting and in situ hybridization analyses. We also showed that SERTAD1 was localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of immortalized cardiomyocytes and primary embryonic cardiomyocyte cultures. The overexpression of SERTAD1 in cardiomyocytes not only enhanced the activity of two BMP reporters in a dose-dependent manner but also increased the expression of several known BMP/SMAD regulatory targets. Therefore, these data suggest that SERTAD1 acts as a SMAD1 transcriptional co-activator to promote the expression of BMP target genes during mouse cardiogenesis.

Peng, Yin [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)] [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Zhao, Shaomin [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States) [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Song, Langying [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)] [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Wang, Manyuan [School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China)] [School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Jiao, Kai, E-mail: kjiao@uab.edu [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)] [Department of Genetics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

100

Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, mouse models have proven to be invaluable in expanding our understanding of cancer biology. We have amassed a tremendous amount of proteomics and transcriptomics data profiling blood and tissues from a Her2-driven mouse model of breast cancer that closely recapitulates the pathology and natural history of human breast cancer. The purpose of this report is to make all of these data publicly available in raw and processed forms, as a resource to the community. Importantly, high quality biospecimens from this same mouse model are freely available through a sample repository that we established, so researchers can readily obtain samples to test biological hypotheses without the need of breeding animals and collecting biospecimens. Specifically, six proteomics and six transcriptomics datasets are available, with the former encompassing 841 liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments of both plasma and tissue samples, and the latter including 255 individual microarray analyses of five different tissue types (thymus, spleen, liver, blood cells, and breast ± laser capture microdissection). A total of 18,880 unique peptides were identified with a PeptideProphet error rate ?1%, with 3884 non-redundant protein groups identified in five plasma datasets, and 1659 non-redundant protein groups in a tissue dataset (4977 non-redundant protein groups in total). We anticipate that these data will be of use to the community for software tool development, investigations of analytical variation in MS/MS data, development of quality control tools (multiple technical replicates are provided for a subset of the data), empirical selection of proteotypic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, and for advancing our understanding of cancer biology.

Schoenherr, Regine M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Lin, Chen Wei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Liu, Tao; Holzman, Ted; Coleman, Ilsa; Feng, Li-Chia; Lorentzen, Travis D.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Wang, Pei; Liu, Yan; Gurley, Kay E.; Amon, Lynn M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Peter S.; McIntosh, Martin; Kemp, Christopher; Paulovich, Amanda G.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Pointright: a system to redirect mouse and keyboard control among multiple machines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a software system, PointRight, that allows for smooth and effortless control of pointing and input devices among multiple displays. With PointRight, a single free-floating mouse and keyboard can be used to control multiple screens. When the cursor reaches the edge of a screen it seamlessly moves to the adjacent screen and keyboard control is simultaneously redirected to the appropriate machine. Laptops may also redirect their keyboard and pointing device, and multiple pointers are supported simultaneously. The system automatically reconfigures itself as displays go on, go off, or change the machine they display.

Johanson, Bradley E. (Palo Alto, CA); Winograd, Terry A. (Stanford, CA); Hutchins, Gregory M. (Mountain View, CA)

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Embryotoxic and histopathologic effects of aflatoxin B1 during early pregnancy in the mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During Early Pregnancy in the Mouse, (August 1990) Ying Jia-Hsu, M. D. , Capital Institute of Medicine Co-chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. T, Rick Irvin Dr. John E. Martin The in vivo embryotoxicity of aflatoxin Bl (AFB1) on mice..., and with histopathologic changes that occur as a result of exposure to AFB1 at a single maximum tolerate dose on gestation day 2 or gestation day 4 were characterized, and the correlation of the embryotoxic and histopathologic effects of AFB1 on pregnant mice...

Jia-Hsu, Ying

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

The genetic control of avascular area in mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data. Due to inconsistencies in the genotyping results, an albino female mouse from the low avascular area group was excluded from subsequent analysis. The genotype of the tyrosinase locus of the mice not selected for genotyping was inferred from coat... color. In this cross, albinism was conferred by homozygosity for the BALB/c allele of tyrosinase. The genotype of albino mice at the tyrosinase locus was encoded as AB/cAB/c. For all non- albino mice, a code indicating “not-AB/cAB/c” was used. QTL...

O'Bryhim, Bliss; Radel, Jeff; Macdonald, Stuart J.; Symons, R. C. Andrew

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

Comparative promoter activities of three endogenous copies of mouse mammary tumor virus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 12 CC ~ o c 0 tu x MMTV M13 pLC1 ?(, a~ CAT pBR322 0/ I SV40 Figure 5. Diagram of pLC1. The plasmid pLC1 (Toohey et al. , 1986) contains an Intact LTR obtained from the C3H provirus as a Pst I restriction fragment. The plasmid also...COMPARATIVE PROMOTER ACTIVITIES OF THREE ENDOGENOUS COPIES OF MOUSE MAMMARY TUMOR VIRUS A Thesis by LAURA REID VILANDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree...

Vilander, Laura Reid

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Effect of nitroimidazoles on glucose utilization and lactate accumulation in mouse brain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation sensitizers misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) can produce central and peripheral neuropathy in patients and laboratory animals. Nitroimidazoles can also interfere with glycolysis in vitro under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In the present work, the authors studied the effect of MISO or DMM on lactate production and glucose utilization in mouse brain. It is observed that these compounds result in a 25% inhibition of lactate production in brain slices relative to the control at a 10 mM level. Additionally, MISO (1.0 mg/g/day) or DMM (1.4 mg/g/day) were administered daily (oral) for 1, 4, 7, or 14 days to examine the effect of these two drugs on the regional glucose utilization in C3Hf mouse brain. Five microcuries of 2-deoxy(/sup 14/C)glucose was given following the last drug dose and autoradiographs of serial brain sections were made and analyzed by a densitometer. Following a single dose of either MISO or DMM, no significant differences in glucose uptake were observed when compared with controls. However, following 4, 7, and 14 doses the rate of glucose utilization was significantly reduced in the intoxicated animals. Larger reductions were measured in specific regions including the posterior colliculus, cochlear nuclei, vestibular nuclei, and pons with increasing effects observed at later stages. These results share a degree of correspondence with the regional brain pathology produced by these nitroimidazoles.

Chao, C.F. (Roswell Park Memorial Inst., Buffalo, NY); Subjeck, J.R.; Brody, H.; Shen, J.; Johnson, R.J.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Impact of Mouse Model on Pre-Clinical Dosimetry in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Samir Boutaleb1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/1 Impact of Mouse Model on Pre-Clinical Dosimetry in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Samir Boutaleb animal dosimetry serves as an important link in establishing a relationship between absorbed dose are based on models aiming at representing the animals used during pre-clinical experiments. However

Boyer, Edmond

107

High concentrations of morphine sensitize and activate mouse dorsal root ganglia via TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sensitized the release evoked by heat or the TRPA1 agonist acrolein. Morphine activated HEK293t cells transfected with TRPV1 or TRPA1. Activation of C57BL/6 mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture was investigated with calcium imaging. Morphine induced...

Forster, Alexander B; Reeh, Peter; Messlinger, Karl; Fischer, Michael J M

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Silencing of SPC2 Expression Using an Engineered Ribozyme in the Mouse TC-3 Endocrine Cell Line*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Silencing of SPC2 Expression Using an Engineered Ribozyme in the Mouse TC-3 Endocrine Cell Line the distinct roles of a member of this family (SPC2), gene silencing in cultured cells is an ideal approach to establish TC-3 stable cell lines expressing the chimeric tRNAVal - ribozyme transcript targeting SPC2 m

Perreault, Jean-Pierre

109

Slow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the ramp current-voltage curves, oscillated and was larger during the silent phase than during the activeSlow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations Jianhua Ren,1 Arthur Sherman,2 Richard Bertram,3 Paulette B

Bertram, Richard

110

Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis Ronne L. Surface2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis, Indiana University School of Medicine Digital whole slide imaging is the technique of digitizing a microscope slide at the highest resolution to produce a "digital virtual microscope slide". This digital

Zhou, Yaoqi

111

3D segmentation of mouse organs from MR images using deformable simplex mesh models G. Hamarneh1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D segmentation of mouse organs from MR images using deformable simplex mesh models G. Hamarneh1 , H. Delingette2 , M. Henkelman1 1 Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, 2 INRIA brains and kidneys from MR images. Algorithmic details and 3D segmentation results are presented

Hamarneh, Ghassan

112

``In-bone'' Utricle CulturesVA Simplified, Atraumatic Technique for In Situ Cultures of the Adult Mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effectively in stud- ies of hair cell regeneration and hair cell death, as well as various agents that protect and protection. Background: The current in vitro technique for studying hair cells of the mature mouse utricle to the protective drug tacrine resulted in sig- nificant protection against neomycin (p G 0.05, 3-way analysis

Rubel, Edwin

113

Mechanoelectrical Transduction and Adaptation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle, a Low-Frequency Vestibular Organ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanoelectrical Transduction and Adaptation in Hair Cells of the Mouse Utricle, a Low and Communicative Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030 Hair cells of inner ear organs sensitive to frequencies above 10 Hz adapt to maintained hair bundle deflections at rates that reduce

Corey, David P.

114

PACAP Interactions in the Mouse Brain: Implications for Behavioral and Other Disorders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an activator of adenylate cyclase, the neuropeptide Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Peptide (PACAP) impacts levels of cyclic AMP, a key second messenger available in brain cells. PACAP is involved in certain adult behaviors. To elucidate PACAP interactions, a compendium of microarrays representing mRNA expression in the adult mouse whole brain was pooled from the Phenogen database for analysis. A regulatory network was computed based on mutual information between gene pairs using gene expression data across the compendium. Clusters among genes directly linked to PACAP, and probable interactions between corresponding proteins were computed. Database 'experts' affirmed some of the inferred relationships. The findings suggest ADCY7 is probably the adenylate cyclase isoform most relevant to PACAP's action. They also support intervening roles for kinases including GSK3B, PI 3-kinase, SGK3 and AMPK. Other high-confidence interactions are hypothesized for future testing. This new information has implications for certain behavioral and other disorders.

Acquaah-Mensah, George; Taylor, Ronald C.; Bhave, Sanjiv V.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

A simple, low-cost, data logging pendulum built from a computer mouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lessons and homework problems involving a pendulum are often a big part of introductory physics classes and laboratory courses from high school to undergraduate levels. Although laboratory equipment for pendulum experiments is commercially available, it is often expensive and may not be affordable for teachers on fixed budgets, particularly in developing countries. We present a low-cost, easy-to-build rotary sensor pendulum using the existing hardware in a ball-type computer mouse. We demonstrate how this apparatus may be used to measure both the frequency and coefficient of damping of a simple physical pendulum. This easily constructed laboratory equipment makes it possible for all students to have hands-on experience with one of the most important simple physical systems.

Gintautas, Vadas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hubler, Alfred [UIUC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Molecular mapping of the tubby (tub) mutation on mouse chromosome 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 180 F2 progeny of a C57BL6/J x CAST/Ei tub/+F1 intersubspecific intercross, a map of 28 molecular markers (including eight genes) on chromosome 7 surrounding the tub locus was generated. Using 33 obese F2 progeny, tub was localized approximately 50-52 cM distal to the centromere on mouse chromosome 7 in the interval defined proximally by hemoglobin beta (Hbb), D7Mit38, D7Mit217, D7Mit37, D7Mit96, and D7Mit33 and distally by D7Mit 98. Using 39 obese F2 progeny from a similar intersubspecific intercross, a telomeric boundary of the interval defining tub was defined by D7Mit53; the order centromere-Hbb/tub-D7Mit53/D7Mit328/D7Mit220-parathyroid hormone (Pth)-calcitonin (Calc)-zona pellucida 2 (2p2) was established. By combining the data from the two crosses, the most likely gene order on mouse chromosome 7 is centromere-Hbb-tub-Pth-Calc, thus making it likely that the human homolog of tub resides on 11p15, where the gene order HBB-PTH-CALC is conserved. Assignment of the human tubby homolog to 11p15 allows selection and development of polymorphic molecular markers that can be used to examine segregation of a human homolog of tubby in pedigrees segregating for obesity. The gene sulfonylurea receptor was eliminated as a candidate gene for tubby on the basis of its map position, approximately 3.1 {plus_minus} 3.1 cM centromeric of tyrosinase and approximately 14.9 {plus_minus} 4.8 cM centromeric of Hbb. 47 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Chung, W.K.; Goldberg-Berman, J.; Power-Kehoe, L.; Leibel, R.L. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Characterization of mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase, a Nudix hydrolase encoded by the Nudt14 gene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recombinant mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase (UGPPase), encoded by the Nudt14 gene, was produced in Escherichia coli and purified close to homogeneity. The enzyme catalyzed the conversion of [{beta}-{sup 32}P]UDP-glucose to [{sup 32}P]glucose-1-P and UMP, confirming that it hydrolyzed the pyrophosphate of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar to generate glucose-1-P and UMP. The enzyme was also active toward ADP-ribose. Activity is dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and was greatest at alkaline pH above 8. Kinetic analysis indicated a K{sub m} of {approx}4 mM for UDP-glucose and {approx}0.3 mM for ADP-ribose. Based on V{sub max}/K{sub m} values, the enzyme was {approx}20-fold more active toward ADP-ribose. UGPPase behaves as a dimer in solution and can be cross-linked to generate a species of M{sub r} 54,000 from a monomer of 30,000 as judged by SDS-PAGE. The dimerization was not affected by the presence of glucose-1-P or UDP-glucose. Using antibodies raised against the recombinant protein, Western analysis indicated that UGPPase was widely expressed in mouse tissues, including skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, lung, fat, heart and pancreas with a lower level in brain. It was generally present as a doublet when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, suggesting the occurrence of some form of post-translational modification. Efforts to interconvert the species by adding or inhibiting phosphatase activity were unsuccessful, leaving the nature of the modification unknown. Sequence alignments and database searches revealed related proteins in species as distant as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans.

Heyen, Candy A.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Zhai, Lanmin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Roach, Peter J., E-mail: proach@iupui.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

2009-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

MicroRNAs in early embryonic development : dissecting the role of miR-290 through miR-295 in the mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MicroRNAs mediate developmental regulation of gene expression via translational repression of target mRNAs. Targeted deletion of the miRNA biogenesis machinery in the mouse has demonstrated essential roles for miRNAs during ...

Dennis, Lucas M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Novel Role of the WNT-Dishevelled-GSK3? Signaling Cascade in the Mouse Nucleus Accumbens in a Social Defeat Model of Depression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on earlier gene expression and chromatin array data, we identified the protein, dishevelled (DVL)-2, as being regulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key brain reward region, in the mouse social defeat model of ...

Wilkinson, Matthew B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Visualization of nitric oxide production in the mouse main olfactory bulb by a cell-trappable copper(II) fluorescent probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the visualization of NO production using fluorescence in tissue slices of the mouse main olfactory bulb. This discovery was possible through the use of a novel, cell-trappable probe for intracellular nitric oxide ...

McQuade, Lindsey E.

122

Proteomic profiling of brain cortex tissues in a Tau transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A transgenic mouse model expressing NSE-htau23 was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D-gel electrophoresis to analyze the cortex proteins of transgenic mice was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTP1 and CAII were downregulated with the progression of AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SCRN1 and ATP6VE1 were up regulated and down regulated differentially. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves regionalized neuronal death, synaptic loss, and an accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques. Although there have been numerous studies on tau proteins and AD in various stages of neurodegenerative disease pathology, the relationship between tau and AD is not yet fully understood. A transgenic mouse model expressing neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-controlled human wild-type tau (NSE-htau23), which displays some of the typical Alzheimer-associated pathological features, was used to analyze the brain proteome associated with tau tangle deposition. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed to compare the cortex proteins of transgenic mice (6- and 12-month-old) with those of control mice. Differentially expressed spots in different stages of AD were identified with ESI-Q-TOF (electrospray ionization quadruple time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, glutathione S-transferase P 1 (GSTP1) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) were down-regulated with the progression of AD, and secerin-1 (SCRN1) and V-type proton ATPase subunit E 1 (ATP6VE1) were up-regulated only in the early stages, and down-regulated in the later stages of AD. The proteins, which were further confirmed by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and with western blotting at the protein level, are expected to be good candidates as drug targets for AD. The study of up- and down-regulation of proteins during the progression of AD helps to explain the mechanisms associated with neuronal degeneration in AD.

Chang, Seong-Hun; Jung, In-Soo; Han, Gi-Yeon; Kim, Nam-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan-Wha, E-mail: cwkim@korea.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

Decoding the Regulatory Network for Blood Development from Single-Cell Gene Expression Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Our method is based on the concept of diffusion distances, which can be interpreted as a metric for objects (here, cells) that are related to each other via a gradual but stochastic diffusion-like process, such as cellular differentiation. In brief... -Seq aligner STAR version 2.3.053. Parameters used to align with STAR were “--outFilterMultimapScoreRange 1 --outSAMstrandField intronMotif --genomeLoad NoSharedMemory --outStd SAM”. Mus musculus Ensembl assembly GRCm38 (equivalent to UCSC mm10) was used...

Moignard, Victoria; Woodhouse, Steven; Haghverdi, Laleh; Lilly, Andrew J.; Tanaka, Yosuke; Wilkinson, Adam C.; Buettner, Florian; Macaulay, Iain C.; Jawaid, Wajid; Diamanti, Evangelia; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Piterman, Nir; Kouskoff, Valerie; Theis, Fabian J.; Fisher, Jasmin; Göttgens, Berthold

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

124

Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in the mouse lung: Association with lung pathology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the fibrous shape and durability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), concerns regarding their potential for producing environmental and human health risks, including carcinogenesis, have been raised. This study sought to investigate how previously identified lung cancer prognostic biomarkers and the related cancer signaling pathways are affected in the mouse lung following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT. A total of 63 identified lung cancer prognostic biomarker genes and major signaling biomarker genes were analyzed in mouse lungs (n = 80) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 7 and 56 days post-exposure using quantitative PCR assays. At 7 and 56 days post-exposure, a set of 7 genes and a set of 11 genes, respectively, showed differential expression in the lungs of mice exposed to MWCNT vs. the control group. Additionally, these significant genes could separate the control group from the treated group over the time series in a hierarchical gene clustering analysis. Furthermore, 4 genes from these two sets of significant genes, coiled-coil domain containing-99 (Ccdc99), muscle segment homeobox gene-2 (Msx2), nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2), and wingless-type inhibitory factor-1 (Wif1), showed significant mRNA expression perturbations at both time points. It was also found that the expression changes of these 4 overlapping genes at 7 days post-exposure were attenuated at 56 days post-exposure. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) found that several carcinogenic-related signaling pathways and carcinogenesis itself were associated with both the 7 and 11 gene signatures. Taken together, this study identifies that MWCNT exposure affects a subset of lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. - Research Highlights: > Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes affect lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. > The results suggest potentially harmful effects of MWCNT exposure on human lungs. > The results could potentially be used for the medical surveillance of workers.

Pacurari, M. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Qian, Y., E-mail: yaq2@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Porter, D.W.; Wolfarth, M. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Wan, Y.; Luo, D. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Ding, M. [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Castranova, V. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Guo, N.L., E-mail: lguo@hsc.wvu.edu [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9300 (United States); Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9190 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for atrazine and its main metabolites in the adult male C57BL/6 mouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide that is widely used and relatively persistent in the environment. In laboratory rodents, excessive exposure to ATR is detrimental to the reproductive, immune, and nervous systems. To better understand the toxicokinetics of ATR and to fill the need for a mouse model, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for ATR and its main chlorotriazine metabolites (Cl-TRIs) desethyl atrazine (DE), desisopropyl atrazine (DIP), and didealkyl atrazine (DACT) was developed for the adult male C57BL/6 mouse. Taking advantage of all relevant and recently made available mouse-specific data, a flow-limited PBPK model was constructed. The ATR and DACT sub-models included blood, brain, liver, kidney, richly and slowly perfused tissue compartments, as well as plasma protein binding and red blood cell binding, whereas the DE and DIP sub-models were constructed as simple five-compartment models. The model adequately simulated plasma levels of ATR and Cl-TRIs and urinary dosimetry of Cl-TRIs at four single oral dose levels (250, 125, 25, and 5 mg/kg). Additionally, the model adequately described the dose dependency of brain and liver ATR and DACT concentrations. Cumulative urinary DACT amounts were accurately predicted across a wide dose range, suggesting the model's potential use for extrapolation to human exposures by performing reverse dosimetry. The model was validated using previously reported data for plasma ATR and DACT in mice and rats. Overall, besides being the first mouse PBPK model for ATR and its Cl-TRIs, this model, by analogy, provides insights into tissue dosimetry for rats. The model could be used in tissue dosimetry prediction and as an aid in the exposure assessment to this widely used herbicide.

Lin Zhoumeng [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Science, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Ross, Matthew K. [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Filipov, Nikolay M., E-mail: filipov@uga.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Induction of chloride secretory currents across mouse ileal tissues by rotavirus enterotoxic peptide in different age mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDUCTION OF CHLORIDE SECRETORY CURRENTS ACROSS MOUSE ILEAL TISSUES BY A ROTAVIRUS ENTEROTOXIC PEPTIDE IN DIFFERENT AGE MICE A Thesis by VIRGINIA WATERS COX Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Ak M University in partial... by VIRGINIA WATERS COX Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Judith M. Ball (Chair of Committee) Julian Lei os z (Member) Friedhelm...

Cox, Virginia Waters

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Effects of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on mouse T-lymphocyte function and diglyceride formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Edwards (Interim Department Head) December 1992 ABSTRACT Effects of Dietary Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid on Mouse T-Lymphocyte Function and Diglyceride Formation. (December 1992) Kara Hosack Fowler, B. S. , Texas A&%M University..., coupled to CD3, a mediator which acts in stimulation to bind to phospholipase C (PLC) (10). Mitogens act on the TCR-CD3 complex to stimulate phospholipase C and hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol (100). This results in diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol...

Fowler, Kara Hosack

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Differential gene expression in mouse liver associated with the hepatoprotective effect of clofibrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pretreatment of mice with the peroxisome proliferator clofibrate (CFB) protects against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Previous studies have shown that activation of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is required for this effect. The present study utilizes gene expression profile analysis to identify potential pathways contributing to PPAR{alpha}-mediated hepatoprotection. Gene expression profiles were compared between wild type and PPAR{alpha}-null mice pretreated with vehicle or CFB (500 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 10 days) and then challenged with APAP (400 mg/kg, p.o.). Total hepatic RNA was isolated 4 h after APAP treatment and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MGU74 v2.0 GeneChips. Gene expression analysis was performed utilizing GeneSpring (registered) software. Our analysis identified 53 genes of interest including vanin-1, cell cycle regulators, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, an acetaminophen binding protein. Vanin-1 could be important for CFB-mediated hepatoprotection because this protein is involved in the synthesis of cysteamine and cystamine. These are potent antioxidants capable of ameliorating APAP toxicity in rodents and humans. HPLC-ESI/MS/MS analysis of liver extracts indicates that enhanced vanin-1 gene expression results in elevated cystamine levels, which could be mechanistically associated with CFB-mediated hepatoprotection.

Moffit, Jeffrey S. [University of Connecticut, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT (United States); Koza-Taylor, Petra H. [Pfizer, Inc., Groton Laboratories, Molecular and Investigative Toxicology, Groton, CT (United States); Holland, Ricky D. [National Center for Toxicological Research, Division of Systems Toxicology, Jefferson, AR (United States); Thibodeau, Michael S. [University of Connecticut, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT (United States); Beger, Richard D. [National Center for Toxicological Research, Division of Systems Toxicology, Jefferson, AR (United States); Lawton, Michael P. [Pfizer, Inc., Groton Laboratories, Molecular and Investigative Toxicology, Groton, CT (United States); Manautou, Jose E. [University of Connecticut, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT (United States)]. E-mail: jose.manautou@uconn.edu

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)] [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Pepinsky, R. Blake [BiogenIdec, Inc., 14 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States)] [BiogenIdec, Inc., 14 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Fishman, Paul S. [Research Service, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) [Research Service, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Brown, Robert H. [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)] [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Francis, Jonathan W., E-mail: jwfrancisby@gmail.com [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

130

MSH regulation of tyrosinase in Cloudman S-91 mouse melanoma cell cultures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (MSH) causes an increase in tyrosinase activity (O-diphenol: O/sub 2/ oxidoreductase) in Cloudman S-91 mouse melanoma cell cultures following a lag period of approximately 9 hours. Treatment of cells with 2 x 10/sup -7/M ..cap alpha..- MSH for 6 days results in a 90 fold increase in the specific activity of the enzyme. The hormone mediated increase in tyrosinase activity is dependent upon continued transcription since the enzyme induction is suppressed by either cordycepin (1..mu..g/ml) or ..cap alpha..-amanitin (10..mu..g/ml). To determine if MSH is increasing the synthesis rate of tyrosinase, cell cultures, either exposed to MSH for various times or left untreated, were pulsed with (/sup 3/H)-leucine for 4 hours and tyrosinase immunoprecipitated with an anti-tyrosinase polyclonal antiserum raised in rabbits. The immunoprecipitates were solubilized and electrophoresed on SDS polyacrylamide gels. The proteins were electroblotted to nitrocellulose and the radioactivity in the tyrosinase bands determined. These studies have shown that while tyrosinase activity in hormone-treated cells may increase 90 fold, the rate of synthesis of the enzyme increases only 3 fold at most. Immunoprecipitation analysis of equivalence points of tyrosinase from control and MSH-treated cultures suggests the presence of inactive forms of the enzyme in melanoma cell cultures. These results suggest that, in addition to stimulating tyrosinase synthesis, MSH may also promote the activation of pre-existing enzyme molecules.

Fuller, B.B.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

Ross, Pamela K. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, NJ (United States); Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cunningham, Michael L. [National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane technical mixture regulates cell cycle and apoptosis genes through the activation of CAR and ER? in mouse livers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is a widely used organochlorine pesticide and a xenoestrogen that promotes rodent hepatomegaly and tumours. A recent study has shown significant correlation between DDT serum concentration and liver cancer incidence in humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We hypothesised that a mixture of DDT isomers could exert effects on the liver through pathways instead of classical ERs. The acute effects of a DDT mixture containing the two major isomers p,p?-DDT (85%) and o,p?-DDT (15%) on CAR and ER? receptors and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes were studied in mouse livers. ChIP results demonstrated increased CAR and ER? recruitment to their specific target gene binding sites in response to the DDT mixture. The results of real-time RT-PCR were consistent with the ChIP data and demonstrated that the DDT was able to activate both CAR and ER? in mouse livers, leading to target gene transcriptional increases including Cyp2b10, Gadd45?, cMyc, Mdm2, Ccnd1, cFos and E2f1. Western blot analysis demonstrated increases in cell cycle progression proteins cMyc, Cyclin D1, CDK4 and E2f1 and anti-apoptosis proteins Mdm2 and Gadd45?. In addition, DDT exposure led to Rb phosphorylation. Increases in cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis proteins were accompanied by a decrease in p53 content and its transcriptional activity. However, the DDT was unable to stimulate the ?-catenin signalling pathway, which can play an important role in hepatocyte proliferation. Thus, our results indicate that DDT treatment may result in cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition through CAR- and ER?-mediated gene activation in mouse livers. These findings suggest that the proliferative and anti-apoptotic conditions induced by CAR and ER? activation may be important contributors to the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis as produced by DDT in rodent livers. - Highlights: • DDT activated both CAR and ER? and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes. • DDT produced increases in cell cycle and anti-apoptosis proteins and decrease in p53. • DDT mixture was unable to stimulate the ?-catenin signalling pathway in mouse livers.

Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A. [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Pustylnyak, Vladimir O., E-mail: pustylnyak@ngs.ru [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Pirogova str., 2, 630090 (Russian Federation)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Automatic Seedpoint Selection and Tracing of Microstructures in the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data Set  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in neuronal structures [4]. Research about the neuronal structure can also help understand how the neuronal structure processes information. In order to investigate neuronal structures, researchers at the Brain Network Lab (BNL) at Texas A&M University... by re- searchers at the Brain Network Laboratory (BNL) at Texas A&M University (TAMU) to scan entire mouse brains at a sub-micrometer resolution (down to 300 nm). This instrument consists of a high-precision stage, a diamond knife and an illuminator...

Kim, Dongkun

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

134

LEIOCEPHALIDAE 1989 Leiocephalinae Frost and Etheridge, Misc. Publ. Mus. Nat. Hist. Univ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Hispaniola, Navassa, and Martinique. Recently extinct species were found on Barbuda and Antigua, Anguilla, Guadeloupe, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica. Leiocephalus Gray 1827 Leiocephalus Gray, Philos. Mag, 84: 1. Range: Cuba and nearby islands, the Cayman Islands, the Bahama Islands, Hispaniola

135

GEORGE, J. C. 1962. A histophysiological study ofthe red and white mus-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

),The physiological ecology of tunas. Academic Press, N.Y. HALL. F. G. 1930. The ability of the common mackerel, R. C. L. 1973. On the function of the white muscles in teleosts at intermediate swimming speeds. J.). Compo Biochem. Physiol. 49B:367-373. JOHNSTON, I. A., W. DAVISON, AND G. GOLDSPINK. 1977. Energy

136

Transient inhibition of cell proliferation does not compromise self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have unlimited capacity for self-renewal and can differentiate into various cell types when induced. They also have an unusual cell cycle control mechanism driven by constitutively active cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks). In mouse ESCs (mESCs). It is proposed that the rapid cell proliferation could be a necessary part of mechanisms that maintain mESC self-renewal and pluripotency, but this hypothesis is not in line with the finding in human ESCs (hESCs) that the length of the cell cycle is similar to differentiated cells. Therefore, whether rapid cell proliferation is essential for the maintenance of mESC state remains unclear. We provide insight into this uncertainty through chemical intervention of mESC cell cycle. We report here that inhibition of Cdks with olomoucine II can dramatically slow down cell proliferation of mESCs with concurrent down-regulation of cyclin A, B and E, and the activation of the Rb pathway. However, mESCs display can recover upon the removal of olomoucine II and are able to resume normal cell proliferation without losing self-renewal and pluripotency, as demonstrated by the expression of ESC markers, colony formation, embryoid body formation, and induced differentiation. We provide a mechanistic explanation for these observations by demonstrating that Oct4 and Nanog, two major transcription factors that play critical roles in the maintenance of ESC properties, are up-regulated via de novo protein synthesis when the cells are exposed to olomoucine II. Together, our data suggest that short-term inhibition of cell proliferation does not compromise the basic properties of mESCs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Cdks slows down mESCs proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mESCs display remarkable recovery capacity from short-term cell cycle interruption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short-term cell cycle interruption does not compromise mESC self-renewal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oct4 and Nanog are up-regulated via de novo synthesis by cell cycle interruption.

Wang, Ruoxing [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive 5018, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 (United States)] [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive 5018, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 (United States); Guo, Yan-Lin, E-mail: yanlin.guo@usm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive 5018, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 (United States)] [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive 5018, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Slow elimination of phosphorylated histone {gamma}-H2AX from DNA of terminally differentiated mouse heart cells in situ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphorylation of replacement histone H2AX occurs in megabase chromatin domains around double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and this modification (called {gamma}-H2AX) may serve as a useful marker of genome damage and repair in terminally differentiated cells. Here using immunohistochemistry we studied kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX formation and elimination in the X-irradiated mouse heart and renal epithelial tissues in situ. Unirradiated tissues have 3-5% {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells and in tissues fixed 1 h after X-irradiation {gamma}-H2AX-positive nuclei are induced in a dose-dependent manner approaching 20-30% after 3 Gy of IR. Analysis of mouse tissues at different times after 3 Gy of IR showed that maximal induction of {gamma}-H2AX in heart is observed 20 min after IR and then is decreased slowly with about half remaining 23 h later. In renal epithelium maximum of the {gamma}-H2AX-positive cells is observed 40 min after IR and then decreases to control values in 23 h. This indicates that there are significant variations between non-proliferating mammalian tissues in the initial H2AX phosphorylation rate as well as in the rate of {gamma}-H2AX elimination after X-irradiation, which should be taken into account in the analysis of radiation responses.

Gavrilov, Boris [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vezhenkova, Irina [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Firsanov, Denis [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Solovjeva, Liudmila [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Svetlova, Maria [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, Vyacheslav [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tomilin, Nikolai [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: nvtom@hotmail.com

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

138

Mandibular and Neural Crest Cell Deficits Seen in TsDn65 Down Syndrome Mouse Model Rescued By Green Tea Polyphenol, EGCG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the mandibular deficit seen in E9.5 Ts65Dn embryos. We propose that EGCG, a green tea polyphenol, will inhibitMandibular and Neural Crest Cell Deficits Seen in TsDn65 Down Syndrome Mouse Model Rescued By Green Tea Polyphenol, EGCG Gracelyn C. Bose1 , Rachel A. Novack1 ,Danika M. Tumbleson1 , Alexis N. Chom1

Zhou, Yaoqi

139

The Teratogenic Sensitivity to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Is Modified by a Locus on Mouse Chromosome 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- phrosis in developing mice exposed to the pollutant 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) is a prototype for the study of gene-environment interactions. Dioxin is an ubiquitous environmental pollutantThe Teratogenic Sensitivity to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin Is Modified by a Locus on Mouse

Bradfield, Christopher A.

140

Direct and indirect impact of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)1 on adult mouse Leydig cells: an in vitro study.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Direct and indirect impact of 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)1 on adult mouse Leydig,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related substances are ubiquitous22 environmental pollutants that exert words: Dioxin; Leydig cell; in vitro; AhR; chemokine39 40 inserm-00816472,version1-22Apr2013 #12;3 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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141

Systematic implications of mtDNA sequence variation in a deer mouse species endemic to islands in the Gulf of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

validity, systematic relationships and geographic origin of P. sejugis, a species of deer mouse endemic to two islands in the Gulf of California. To determine genetic affinities, sequence variation was analyzed for a 1,439 base pair region (ND3/ND4L/ND4...

Moore, Ashli Francille

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

Local volume changes of the corpus callosum from 3D MR images of wildtype and knockout mouse brains G. Hamarneh1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CC from the MR images (Figure 1a) using Livewire, a semi-automatic segmentation tool provided by AmiraLocal volume changes of the corpus callosum from 3D MR images of wildtype and knockout mouse brains G. Hamarneh1 , J. Chen1 , N. Lifshitz1 , J. Henderson2 , M. Henkelman1 1 Hospital for Sick Children

Hamarneh, Ghassan

143

Simultaneous submicrometric 3D imaging of the micro-vascular network and the neuronal system in a mouse spinal cord  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defaults in vascular (VN) and neuronal networks of spinal cord are responsible for serious neurodegenerative pathologies. Because of inadequate investigation tools, the lacking knowledge of the complete fine structure of VN and neuronal systems is a crucial problem. Conventional 2D imaging yields incomplete spatial coverage leading to possible data misinterpretation, whereas standard 3D computed tomography imaging achieves insufficient resolution and contrast. We show that X-ray high-resolution phase-contrast tomography allows the simultaneous visualization of three-dimensional VN and neuronal systems of mouse spinal cord at scales spanning from millimeters to hundreds of nanometers, with neither contrast agent nor a destructive sample-preparation. We image both the 3D distribution of micro-capillary network and the micrometric nerve fibers, axon-bundles and neuron soma. Our approach is a crucial tool for pre-clinical investigation of neurodegenerative pathologies and spinal-cord-injuries. In particular, it s...

Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana; Modregger, Peter; Bucci, Domenico; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Spadon, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Requardt, Herwig; Giove, Federico; Bravin, Alberto; Cedola, Alessia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

Gerecke, Donald R. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), a Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: gerecke@eohsi.rutgers.edu; Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Tong Weida [US FDA, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AK (United States); Androulakis, Ioannis P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Georgopoulos, Panos G. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Joint Institute of UMDNJ-RW Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Chondroregulatory action of prolactin on proliferation and differentiation of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells in 3-dimensional micromass cultures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor mRNAs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low PRL concentration (10 ng/mL) increased chondrocyte viability and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher PRL concentrations ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL) decreased viability and increased apoptosis. -- Abstract: A recent investigation in lactating rats has provided evidence that the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) increases endochondral bone growth and bone elongation, presumably by accelerating apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and/or subsequent chondrogenic matrix mineralization. Herein, we demonstrated the direct chondroregulatory action of PRL on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in 3-dimensional micromass culture of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line. The results showed that ATDC5 cells expressed PRL receptor (PRLR) transcripts, and responded typically to PRL by downregulating PRLR expression. Exposure to a low PRL concentration of 10 ng/mL, comparable to the normal levels in male and non-pregnant female rats, increased chondrocyte viability, differentiation, proteoglycan accumulation, and mRNA expression of several chondrogenic differentiation markers, such as Sox9, ALP and Hspg2. In contrast, high PRL concentrations of Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 100 ng/mL, comparable to the levels in pregnancy or lactation, decreased chondrocyte viability by inducing apoptosis, with no effect on chondrogenic marker expression. It could be concluded that chondrocytes directly but differentially responded to non-pregnant and pregnant/lactating levels of PRL, thus suggesting the stimulatory effect of PRL on chondrogenesis in young growing individuals, and supporting the hypothesis of hypertrophic chondrocyte apoptosis in the growth plate of lactating rats.

Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)] [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand) [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol, E-mail: naratt@narattsys.com [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand) [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

Pierce, Anson, E-mail: piercea2@uthscsa.edu [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States) [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran's Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas, 78284 (United States); Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti [Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States)] [Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Yoo, Si-Eun [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States) [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States) [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran's Affairs, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas, 78284 (United States)

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

147

Mode of Action and Pharmacokinetic Studies of 2-Butoxyethanol in the Mouse with an Emphasis on Forestomach Dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic inhalation studies with 2-butoxyethanol conducted by National Toxicology Program identified the forestomach and liver of B6C3F1 mice as target organs for tumorigenicity. Previous studies have sown that liver tumors likely results from chronic hemolysis-induced oxidative stress. For forestomach lesions see in mice, chronic contact irritation (cytotoxicity) and regenerative hyperplasia are hypothesized to result in forestomach tumor development. To test this, experiments were conducted to address the sensitivity of mouse forestomach to BE administered by various routes. Oral administration of undiluted BE was shown to cause irritation and a compensatory proliferative response in mouse forestomach confirming that direct contact between forestomach and BE can cause irritation. However, only small amounts of BE were detected on fur of mice at the end of 6-h, whole-body or nose-only inhalation exposures to highest concentration used in the NTP chromic inhalation studies. Furthermore, no significant differences were detected in end-exposure blood concentrations of BE and butoxyacetic acid between these types of exposures. In addition, parenteral administration of BE also resulted in forestomach lesions, indicating there may be sources other than grooming for BE- or BAA-induced forestomach irritation. In pharmacokinetic study, BE and to a lesser extend BAA were eliminated more slowly from the forestomach tissue of mice than from blood or other tissues, following either oral gavage or ip injection. The forestomach was the only tissue with detectable levels of BE at 24 h. BE and BAA were both excreted in the saliva and were present in stomach contents for a prolong period of time following these routes of exposure which may further contribute to forestomach tissue dosimetry. Thus, there appear to be multiple mechanisms behind the increased levels of BE and BAA in the forestomach tissue of mice, which together can contribute to a prolong contact irritation, compensatory hyperplasia, and tumorigenicity in mice. The relevant of these effects in humans, who lack a forestomach, is questioned.

Poet, Torka S.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Mast, Terryl J.; Miller, Rodney A.; Thrall, Brian D.; Corley, Rick A.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Functional Analysis of the Mouse Scn8a Sodium Channel Marianne R. Smith,1 Raymond D. Smith,1 Nicholas W. Plummer,2 Miriam H. Meisler,2 and Alan L. Goldin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional Analysis of the Mouse Scn8a Sodium Channel Marianne R. Smith,1 Raymond D. Smith,1 modulate the electrophysiological properties of the channels (Isom et al., 1992, 1995; Smith and Goldin

Goldin, Alan L.

149

Ortho-aminoazotoluene activates mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car{sup -/-}) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car{sup -/-} livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. - Highlights: > The azo dye and mouse carcinogen OAT is a very effective mCAR activator. > OAT increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. > OAT CAR-dependently increases the expression of a specific subset of CAR target genes. > OAT induces an unexpectedly deferred, but CAR-dependent hepatocyte proliferation.

Smetanina, Mariya A., E-mail: maria.smetanina@gmail.com [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Group of Pharmacogenomics, Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 8, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Pakharukova, Mariya Y. [Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kurinna, Svitlana M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Unit 1000, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Merkulova, Tatyana I. [Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Sodium fluoride induces apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells through ROS-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium fluoride (NaF) is used as a source of fluoride ions in diverse applications. Fluoride salt is an effective prophylactic for dental caries and is an essential element required for bone health. However, fluoride is known to cause cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, no information is available on the effects of NaF on mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We investigated the mode of cell death induced by NaF and the mechanisms involved. NaF treatment greater than 1 mM reduced viability and DNA synthesis in mESCs and induced cell cycle arrest in the G{sub 2}/M phase. The addition of NaF induced cell death mainly by apoptosis rather than necrosis. Catalase (CAT) treatment significantly inhibited the NaF-mediated cell death and also suppressed the NaF-mediated increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) levels. Pre-treatment with SP600125 or z-VAD-fmk significantly attenuated the NaF-mediated reduction in cell viability. In contrast, intracellular free calcium chelator, but not of sodium or calcium ion channel blockers, facilitated NaF-induced toxicity in the cells. A JNK specific inhibitor (SP600125) prevented the NaF-induced increase in growth arrest and the DNA damage-inducible protein 45?. Further, NaF-mediated loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was apparently inhibited by pifithrin-? or CAT inhibitor. These findings suggest that NaF affects viability of mESCs in a concentration-dependent manner, where more than 1 mM NaF causes apoptosis through hydroxyl radical-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways. -- Highlights: ? The mode of NaF-induced cell death and the mechanisms involved were examined. ? NaF induced mainly apoptotic death of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). ? NaF induced mitochondrial-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. ? JNK- and p53-mediated pathways are involved in NaF-mediated apoptosis in the cells. ? ROS are the up-stream effector in NaF-mediated activation of JNK and p53 in mESCs.

Nguyen Ngoc, Tam Dan [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Young-Ok [Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lim, Shin-Saeng [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of) [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioactive Material Sciences and Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Kim, Jong-Ghee [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Jung Sun [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Youngji [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Young-Mi, E-mail: young@jbnu.ac.kr [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Chae, E-mail: leejc88@jbnu.ac.kr [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of) [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Department of Bioactive Material Sciences and Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (?-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ? 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ? This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ? 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ? This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

Boulware, Stephen [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Vasquez, Karen M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States)] [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A melanocyte-specific gene, Pmel 17, maps near the silver coat color locus on mouse chromosome 10 and is in a syntenic region on human chromosome 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Melanocytes preferentially express an mRNA species, Pmel 17, whose protein product cross-reacts with anti-tyrosinase antibodies and whose expression correlates with the melanin content. The authors have now analyzed the deduced protein structure and mapped its chromosomal location in mouse and human. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the Pmel 17 cDNA showed that the protein is composed of 645 amino acids with a molecular weight of 68,600. The Pmel 17 protein contains a putative leader sequence and a potential membrane anchor segment, which indicates that this may be a membrane-associated protein in melanocytes. The deduced protein contains five potential N-glycosylation sites and relatively high levels of serine and threonine. Three repeats of a 26-amino acid motif appear in the middle of the molecule. The human Pmel 17 gene, designated D12S53E, maps to chromosome 12, region 12pter-q21; and the mouse homologue, designated D12S53Eh, maps to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10, a region also known to carry the coat color locus si (silver).

Kwon, B.S.; Chintamaneni, C.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kim, K.K. (Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ., Indianapolis (United States)); Kozak, C.A. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N. (National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States)); Barton, D.; Francke, U. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.

Wang, Xuan; Hu, Mary Y.; Liu, Maili; Hu, Jian Z.

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

Interactions between ultraviolet light and interleukin-1 on MSH binding in both mouse melanoma and human squamous carcinoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interactions between beta-melanotropin (MSH), interleukin 1-a (IL-1), and ultraviolet light (UV) were examined in Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma and RHEK human squamous carcinoma cell lines. The following points were established: (1) both cell lines produced IL-1 and their production was stimulated by exposure of the cells to UV; (2) both cell lines possessed high affinity binding sites for MSH, and their ability to bind MSH was modulated by IL-1; (3) IL-1 exhibited both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on MSH binding to Cloudman cells; and (4) the stimulatory effect of IL-1 on MSH binding to melanoma cells was reflected in enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH regarding tyrosinase activity (E.C. 1.14.18.1) and melanin content. The findings raise the possibility that interactions between keratinocytes and melanocytes may be regulated by IL-1 and MSH, and suggest a possible mechanism for stimulation of cutaneous melanogenesis by solar radiation: enhancement of MSH receptor activity by induction of IL-1.

Birchall, N.; Orlow, S.J.; Kupper, T.; Pawelek, J. (Univ. of Auckland, (New Zealand))

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Radiosensitivity of mouse lip mucosa: Influence of anesthesia, carbogen, and a new high O/sub 2/ carrying perfluorochemical emulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of a new perfluorochemical emulsion based on F-66E (54%, w/v) which carries, in combination with carbogen, twice as much oxygen as Fluosol-DA 20% was tested on the radiation response of the lip mucosa of unanesthetized mice. Mice were pretreated with 0.015 ml/g of the F-66E emulsion in the presence of carbogen for 1 h prior to and during irradiation. There was a significant increase in the mortality rate following the highest radiation dose in mice given F-66E emulsion plus carbogen. The reactions of lip mucosa of mice given F-66E emulsion and/or carbogen were not significantly different from that of the control group using three end points (average score, mean peak, incidence of mucosal desquamation), but the peak mucosal reaction was delayed. The radiosensitivity of the mouse lip mucosa to Ethrane, an anesthetic gas inhaled with carbogen, was also tested. The reaction of lip mucosa in the anesthetized mice was significantly greater than that of the control group. There was also a significant increase in the mortality rate following the two highest radiation doses.

Thomas, C.; de Vathaire, F.; Lartigau, E.; Malaise, E.P.; Guichard, M.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Tissue distribution of sup 14 C- and sup 3 H-labelled misonidazole in the tumor-bearing mouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The retention of labelled misonidazole (MISO) was measured in a range of normal tissues in the mouse 24 hr after the intravenous injection of ({sup 14}C)MISO (ring labelled) and ({sup 3}H)-MISO (side-arm labelled). For ({sup 14}C)MISO the 24 hr tissue retention, in order of the highest to the lowest levels (excluding pathways of excretion), was esophageal epithelium, liver, foot pad, eyelid, lung, subcutaneous lung tumor (A110), esophageal wall, uterus, eye ball, blood, salivary gland, spleen, voluntary muscle, pancreas, inguinal fat. It was assumed that the {sup 14}C represented MISO metabolite(s) bound to macromolecules. An approximately similar pattern was observed for ({sup 3}H)MISO, but a higher percentage of the injected activity per gram of tissue was retained, probably due to the presence of tritiated water in the tissues. It has generally been assumed that significant levels of MISO binding are restricted to hypoxic tissues, for example tumors, but the present results show that significant levels of binding can also occur in apparently normoxic tissues. The explanation is put forward that this binding may be due to local high levels of nitroreductase capacity.

Cobb, L.M.; Nolan, J.; Butler, S. (MRC Radiobiology Unit, Didcot, Oxon (England))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Skp2 promotes adipocyte differentiation via a p27{sup Kip1}-independent mechanism in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Skp2, the substrate-binding subunit of an SCF ubiquitin ligase complex, is a key regulator of cell cycle progression that targets substrates for degradation by the 26S proteasome. We have now shown that ablation of Skp2 in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) results both in impairment of adipocyte differentiation and in the accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}, a principal target of the SCF{sup Skp2} complex. Genetic ablation of p27{sup Kip1} in MEFs promoted both lipid accumulation and adipocyte-specific gene expression. However, depletion of p27{sup Kip1} by adenovirus-mediated RNA interference failed to correct the impairment of adipocyte differentiation in Skp2{sup -/-} MEFs. In contrast, troglitazone, a high-affinity ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), largely restored lipid accumulation and PPAR{gamma} gene expression in Skp2{sup -/-} MEFs. Our data suggest that Skp2 plays an essential role in adipogenesis in MEFs in a manner that is at least in part independent of regulation of p27{sup Kip1} expression.

Okada, Mitsuru; Sakai, Tamon; Nakamura, Takehiro [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Kitajima, Shigetaka [Department of Biochemical Genetics, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Matsuki, Yasushi; Watanabe, Eijiro; Hiramatsu, Ryuji [Pharmacology Research Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd., Takarazuka 665-0051 (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroshi [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama 589-8511 (Japan)], E-mail: hsakaue@med.kindai.ac.jp; Kasuga, Masato [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan)

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

Assay using embryo aggregation chimeras for the detection of nonlethal changes in X-irradiated mouse preimplantation embryos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a short-term in vitro assay for the detection of sublethal effects produced by very low levels of ionizing radiation. The assay utilizes mouse embryo aggregation chimeras consisting of one irradiated embryo paired with an unirradiated embryo whose blastomeres have been labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). X irradiation (from 0.05 to 2 Gy) and chimera construction were performed with four-cell stage embryos, and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h to the morula stage. The morulae were partially dissociated with calcium-free culture medium and viewed under phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution of irradiated (unlabeled) and control (FITC labeled) embryos per chimera. In chimeras where neither embryo was irradiated, the ratio of the unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.50 (17.8 +/- 5.6 cells per unlabeled embryo and 17.4 +/- 5.5 cells per FITC-labeled partner embryo). However, in chimeras formed after the unlabeled embryos were irradiated with as little as 0.05 Gy, the ratio of unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.43 (P less than 0.01). The apparent decreases in cell proliferation were not observed in irradiated embryos that were merely cocultured with control embryos, regardless of whether the embryos were zona enclosed or zona free. We conclude that very low levels of radiation induce sublethal changes in cleaving embryos that are expressed as a proliferative disadvantage within two cell cycles when irradiated embryos are in direct cell-to-cell contact with unirradiated embryos.

Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Miller, L.; Samuels, S.J.; Chang, R.J.; Overstreet, J.W.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Name ID# Date General Degree Credit Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field Area III core course in any field 3-5 4 4 MUS 119 Materials of Music I MUS 120 Materials of Music II MUS 121 Ear Training I MUS 122 Ear Training II MUS 219 Materials of Music III MUS 220 Materials 3 MUS-APL 10 Concert Class* MUS-APL 108, 109 Class Piano Senior Recital** OR Senior Project*** *8

Barrash, Warren

160

Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

MUS420/EE367A Supplement to Lecture 7B: Wave Digital Filters and Waveguide Networks for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-time energy. Classical Kirchoff Network · Basic component: N-port i1 i2 iN v1 v2 vN . . . · Characterized by port voltages vk and currents ik, k = 1 . . . N. 2 #12;· N-ports to be connected portwise · Instantaneous power absorbed by the N-port through the ports is pinst = N j=1 vjij Passivity A given N-port

Smith III, Julius Orion

162

MUS420/EE367A Supplement to Lecture 7B: Wave Digital Filters and Waveguide Networks for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-time energy. Classical Kirchoff Network · Basic component: N-port i1 i2 iN v1 v2 vN . . . · Characterized by port voltages vk and currents ik, k = 1 . . . N. 2 · N-ports to be connected portwise · Instantaneous power absorbed by the N-port through the ports is pinst = N j=1 vjij Passivity A given N-port satisfies

Smith III, Julius Orion

163

Manuscript Version 6. Official copy "Mouse" in Berkshire Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, W.S. Bainbridge (ed). 2004 by Berkshire Publishing Group. http://www.berkshirepublishing.com/brw/BerkProd.asp?projID=29#  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

input to computer systems is a critical and integral part of any human-computer interaction system of the entire interactive system. The most common input device ­ the computer mouse The most common input device Engelbart and his colleagues who pioneered interactive computing with their online system NLS

Zhai, Shumin

164

Exploring the in vitro formation of trimethylarsine sulfide from dimethylthioarsinic acid in anaerobic microflora of mouse cecum using HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-MS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although metabolism of arsenicals to form methylated oxoarsenical species has been extensively studied, less is known about the formation of thiolated arsenical species that have recently been detected as urinary metabolites. Indeed, their presence suggests that the metabolism of ingested arsenic is more complex than previously thought. Recent reports have shown that thiolated arsenicals can be produced by the anaerobic microflora of the mouse cecum, suggesting that metabolism prior to systemic absorption may be a significant determinant of the pattern and extent of exposure to various arsenic-containing species. Here, we examined the metabolism of {sup 34}S labeled dimethylthioarsinic acid ({sup 34}S-DMTA{sup V}) by the anaerobic microflora of the mouse cecum using HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS to monitor for the presence of various oxo- and thioarsenicals. The use of isotopically enriched {sup 34}S-DMTA{sup V} made it possible to differentiate among potential metabolic pathways for production of the trimethylarsine sulfide (TMAS{sup V}). Upon in vitro incubation in an assay containing anaerobic microflora of mouse cecum, {sup 34}S-DMTA{sup V} underwent several transformations. Labile {sup 34}S was exchanged with more abundant {sup 32}S to produce {sup 32}S-DMTA{sup V}, a thiol group was added to yield DMDTA{sup V}, and a methyl group was added to yield {sup 34}S-TMAS{sup V}. Because incubation of {sup 34}S-DMTA{sup V} resulted in the formation of {sup 34}S-TMAS{sup V}, the pathway for its formation must preserve the arsenic-sulfur bond. The alternative metabolic pathway postulated for formation of TMAS{sup V} from dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) would proceed via a dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) intermediate and would necessitate the loss of {sup 34}S label. Structural confirmation of the metabolic product was achieved using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The data presented support the direct methylation of DMTA{sup V} to TMAS{sup V}. Additionally, the detection of isotopically pure {sup 34}S-TMAS{sup V} raises questions about the sulfur exchange properties of TMAS{sup V} in the cecum material. Therefore, {sup 34}S-TMAS{sup V} was incubated and the exchange was monitored with respect to time. The data suggest that the As-S bond associated with TMAS{sup V} is less labile than the As-S bond associated with DMTA{sup V}.

Kubachka, Kevin M. [US EPA, ORD, NERL, Microbiological and Chemical Exposure, Assessment Research Division, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Kohan, Michael C. [US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Herbin-Davis, Karen [US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, Experimental Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Creed, John T. [US EPA, ORD, NERL, Microbiological and Chemical Exposure, Assessment Research Division, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)], E-mail: creed.jack@epa.gov; Thomas, David J. [US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, Experimental Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

Use of a transfected and amplified Drosophila heat shock promoter construction for inducible production of toxic mouse c-myc proteins in CHO cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After transfection and selection with methotrexate, CHO cell lines were established which contained up to 2000 copies of an expression vector for c-myc protein. The vector contained the Drosophila heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) promoter fused with the coding region of the mouse c-myc gene. Incubation of cells for up to 3 hours at 43/sup 0/C resulted in at least a 100-fold induction of recombinant c-myc mRNA. When cells were shifted back to 37/sup 0/C, within 1 to 4 hours, this RNA was translated into protein to yield about 250 ..mu..g per 10/sup 9/ cells. Cells died a few hours later, suggesting that high concentrations of intracellular c-myc are cytotoxic. 47 refs., 5 figs.

Wurm, F.M.; Gwinn, K.A.; Papoulas, O.; Pallavicini, M.; Kingston, R.E.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy (sf) mouse requires T cells that mature in a sf thymic environment: Potential model for thymic education  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristic lesions in mice hemi- or homozygous for the X-linked mutation scurfy (sf) include lymphohistiocytic proliferation in the skin and lymphoid organs, Coombs' test-positive anemia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and death by 24 days of age. The role of the thymus in the development of fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy mouse was investigated. Neonatal thymectomy doubles the life span of scurfy mice, moderates the histologic lesions, and prevents anemia, despite the continued presence of high levels of serum IgG. Animals bred to be nude and scurfy (nu/nu;sf/Y) are viable, fertile, and free of scurfy lesions. Bone marrow from scurfy mice can reconstitute lethally irradiated, H-2-compatible animals but does not transmit scurfy disease. The authors conclude, from these data, that scurfy lesions are mediated by T lymphocytes that mature in an abnormal (sf) thymic environment.

Godfrey, V.L.; Rinchik, E.M.; Russell, L.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Wilkinson, J.E. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Structure of the mouse tyrosinase-related protein-2/dopachrome tautomerase (Tyrp2/Dct) gene and sequence of two novel slaty alleles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have isolated the eight exons and 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking regions of the mouse tyrosinase-related protein-2 (dopachrome tautomerase) gene (Tyrp2/Dct), which is mutated in slaty mice. The gene has a structure that is considerably different from those of other tyrosinase family members in both the number and the position of introns, consistent with the suggestion that the divergence of the family represents an ancient gene duplication. We also identify in the 5{prime} flanking DNA an 11-bp element, the M-box, conserved in other tyrosinase family genes. We have characterized point mutations in two slaty alleles recently identified at the Jackson Laboratory: slaty-2J (slt{sup 2J}) has a similar phenotype to the original slaty (slt) mutation, and slaty light (Slt{sup lt}), which has a more severe effect and is semidominant. We suggest that the slaty-light phenotype is a result of the failure of the enzyme to be correctly targeted to its normal location on the inner face of the melanosomal membrane. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Budd, P.S.; Jackson, I.J. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Using Cysteinyl Peptide Enrichment Coupled with Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

S-nitrosylation (SNO) is an important reversible thiol oxidation event that has been increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. While many proteins susceptible to S-nitrosylation have been reported, site-specific identification of physiologically relevant SNO modifications remains an analytical challenge due to the low-abundance and labile nature of the modification. Herein we present further improvement and optimization of the recently reported, resin-assisted cysteinyl peptide enrichment protocol for SNO identification and the extension of this application to mouse skeletal muscle to identify specific sites sensitive to S-nitrosylation by quantitative reactivity profiling. The results of our data indicate that the protein- and peptide-level enrichment protocols provide comparable specificity and coverage of SNO-peptide identifications. S-nitrosylation reactivity profiling was performed by quantitatively comparing the site-specific SNO modification levels in samples treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), an NO donor, at two different physiologically relevant concentrations (i.e., 10 ?M and 100 ?M). The reactivity profiling experiments overall identified 489 SNO-modified cysteine sites from 197 proteins with the specificity of 95.2% at the unique-peptide-level based on the percentage of Cys-peptides. Among these sites, 260 sites from 135 proteins were observed with relatively high reactivity to S-nitrosylation; such SNO-sensitive sites are more likely to be physiologically relevant. Many of the SNO-sensitive proteins are preferentially localized in mitochondria, contractile fiber and actin cytoskeleton, suggesting the susceptibility of these subcellular compartments to redox regulation. Moreover, the SNO-sensitive proteins seem to be primarily involved in metabolic pathways, including TCA cycle, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glutathione metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting the importance of redox regulation in muscle metabolism and insulin action.

Su, Dian; Shukla, Anil K.; Chen, Baowei; Kim, Jong Seo; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Qu, Yi; Aryal, Uma K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Clauss, Therese RW; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Effects of prolactin on lipid biosynthesis and protein kinase C in mouse mammary gland and NB sub 2 node lymphoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cultured mouse mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice, prolactin (PRL) stimulates an increased rate of incorporation of ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 3}H)glucose into triglycerides. The effect is significant between 4-6 hours after addition of PRL. Enzymes likely to be rate-limiting to this process include acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthetase, acetyl CoA synthetase, and/or pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). It is possible that early perturbations of phospholipid (PL) metabolism may represent the initial cellular effects of PRL. Consequently the effect of PRL on the incorporation of several precursors into PLs was determined. Employing ({sup 14}C)acetate as a substrate, PRL stimulates its incorporation into phosphatidylcholine, as early as 1-2 hours, and phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine by 2-4 hours. ({sup 3}H)Glycerol incorporation into triglycerides was significantly enhanced by PRL between 4-6 hours, but not into PLs until after 16 hours. Similarly, PRL did not enhance incorporation of ({sup 32}P)O{sub 4}, ({sup 3}H)choline, ({sup 3}H)inositol or ({sup 3}H)seine into PLs until 14-16 hours after addition to culture. 12-O-tetradeconyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was found to increase ({sup 3}H)uridine incorporation into RNA, and ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation into caseins in a PRL-like manner. In addition, PRL stimulates a transient, time-dependent translocation of PKC to the particulate fraction of mammary gland explants.

Waters, S.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Responses of the L51781Y tk/sup +//tk/sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay: III. 72 coded chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seventy-two chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L51781Y tk/sup +///sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay, using procedures based upon those described previously. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before planting in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 ..mu..g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Significant responses were obtained with allyl isothiocyanate, p-benzoquinone dioxime, benzyl acetate, 2-biphenylamine HCl, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)ether, cadmium chloride, chlordane, chlorobenzene, chlorobenzilate, 2-chloroethanol, chlorothalonil, cytarabine x HCl, p,p'-DDE, diazinon, 2,6-dichloro-p-phenylenediamine, N,N-diethylthiourea, diglycidylresorcinol ether, 2,4-dimethoxy aniline x HCl, disperse yellow 3, endosulfan, 1,2-epoxyhexadecane, ethyl acrylate, ethyl benzene, ethylene thiourea, F D and C yellow Number 6, furan, heptachlor, isophorone, mercuric chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline x 2 HCl, methyl viologen, nickel sulfate x 6H/sub 2/O, 4,4'-oxydianiline, pentachloroethane, piperonyl butoxide, propyl gallate, quinoline, rotenone, 2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-4-nitro-anisole, 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethane, trichlorfon, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, 1,1,3-trimethyl-2-thiourea, 1-vinyl-3-cyclopetene dioxide, vinyl toluene, and ziram. The assay was incapable of providing a clear indication of whether some chemicals were mutagens; these benzyl alcohol, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, phenol, succinic acid-2,2-dimethyl hydrazide, and toluene.

McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.; Cattanach, P.; Edwards, I.; McBride, D.; Riach, C.; Caspary, W.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Examination of the effects of arsenic on glucose homeostasis in cell culture and animal studies: Development of a mouse model for arsenic-induced diabetes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous epidemiologic studies found increased prevalences of type 2 diabetes mellitus in populations exposed to high levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in drinking water. Although results of epidemiologic studies in low-exposure areas or occupational settings have been inconclusive, laboratory research has shown that exposures to iAs can produce effects that are consistent with type 2 diabetes. The current paper reviews the results of laboratory studies that examined the effects of iAs on glucose metabolism and describes new experiments in which the diabetogenic effects of iAs exposure were reproduced in a mouse model. Here, weanling male C57BL/6 mice drank deionized water with or without the addition of arsenite (25 or 50 ppm As) for 8 weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests revealed impaired glucose tolerance in mice exposed to 50 ppm As, but not to 25 ppm As. Exposure to 25 and 50 ppm As in drinking-water resulted in proportional increases in the concentration of iAs and its metabolites in the liver and in organs targeted by type 2 diabetes, including pancreas, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Dimethylarsenic was the predominant form of As in the tissues of mice in both 25 and 50 ppm groups. Notably, the average concentration of total speciated arsenic in livers from mice in the 50 ppm group was comparable to the highest concentration of total arsenic reported in the livers of Bangladeshi residents who had consumed water with an order of magnitude lower level of iAs. These data suggest that mice are less susceptible than humans to the diabetogenic effects of chronic exposure to iAs due to a more efficient clearance of iAs or its metabolites from target tissues.

Paul, David S. [Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Hernandez-Zavala, Araceli [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Walton, Felecia S. [Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Adair, Blakely M. [Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Dedina, Jiri; Matousek, Tomas [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Laboratory of Trace Element Analysis, Videnska 1083, CZ-142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Styblo, Miroslav [Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)], E-mail: styblo@med.unc.edu

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Extracellular ATP-induced nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transient is mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extracellular ATP (eATP) induces an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} transient by activating phospholipase C (PLC)-associated P2X4 purinergic receptors, leading to production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and subsequent Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores in mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy, Ca{sup 2+} indicator fluo-4 AM, and the cell permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342, we examined the properties of eATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} release in pancreatic {beta}-cell nuclei. eATP induced a higher nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transient in pancreatic {beta}-cell nuclei than in the cytosol. After pretreatment with thapsigargin (TG), an inhibitor of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA) pumps, the amplitude of eATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} transients in the nucleus was still much higher than those in the cytosol. This effect of eATP was not altered by inhibition of either the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (PMCA) or the plasma membrane Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger (NCX) by LaCl{sub 3} or by replacement of Na{sup +} with N-Methyl-Glucosamine. eATP-induced nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transients were abolished by a cell-permeable IP3R inhibitor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), but were not blocked by the ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist ryanodine. Immunofluorescence studies showed that IP3Rs are expressed on the nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells. These results indicate that eATP triggers nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transients by mobilizing a nuclear Ca{sup 2+} store via nuclear IP3Rs.

Chen, Zheng; Li, Zhengzheng; Peng, Gong; Chen, Xiaoli; Yin, Wenxuan [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China)] [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China); Kotlikoff, Michael I. [Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yuan, Zeng-qiang, E-mail: zqyuan@sun5.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China)] [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China); Ji, Guangju, E-mail: gj28@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China)] [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Monitoring Cyp2b10 mRNA expression at cessation of 2-year carcinogenesis bioassay in mouse liver provides evidence for a carcinogenic mechanism devoid of human relevance: The dalcetrapib experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction: Dalcetrapib is a cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) modulator in clinical assessment for cardiovascular outcome benefits. In compliance with regulatory requirements, dalcetrapib was evaluated in rodent 2-year carcinogenesis bioassays. In the mouse bioassay, male mice demonstrated increased liver weight and statistically increased incidences of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma. Hepatic cytochrome p450 (Cyp) 2b10 mRNA induction and increased Cyp2b10 enzyme activity signify activation of hepatic nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a widely established promoter of rodent-specific hepatic tumors. We therefore monitored hepatic Cyp2b10 mRNA and its enzyme activity in a subset of dalcetrapib-treated male mice from the bioassay. Methods: Liver samples were obtained from ? 1/3 of male mice from each dose group including vehicle-controls (mean and earliest study day of death 678 and 459 respectively). Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to determine Cyp2b10 mRNA expression and Cyp1a-, Cyp2b10- and Cyp3a-selective activities were monitored. Results: Cyp2b10 mRNA was strongly induced by dalcetrapib with an expected wide inter-individual variation (5–1421-fold). Group average fold-induction versus vehicle-controls showed a dose-related increase from 48-fold (250 mg/kg/day) to 160-fold (750 mg/kg/day), which declined slightly at 2000 mg/kg/day (97-fold). Cyp enzyme activities showed approximate doubling of total Cyp P450 content per milligram protein and a 9-fold increase in Cyp2b10-selective pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activity (750 mg/kg/day). Discussion: These data from hepatic Cyp2b10 monitoring are strongly suggestive of CAR activation by dalcetrapib, a mechanism devoid of relevance towards hepatocarcinogenesis in humans; results show feasibility of Cyp2b10 as a surrogate marker for this mechanism at cessation of a carcinogenesis bioassay. -- Highlights: ? Liver tumors were induced in male mice by dalcetrapib in a 2-y study (bioassay). ? Cyp2b10 induction typifies activation of nuclear receptor CAR in mouse liver. ? First report of hepatic Cyp2b10 monitoring at the end of a mouse bioassay. ? Cyp2b10 induction supports CAR activation by dalcetrapib in mouse bioassay. ? CAR activation is a mechanism of hepatic tumorigenesis of no relevance to humans.

Hoflack, J-C.; Mueller, L., E-mail: Lutz.Mueller@roche.com; Fowler, S.; Braendli-Baiocco, A.; Flint, N.; Kuhlmann, O.; Singer, T.; Roth, A.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

9. international mouse genome conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

In vitro cytotoxicity tests of ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based varistor fabricated from ZnO micro and nanoparticle powders on L929 mouse cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study investigated the cytotoxicity of ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-varistors. To this effect, ZnO?Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} varistors fabricated from ZnO micro-and nanoparticle powders are prepared via conventional ceramic processing method. The effects of ZnO particle size on the properties of ZnO varistors are also investigated. The strong solid-state reaction during sintering may be attributed to the high surface area of the 20 nm ZnO nanoparticles that promote strong surface reaction. The intensity of XRD peaks reflected the high degree of crystallinity of the ZnO nanoparticles. However, the width of the peaks in case of ZnO nanoparticles has increased due to the quantum size effect. The cytotoxicity evaluation of ZnO varistor was conducted on mouse connective tissue fibroblast cells (L929) using Trypan Blue Exclusion Assay analysis. The results show that the four types of varistor samples lead to cellular mitochondrial dysfunction, morphological modifications and apoptosis at the various concentration range and the toxic effects are obviously displayed in high concentration samples. 20nm-VDR is the most toxic materials followed by 40nm-VDR, P8-VDR, and W4-VDR in a descending order.

Sendi, Rabab Khalid, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com; Mahmud, Shahrom, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com; Munshi, Ayman, E-mail: last-name3@hotmail.com, E-mail: shahromx@hotmail.com, E-mail: ameerah7@hotmail.com [Nano-optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R.), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Penang (Malaysia); Seeni, Azman, E-mail: azanseeni@gmail.com [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute (AMDI), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 13200, Bertam, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

178

2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin causes increases in expression of c-erb-A and levels of protein-tyrosine kinases in selected tissues of responsive mouse strains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) administered in vivo causes drastic reduction in the weight of the mouse thymus at low doses the reduction becoming statistically significant after 2 days. To understand the cause for such thymic involution TCDD-evoked changes in various biochemical parameters in this tissue were examined. The most noticeable change was observed in the increased activity of specific protein-tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C and an increased level of p21{sup ras}-associated binding of ({sup 3}H)GTP. The above changes appear to be a selective effect on these special classes of proteins. It has become apparent that the rise in protein-tyrosine kinase activities becomes significant within 24 hr, whereas the rise in protein kinase C does not become significant until 48 hr. In view of similarities between TCDD and thyroid hormones in causing thymic involution, the levels of c-erb-A expression were assessed in the liver by using avian {sup 32}P-labeled v-erb-A probe and RNA transfer blot hybridization technique. The results clearly indicate that TCDD has the property to elevate levels of mRNA bearing homology to v-erb-A. Based on such observations a hypothesis has been proposed that TCDD owes its potency to its ability to stimulate the expression of one of a family of DNAs bearing homology to v-erb-A and that one of the major consequences of such an action is stimulation of various tyrosine kinases.

Bombick, D.W.; Jankun, J.; Tullis, K.; Matsumura, F. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Assignment of the tyrosinase-related protein-2 gene (TYRP2) to human chromosome 13q31-q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Extended synteny with mouse chromosome 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recombinant human genomic liver DNA [lambda]-phage library was screened with the insert of the pHuTRP-2 cDNA clone to isolate a series of bacteriophage with inserts spanning the human TYRP2 gene. One of the [lambda]-phage clones ([lambda]HuT-YRP2-7) containing a 2-kb HindIII fragment with the 5[prime] exon sequence of the cDNA as determined by sequence analysis was used for the gene localization study. DNA prepared from the phage by Qiagen chromatography was nick-translated with biotin-14-dATP and hybridized in situ at a final concentration of 5 ng/[mu]l to metaphases from two normal males. The fluorescence in situ hybridization method was modified from that previously described in that chromosomes were stained before analysis with both propidium iodide as counterstain and DAPI for chromosome identification. Twenty metaphases from the first normal male were examined for fluorescent signal. All of these metaphases showed signal on one or both chromatids of chromosome 13 in the region 13q31-q33; 88% of this signal was at the interface of bands 13q31-q32. There was a total of four nonspecific background dots observed in these 20 metaphases. A similar result was obtained from hybridization of the probe to 20 metaphases from the second normal male (data not shown). This region has also been shown to contain the propionyl coenzyme A carboxylase [alpha]-chain gene by in situ hybridization. The localization of the TYRP2 locus to human chromosome 13q31-q32 extends the syntenic region of chromosome 13 with mouse chromosome 14. 15 refs., 1 fig.

Sturm, R.A. (Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)); Baker, E.; Sutherland, G.R. (Centre for Medical Genetics, North Adelaide (Australia))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-binding protein (PBP) but not PPAR-interacting protein (PRIP) is required for nuclear translocation of constitutive androstane receptor in mouse liver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates transcription of phenobarbital-inducible genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in liver. CAR is localized to the hepatocyte cytoplasm but to be functional, it translocates into the nucleus in the presence of phenobarbital-like CAR ligands. We now demonstrate that adenovirally driven EGFP-CAR, as expected, translocates into the nucleus of normal wild-type hepatocytes following phenobarbital treatment under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. Using this approach we investigated the role of transcription coactivators PBP and PRIP in the translocation of EGFP-CAR into the nucleus of PBP and PRIP liver conditional null mouse hepatocytes. We show that coactivator PBP is essential for nuclear translocation of CAR but not PRIP. Adenoviral expression of both PBP and EGFP-CAR restored phenobarbital-mediated nuclear translocation of exogenously expressed CAR in PBP null livers in vivo and in PBP null primary hepatocytes in vitro. CAR translocation into the nucleus of PRIP null livers resulted in the induction of CAR target genes such as CYP2B10, necessary for the conversion of acetaminophen to its hepatotoxic intermediate metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. As a consequence, PRIP-deficiency in liver did not protect from acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis, unlike that exerted by PBP deficiency. These results establish that transcription coactivator PBP plays a pivotal role in nuclear localization of CAR, that it is likely that PBP either enhances nuclear import or nuclear retention of CAR in hepatocytes, and that PRIP is redundant for CAR function.

Guo Dongsheng [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sarkar, Joy [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Ahmed, Mohamed R. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Viswakarma, Navin [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Jia Yuzhi [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Yu Songtao [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sambasiva Rao, M. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Reddy, Janardan K. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)]. E-mail: jkreddy@northwestern.edu

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of ?-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of ?-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited ?-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ? Carcinogenic metals in drinking water promote colorectal tumor formation in vivo. ? Carcinogenic metals induce ?-catenin activation in vivo and in vitro. ? ROS generation induced by carcinogenic metals mediated ?-catenin activation.

Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Saito, Hiroshi [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y. [Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li, Li [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)] [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States)] [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States); Evers, B. Mark [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Gamma irradiation of the prenatal mouse dentition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the dental lamina to the stage of the deposition of enamel and dentin. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a continuous stress of gamma irradiation on the structure of the odontogenic cells, the relative size and rate of development... development. In 1927, Leist (9) made a study of the effect of X-rays on teeth, which was brought about by the following rase. A worker in a Roentgen tube factory was exposed daily to a considerable dose of X-irradiation. Sometime later he began to show...

Kerley, Michael Auston

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF...

184

Non-equilibrium vibrational and electron energy distributions functions in atmospheric nitrogen ns pulsed discharges and \\mus post-discharges: the role of electron molecule vibrational excitation scaling-laws  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of the electron energy distribution function in nanosecond atmospheric nitrogen discharges is investigated by means of self-consistent solution of the chemical kinetics and the Boltzmann equation for free electrons. The post-discharge phase is followed to few microseconds. The model is formulated in order to investigate the role of the cross section set, focusing on the vibrational-excitation by electron-impact through resonant channel. Four different cross section sets are considered, one based on internally consistent vibrational-excitation calculations which extend to the whole vibrational ladder, and the others obtained by applying commonly used scaling-laws.

Colonna, Gianpiero; Celiberto, Roberto; Capitelli, Mario; Tennyson, Jonathan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Bol. Mus. Para. Emlio Goeldi. Cincias Humanas, Belm, v. 3, n. 2, p. 195-211, maio-ago. 2008 A cidade, um foco de diversidade agrcola no Rio Negro (Amazonas, Brasil)?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cidade, um foco de diversidade agrícola no Rio Negro (Amazonas, Brasil)? The urban area, a center pour le Développement. Unité de Recherche 200, Brasília, Brasil (laura.emperaire@uol.com.br). II;A cidade, um foco de diversidade agrícola no Rio Negro (Amazonas, Brasil)? 196 INTRODU��O O

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

186

Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Musculus 425 RelevanceObjectives: H-D In-Cylinder Combustion Current Objectives: SNL - Spatialtemporal evolution of LTC soot-precursors SNL - Injector dribble effects on UHC ...

187

alter allgemeinzustand und: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

auf den Bewegungsumfang der Halswirbelsule und die elektrische Aktivitt des SPC (Musculus semispinalis capitis) (more) Pogrzeba, Miriam Ruth 2009-01-01 2 Der...

188

alter hufigkeit und: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

auf den Bewegungsumfang der Halswirbelsule und die elektrische Aktivitt des SPC (Musculus semispinalis capitis) (more) Pogrzeba, Miriam Ruth 2009-01-01 2 Der...

189

annex der einfluss: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

auf den Bewegungsumfang der Halswirbelsule und die elektrische Aktivitt des SPC (Musculus semispinalis capitis) (more) Pogrzeba, Miriam Ruth 2009-01-01 13...

190

An In-Cylinder Imaging Survey of Low-Temperature, High-Efficiency...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

luminosity of low temperature combustion strategies are contrasted to conventional gasoline and diesel engine combustion deer11musculus.pdf More Documents & Publications...

191

Blue whale response to underwater noise from commercial ships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrodynamics and energetics of blue whale lunge feeding:2010. Association between Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)and calling behavior of blue whales from a suction-cup-

McKenna, Megan Frances

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Observations on feeding behavior in the vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

47C119C119C119C46C117C114C98C97C110C102C105C115C99C104C101C114C46C100C101C47C106C111C117C114C110C97C108C115C47C109C97C109C109C98C105C111C108 C90C101C105C116C115C99C104C114C105C102C116 C102C117C200C114C83C97C200C117C103C101C116C105C101C114C107C117C110C... C97C115C44 C76C97C119C114C101C110C99C101C44 C75C97C110C115C97C115C59C68C101C112C97C114C116C109C101C110C116 C111C102C70C111C114C101C115C116C114C121C44C77C105C99C104C105C103C97C110C83C116C97C116C101 C85C110C105C118C101C114C115C105C116C121C44C69C97C115C...

Timm, Robert M.; Vriesendorp, Corine

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

a13 control mouse: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

One of the first indications that mitochondria may play a role in pathogenesis was the report nearly Douglas C. Wallace 1999-01-01 117 Research and Development of a 13-inch...

194

Mammalian genetics pioneer Liane Russell writes Mouse House history...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ResearchReviews in Mutation Research is publicly available at http:www.sciencedirect.comsciencearticlepiiS1383574213000690 . - Bill Cabage, 865.574.4399, December 30...

195

Glove Mouse Project The goal of this project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that is cost-effective,easy to use, and portable. Hybrid, High-performance Cluster Computer Setup The objective it to create a viable fuel for use in a diesel engine. Multi-Functional Automated Turret Stand alone turret Design and implementation of an unmanned aerial vehicle which is capable of autonomous control via

de Lijser, Peter

196

The proteome of mouse brain microvessel membranes and basal lamina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IPI00849927 IPI00113377 Gene Vim Mbp Lrp1 Gnaq Ahnak AlcamIPI00319830.7 IPI00115564.5 Aco2 Vim Tubb3 Ncam1 Gnao1 Mdh2

Chun, Hyun Bae

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Metabonomic Profiling of TASTPM Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for the development of new therapies against and diagnosis of AD. In this study, non-targeted metabotyping of TASTPM transgenic AD mice was performed. The metabolic profiles of both brain and plasma of TASTPM mice were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to those of wild type C57BL/6J mice. TASTPM mice were metabolically distinct compared to wild type mice (Q28 Y = 0.587 and 0.766 for PLS-DA models derived from brain and plasma, respectively). A number of metabolites were found to be perturbed in TASTPM mice in both brain (D11 fructose, L-valine, L-serine, L-threonine, zymosterol) and plasma (D-glucose, D12 galactose, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and D-gluconic acid). In addition, enzyme immunoassay confirmed that selected endogenous steroids were significantly perturbed in brain (androstenedione and 17-OH-progesterone) and plasma (cortisol and testosterone) of TASTPM mice. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that perturbations related to amino acid metabolism (brain), steroid biosynthesis (brain), linoleic acid metabolism (plasma) and energy metabolism (plasma) accounted for the differentiation of TASTPM and wild-type

Hu, Zeping; Browne, Edward R.; Liu, Tao; Angel, Thomas E.; Ho, Paul C.; Chun Yong Chan, Eric

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

Characterization of Neuropeptide Y Expressing Cells in the Mouse Retina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

present in two layers, the inner nuclear layer (INL) and the ganglion cell layer (GCL). The cells in both layers were densely distributed, with those in the INL having a mean density of 1452 65 cells/mm2 , and those in the GCL having a mean density of 644 41 cells/mm2 . The cells in the INL extended

Nirenberg, Sheila

199

Laminar circuit organization and response modulation in mouse visual cortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.25 NaH2PO4, 4 MgCl2, 0.5 CaCl2, and 24 NaHCO3). SlicesNaCl, 2.5 KCl, 26 NaHCO3, 2 CaCl2, 2 MgCl2, 1.25 NaH2PO4,

Olivas, Nicholas D; Quintanar-Zilinskas, Victor; Nenadic, Zoran; Xu, Xiangmin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

aux tissus mous: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Cette note presente un moniteur d'acces aux donnees d'un PLC Schneider ou Siemens, pouvant fonctionner sur n'importe quelle plateforme (Windows, Linux...) equipee...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Conservation of exon scrambling in human and mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exon scrambling is a phenomenon in which the exons of an mRNA transcript are spliced in an order inconsistent with that of the genome. In this thesis, I present a computational analysis of scrambled exons in human and ...

Hamilton, Monica L. (Monica Lauren)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In some cases, the development of an MOU (particularly negotiation of the MOU terms) has been viewed as a distraction that prevented the project from move forward in a...

203

The development of direction selectivity in the mouse retina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

firing of starburst amacrine cells and DSGCs, is not necessary to establish the retinal circuitsfiring rate in the null direction is as low as in adult, indicating that the circuits

Elstrott, Justin Blake

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Increased Levels of Inosine in a Mouse Model of Inflammation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One possible mechanism linking inflammation with cancer involves the generation of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, and halogen species by activated macrophages and neutrophils infiltrating sites of infection or tissue damage, ...

Prestwich, Erin

205

Comparative analysis of proteome and transcriptome variation in mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ghazalpour 1 * . , Brian Bennett 1. , Vladislav A. PetyukNat Genet 41: 166–167. 12. Bennett BJ, Farber CR, Orozco L,Citation: Ghazalpour A, Bennett B, Petyuk VA, Orozco L,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effects of Systemic Inflammation on Synaptogenesis in Developing Mouse Hippocampus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2(3):284-291. Streit WJ, Graeber MB, Kreutzberg GW. 1988.2(3):284-291. Streit WJ, Graeber MB, Kreutzberg GW. 1988.

Sloniowski, Slawomir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Acquisition and Mining of the Whole Mouse Brain Microstructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

joined the Brain Networks Laboratory (BNL) and his patient and thoughtful advice led me to the point where I am now. I particularly want to thank him for letting me join the laboratory and have this wonderful opportunity. Dr. Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna has... the pleasure of working. Finally, I would like to thank the late Dr. Bruce H. McCormick whose vision and unstoppable drive for research have been greatly in uential to me. All achievements in BNL would not have been possible without his dream. He...

Kwon, Jae-Rock

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

Interferon-Stimulated Genes in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on for eac h respe ctive g ene. L E, luminal e pithel ium; G E, glan dula r e pitheli um; D ,d eci du a. D D D D LE LE LE GE D LE 18 FIG. 4. ISH analysis of Isg1 5, Nm i, O as2 , a nd Plsc r1 in e ndom etria an d con ceptuse... GR: Jak-STAT pathways and transcriptional activation in response to IFNs and other extracellular signaling proteins. Science 1994, 264(5164):1415- 1421. 27. Ritchie KJ, Hahn CS, Kim KI, Yan M, Rosario D, Li L, de la Torre JC, Zhang DE: Role of ISG...

Tilford, Sarah

2008-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

209

PRIME R NOTES Microsatellite markers in wood mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, USA Keywords: Apodemus, Chelyabinsk, genetic markers, microsatellites, Murinae Received 13 June 1997 in the vicinity of Chelyabinsk, Russia, one of the Earth's most radioactively and chemically polluted spots. Here of the microsatellite markers is described in animals collected near Chelyabinsk. Mice of the genus Apodemus comprise

Baker, Robert J.

210

antigen mouse monoclonal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in adulthood of autoreactive T cells specific to that antigen. The renal-specific ... Marshall, Naomi Jane 2009-01-01 45 The Journal of Neuroscience, March 1988, 8(3): 874-882...

211

attenuates mouse neuroinvasiveness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kowar; Otmar Scherzer 2010-09-22 7 Atlas-based attenuation correction for small animal PETMRI scanners Abhijit J. Chaudhari, ajchaudhari@ucdavis.edu, Biology and Medicine...

212

Changes in misonidazole binding with hypoxic fraction in mouse tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Binding of misonidazole (MISO) or a derivative to hypoxic cells in tumors has been proposed as a method for identifying tumors, and measuring their level of hypoxia. The author has recently shown that the hypoxic fraction of tumor cells can be altered over a wide range in vivo by acutely changing the hematocrit of the host animal by transfusion. The present study is aimed to investigate the changes in binding by /sup 14/C MISO that accompanied this procedure. Tumor bearing mice were injected with /sup 14/C MISO, irradiated with a single dose of X rays (20 Gy) and their tumor excised and bisected. One half of each tumor was used to determine cell survival in vitro, the other was used for /sup 14/C scintillation counting. As previously described, tumor cell survival was dramatically increased in acutely anemic mice and this was accompanied by an increase in /sup 14/C MISO binding to the tumors. The relationship between clonogenic cell survival and binding was found to be linear on a log-log plot for each of the tumor lines studied, but the slopes of the lines were different in different tumor lines and generally steeper than the value of 1.0 expected for a 1:1 correspondence between cells binding radioactivity and radiobiological resistance.

Hirst, D.G.; Hazlehurst, J.L.; Brown, J.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Transgenic mouse models of childhood-onset psychiatric disorders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Childhood-onset psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), mood disorders, obsessive compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSD), and schizophrenia (SZ), affect ...

Robertson, Holly Rochelle

214

Expression of esterase-2 in developing mouse embryos and neonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as maternal invironments in which the gene product can be assayed. The esterase-2 gene product (ES-2) was purified by means of isoelectric foc- using and gel filtration of C57BL/6J kidney homogenates. Purified ES-2 was used to elicit antisera from New... in kidney. . Page 28 LIST OF FIGURES Page 1. Heat curves. 14 2. Immunoelectrophoretic rockets of purified ES-2. 15 3. Rocket areas vs. purified ES-2. 16 4. Starch gel of purified ES-2 18 5. Crossed electrophoresis 19 6. Immunoelectrophoretic...

Deal, Frank Hans

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Geometrically Decoupled Phased Array Coils for Mouse Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B] measurements with flux probe????...???.. ..... 54 47 Circuit showing position of the tuning and matching capacitors .............. 70 48 Central core and shield of the semi rigid cable??????????. 72 49 Stepwise construction of a balun....16cms) (Figure 9(a)). The protel file for the endrings with 2 sizes of apertures is saved on the d:/Sahil/endringsmall.pcb and d:/Users/Sahil/endringlarge.pcb (Figure 9(b)). Two of these structures were stuck together using plastic epoxy...

Bhatia, Sahil

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy production via glycolysis, ?-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful...

217

Static and dynamic tactile directional cues experiments with VTPlayer mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is a track- ball: the braille cell replaces the scrolling wheel. The second one is called Tacti] added a 2Ă?4 braille cell on three devices to add tactile information. The first one, called TactiBall

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

Uterine deletion of Trp53 compromises antioxidant responses in mouse  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctional MaterialsRobert

219

Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheir Atmospheric Impacts. |Characterizationindividual

220

Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheir AtmosphericAnalysis Complemented with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The mouse visually evoked potential : neural correlates and functional applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The visually evoked potential (VEP) is a local field potential (LFP) evoked in visual cortex in response to visual stimuli. Unlike extracellular single unit recordings, which allow us to probe the function of single spiking ...

Muhammad, Rahmat

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Reverse Genetics System for Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the virus has entered the target cell, it begins to translate viral replication proteins and then to copy the genome in order to access the structural genes needed to make progeny virus. The entire replication cycle takes place in the cytoplasm of the host... to the 3? UTR of MHV, it does not provide access to genes upstream of the S gene, leaving only 1/3 of the genome available for analysis (50). The other two thirds of the genome consists of ORF1a and ORF1b, which contain the replicase genes. These genes...

Carter, Kristen

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Mammalian genetics pioneer Liane Russell writes Mouse House history |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowellfor 2013Malcolm J. Andrews,

224

Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation in Mouse. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement and Making aCompactCompany Template

225

Proteomic Identification and Quantification of S-glutathionylation in Mouse  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedlesAdvanced Photon Source Thecharacterization

226

Effects of Systemic Inflammation on Synaptogenesis in Developing Mouse Hippocampus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neurosci 28(3):117-119. Battaglia FP, Benchenane K, SirotaY,Gross CG, Kopil C, Battaglia L, McBreen M, Stranahan AM,Neurosci 28(3):117-119. Battaglia FP, Benchenane K, Sirota

Sloniowski, Slawomir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Monitoring transient repolarization segment morphology deviations in mouse ECG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis details the design, implementation and validation of a system that facilitates partial automation for detection of anomalous repolarization segment morphologies in the ECG of mice. The technology consists of ...

Oefinger, Matthew Blake, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

Bramhall, Naomi F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Cleaner, More Efficient Diesel Engines  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Mark Musculus, an engine combustion scientist at Sandia National Laboratories, led a study that outlines the science base for auto and engine manufacturers to build the next generation of cleaner, more efficient engines using low-temperature combustion. Here, Musculus discusses the work at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility.

Musculus, Mark

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

Cleaner, More Efficient Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mark Musculus, an engine combustion scientist at Sandia National Laboratories, led a study that outlines the science base for auto and engine manufacturers to build the next generation of cleaner, more efficient engines using low-temperature combustion. Here, Musculus discusses the work at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility.

Musculus, Mark

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

231

La rcupration de l'nergie de la houle, La Revue 3EI n59, Dc embre 2009, p : 17 La rcupration de l'nergie de la houle, Partie 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systèmes à corps mus par la houle. Ainsi, les plus récents (Pelamis, AWS, CETO, SEAREV, Wavebob...) font

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - autosomal recessive spinal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

delivery could be useful for disorders such as spinal mus- ... Source: Mandel, Ronald J. - Department of Neuroscience, University of Florida Collection: Biology and Medicine 6...

233

S1Supplemental Data Serotonin and Go Modulate Functional States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

derivative of nde-box::YC2.3 (18 nde-box vulval mus- was examined for the presence or absence of Ca2 activity

Schafer, William R.

234

Behavioral context of call production by eastern North Pacific blue whales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by eastern North Pacific blue whales Erin M. Oleson 1, *,context of calls produced by blue whales Balaenoptera mus-North Pacific population of blue whales (Thompson 1965,

Oleson, Erin M; Calambokidis, J; Burgess, W C; McDonald, M A; LeDuc, C A; Hildebrand, J A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - activates deoxynucleotide synthesis Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cds1-dependent intra-S-phase checkpoint that slows DNA synthesis (26, 34... a unique spectrum of phenotypes. Mus81 enables survival of deoxynucleotide ... Source: Heyer,...

236

FONDER ET REFONDER LA VILLE : RCITS ET REPRSENTATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, directeur du musée national du Château de Pau, JEAN-LOUIS GOUT, président de l'UPPA, DANIEL BALOUP

Dambrine, Marc

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - area eastern cape Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

capensis) from Cape Town. Used with the permission of the pho... . Georychus capensis (Pallas, 1778) Cape Mole-rat Mus ... Source: Hayssen, Virginia - Department of Biological...

238

Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ce001musculus2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

239

Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

D.C. ace01musculus.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

240

Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ce001musculus2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ce001musculus2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel...

242

Supplementary Information: Estimation of Pfs Specific Activity Materials. Mouse anti-polyhistidine and goat anti-mouse IgG conjugated to alkaline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This was done by connecting the cathode and anode (nickel chromium wire) using alligator clips to a DC power. Estimations of Pfs specific activity. Pfs-chitosan conjugate was prepared and electrodeposited onto different

Rubloff, Gary W.

243

Protocol: Mouse Cardiac CINE Protocol, Page 1 of 2 Author: R.Bussell 8/9/2013 Protocol: Mouse Cardiac CINE Protocol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitor. The leads should be twisted along their entire length and never form a loop. Tape leads securely the respiratory bellows between the animal and a hard surface so the respiratory signal is reliable. Set the bladder below the diaphragm. If the bladder is too high you may observe the heart beat in the respiratory

Squire, Larry R.

244

Boosting Monte Carlo Rendering by Ray Histogram Fusion MAURICIO DELBRACIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Universidad de la Rep´ublica, Uruguay PABLO MUS ´E Universidad de la Rep´ublica, Uruguay ANTONI BUADES ENS), ENS-Cachan, France, mdelbra@fing.edu.uy; P. Mus´e, Universidad de la Rep´ublica, Montevideo, Uruguay

Kazhdan, Michael

245

Boise State University Evaluation for Graduation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Principles of Microeconomics Area II core course in history 3 3 3 3 Area III MATH 124 Introduction of Business 3 3 ITM 104 Operating Systems and Word Processing ITM 105 Spreadsheet Topics ITM 106 Database Music History and Literature II MUS 351 Music History and Literature I OR MUS 353 Music History

Barrash, Warren

246

Boise State University Evaluation for Graduation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics Area II core course in history 3 3 3 3 Area III MATH 124 Database Topics ITM 310 Business Intelligence 1 1 1 3 MGMT 301 Leadership Skills 3 MKTG 301 Principles Music History and Literature II MUS 351 Music History and Literature I OR MUS 353 Music History

Barrash, Warren

247

Name ID# Date General Degree Credit Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

core course in history 3 3 3 3 Area III MATH 124 Introduction to Mathematical Thought OR MATH 124 Database Topics ITM 310 Business Intelligence 1 1 1 3 MGMT 301 Leadership Skills 3 MKTG 301 Principles Music History and Literature II MUS 351 Music History and Literature I OR MUS 353 Music History

Barrash, Warren

248

Understanding and preserving nature THE MUSUM THROUGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and anatomy courses, in French (not Latin) 1739 - Georges-Louis Leclerc, Count de Buffon, named Intendant - Musée de l'Homme reopens #12;Welcome to the French Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle. Like nature and innovations, professions and collections, knowledge sharing and partnerships, are broad in scope

249

Reproductive strategies and natural history of the arboreal Neotropical vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, based on mass, is variable but most females are parous by 60 g. Litter size is small with a mode of 2 and embryos are not evenly distributed across the uterine horns. Vesper mice exhibit striking morphological differences in terms of tooth-wear...

Romero, Andrea; Timm, Robert M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - activate mouse dorsal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rearrangement during Morphogenesis of the Summary: elegans Dorsal Hypodermis E. M. Williams-Masson,*, P. J. Heid, C. A. Lavin, and J. Hardin *Molecular... in the dorsal...

251

Mouse and human embryonic stem cells: can they improve human health by preventing disease?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 (2), 310-321. George, S. ; Heng, B. C. ; Vinoth, K. J. ;1349. Cao, T. ; Lu, K. ; Fu, X. ; Heng, B. C. Differentiated

Talbot, Prue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

FoxP genes subdivide interneuron subclasses in the developing mouse spinal cord  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Biology by Timothy Tin Heng Wong Committee in charge:The Thesis of Timothy Tin Heng Wong is approved and it isSpinal Cord by Timothy Tin Heng Wong Master of Science in

Wong, Timothy Tin Heng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

System for remote multichannel real-time monitoring of mouse ECG via the Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hardware/software system was developed to allow real-time monitoring of multiple physiological signals simultaneously via the Internet. The hardware is specifically designed for measuring ECG signals from mice, while the ...

Oefinger, Matthew Blake, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - ames dwarf mouse Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

object is a brown dwarf. However, the use of this so-called lithium Source: Stancil, Phillip C. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia Collection: Physics...

255

The effects of adult male mouse urine odor on evoked potentials in adult female mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collected with EEG electrodes placed within a cup of physiological saline solution and SCI-LAB turned on Power spectrum of data collected with EEG electrodes placed within a cup of physiological saline solution and SCI-LAB turned off 56 10. Power... spectrum (test 1) of data collected with EEG electrodes tied together and placed within a cup of physiological saline solution 59 power spectrum (test 2) of data collected with EEG electrodes tied together and placed within a cup of physiological...

Brown, Troy Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Characterization of Urinary Iron Loss in the fsn (flaky skin) Anemia Mouse Mutant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Ashland, OR) gating on live cells and excluding doublets. Gating was based on unstained and isotype controls. Western Blot of kidney samples and Antibodies fsn and WT littermate kidney was dissected after 4 weeks on a high iron diet. Half...

Kress, Robert Lee

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Intravital imaging of amyloid plaques in a transgenic mouse model using optical-resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; revised November 10, 2009; accepted November 10, 2009; posted November 12, 2009 (Doc. ID 114001 to play a major role in the pathogen- esis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the underlying mechanisms

Wang, Lihong

258

Associations Between Paternal Responsiveness and Stress Responsiveness in the Biparental California Mouse, Peromyscus californicus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

receptor antagonist, s179d-prl, delay the onset of maternalsion of the peptides prolactin (PRL) and oxytocin (OT), andChanges in peripheral PRL levels in fathers of several

Chauke, Miyetani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Impaired Adult Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Masashi Tabuchi 1 , Stuart M. Allan 1 , Elysse M. Knight 1 ,JJ, Jones VC, Tabuchi M, Allan SM, Knight EM, et al. (2008)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Analysis of pluripotent mouse stem cell proteomes : insights into post- transcriptional regulation of pluripotency and differentiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein KIAA1967 ho 589.07 Vim Vimentin 273.11 Etfa Electron2610301G19RikIPI00123624 Vim IPI00227299 Etfa IPI00116753375.33 substrate Prkar2b Cfl2 Vim IPI00224570 IPI00266188

O'Brien, Robert Norman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Investigations into arsenate-induced neural tube defects in a mouse model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in drinking water and increased risk of congenital heart malformations in exposed offspring (22; 29) The first study explored the relationship between the population- weighted mean arsenic concentration in public drinking water supplies, and mortality from.../l. In the second study, information concerning 270 cases and 665 control children was used to identify maternal exposures to drinking water contaminants associated with increased 5 risks for congenital heart disease. Arsenic exposure at any detectable level...

Hill, Denise Suzanne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Phenotypic Evolution of Therapeutic Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium after Invasion of TRAMP Mouse Prostate Tumor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salmonella has been of interest in cancer research due to its intrinsic ability to selectively target and colonize within tumors, leading to tumor cell death. Current research indicates promising use of Salmonella in regular ...

Choe, Elizabeth

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated mouse sam Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

decision makers can choose among solar, wind, and Summary: to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NREL has developed a tool--the System Advisor Model (SAM... and...

264

Mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse models of Parkinson’s disease revealed by transcriptomics and proteomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J Bioenerg Biomembr (2009) 41:487–491 DOI 10.1007/s10863-nitrogen species (RNS). J Bioenerg Biomembr (2009) 41:487–MPTP and methamphetamine J Bioenerg Biomembr (2009) 41:487–

Smith, Desmond J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Did "Minority Report" Get it Wrong? Superiority of the Mouse over 3D Input Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-specialists (e.g., Google Earth, Sketchup) has focused increased attention on the problem of improved interaction

Cooperstock, Jeremy R.

266

Investigating the consequences of chromosome abnormalities arising during pre-implantation development of the mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instrumental in making the Institute a first-class environment to work in. For enjoyable and productive collaborations I wish to thank Dr Thierry Voet for the array-based karyotyping experiments and also Aisha Elaimi together with Joyce Harper for FISH... at serine residue 139) hCG – Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin hES cells – Human Embryonic Stem Cells H4K20me2 – Dimethylation of Histone4 At Lysine Residue 20 H2 O 2 – Hydrogen Peroxide ICC - Immunocytochemistry ICM – Inner Cell Mass ICSI – Intra...

Bolton, Helen Louise

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

267

Cell-cell and cell-medium interactions in the growth of mouse embryonic stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Embryonic stem cells serve as powerful models for the study of development and disease and hold enormous potential for future therapeutics. Due to the potential for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to provide a variety of tissues ...

Mittal, Nikhil, 1979-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Guiding the osteogenic fate of mouse and human mesenchymal stem cells through feedback system control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3, S32–38 (2009). 37. Diefenderfer, D. L. , Osyczka, A. M. ,1, 38. Osyczka, A. M. , Diefenderfer, D. L. , Bhargave, G. &

Honda, Y; Ding, X; Mussano, F; Wiberg, A; Ho, C-M; Nishimura, I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Mechanisms of ocular dominance plasticity in the juvenile and adult mouse visual cortex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity is a classic example of bidirectional experience-dependent plasticity in the primary visual cortex. This form of plasticity is most robust during early postnatal development (termed the ...

Khibnik, Lena A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Metabolism of vitamin K in Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the carboxylation of blood proteins, induce GLU VITAMIN K CYCLE GLA K Carboxylase K Epoxidase HHO I I II -N-C-C- + CO~+ 0~ I H-C-H I H-C-H I COOH H HO I I II -N-CM- I H-C-H I H-C HOOC COOH / X CHs OH K red. K Epoxide Reductase 0 CHs...

Johnson, Terryl Marie

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Genomic Imprinting Variations in the Mouse Type 3 Deiodinase Gene Between Tissues and Brain Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

following the manufacturers di- rections (TKT4 and TKT3 from Siemens, Washington, DC). Serum TSH was determined by RIA as previously described (9). DNA and RNA isolation and Northern and Southern analysis Total RNA and poly (A#3;) RNA were isolated from...

Martinez, M. Elena; Charalambous, Marika; Saferali, Aabida; Fiering, Steven; Naumova, Anna K.; St. Germain, Donald; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Hernandez, Arturo

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

272

Comparison of trichostatin A and valproic acid treatment regimens in a mouse model of kidney fibrosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are promising new compounds for the therapy of fibrotic diseases. In this study we compared the effect of two HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A and valproic acid, in an experimental model of kidney fibrosis. In mice, doxorubicin (adriamycin) can cause nephropathy characterized by chronic proteinuria, glomerular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, as seen in human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Two treatment regimens were applied, treatment was either started prior to the doxorubicin insult or delayed until a significant degree of proteinuria and fibrosis was present. Pre-treatment of trichostatin A significantly hampered glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as did the pre-treatment with valproic acid. In contrast, the development of proteinuria was only completely inhibited in the pre-treated valproic acid group, and not in the pre-treated trichostatin A animals. In the postponed treatment with valproic acid, a complete resolution of established doxorubicin-induced proteinuria was achieved within three days, whereas trichostatin A could not correct proteinuria in such a treatment regimen. However, both postponed regimens have comparable efficacy in maintaining the kidney fibrosis to the level reached at the start of the treatments. Moreover, not only the process of fibrosis, but also renal inflammation was attenuated by both HDAC inhibitors. Our data confirm a role for HDACs in renal fibrogenesis and point towards a therapeutic potential for HDAC inhibitors. The effect on renal disease progression and manifestation can however be different for individual HDAC inhibitors. - Highlights: • Valproic acid is a potent antiproteinuric drug, whereas trichostatin A is not. • Trichostatin A and valproic acid reduce kidney fibrosis in doxorubicin nephropathy. • Both valproic acid and trichostatin A attenuate renal inflammation.

Van Beneden, Katrien, E-mail: kvbenede@vub.ac.be [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Geers, Caroline [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Pauwels, Marina [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Mannaerts, Inge [Department of Cell Biology, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Wissing, Karl M. [Department of Nephrology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Van den Branden, Christiane [Department of Human Anatomy, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Grunsven, Leo A. van, E-mail: lvgrunsv@vub.ac.be [Department of Cell Biology, Liver Cell Biology Lab, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - apolipoprotein e-deficient mouse Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

17 Research report Summary: , Grauer E, Sehayek E, Michaelson DM. Biochem- ical and cognitive studies of apolipoprotein-E-deficient... . Memory deficits and cholinergic...

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse olfactory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

olfactory bulb has around 3000glomeruli(Meisami, 1979); a similararrange- ... Source: Vogt, Richard G. - Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina...

275

TRP channel gene expression in the mouse retina Jared C. Gilliam, Theodore G. Wensel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 in the photoreceptor inner segment layer, for TRPM1 in the inner nuclear layer (INL), for TRPM3 in the INL, and for TRPML1 in the outer plexiform and nuclear layers. Strong immunofluorescence signal in cone outer segments was observed for TRPM7 and TRPP2. TRPC5 immunostaining was largely confined to INL

Wensel, Theodore G.

276

Transplacental transfer of immune antibodies in the mouse demonstrated by antibody labeled in vivo with tritium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this manner are valid only for the iso- tope used in their construction and only when the same counting conditions prevail such as machine settings, coctail formula, type of quencher present, and counting temperature. 39 VITA Hubert E. McKinney was born...

McKinney, Hubert Eugene

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Natural history and karyology of the Yucatán vesper mouse, Otonyctomys hatti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G41G62G73G74G72G61G63G74 G53G65G76G65G6EG74G65G65G6EG20G73G70G65G63G69G6DG65G6EG73G20G6FG66G20G74G68G65G20G72G61G72G65G20G59G75G63G61G74GE1G6EG20G76G65G73G70G65G72G20G6DG6FG75G73G65G2C G4FG74G6FG6EG79G63G74G6FG6DG79G73G20G68G61G74G74G69G2CG20G61G72G...65G20G6EG6FG77G20G6BG6EG6FG77G6EG20G66G72G6FG6DG20G42G65G6CG69G7AG65G2CG20G47G75G61G74G65G2D G6DG61G6CG61G2CG20G61G6EG64G20G74G68G65G20G4DG65G78G69G63G61G6EG20G73G74G61G74G65G73G20G6FG66G20G43G61G6DG70G65G63G68G65G2CG20G51G75G69G6EG74G61G6EG61 G52G6FG...

Genoways, Hugh H.; Timm, Robert M.; Engstrom, Mark D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

DCAMKL-1 expression identifies tuft cells rather than stem cells in the adult mouse intestinal epithelium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

differentiation markers. Tuft cells, also known as brush, caveolated, multivesicular or fibrillovesicular cells, are found in the hollow organs of the GI tract and in respiratory organs 6 . They are reliably distinguished

Boyer, Edmond

279

THE DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LANGERHANS CELLS AND INTRAEPIDERMAL NERVE FIBERS IN THE MOUSE AND RAT FOOTPAD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin disorders are often associated with immune and nervous system dysfunction. Intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) detect mechanical, thermal, and noxious stimuli. Although immune cells such as mast and T cells can alter ...

Doss, Argenia Lanisha Necole

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of specific neuronal circuit elements. The mammalian forebrain is a tissue of stunning complexity comprised to which a single canonical circuit comprised of a set of canonical cell types can be recognized across of characteristics including anatomical location, intrinsic firing properties, synaptic physiology, somatodendritic

Cai, Long

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Geometric representation of neuroanatomical data observed in mouse brain at cellular and gross levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation studies two problems related to geometric representation of neuroanatomical data: (i) spatial representation and organization of individual neurons, and (ii) reconstruction of three-dimensional neuroanatomical regions from sparse...

Koh, Wonryull

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Sex Chromosome Trisomy mouse model of XXY and XYY: metabolism and motor performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

breast cancer [19,20], osteoporosis [21,22], and autoimmunee.g. , hypogonadism, osteoporosis, and learning and socialDi MA, Vinanzi C, Foresta C: Osteoporosis in Klinefelter's

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Mouse and human embryonic stem cells: can they improve human health by preventing disease?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diseases, they also have equally great potential to prevent disease by identifying dangerous environmental chemicals

Talbot, Prue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

UPTAKE OF [3H]-COLCHICINE INTO BRAIN AND LIVER OF MOUSE, RAT, AND CHICK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by M.R. Rosenzweig and E.l. Bennett, Cambridge, MA: The MITJ.F. , D.W. landry, E.l. Bennett, and M.E. Jarvik. long-termRAT,AND CHICK Edward L. Bennett, Marie Hebert Alberti, and

Bennett, Edward L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The tumor cells were derived from primary mouse medulloblastomas, which are cerebel-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the active compound classes, which suggests that common off- target effects are unlikely, and inhibition of the antiproliferative effect of the D2/3 dopa- mine receptor agonist bromocriptine by coad- ministration of the D2 with Parkinson disease10. Finally, the possibility that neu- rotransmitters are involved in cancer stem cell self

Doyle, Patrick S.

286

Identification of a Mouse Thiamine Transporter Gene as a Direct Transcriptional Target for p53*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- mine transporter activities were found in cells overex- pressing mTHTR-1 and under conditions of DNA damage or p53 activation. Our findings indicate that p53 may be involved in maintaining thiamine frequent events in human cancers. p53 has been shown to inhibit cell cycle progression, promote apoptosis

Lin, Chi-Hung

287

Transcriptomic responses in mouse brain exposed to chronic excess of the neurotransmitter glutamate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compensatory responses offering protection against stress, promoting growth of neuronal processes (neurites) and re-establishment of synapses. The transcription of a key gene in the neurite growth network, the kinase Ptk2b, was significantly up-regulated in Tg...

Wang, Xinkun; Bao, Xiaodong; Pal, Ranu; Agbas, Abdulbaki; Michaelis, Elias K.

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

288

Odorant Receptor Expression Defines Functional Units in the Mouse Olfactory System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and influ- ence the guidance of OSN axons to synaptic targets in the olfactory bulb (OB). OSNs expressing of single neurons from gene- targeted mice in which the green fluorescent protein is coex- pressed and arrangement of glomerular functional units. Key words: olfaction; olfactory system; olfactory bulb; glo

Bozza, Thomas

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse brain Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Brd... U) labelling, that cell proliferation does occur in the Drosophila ... Source: Brand, Andrea - Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge Collection: Biology and...

290

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Decreased Choroidal and Retinal Blood Flow in the DBA/2J Mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteins: tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), which causes iris stromal atrophy,6 and glycoprotein

Duong, Timothy Q.

291

NOTCH2 REGULATES BMP4 AND MORPHOGENESIS IN THE DEVELOPING MOUSE CILIARY BODY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= Pituitary tumor-transforming 1 rSMAD = Receptor - mothers against decapentaplegic homolog SMAD = Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog TGF-? = Transforming growth factor-beta Tryp = Tyrosinase-related protein Wnt2b = Wingless-type MMTV integration... of the tyrosinase gene as a phenotype enhancer for both CYP1b1-/- and FOXC1-/- mice. Treatment of subsequent CYP1b1-/- albino mice with L-dopa in utero led to a remarkable rescuing of the phenotype. This provides an outstanding example of the necessity...

Tanzie, Christopher Patrick

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Time course and progression of wild type ż-Synuclein accumulation in a transgenic mouse model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cerebral cortex (RSC, S1, Pir, CA1-3, M2, oCx), subcorticalOlf), piriform cortex (Pir), retrosplenial cortex (RSC),

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Characterisation of microRNA expression in post-natal mouse mammary gland development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For example during puberty and gestation, proliferation and associated processes of cell division and mitosis were highly represented, cal- cium/sodium ion transport, translation and intracellular protein transport were prominent during lactation, apop- tosis... and miR-429. There is increasing evidence that this miRNA family plays a crucial role in the regulation of epithelial to mesenchy- mal transition (EMT). All five members of the miR-200 family were markedly down-regulated in cells that had undergone EMT...

Avril-Sassen, Stefanie; Goldstein, Leonard D; Stingl, John; Blenkiron, Cherie; Le Quesne, John; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Karagavriilidou, Konstantina; Watson, Christine J; Tavare, Simon; Miska, Eric A; Caldas, Carlos

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 ?m. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany)] [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Hernandez, Victor H. [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany) [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Moser, Tobias [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany) [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Göttingen (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany) [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Göttingen (Germany)

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

tion. Human or mouse intestinal epithelial cells that express the poly-Ig receptor were  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Antibodies specific for Clostrid- ium difficile toxin A and Helicobacter pylori urease have been generated, Glauser M et al (1995) Oral immunization with Helicobacter pylori urease as a treatment against Helicobacter infection. Gas- troenterology (in press) Haneberg B, Kendall D, Amerongen HM, Apter FM

Boyer, Edmond

296

Automated, all-optical cranial surgery for transcranial imaging of mouse brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. , Ultrashort Laser Pulses. Ultrafast optics, Trenbio,T. , Chirped Pulse Amplification. Ultrafast optics, Trenbio,ultrafast laser systems [2] which produce laser pulses with

Jeong, Diana

297

Video Article Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cell culture medium with 3.5% Ficoll using a syringe pump (Cole-Parmer, Vernon Hills, IL) to generate

Chesler, Naomi C.

298

Functional Expression of the CXC-Chemokine Receptor-4/ Fusin on Mouse Microglial Cells and Astrocytes'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1a (SDF-1a). Both astrocytes and microglial cells mobilized calcium following stimulation with chemically synthesized SDF-1a. SDF-la- and carbachol-mediated calcium responses of astrocytes were partially and other G proteins. In contrast, the calcium responses of microglial cells to SDF-la were completely

Springer, Timothy A.

299

anti-mouse muc6 antibody: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(15-17) and that the interaction between CD2 and LFA-3 can mediate adhesion of J Clark; Debbie A Law; David J Paterson; Michael Puklavec; Alan; F. Williams 1988-01-01 328...

300

A Structurally Based Investigation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Mouse Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the elastase. ............... 35 3.3 Pressure-diameter and pressure-force for the native vessel (a and b) as compared to the pressure-diameter and pressure-force data for the post- elastase vessel (c and d). Culled data are represented by the symbols... in the native (a) and post-elastase vessel (c). Collagen is stained in pink and cell nuclei in purple. VVG stain for elastin in the native (b) and post-elastase vessel (d), where elastin is stained black...

Collins, Melissa

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Comparing performance of keyboarding/mousing tasks using notebook computer flat panel displays vs. CRT monitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consisted of a notebook computer alone, a notebook computer used with external input devices, monitor blocks, a notebook computer stand, and CRT monitors. Each subject performed two tasks (data entry and editing) for 10 minutes in each configuration-task...

Ventrca, Rachel Lynn

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

High-resolution mapping of gene expression using association in an outbred mouse stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and designed the experiments: AG SD DJS TAD AJL. Performedthe experiments: AG SD PZW AB RC TAD AJL. Analyzedthe data: AG SD HK CF EE TAD AJL. Contributed reagents/

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The architecture of the mouse trigeminal-facial brainstem : disynaptic circuitry, genomic organization, and follicle mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MicroBrightField Inc. , Williston, VT). Brain traces wereMicroBrightField, Inc. , Williston, VT) according to the

Matthews, David William; Matthews, David William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Proteomic analysis of c-butyrolactone-treated mouse thalamus reveals dysregulated proteins upon absence seizure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the disease pro- gress at protein level, we performed proteomic studies using the thalamus of mice for which suggest that absence seizures are associated with restricted functional sets of pro- teins, whose down difference gel electrophoresis, c-butyrolactone, proteome, sensory pro- cessing, thalamus. J. Neurochem

Kim, Daesoo

305

The use of mouse models to elucidate the genetic and environmental components of neural tube defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neural tub defects (NTDs) rank among the most common phics. congenital anomalies affecting human infants worldwide. Unfortunately, the: etiology is poorly understood accuse the genetic and environmental components contributing to their expression...

Gefrides, Lisa Anne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse nervous Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Manoa Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 39 November 4, 2009 6.16 The sonic hedgehog gene is shown by in situ hybridization to be expressed in the chick nervous...

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse subventricular Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine 82 Neuron, Vol. 39, 937950, September 11, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press Sonic Hedgehog Is Required for Progenitor Cell Summary: and Gli1 Expression in the Adult...

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult mouse hippocampus Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adult hippocampus. Rat hip- pocampal progenitors proliferated when cultured in Shh, and Sonic hedgehog... cells. We found high expression of the Shh receptor Patched in both the...

309

DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION OF THE DRUG-PROCESSING GENOME IN MOUSE LIVER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AhR Aryl hydrocarbon receptor Aldh Aldehyde dehydrogenase ARNT AhR nuclear translocator Asbt Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter Bcrp Breast cancer resistance protein bDNA Branched DNA Bsep Bile-salt export pump CA Cholic acid CAR... drug interactions and cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated that the mRNAs of Cyp1-4 are inducible by ligands of four classes of xeno-receptors, namely the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, Nr1i3...

Cui, Yue

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

Functional recovery with recombinant human IGF1 treatment in a mouse model of Rett Syndrome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rett Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that arises from mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). MeCP2 has a large number of targets and a wide range of functions, suggesting the hypothesis ...

Garcia, Rodrigo

311

A novel cell culture model for studying differentiation and apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 mol/l sodium cacodylate/HCl buffer of pH 7.2–7.4 at 4°C for 48 h. After washing with distilled water (dH2O) for 20 min, the samples underwent secondary fixation in 1% osmium tetroxide in dH2O for 45 min at room temperature. Samples were... .0 0 4 × 103 9.2 ± 1.2 0 2 × 103 8.4 ± 2.0 0 1 × 103 6.4 ± 1.7 0 Cells were seeded at five different densities in soft agar and grown for 14 days. Colonies were defined as spherical growth of cells of 5 mm in diameter or more. Values shown are the means...

Gordon, Katrina E; Binas, Bert; Chapman, Rachel S; Kurian, Kathreena M; Clarkson, Richard W E; Clark, A John; Birgitte Lane, E; Watson, Christine J

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Imaging vasodynamics in the awake mouse brain with two-photon Andy Y. Shih1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetic resonance imaging PoRTS = polished and reinforced thinned skull RBC = red blood cell TPLSM = two-to-moment energy demands of neuronal computation in the mammalian brain are high, yet the brain has limited reserves of energy [1, 2]. A solution to this dilemma calls for a vascular system that functions

Kleinfeld, David

313

Virtual Histology of Transgenic Mouse Embryos for High-Throughput Phenotyping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Capecchi4,5 , Charles Keller3* 1 Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, 3 Department of Cellular Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, 5 Howard Hughes Medical

Capecchi, Mario R.

314

A mouse model of osteochondromagenesis from clonal inactivation of Ext1 in chondrocytes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lake City, UT 84112; b Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Edited by Neal G. Copeland, Institute of Molecular and Cell. Jonesa,b,1,2 , Virginia Piomboc,1 , Charles Searbyd , Gail Kurrigerb , Baoli Yange , Florian Grabellusf

Capecchi, Mario R.

315

Progressive Genomic Instability in the FVB/Kras[superscript LA2] Mouse Model of Lung Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alterations in DNA copy number contribute to the development and progression of cancers and are common in epithelial tumors. We have used array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to visualize DNA copy number alterations ...

Jacks, Tyler E.

316

Calmodulin Kinase Pathway Mediates the K ?-Induced Increase in Gap Junctional Communication between Mouse Spinal Cord  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrocytes are coupled to one another by gap junction channels that allow the diffusion of ions and small molecules throughout the interconnected syncytium. In astrocytes, gap junctions are believed to participate in spatial buffering removing the focal excess of potassium resultant from intense neuronal activity by current loops through the syncytium and are also implicated in the propagation of astrocytic calcium waves, a form of extraneuronal signaling. Gap junctions can be modulated by several factors, including elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. Because K ? elevation is a component of spinal cord injury, we evaluated the extent to which cultured spinal cord astrocytes is affected by K ? levels and obtained evidence suggesting that a Ca 2 ? –calmodulin (CaM) protein kinase is involved in the K ?-induced increased coupling. Exposure of astrocytes to high K ? solutions induced a

Mara H. De Pina-benabou; Miduturu Srinivas; David C. Spray; Eliana Scemes

317

ARTICLE IN PRESS Genetic variations that regulate bone morphology in the male mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to aging, menopause, or mechanical unloading, define an individual's susceptibility to osteoporosis [1­4]. Identification of the factors that may control these two primary predictors of osteoporosis, includ- ing

318

Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the mouse brain. |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnalCommittee Draftfor $1.14EnergyEMSL Dual

319

Microsoft Word - FINAL 2010_SPFPA_CBA With MOUs.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronic Input OptionsStoffle2006,5, 2005 101

320

Tandem Mass Spectrometry identifies many mouse brain O-GlcNAcylated  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9.securityTamas Vargaproteins including

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hoplopleura janzeni n. sp. (Phthiraptera: Anoplura), a new sucking louse from a Central American swimming mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HS), 3 dorsal marginal head setae (DMHS), 1 long dorsal principal head seta (DPTS), 1 short dorsal accessory head seta (DAcHS), and 1 dorsal posterior central head seta (DPoCHS) dorsally on each side; 1 DMHS inserted anteriorly and close to dorsal head... 1 lacking setae; sternite 2 with 6 sternal abdominal setae (StAS) with 2 lateral StAS on each side slightly thickened; sternite 3 with 6 StAS with narrow central setae and stout lateral setae (2 on 1 side, 3 on the other); sternites 4–10 each with 6–8...

Durden, Lance A.; Timm, Robert M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Use of Course Woody Debris by Cotton Mouse (Peromyscus gossypinus)in a Southeastern Pine Forest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Course woody debris may be an important resource for many small mammals by providing protection and food sources. The author tracked cotton mice movements via radiotelemetry and powder in managed loblolly pine forests. Most day refuges for mice were associated with debris, including rotting stumps (69%), upturned root boles (14%) and under fallen logs (9%). Stumps used were more larger and more highly decomposed. Night time telemetry indicated that mice movements were more closely associated with the logs. Rooting stumps are an important resource for cotton mice.

T.S. McCay

1999-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

323

Identification of cis-regulatory elements in mouse Mab21l2 gene by comparative genomics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The mab-21 gene was first identified in Caenorhabditis elegans as a critical component required for sensory organ identity determination. Mab21 homologs are highly conserved from… (more)

Shek, Kim Fung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Mechanisms of entry of poliovirus into the central nervous system in a mouse model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Experimental mice did not develop paralysis when Lansing type II poliovirus was injected intravenously, 2) Using electron microscopy nopoliovirus-like particles were detected in either the endothelial cells or inflammatory cells, 3) Using immunofluorescence...

Ting, Jing-Wen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Identification and Characterization of Modulators of Chemotherapeutic Response in Mouse Models of Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemotherapeutic drug resistance is a major cause of cancer treatment failure. While much attention has been focused on the genetics of tumor development, less is known about the genetic determinants of therapeutic outcome. ...

Doles, Jason (Jason David)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic mouse micronucleus Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences ; Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources 8 Chronic Exposure to Arsenic Causes Increased Cell Survival, DNA Damage, and...

327

Development, characterization and transcriptional profiling of a mouse model of fatal infectious diarrhea and colitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Citrobacter rodentium is a naturally occurring murine bacterial pathogen which is used to model human diarrheagenic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC) infections in mice. C. rodentium causes colonic hyperplasia and a variable degree ...

Borenshtein, Diana

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mouse-Specific Tandem IgY7-SuperMix Immunoaffinity Separations for Improved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification andinterface1 EEnergy, OfficeMotors

329

A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011A FirstEMSL ShellA StandardA Surprising

330

Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research |Regulation Services2014 UpdateTeach-Ins | DepartmentSeniors checkA look at

331

Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergy StorageAdvancedMetamaterials Research PersonnelMeasured

332

RAPID/Best Practices/Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) for Interstate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County, Kentucky:County,Quogue is aPage EditTransmission

333

Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering Facilities » Spallation

334

Studies of Secondary Melanoma on C57BL/6J Mouse Liver Using 1H NMR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide Thin Films.Administration goStudies Bolster.

335

1H NMR Metabolomics Study of Metastatic Melanoma in C57BL/6J Mouse Spleen.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | BlandinePrincetonOPT OpticsFrequently6| EMSL NMR

336

Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse Model of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedlesAdvanced Photon Source Thecharacterization of

337

Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K. | EMSL MeasurementEMSL

338

BULLETIN D'INSCRIPTION L'Education nouvelle au service d'une nation rformer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Musée de la Résistance nationale à l'attention de Julie BAFFET Parc du Vercors. 88, avenue Marx Dormoy B : .............................................................................. Code postal : ................................. Ville : .............................. Téléphone

Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Université

339

atlas superconducting linac: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 mus. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern...

340

anl aps positron linac: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 mus. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

apf-ih type linac: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 mus. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern...

342

acelerador lineal linac: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 mus. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern...

343

Tuning the photophysical properties of amidophosphine complexes of copper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of monomeric copper complexes that allow for the tuning of the emission properties is reported. Luminescence lifetimes up to 150 [mu]s are observed in benzene solution at ambient temperature, which are comparable ...

Mickenberg, Seth F. (Seth Fox)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Protons Act as a Transmitter for Muscle Contraction in C. elegans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pbo-6 genes encode subunits of a ``cys- loop'' proton-gated cation channel required for mus- cles. Usually, classical neurotransmitters are stored in synaptic vesi- cles. Calcium stimulates the fusion

Cooper, Robin L.

345

Ocean Dynamics Theoretical, Computational and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-tracking- derived currents in May­June 2009 under three different wind conditions, we reproduced the June 2009 and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution RE- MUS autonomous underwater vehicle Operations Group who

Chen, Changsheng

346

State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Applied Science BS in Industrial and Systems Engineering-Four-Year Program Rockland Community College (A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema, ME, EECE, CS, BE) ENR 206 CIRCUITS Free Elective Gen Ed Elective (N) Any Social Science #12;

Suzuki, Masatsugu

347

WING TIP ANATOMY AND AERODYNAMICS IN FLYING National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WING TIP ANATOMY AND AERODYNAMICS IN FLYING SQUIRRELS National Museum of Natural History aerodynamically sophisticat- back into a curve by the tibiocarpalis mus- ed. They are able to modify shape

Mathis, Wayne N.

348

2010. XX, 524 p. Hardcover SFr. 233.00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& warfare. Soil and Culture explores high culture and popular culture--from the paintings of Hierony- mus% VAT for electronic products. Pre-publication pricing: Unless otherwise stated, pre-pub prices

349

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult rat sacral Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

capensis) from Cape Town. Used with the permission of the pho... . Georychus capensis (Pallas, 1778) Cape Mole-rat Mus capensis Pallas, 1778:172. Type locality ... Source: Hayssen,...

350

Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Feasibility study in a mouse model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. Methods: 50?l of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 5} colony forming units (cfu)/?l was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5?°C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Results: Macroscopic evaluation of treated abscess indicated a diminution of external size of abscess 1 day after treatment. Treatment did not cause open wounds. The median (lower to upper quartile) bacterial count 1 day after treatment was 6.18 × 10{sup 3} (0.76 × 10{sup 3}–11.18 × 10{sup 3}), 2.86 × 10{sup 3} (1.22 × 10{sup 3}–7.07 × 10{sup 3}), and 3.52 × 10{sup 3} (1.18 × 10{sup 3}–6.72 × 10{sup 3}) cfu/100 ?l for control, MT and HT groups, respectively; for the 4-day end point, the count was 1.37 × 10{sup 3} (0.67 × 10{sup 3}–2.89 × 10{sup 3}), 1.35 × 10{sup 3} (0.09 × 10{sup 3}–2.96 × 10{sup 3}), and 0.07 × 10{sup 3} (0.03 × 10{sup 3}–0.36 × 10{sup 3}) cfu/100 ?l for control, MT and HT, showing a significant reduction (p = 0.002) on the bacterial load four days after focused ultrasound treatment when treating at high temperature (HT). The MPO amount remained unchanged between groups and days, indicating no change on local neutrophil recruitment in the abscess caused by the treatment. The white blood cell count remained unchanged between groups and days indicating that no systemic inflammatory response was caused by the treatment. Conclusions: Focused ultrasound induces a therapeutic effect in abscesses induced by MRSA. This effect is observed as a reduction of the number bacteria without significantly altering the amount of MPO at the site of a MRSA-induced abscess. These initial results suggest that focused ultrasound is a viable option for the treatment of localized MRSA-related infections.

Rieck, Birgit [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada)] [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada); Bates, David; Pichardo, Samuel, E-mail: spichard@lakeheadu.ca, E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Curiel, Laura, E-mail: spichard@lakeheadu.ca, E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4, Canada and Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada)] [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4, Canada and Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada); Zhang, Kunyan [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)] [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Escott, Nicholas [Department of Pathology, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada)] [Department of Pathology, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada)] [Philips Healthcare, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mutation rate in the post-chernobyl families from ukraine.mutation rate after the Chernobyl accident. Nature 380, 683-fallout following the Chernobyl accident (Dubrova et al. ,

Marchetti, Francesco

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Evaluation of the Effects of Green Tea Extracts on Bone Homeostasis in the Ts65Dn Down Syndrome Mouse Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of the Effects of Green Tea Extracts on Bone Homeostasis in the Ts65Dn Down Syndrome- gallate (EGCG), an aromatic polyphenol found in high concentrations in green tea, is a known inhibitor

Zhou, Yaoqi

353

J Physiol . Author manuscript In vivo expression of G-protein beta1gamma2 dimer in adult mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of glucose uptake and of ion transport and membrane excitability (for review see (Jean-Baptiste ,et al localization in the transverse-tubulevivo 1 2 membrane. Membrane current and indo-1 fluorescence measurements ; Ion Channel Gating ; physiology ; Mice ; Muscle Contraction ; physiology ; Muscle Fibers, Skeletal

Boyer, Edmond

354

AAV serotype-1 mediates early onset of gene expression in mouse hearts and results in better therapeutic effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer. 2,3 In an acute heart attack, metabolic changesprevious history of heart attack or blockage of the coronary

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Analysis of the mouse embryonic stem cell regulatory networks obtained by ChIP-chip and ChIP-PET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Genome-wide approaches have begun to reveal the transcriptional networks responsible for pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed either by hybridization to a ...

Mathur, Divya

356

Autophagy induction reduces mutant ataxin-3 levels and toxicity in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cytoprotective and autophagy- inducing properties offer the possibility for the development of treatment rationales involving simultaneous lithium and rapamycin administration (Sarkar et al., 2008). Therefore there may be much potential for the use of drugs upre... , have been demonstrated to sequester transcription factors (Perez et al., 1998). Ataxin-3 may also have a more direct role in transcription regulation through its interactions with histone acetyltransferases (Li et al., 2002) and histone deacetylases...

Menzies, Fiona M.; Huebener, Jeannette; Renna, Maurizio; Bonin, Michael; Riess, Olaf; Rubinsztein, David C.

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

357

Investigation of T cell-mediated immune surveillance against tumor-specific antigens in genetically engineered mouse models of cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The association of tumor cells and lymphocytes has led to the hypothesis that our immune system actively inhibits the formation and progression of cancer, a phenomenon called tumor immune surveillance. T cells specific to ...

Du Page, Michel Justin Porter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Identification and Evaluation of Brucella Recombinant Outer Membrane Proteins as Subunit Vaccinogen Candidates in the Mouse Model of Brucellosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and identification modeling approach provides strong evidence for prediction of Brucella protective antigens, and represent a novel strategy with broad application to other major pathogens....

Gomez, Gabriel

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Myocardial and cerebral perfusion studies in animal models S65 In-vivo phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Endothelial Growth Factor gene(Vegf/ mice) develop motor neurodegeneration reminiscent for Amyotrophic Lateral Tesla setup J. Pfeuffer1 , H. Merkle2 , N. K. Logothetis1 ; 1 Dep. Physiology of Cognitive Processes

Jegelka, Stefanie

360

158 BrainResearch,359(1985) 158-165 Unfocused Laser Illumination Kills Dye-Targeted Mouse Neurons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

158 BrainResearch,359(1985) 158-165 Elsevier BRE 11224 Unfocused Laser Illumination Kills Dye March 12th, 1985) Key words:laser-lesioning -- dye-targeting -- central nervous system-- in vitro by propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye that leaks through damaged membranes and binds to nucleic acids

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Inhibitory actions of Ah receptor agonists and indole-containing compounds in breast cancer cell lines and mouse models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Recently, it has been reported that the SAhRM 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane inhibited DMBA-induced mammary tumor growth in rats and also inhibited MAPK and PI3-K pathways in human breast cancer cells. BT-474 and MDA-MB-453 cell lines are ErbB2...

Walker, Kelcey Manae Becker

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

362

The role of p53 in normal development and teratogen-induced apoptosis and birth defects in mouse embryos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be causally linked to NTDs observed in embryos exposed to HS. Taken together, these studies suggest that precise control of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest pathways are critical for neural tube development and the prevention of teratogen-induced NTDs....

Hosako, Hiromi

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Ligand Binding Domain of GCNF Is Not Required for Repression of Pluripotency Genes in Mouse Fetal Ovarian Germ Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In mice, successful development and reproduction require that all cells, including germ cells, transition from a pluripotent to a differentiated state. This transition is associated with silencing of the pluripotency genes ...

Okumura, Leah M.

364

Maternal diet-induced obesity programmes cardiovascular dysfunction in adult male mouse offspring independent of current body weight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heart per- fusion, offspring at 12weeks of age remained fed andwere culled by cervical dislocation. The hearts used in the Langendorff heart perfusion were fixed post procedure, whereas the heart of its littermate was frozen. Blood was allowed to clot... and the heart was rapidly excised and immediately placed into ice-cold Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate (KHB) buf- fer (120mM NaCl, 4.7mM KCl, 1.2mM MgSO2·7H2O, 1.2mMKH2PO4, 25mMNaHCO3, 10mMglucose, and1.3mM CaCl2·2H2O). The heart was cannulated via the aorta and per...

Blackmore, Heather L.; Niu, Youguo; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Giussani, Dino A.; Ozanne, Susan E.

2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

365

Identification and characterisation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor expressing cells using a new transgenic mouse model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coverslipped and viewed using epifluorescence (Nikon Eclipse 80; Kingston upon Thames, UK). Photomicrographs were taken with a Micropublisher 3.3 RTV camera and QCapture Pro software (Qimaging Inc., Surrey, BC, Canada). Nodose and Enteric Ganglia culture Nodose... -fluorescence was prominent in the area postrema. This is a region with a leaky blood brain barrier that has been postulated previously as an area potentially capable of responding to circulating GLP-1 concentrations (24). In the hypothalamus, we found glp1r...

Richards, Paul; Parker, Helen E.; Adriaenssens, Alice E.; Hodgson, Joshua M.; Cork, Simon C.; Trapp, Stefan; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Maternal Diet-induced Obesity Programs Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Adult Male Mouse Offspring Independent of Current Body Weight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was inserted into the LV through the left atrium (LA). The balloon was filled with deionized water and attached to a rigid, deionized water-filled catheter connected to a calibrated pressure transducer (ArgonMedical Devices). The volume of the balloon... ). Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2#3; ATPase (SERCA2a) is important for ex- trusion of cytosolic calcium necessary for cardiomyocyte relaxation as well as in accumulating calcium in the sar- coplasmic reticulum in preparation for contraction (38). Protein...

Blackmore, Heather L.; Niu, Youguo; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Giussani, Dino A.; Ozanne, Susan E.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ex vivo and in vivo imaging of myelin fibers in mouse brain by coherent anti-Stokes Raman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

major depression," Psychiatry Res. 151, 179-188 (2007). 3. S. J. Wright, V. E. Centonze, S. A. Stricker. Dolle, C. Wu, D. Feinstein, G.-F. Huang, F. Semah, C. A. Mathis, W. Klunk, R. M. Gould, C. Lubetzki, 9304-9309 (2006). 5. A. Sherbondy, D. Akers, R. Mackenzie, R. Dougherty, and B. Wandell, "Exploring

Cheng, Ji-Xin

368

An integrative functional genomics approach towards quantitative trait gene nomination in existing and emerging mouse genetic reference populations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An approach that has been widely applied for the genetic dissection of complex traits is Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping. QTL mapping identifies genomic regions… (more)

Philip, Vivek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Identification of apolipoprotein D as a cardioprotective gene using a mouse model of lethal atherosclerotic coronary artery disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mice with homozygous null mutations in the HDL receptor (scavenger receptor class B, type I, or SR-BI) and apolipoprotein E (apoE) genes [SR-BI/apoE double KO (SR-BI[superscript ?/?]/apoE[superscript ?/?] or dKO) mice] ...

Mani, D. R.

370

The characterization of a mouse model of transient stroke using ex vivo MR microscopy and in vivo MR imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disrupted blood-brain barrier after an ischemic attack can cause vasogenic edema and increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation. Therefore, early detection and monitoring of BBB damage is important in the pathological ...

Huang, Shuning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Genetic Removal of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Rescues the Symptoms of Fragile X Syndrome in a Mouse Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vitronectin, aggrecans, MCP-3, SDF, CD44, transglutaminase (RNA: ribonucleic acid SDF: stromal cell derived factor SER:1?, stromal cell derived factor (SDF) and pro-tumor necrosis

Sidhu, Harpreet Kaur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Characterization of the 3' terminal 42 nucleotide host protein binding element of the mouse hepatitis virus 3' untranslated region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schematic representation of the defined secondary structures of the MHV 3' UTR including the pseudoknot identified in BCoV??..????????. 21 8 Identified binding sites of known host proteins in the MHV genome and complementary RNA... of complement (25). M protein has been shown to interact with genome associated N protein in pre-Golgi complexes, which is the site of virion assembly and release (69). Work by Nguyen and Hogue demonstrated that BCoV M interacts with HE and S proteins...

Johnson, Reed Findley

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Development of the mouse as a laboratory animal model for the study of Corynebacterium equi pneumonia in foals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Norris Animal Foundation: Report of foal pneumonia panel. Denver, Colorado. 1978, pp 2-30. 8. Ca t BR: . 81 aostst P o d I II t I ~Mi hlolo Bp I VPI ld, 111, Ch s C. V o a~s, 918, pp 118- 13. 9. M h tlA, Pat IIA: ~kt I ~gt 11* ad~Vito1 ed 7. Iowa...

Brown, Joanne Marie

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2009-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

375

Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: • Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. • Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. • Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. • Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.

Yanamala, Naveena, E-mail: wqu1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hatfield, Meghan K., E-mail: wla4@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Farcas, Mariana T., E-mail: woe7@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Schwegler-Berry, Diane [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Hummer, Jon A., E-mail: qzh3@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shurin, Michael R., E-mail: shurinmr@upmc.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Birch, M. Eileen, E-mail: mib2@cdc.gov [NIOSH/CDC, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226 (United States); Gutkin, Dmitriy W., E-mail: dwgutkin@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kisin, Elena, E-mail: edk8@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bugarski, Aleksandar D., E-mail: zjl1@cdc.gov [Office of Mine Safety and Health Research/NIOSH/CDC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Shvedova, Anna A., E-mail: ats1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch/NIOSH/CDC, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Department Physiology and Pharmacology, WVU, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-ÎşB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-ÎşB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

Jian Li

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effects of the Over-Expression of Neuronal Glutamate Dehydrogenase (Glud1) on Mouse Brain Mitochondrial Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glutamate has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity and subsequent neurodegeneration through changes in synaptic function, loss of glutamatergic neurons, synapses, and dendrites. All of these characteristics are also observed ...

Anguiano, Laura

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nanobodies Targeting Mouse/Human VCAM1 for the Nuclear Imaging of Atherosclerotic First author's surname and short title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Caveliers2,7 , PhD; Serge Muyldermans3,4 , PhD, Tony Lahoutte2,7 , MD PhD; Daniel Fagret1 , MD Ph proteins and endothelial cells and in vivo in ApoE-deficient (ApoE-/- ) mice. A nontargeting control for all 3 ratios). Atherosclerotic lesions located within the aortic arch of ApoE-/- mice were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

379

Assessment of Cerebellar and Hippocampal Morphology and Biochemical Parameters in the Compound Heterozygous, Tottering/leaner Mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and death in cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and 3) changes in basic biochemical parameters in granule cells of the cerebellum and hippocampus. This study revealed no volume abnormalities within the hippocampus of the mutant mice, but a decrease...

Murawski, Emily M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

380

The expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase during postnatal development in the leaner and tottering mouse cerebella  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tottering and leaner mice carry different mutations in the portion of their genetic information (tottering locus) that encodes for the ??[A] subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium ion channels. These channels, located on the cell membrane...

Zeve, Daniel Richard

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Biomechanics of common carotid arteries from mice heterozygous for mgR, the most common mouse model of Marfan syndrome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marfan syndrome, affecting approximately one out of every 5,000 people, is characterized by abnormal bone growth, ectopia lentis, and often-fatal aortic dilation and dissection. The root cause is a faulty extracellular matrix protein, fibrillin-1...

Taucer, Anne Irene

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cerebellar Purkinje cell death in the P/Q -type voltage-gated calcium ion channel mutant mouse, leaner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inducing an inflammatory response in the tissue surrounding the affected cell (Sastry and Rao, 2000; Yuan and Yankner, 2000; Yuan, et al., 2003). Programmed cell death is an essential requirement for normal neurodevelopment and a key component of many...

Frank-Cannon, Tamy Catherine

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

Transcription factors SOX4 and SOX11 function redundantly to regulate the development of mouse retinal ganglion cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lerner Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195 4 College of Life and Environmental Sciences layer while deletion of Brn3b has no effect on the expression of Sox4 and Sox11. Taken together layers: photoreceptors (rods and cones) constitute the outer nuclear layer (ONL); horizontal, bipolar

384

Loss of Hsp70 Exacerbates Pathogenesis But Not Levels of Fibrillar Aggregates in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Endogenous protein quality control machinery has long been suspected of influencing the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of misfolded proteins. Huntington's disease (HD) ...

Lindquist, Susan

385

Process for recovery of hydrogen and  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

on of sulfur Abstract A process of abstracting sulfur from H.sub.2 S and generating hydrogen is disclosed comprising dissolving Pd.sub.2 X.sub.2 (.mu.-dppm).sub.2 in a solvent and then introducing H.sub.2 S. The palladium complex abstracts sulfur, forming hydrogen and a (.mu.-S) complex. The (.mu.-S) complex is readily oxidizable to a (.mu.-SO.sub.2) adduct which spontaneously loses SO.sub.2 and regenerates the palladium complex.

James, Brian R. (Vancouver, CA); Li-Lee, Chung (Vancouver, CA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the mouse brain. Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the mouse brain. Abstract: Integrating...

387

In-Source Fragmentation and the Sources of Partially Tryptic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

using three biological samples, including a standard protein mixture, a mouse brain tissue homogenate, and a mouse plasma sample. Since the in-source fragments of a...

388

Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation in Mouse. Comparative Analysis of Proteome and Transcriptome Variation in Mouse. Abstract: The relationships between...

389

The effects of physiological age on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jaenisch. Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model withcan be used to treat sickle cell anemia in a mouse model 5 ,

Buckspan, Caitlin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Medial Entorhinal Cortex's role in temporal and working memory : characterization of a mouse lacking synaptic transmission in Medial Entorhinal Cortex Layer III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Declarative memory requires the integration and association of multiple input streams within the medial temporal lobe. Understanding the role each neuronal circuit and projection plays in learning and memory is essential ...

Rivest, Alexander Jay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Role of Tissue Repair in Survival from S-(1,2-Dichlorovinyl)-L-Cysteine– Induced Acute Renal Tubular Necrosis in the Mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S-(1,2-Dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), a model nephrotoxi-cant in mice, causes acute tubular necrosis and death at high doses. Our earlier studies revealed that renal tissue repair was critical for survival in mice with DCVC nephrotoxicity. The ob-jective of this study was to investigate if increasing renal tissue repair could protect mice from the lethal outcome of DCVC. Male Swiss Webster (SW) mice were administered a low dose of DCVC (15 mg/kg, ip) 72 h before injection of a normally lethal dose of DCVC (75 mg/kg, ip); this resulted in 100 % protection against the lethal effect of DCVC. Because DCVC caused twofold decrease in cytosolic and mitochondrial -lyase activity, the possibility that DCVC protection may be caused by decreased bioactivation was examined. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2, 6 mg/kg), a nephrotoxicant with no effect on -lyase activity, was administered 96 h before a lethal dose of DCVC. This also resulted in 100 % protection from the lethal effect of DCVC. In both studies total glutathione was unchanged at any time after the lethal dose of DCVC was admin-istered, obviating the role of glutathione in protection. In both cases the augmented and sustained tissue repair induced by prim-ing dose and documented by 3H-thymidine pulse labeling and immunocytochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen re-sulted in 100 % survival in spite of the extensive renal injury. These findings suggest that stimulation of renal tubular repair by the priming dose, through augmented cell division, and the resistance of new cells to mechanisms of progression of injury, underlies auto- and heteroprotection against DCVC. The molecular mech-anisms may have potential application in pharmacotherapeutic intervention for treatment of acute renal failure.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Binding of Protoporphyrin IX and Metal Derivatives to the Active Site of Wild-Type Mouse Ferrochelatase at Low Porphyrin-to-Protein Ratios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biotecnologia, Departamento de Qui´mica, Faculdade de Cie^ncias e Tecnologia, UniVersidade NoVa de Lisboa, 2829

Shelnutt, John A.

393

Systematic examination of the impact of pre-stimulus alpha- mu and gamma band oscillations on perception : correlative and causal manipulation in mouse and human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The over-arching hypothesis that drives my work is that neural dynamics, fluctuating on millisecond to second time scales, powerfully impact perception. In this thesis, I employ correlative electrophysiological recording ...

Pritchett, Dominique L. (Dominique Leon)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effect of long-term culturing on the potential of mouse embryonic stem cells for in vitro and in vivo development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed comparative analysis of in vitro and in vivo pluripotency for two clones of ES-D3 cells subjected to different number of passages after the beginning of subcloning. Both clones of ES cells produced characteristically shaped colonies and embryoid bodies during culturing in suspension. High activity of alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated in ES cells by cytochemical staining. The proportion of aneuploid ES cells increased with the increase in the number of passages, as shown by karyotyping. Experiments on producing chimeric mice using ES cells have shown that clone D3W (passage 17) exceeds clone D3M (passage 42) both in terms of chimera proportion among the offspring and in terms of the extent of coat chimerism (proportion of agouti coat color (ES component) in the coat of chimeras). 26 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Mitalipov, Sh.M.; Mitalipova, M.M.; Ivanov, V.I.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A lentiviral system for RNAi transgenesis and the Ena/VASP triple-knockout defines neuronal and non-neuronal functions in mouse development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mammalian development extends and exploits signaling pathways that function exclusively in axon guidance in lower organisms. This emerging paradigm employs complex expression patterns of expanded protein families to achieve ...

Rubinson, Douglas A. (Douglas Adam), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Motor Neuron-Specific Restoration of SMN in Two SMA Mouse Models: Insights into the Role of Motor Neurons in Spinal Muscular Atrophy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The intronic splicing silencer (N1 ISS-N1, discovered by Singh et al. 2006) is the main checkpoint of SMN2 exon 7 splicing regulation. Once ISS-N1 is deleted exon 7 is included. Anti-N1 treatment was capable of elevating SMN levels in type I SMA patient...

Paez, Ximena

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

Distinct graft-versus-leukemic stem cell effects of early or delayed donor leukocyte infusions in a mouse chronic myeloid leukemia model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WR, et al. Donor leukocyte infusions in 140 patients withdo- nor leukocyte infusions as treatment for relapsedwith donor lymphocyte infusions to achieve rapid mo- lecular

Lu, Yi-Fen; Gavrilescu, L Cristina; Betancur, Monica; Lazarides, Katherine; Klingemann, Hans; Van Etten, Richard A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Increased hepatic oxidative metabolism distinguishes the action of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta from Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the ob/ob mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coverage of the metabolome, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) were used to examine metabolites from tissue extracts...

Roberts, Lee D; Hassall, David G; Winegar, Deborah A; Haselden, John N; Nicholls, Andrew W; Griffin, Julian L

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

399

Effects of chronic, low-intensity gamma irradiation on the gonadotropic response of the ovaries and testes of the albino mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i senor icsl Cells, of Ter=s osrtiel fuli' illr, ent c f tho recuire e ct for tne oe ree of i ". ST::R GF SCI-~;CE :~u ust, , l?tO J sjcr Subject: I'olo y (ioolo y) FFFECTS OF CHRONIC, LOvk-INTENSITY Ghhhh& IRRaDI&TION ON THE, GONADOTROPIC... made re. . ardin =" th? effect of irradi?tion on endocrin . secret' on by the testes. abbott (195') reoorted that ardro?enic caoacity was rot reduced as juc:, ed by the wei;hts of accessory sex or-ans in the course of twerty-five weeks after...

Hunter, Jerry Don

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Detection and quantitation of benzo(a)pyrene-derived DNA adducts in mouse liver by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry: comparison with P-32-postlabeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) is a proven animal carcinogen that is potentially carcinogenic to humans. B( a)P is an ubiquitous environmental pollutant and is also present in tobacco smoke, coal tar, automobile exhaust emissions, and charred food. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method using electrospray ionization and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) has been developed for the detection of 10-(deoxyguanosin-N{sub 2}-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10- tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene (B(a)PDE-N{sub 2}dG) adducts formed in DNA following the metabolic activation of B(a)P to benzo(a) pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (B(a)PDE).

Singh, R.; Gaskell, M.; Le Pla, R.C.; Kaur, B.; Azim-Araghi, A.; Roach, J.; Koukouves, G.; Souliotis, V.L.; Kyrtopoulos, S.A.; Farmer, P.B. [University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom)

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Selective HDAC 1/2 Inhibitor Modulates Chromatin and Gene Expression in Brain and Alters Mouse Behavior in Two Mood-Related Tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Psychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression, are projected to lead global disease burden within the next decade. Pharmacotherapy, the primary – albeit often ineffective – treatment ...

Schroeder, Frederick A.

402

Isolation and sequence of a cDNA clone for human tyrosinase that maps at the mouse c-albino locus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Screening of a lambdagt11 human melanocyte cDNA library with antibodies against hamster tyrosinase resulted in the isolation of 16 clones. The cDNA inserts from 13 of the 16 clones cross-hybridized with each other, indicating that they were form related mRNA species. One of the cDNA clones, Pmel34, detected one mRNA species with an approximate length of 2.4 kilobases that was expressed preferentially in normal and malignant melanocytes but not in other cell types. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed that the putative human tyrosinase is composed of 548 amino acids with a molecular weight of 62,610. The deduced protein contains glycosylation sites and histidine-rich sites that could be used for copper binding. Southern blot analysis of DNA derived from newborn mice carrying lethal albino deletion mutations revealed that Pmel34 maps near or at the c-albino locus, the position of the structural gene for tyrosinase.

Kwon, B.S.; Haq, A.K.; Pomerantz, S.H.; Halaban, R.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Selective cytotoxicity of 4-S-cysteaminylphenol on follicular melanocytes of the black mouse: rational basis for its application to melanoma chemotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously shown that 4-S-cysteaminylphenol (4-S-CAP) causes a significant inhibition of in vivo melanoma growth. To clarify the mechanism of the in vivo antimelanoma effect, this study evaluated the cellular and subcellular changes of follicular melanocytes after s.c. administration of 4-S-CAP on the lumbar areas of black and albino mice. 4-S-CAP produced a prompt, selective swelling and lysis of melanocytes, resulting eventually in the necrosis of melanocytes and the depigmentation of black hair follicles. None of the degenerative changes were seen in melanocytes and keratinocytes of control albino follicles. Comparison of melanocytes in black and albino follicles revealed that melanin synthesis is highly active in the melanocytes of black follicles while melanin and tyrosinase synthesis is not seen in the melanocytes of albino follicles. The findings indicate that the selective melanocytotoxicity of 4-S-CAP is manifested by lysis and necrosis of cells which are actively engaged in melanin synthesis. 4-S-CAP appears to provide a new modality for rational chemotherapy of malignant melanoma.

Ito, Y.; Jimbow, K.

1987-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Cell-to-cell variability and culture conditions during self-renewal reversibly affect subsequent differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell-to-cell variability in clonal populations is reflected in a distribution of mRNA and protein levels among individual cells, including those of key transcription factors governing embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency ...

Tan, Jit Hin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A tale of two drug metabolizing enzymes : the CYP1A1-GFP transgenic mouse and the promiscuous nature of UGTs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JA. Association of the dioxin receptor with the M r 90,000of polychlorinated dibenzo-p- dioxins, dibenzofurans, andDR, Fisher R. Sources of dioxins in the United Kingdom: the

Operańa, Theresa Necesito

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Therapeutic versus neuroinflammatory effects of passive immunization is dependent on Abeta/amyloid burden in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlation of Ab with TGFb and SDF-1. Immunized males showlevels of MCP-1, IL-10, SDF-1, and RANTES in PBS-treatedT, Gawaz M: Decreased CXCL12 (SDF-1) plasma levels in early

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Whole mouse blood microRNA as biomarkers for exposure to c-rays and THOMAS TEMPLIN, SALLY A. AMUNDSON, DAVID J. BRENNER, &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, SALLY A. AMUNDSON, DAVID J. BRENNER, & LUBOMIR B. SMILENOV Center for Radiological Research, Columbia and the physiological effects of ionising radiation. Correspondence: Dr Lubomir B. Smilenov, PhD, Assistant Professor

Brenner, David Jonathan

408
409

Effects of Chronic Nicotine Exposure and Lack of High Affinity Nicotinic Receptors on Cortico-Hippocampal Areas in the Aging Mouse Brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance. Epidemiology studies show that smoking is negatively correlated with the incidence of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Postmortem research and neuroimaging studies show that loss of nicotinic binding sites in the brain is the major...

Huang, Pei-San

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

AAV-mediated delivery of the transcription factor XBP1s into the striatum reduces mutant Huntingtin aggregation in a mouse model of Huntington's disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contribution of ER stress to HD has not been directly addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of XBP1s using AAVs decreases Huntingtin aggregation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a new in vivo model of HD based on the expression of a large fragment of mHtt-RFP. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutations that expand a polyglutamine region in the amino-terminal domain of Huntingtin (Htt), leading to the accumulation of intracellular inclusions and progressive neurodegeneration. Recent reports indicate the engagement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in human HD post mortem samples and animal models of the disease. Adaptation to ER stress is mediated by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an integrated signal transduction pathway that attenuates protein folding stress by controlling the expression of distinct transcription factors including X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Here we targeted the expression of XBP1 on a novel viral-based model of HD. We delivered an active form of XBP1 locally into the striatum of adult mice using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs) and co-expressed this factor with a large fragment of mutant Htt as a fusion protein with RFP (Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP) to directly visualize the accumulation of Htt inclusions in the brain. Using this approach, we observed a significant reduction in the accumulation of Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP intracellular inclusion when XBP1 was co-expressed in the striatum. These results contrast with recent findings indicating a protective effect of XBP1 deficiency in neurodegeneration using knockout mice, and suggest a potential use of gene therapy strategies to manipulate the UPR in the context of HD.

Zuleta, Amparo [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile) [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vidal, Rene L. [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile) [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile); Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey [Department of Molecular Biology, Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)] [Department of Molecular Biology, Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Hetz, Claudio, E-mail: chetz@med.uchile.cl [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile) [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, 651 Huntington Av., Boston, MA 02446 (United States); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile)

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Binding of Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein to Mouse CD36 Is Mediated in Part by Oxidized Phospholipids That Are Associated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friedman¶ , Edward A. Dennis, Joseph L. Witztum, Daniel Steinberg, and Oswald Quehenberger** From ( 50%) both by the reconstituted apoB from OxLDL and by microemulsions prepared from OxLDL lipids and by demonstrating reciprocal inhibition, i.e. apoB from OxLDL inhibited the binding of the OxLDL lipids and vice

Dennis, Edward A.

412

Submitted on February 16, 2007. Accepted on May 8, 2007. Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, IB, Departamento de Zoologia. Ilha do Fundo, 21941-590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: POLYCHAETA) FROM ROCAS ATOLL, NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL 1 (With 3 figures) RĂ?MULO BARROSO 2, 3 PAULO CESAR PAIVA 3, 1995). This paper describes the amphinomids species #12;358 R.BARROSO & P.C.PAIVA Arq. Mus. Nac., Rio

Paiva, Paulo Cesar de

413

Beginners French Fall 2011 Professor: Vronique Sauron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pronoms COD Les pronons COI Pourquoi ? Parce que... Leçon 4 : Aller au musée Situer un lieu sur un plan is available in the Academic Conduct Code. Students are advised that the penalty against students on a Boston U

Guenther, Frank

414

Charte informatique Mnhn_Ed11.doc Page 1/7 Charte d'utilisation des ressources informatiques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle La présente charte est avant tout un code de bonne conduite. Elle, départements et directions ainsi que leurs périphériques ; l'ensemble du parc logiciel, des bases de données

415

2005 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved. Evolution, 59(7), 2005, pp. 16001603  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lund, Sweden 6E-mail: jan-ake.nilsson@zooekol.lu.se Abstract. Sedentary passerine birds living- entary passerine birds living in temperate and boreal regions. During this period, energy requirements is produced by shivering, primarily in the flight mus- cles. In situations where an increased sustained work

Hohtola, Esa

416

CoViCAD: Comprehensive Visualization of Coronary Artery Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the patient suffers a my- ocardial infarction, also known as heart attack. Part of the heart mus- cle tissue viability information in a detailed anatomical context. We combine multiple MRI scans (whole heart anatomical data, late enhancement data) and multiple segmentations (polygonal heart model, late enhancement

417

Study of the digital camera acquisition process and statistical modeling of the sensor raw data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of the digital camera acquisition process and statistical modeling of the sensor raw data C. In the present report we present a detailed analysis of the digital image acquisition process which allows us. Aguerrebere, J. Delon, Y. Gousseau, P. Mus´e 1 Introduction The accurate modeling of the acquisition process

418

[Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, February 1, 1993--November 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research focuses on two repair deficient mutations in Drosophila melanogaster, namely mei-9, mei-41. In addition, the authors propose to extend this study to include the mus-312 mutation. They expect these studies to provide substantial insights into both the molecular mechanisms of DNA repair in Drosophila and the role these genes play in normal biological processes.

Hawley, R.S.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

This article was downloaded by: [MNHN Musum National D'Histoire Naturelle], [Salvador Bailon] On: 05 March 2014, At: 00:32  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article was downloaded by: [MNHN Muséum National D'Histoire Naturelle], [Salvador Bailon] On) Salvador Bailon a , Renaud Boistel b , Pere Bover c d & Josep Antoni Alcover c d a UMR 7209--7194 du CNRS: Salvador Bailon , Renaud Boistel , Pere Bover & Josep Antoni Alcover (2014) Maioricalacerta rafelinensis

420

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

populations of mus- sels. Dam construction, siltation, water pollution, min- ing and industrial wastes important commer- cial value in the cultured pearl and jewelry industry. Our pearly mussels are of unique- sels are underway. However, water pollution continues to threaten streams crucial to their survival

Liskiewicz, Maciej

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cellular/Molecular A Chimera Analysis of Prestin Knock-Out Mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cellular/Molecular A Chimera Analysis of Prestin Knock-Out Mice Mary Ann Cheatham,1 Sharon Low, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, and 3MusWorks, Falls Church, Virginia 22042 A chimera. In this report, we describe a chimera analysis of prestin function. A chimera is a genetic composite. It contains

Dallos, Peter

422

MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM Contributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pub. 5:1-35). and revision by Schwartz and Henderson (1988. Milwaukee Publ. Mus. Contr. BioI. Geol. 74. This is a supplement to West Indiall Amphibians and Reptiles: A Chl'r:k-list by Schwartz and Henderson that section is presented. As in Schwartz and Henderson. original locality records in miles are not converted

Hedges, Blair

423

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biochemical indices of quality. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Engineering studies on freezing and cold storage systems . · · . . . . . . . · . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Storage of fish in refrigerated sea water . . . 5 Time-temperature tolerance of frozen seafoods 5 to meet the needs of industry. Funda- ment al research has been continued in the field of fish - mus cle

424

Towards a Conceptual Model of a Bio-Robotic AUV: Pectoral Fin Hydrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these technological problems whereas the FY03 ONR MURI program (Integrated Artificial Mus- cle, High-Lift Bio of marine mammals systems (MMS), specifically dolphins. The key technological advances required in order to reach this goal are: 1) An engineered sonar system that matches the perfor- mance of MMS. 2) An AUV

Mittal, Rajat

425

A ten-year decrease in plant species richness on a neotropical inselberg:1 detrimental effects of global warming?2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of global warming?2 3 EMILE FONTY*, CORINNE SARTHOU, DENIS LARPIN§ and JEAN-FRAN�OIS4 PONGE*1 5 6 *Muséum 15 Keywords: aridity, biodiversity loss, global warming, low forest, plant communities, tropical16 probable cause of the observed species disappearance is global warming, which severely28 affected northern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

426

Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Binghamton University BS in Computer Engineering-Four-Year Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5/12/2011 Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Binghamton University BS-AS in engineering science 2009 Fall Spring BU Course No. Course Name Transfer Course BU Course No. Course Name Project II Technical Elective I Technical Elective II General Ed Elective (A) Thea, Art, Mus, Cinema

Suzuki, Masatsugu

427

State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Applied Science BS in Industrial and Systems Engineering-Four-Year Program -Application curriculum code: 1367 BROOME COMMUNITY COLLEGE--AS in engineering science 2009 Fall Spring BU Course No. Course Name transfer Gen Ed Elective (A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema **** *************************************************Year

Suzuki, Masatsugu

428

Transfer Information Sheet for Bergen Community College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

223 Business Law I BLS 111 3 ART, CIN, DAN. MUS, THR, LIT, WRT 204 or 205 Art, Cinema, DanceEd "H" or GenEd "C" 6 Bio, CHM, ESC or PHY Lab Science GenEd "L" 4 ECO 202 Macroeconomics ECON 162 3 or PHY Science elective Science elective 4 ECO 201 Microeconomics ECON 160 3 Total transfer credits 62

Suzuki, Masatsugu

429

State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Ed Elective (A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema General Ed Elective (N) Any social science *Electrical and Applied Science BS in Computer Engineering-Four-Year Program Rockland Community College Elective (H) ENG/THEA/ART/PHIL/CINEMA EECE 382 EECE Seminar II Year 4 Fall Spring BU Course # Course Name

Suzuki, Masatsugu

430

State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

203 Professional Elec II General Ed Elec A) Mus/Art/Thea/Cinema General Ed Elec (N) Any social science and Applied Science BS in Electrical Engineering-Four-Year Program Rockland Community College Communication Systems EECE 382 EECE Seminar II General Ed Elective (H) ENG/THEA/ART/PHIL/CINEMA Year 4 Fall

Suzuki, Masatsugu

431

State University of New York at Binghamton Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Elective General Ed Elective (N) Any Social Science General Ed Elective (A) Thea, Art, Mus, Cinema and Applied Science BS in Bioengineering-Four-Year Program Fall 2011 Application curriculum code: 1532 BROOME COMMUNITY COLLEGE-AS in engineering science Fall Spring Course No. Course Name Transfer Course Course No

Suzuki, Masatsugu

432

alport syndrome concerted: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theory and Musicianship II MUS 288 202 Music Theory and Musicianship II 231 Aalberts, Daniel P. First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21...

433

A COMPLETE SYSTEM FOR POLYPS FLAGGING IN VIRTUAL COLONOSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both the information in the candidate polyp location and its immediate surrounding area. The proposed by Kim et. al [5], where about 3000 patients went through OC Marcelo Fiori and Pablo Mus, USA. and another 3000 through VC, seven perforations occurred in the OC while none were recorded

434

NATURE METHODS | VOL.2 NO.11 | NOVEMBER 2005 | 805 RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An aneuploid mouse strain carrying human chromosome 21 with Down syndrome phenotypes Down syndrome (DS

Cai, Long

435

Large-area, low-noise, high-speed, photodiode-based fluorescence detectors with fast overdrive recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two large-area, low-noise, high-speed fluorescence detectors have been built. One detector consists of a photodiode with an area of 28 mmx28 mm and a low-noise transimpedance amplifier. This detector has a input light-equivalent spectral noise density of less than 3 pW/{radical}(Hz), can recover from a large scattered light pulse within 10 {mu}s, and has a bandwidth of at least 900 kHz. The second detector consists of a 16-mm-diam avalanche photodiode and a low-noise transimpedance amplifier. This detector has an input light-equivalent spectral noise density of 0.08 pW/{radical}(Hz), also can recover from a large scattered light pulse within 10 {mu}s, and has a bandwidth of 1 MHz.

Bickman, S.; DeMille, D. [Physics Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, SPL 23, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Observation of high coherence in Josephson junction qubits measured in a three-dimensional circuit QED architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting quantum circuits based on Josephson junctions have made rapid progress in demonstrating quantum behavior and scalability. However, the future prospects ultimately depend upon the intrinsic coherence of Josephson junctions, and whether superconducting qubits can be adequately isolated from their environment. We introduce a new architecture for superconducting quantum circuits employing a three dimensional resonator that suppresses qubit decoherence while maintaining sufficient coupling to the control signal. With the new architecture, we demonstrate that Josephson junction qubits are highly coherent, with $T_2 \\sim 10 \\mu$s to $20 \\mu$s without the use of spin echo, and highly stable, showing no evidence for $1/f$ critical current noise. These results suggest that the overall quality of Josephson junctions in these qubits will allow error rates of a few $10^{-4}$, approaching the error correction threshold.

Hanhee Paik; D. I. Schuster; Lev S. Bishop; G. Kirchmair; G. Catelani; A. P. Sears; B. R. Johnson; M. J. Reagor; L. Frunzio; L. Glazman; S. M. Girvin; M. H. Devoret; R. J. Schoelkopf

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

437

UNIVERSIT DE TOURS UFR de Droit, d'conomie et des Sciences Sociales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAROC (1912-1956) : Fès-nouvelle THESE DE DOCTORAT EN HISTOIRE Présentée par Charlotte Jelidi, née Mus Maroc, celles de la Société des Architectes diplômés par le Gouvernement, celles de l'Institut français (1924-1930). Sources : Archives municipales de Fès. Beaufils Louis Formé à l'ENSBA. Arrivé au Maroc

Boyer, Edmond

438

Publication trimestrielle N 228 -DCEMBRE 2006 L'Arganier : arbre du Maroc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

49 Publication trimestrielle N° 228 - D�CEMBRE 2006 L'Arganier : arbre du Maroc De la récolte du collecte. Musée national des Arts et Traditions populaires L'Arganier : arbre du Maroc De la récolte du plus septentrional. Espèce sylvestre endémique du Maroc, sa présence remonterait à l'ère tertiaire, où

439

Preliminary Langmuir probe results on the CTX gun experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results obtained with a double Langmuir probe in the Compact Toroid experiment facility confirm the existence of a gun plasma of n approx. 5 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ and T approx. 10 eV lasting for approx. 250 to 400 ..mu..s, which is consistent with interferometry and Thomson scattering data. The probe current characteristics as a function of voltage suggest non-Maxwellian features of the particles distribution functions.

Tuszewski, M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

Anders, Andre

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Laser synchronized high-speed shutter for spectroscopic application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fast mechanical shutter, based on rotating chopper wheels, has been designed and implemented to shutter the entrance slit of a spectrograph. This device enables an exposure time of 9 .mu.s to be achieved for a 0.8 mm wide spectrograph entrance slit, achieves 100% transmission in the open state, and an essentially infinite extinction ratio. The device further incorporates chopper wheel position sensing electronics to permit the synchronous triggering of a laser source.

Miles, Paul C. (Tracy, CA); Porter, Eldon L. (Tracy, CA); Prast, Thomas L. (Livermore, CA); Sunnarborg, Duane A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Campus n 105 Ses costumes hors d'ge, ses cheveux en ba-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'aventures. Passionné par les In- diens et les trappeurs, il joue les coureurs des bois autour de la plaine de silhouette d'Eugène Pittard. Le personnage, il est vrai, est diffi- cile à croquer. Fondateur du Musée d archéologiques d'importance, tandis qu'il a été, au milieu des années 1920, l'un des premiers chercheurs à

Genève, Université de

443

Removal of a liquid paraffin film from a water surface by short pulses from a CO{sub 2} laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of removal of a liquid paraffin film from a water surface irradiated by 40 - 270-{mu}s pulses from a CO{sub 2} laser is studied experimentally and theoretically. It is found for the first time that the mass of removed paraffin can exceed that of paraffin located in the region irradiated by the laser pulse. A theoretical model is proposed which explains the results obtained. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Antonova, L I; Drobyazko, S V; Evdokimov, I A; Krasyukov, A G; Likhanskii, V V; Loboiko, A I; Senatorov, Yu M [State Research Center of Russian Federation 'Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research', Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Research needs to address ASR challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 8 For all its benefits, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) does have some potential challenges that warrant further research and planning, according to scientists and others involved in ASR. In 2005, the National Research... Council (NRC) convened a Committee on Sustainable Underground Storage of Recoverable Water to evaluate past experiences with ASR, or what the committee called managed underground storage (MUS) of recoverable water. Another committee goal...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Solid state switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Dreifuerst, Gary R. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Scaling results and future plans for the Los Alamos FRX-C experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The particle containment time in FRX-C is measured to be 140 +- 30 ..mu..s. This corresponds to R/sup 2/ scaling when compared with earlier FRX-B results and agrees with predictions based on lower-hybrid cross-field diffusion. Further improvement in confinement may be possible by translating a field-reversed configuration (FRC) in such a way as to increase x/sub s/.

Siemon, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

On Target May 2013 | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

System Gets Clear, 3D Brain Scans of Moving Mice Mouse Medicine: System Gets Clear, 3D Brain Scans of Moving Mice Three markers attached to the head of a mouse enable the...

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - autotransplanted rabbit submandibular Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or I:200 mouse anti-eIF- 2a), they were washed in TTBS... (donkey anti-rabbit or sheep anti-mouse IgG in 4% donkey or sheep serum, respectively). Immunore active... minutes...

449

Perception-Action Loop in the Experience of Virtual Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system translates this optical flow vector into the direction and speed of the rotation (yaw)YAW Vertical (Forward-Backward) Mouse Movement Turning up-down PITCH Z X Table 6.2: Mouse mapping in the control system

Kim, Seung Wook

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

annual radiological environmental: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

irradiations of the ears. Bystander effects in the hairless mouse ear 2.4 164 Lubomir Smilenov CRR Biol. Mouse irradiation using IND 115 ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM INFORMATION 1997 BNL...

451

archaeal dna-sliding clamp: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

irradiations of the ears. Bystander effects in the hairless mouse ear 2.4 164 Lubomir Smilenov CRR Biol. Mouse irradiation using IND 418 Weitere Kolloquiumstermine sind im WWW...

452

Sphingosine-1-phosphate inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell migration by activating G??? and RhoA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and transferred to a PVDF membrane. The membrane was then stained with mouse anti- RhoA (Cytoskeleton, Denver, CO) and then horseradish peroxidase-conjugated rabbit anti mouse (Dako Cytomation, Carpinteria, CA). Detection reagents (Amersham Resources...

Anthis, Nicholas J

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

Collisional lasing on a self-terminating transition 2{sup 1}P{sup o}{sub 1} - 2{sup 1}S{sub 0} in helium atom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lasing on a self-terminating transition 2{sup 1}P{sup o}{sub 1} - 2{sup 1}S{sub 0} ({lambda} = 2.058 {mu}m) in helium atom is studied for a single- and double-pulse operation regimes under electron beam pumping in pure helium and its mixtures with H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, and N{sub 2}O. In pure helium, the maximal pulse duration is {approx}50 ns, which agrees with the calculated value. Recovery of lasing in the second pulse is observed at a time delay between the pulses of longer than 1.25 {mu}s. In adding CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O, the relaxation rate for population of the metastable state He(2{sup 1}S{sub 0}) increases, which makes the delay, needed for recovering lasing, shorter up to pulse merging in the case of H{sub 2}O. At the exciting pulse base-level duration of 1.2 {mu}s, in mixtures of helium with NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O, laser pulses with a duration of {approx}0.8 {mu}s are observed, which testifies that collisional quasi-cw lasing occurs. Mechanisms of collisional lasing are discussed.

Bel'skaya, E V; Bokhan, P A; Zakrevskii, D E; Lavrukhin, M A [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

rf system for the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FEL electron linac consists of three buncher cavities: two accelerator cavities and a deflection cavity, each with its own phase-coherent rf source. All sources will be pulsed for 100 ..mu..s at a 1-pps rate. The phase and amplitude stability requirements are +-1/2/sup 0/, and +-1/2%. There are two subharmonic bunchers, each requiring 5 kW at 108.33 MHz. All remaining cavities operate at 1300 MHz. The fundamental buncher requires 5 kW, whereas each of the accelerating cavities requires at least 3 MW. The deflection cavity requires up to 100 kW, which is coupled from one of the accelerator cavity rf sources. Prominent features of the rf system are the phase and amplitude control circuits and the multimegawatt klystron amplifiers. Three L3707 klystrons were obtained from the AMRAD radar site at White Sands, which was decommissioned in the early 1970s. The tubes originally were designed to produce 10-MW, 10-..mu..s pulses. Each tube has delivered over 3.6-MW, 100-..mu..s pulses in the FEL system.

Friedrichs, C.C.; Tallerico, P.J.; Hoffert, W.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Experimental Investigation of Axial and Beam-Riding Propulsive Physics with TEA CO{sub 2} laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A twin Lumonics K922M pulsed TEA CO{sub 2} laser system (pulse duration of approximately 100 ns FWHM spike, with optional 1 {mu}s tail, depending upon laser gas mix) was employed to experimentally measure both axial thrust and beam-riding behavior of Type no. 200 lightcraft engines, using a ballistic pendulum and Angular Impulse Measurement Device (AIMD, respectively. Beam-riding forces and moments were examined along with engine thrust-vectoring behavior, as a function of: a) laser beam lateral offset from the vehicle axis of symmetry; b) laser pulse energy ({approx}12 to 40 joules); c) pulse duration (100 ns, and 1 {mu}s); and d) engine size (97.7 mm to 161.2 mm). Maximum lateral momentum coupling coefficients (C{sub M}) of 75 N-s/MJ were achieved with the K922M laser whereas previous PLVTS laser (420 J, 18 {mu}s duration) results reached only 15 N-s/MJ--an improvement of 5x. Maximum axial C{sub M} performance with the K922M reached 225 N-s/MJ, or about {approx}3x larger than the lateral C{sub M} values. These axial C{sub M} results are sharply higher than the 120 N/MW previously reported for long pulse (e.g., 10-18 {mu}s)CO{sub 2} electric discharge lasers.

Kenoyer, D. A.; Salvador, I.; Myrabo, L. N.; Notaro, S. N.; Bragulla, P. W. [Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (United States)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

456

A dosimetric comparative study: Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of nasal cavity carcinomas. The treatment of 10 patients, who had completed IMRT treatment for resected tumors of the nasal cavity, was replanned with the Philips Pinnacle{sup 3} Version 9 treatment-planning system. The IMRT plans used a 9-beam technique whereas the VMAT (known as SmartArc) plans used a 3-arc technique. Both types of plans were optimized using Philips Pinnacle{sup 3} Direct Machine Parameter Optimization algorithm. IMRT and VMAT plans' quality was compared by evaluating the maximum, minimum, and mean doses to the target volumes and organs at risk, monitor units (MUs), and the treatment delivery time. Our results indicate that VMAT is capable of greatly reducing treatment delivery time and MUs compared with IMRT. The reduction of treatment delivery time and MUs can decrease the effects of intrafractional uncertainties that can occur because of patient movement during treatment delivery. VMAT's plans further reduce doses to critical structures that are in close proximity to the target volume.

Nguyen, Kham, E-mail: khamdiep@gmail.com [School of Health Professions, Medical Dosimetry Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, School of Health Professions—Unit 2, Houston, TX (United States); Cummings, David; Lanza, Vincent C.; Morris, Kathleen; Wang, Congjun; Sutton, Jordan; Garcia, John [School of Health Professions, Medical Dosimetry Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, School of Health Professions—Unit 2, Houston, TX (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

G54SIM Lab 02 Tutorial: Laptop Simulation Build a simulation model of a laptop operation. When the laptop is on and the user is working, i.e. is pressing the keyboard keys and moving the mouse, the laptop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the battery usage. To wake the laptop up you need to press the power button. In any of the three states On {EnergyConsumption} [EnergyConsumption=: Laptop.isStateActive(On)?5 : Laptop.isStateActive(ScreenOff)?31 G54SIM Lab 02 Tutorial: Laptop Simulation Task Build a simulation model of a laptop operation

Aickelin, Uwe

458

Nonylphenol-mediated CYP induction is PXR-dependent: The use of humanized mice and human hepatocytes suggests that hPXR is less sensitive than mouse PXR to nonylphenol treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonylphenol (NP), a by-product of alkylphenol ethoxylates, is a pervasive surfactant that activates the xenosensing nuclear receptor, the pregnane X-receptor (PXR) in transactivation assays in vitro. We are interested in determining if NP activates PXR in vivo, determining if hPXR and mPXR act similarly, and investigating the role of PXR in protecting individuals from NP. Wild-type (WT), PXR-null, and humanized PXR (hPXR) mice were treated with NP at 0, 50 or 75 mg/kg/day for one week, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, liver histopathology, and serum NP concentrations were examined. WT mice treated with NP showed induction of Cyp2b, and male-specific induction of Cyp2c and Cyp3a. CYPs were not induced in PXR-null mice, demonstrating that PXR is necessary for NP-mediated CYP induction. CAR-mediated CYP induction was not observed in the PXR-null mice despite previous data demonstrating that NP is also a CAR activator. hPXR mice only showed moderate Cyp induction, suggesting that hPXR is not as sensitive to NP as mPXR in vivo. NP-mediated Cyp3a induction from three human hepatocyte donors was not significant, confirming that hPXR is not very sensitive to NP-mediated CYP induction. Lastly, mice with PXR (mPXR and hPXR) showed lower NP serum concentrations than PXR-null mice treated with NP suggesting that PXR plays a role in decreasing liver toxicity by basally regulating phase I-III detoxification enzymes that promote the metabolism and elimination of NP. In summary, PXR is required for NP-mediated CYP-induction, mPXR mediates greater CYP induction than hPXR in vivo, and the presence of PXR, especially mPXR, is associated with altered histopathology and increased clearance of NP.

Mota, Linda C. [Clemson University, Environmental Toxicology, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Barfield, Christina [Clemson University, Biological Sciences, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Hernandez, Juan P. [University of Texas at El Paso, Biological Sciences, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Baldwin, William S., E-mail: baldwin@clemson.edu [Clemson University, Environmental Toxicology, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Clemson University, Biological Sciences, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Gastric colonisation with a restricted commensal microbiota replicates the promotion of neoplastic lesions by diverse intestinal microbiota in the Helicobacter pylori INS-GAS mouse model of gastric carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objectives: Gastric colonisation with intestinal flora (IF) has been shown to promote Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-associated gastric cancer. However, it is unknown if the mechanism involves colonisation with specific or diverse ...

Lertpiriyapong, Kvin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Cell Prolif. 2007, 40, 106124 2007 The Authors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Madison 53706. Tel.: +608 265 5182; E-mail: Alexander@oncology.wisc.edu #12;Simulating mouse mammary gland

Beebe, David J.

462

Modeling Human Neural Development Using Pluripotent Stem Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jaenisch R. Treatment of sickle cell anemia mouse model withharboring the mutation for sickle cell disease 20 . Despite

Patterson, Michaela Cyr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Biometric Authentication via Keystroke Sound Joseph Roth Xiaoming Liu Arun Ross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mouse [15]. Although it is nonin- trusive, keystroke dynamics utilizes key-logging to record typed texts

464

Biometric Authentication via Keystroke Sound Joseph Roth Xiaoming Liu Arun Ross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mouse [16]. Although being non- intrusive, keystroke dynamics utilizes key-logging to record all typed

Ross, Arun Abraham

465

Michael DiMaio Immunohistochemical Algorithm for Differentiating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-derived IL-1 as Driver of Pathology in a Mouse Model of Gout 2012 Pathology Research Retreat Awardees

Bogyo, Matthew

466

XM-17330/27330 STANDARD SAMPLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ac- cording to the situation. Click: To press and release the left mouse button. Right-click: To press and release the right mouse button. Double-click: To press and release the left mouse button twice intensity measurement/FIT mode measurement...................... 41 4.2 Measurement Using Calibration Curve

Skemer, Philip

467

A High-Resolution Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genetic Map  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A High-Resolution Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genetic Map of the Mouse Genome Sagiv Shifman1 humans. Using more than 10,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms evenly spaced across the mouse genome, we nucleotide polymorphism genetic map of the mouse genome. PLoS Biol 4(12): e395. DOI: 10.1371/journal

Nachman, Michael

468

Cosmic ray neutron background reduction using localized coincidence veto neutron counting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to both the apparatus and method for increasing the sensitivity of measuring the amount of radioactive material in waste by reducing the interference caused by cosmic ray generated neutrons. The apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of neutron detectors, each of the detectors including means for generating a pulse in response to the detection of a neutron; and (b) means, coupled to each of the neutrons detectors, for counting only some of the pulses from each of the detectors, whether cosmic ray or fission generated. The means for counting includes a means that, after counting one of the pulses, vetos the counting of additional pulses for a prescribed period of time. The prescribed period of time is between 50 and 200 .mu.s. In the preferred embodiment the prescribed period of time is 128 .mu.s. The veto means can be an electronic circuit which includes a leading edge pulse generator which passes a pulse but blocks any subsequent pulse for a period of between 50 and 200 .mu.s. Alternately, the veto means is a software program which includes means for tagging each of the pulses from each of the detectors for both time and position, means for counting one of the pulses from a particular position, and means for rejecting those of the pulses which originate from the particular position and in a time interval on the order of the neutron die-away time in polyethylene or other shield material. The neutron detectors are grouped in pods, preferably at least 10. The apparatus also includes means for vetoing the counting of coincidence pulses from all of the detectors included in each of the pods which are adjacent to the pod which includes the detector which produced the pulse which was counted.

Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Bourret, Steven C. (Los Alamos, NM); Krick, Merlyn S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Two-color CO{sub 2}/HeNe laser interferometer for C-2 experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A six-channel two-color interferometer has been developed for plasma electron density measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration experiment. A CO{sub 2} laser is utilized as the main probe beams, while copropagating visible HeNe laser beams are mainly sensitive to vibration. Density measurements in C-2 plasmas have shown that this is a reliable turn-key system. The maximum residual phase noise after vibration compensation is less than {+-}5 deg., corresponding to a line integral density of 3x10{sup 18} m{sup -2}. The time resolution for routine operation is 2 {mu}s.

Gornostaeva, O.; Deng, B. H.; Garate, E.; Gota, H.; Kinley, J.; Schroeder, J.; Tuszewski, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Solid state switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

471

Single-photoelectron noise reduction in scintillation detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1994--95 search at SLAC for mulicharged particles used four 21 {times} 21 {times} 130-cm{sup 3} Bicron 408 scintillation counters to detect a signal at the single-photoelectron level. The competing noise requiring minimization was due to a combination of PM tube (8-inch Thorne EMI 9353KA) afterpulsing and ambient radiation-induced scintillator luminescence. A very slow decay (> 30 {mu}s) component was observed and received particular attention. Efforts to reduce the SPE noise included photomultiplier tube base modifications, detector shielding and cooling, signal amplification, and veto procedures.

Marvin, T.P. [Southern Oregon State College, Ashland, OR (United States); The SLAC mQ Collaboration

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Generation of plasma inhomogeneities and their total suppression in a volume self-sustained discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle types of inhomogeneities formed in a volume self-sustained discharge are analyzed. Possible mechanisms and conditions for suppression of their development are considered. An ultimately homogeneous volume self-sustained discharge in CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He mixtures where local plasma inhomogeneities are absent is obtained. At the energy contribution of 170 J/l, the duration of steady discharge burning in the CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He = 1: 2: 3 mixtures at atmospheric pressure is 10 {mu}s.

Khomich, V. Yu.; Yamschikov, V. A., E-mail: yamschikov52@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Electrophysics and Electroenergetics (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

High-Sensitivity Delayed-Coincidence Spectrometer to Search for Short-Lived Nuclear States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-sensitivity four-dimensional triple-coincidence spectrometer with two detectors is developed on the basis of an autocorrelation single-crystal scintillation time 4{\\pi} spectrometer and a semiconductor HPGe detector. The delayed-coincidence spectrometer is designed for searching for isomeric nano- and microsecond states in short-lived nuclei and for their related gamma-rays. Half-lives of short-lived states are measured in the range from 4 ns to 4 {\\mu}s. The sufficient activity of the monoisotopic source for the investigations does not exceed 0.01 {\\mu}Ci.

Morozov, V A; Norseev, Yu V; Sereeter, Z; Zlokazov, V B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Design and test results of a 600-kW tetrode amplifier for the Superconducting Super Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and testing of a pulsed 600-kW tetrode amplifier that will be used to drive a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Three stages of amplification provide a nominal gain of 77 dB and peak output power of 600 kW. The amplifier is operated at a pulse width of 100 {mu}s and a repetition frequency of 10 Hz. This paper presents the rf design and calculated operating conditions for the amplifier. Details of the electrical design are presented, along with test results.

Rees, D.E.; Brittain, D.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Grippe, J.M.; Marrufo, O. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Design and test results of a 600-kW tetrode amplifier for the Superconducting Super Collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and testing of a pulsed 600-kW tetrode amplifier that will be used to drive a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Three stages of amplification provide a nominal gain of 77 dB and peak output power of 600 kW. The amplifier is operated at a pulse width of 100 [mu]s and a repetition frequency of 10 Hz. This paper presents the rf design and calculated operating conditions for the amplifier. Details of the electrical design are presented, along with test results.

Rees, D.E.; Brittain, D.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Grippe, J.M.; Marrufo, O. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A macrofossil analysis of materials recovered from Hovenweep National Monument, Cajon Mesa, Colorado and Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mesa area (where it is V 0 5 IO Km ~Pinyon LJWOODLAND El . . . . Sage :::: GRASSLAND 8 Hopsage SHRUBLAND Q Shadscale SHRUBLAND 58 Blackbrush BRUSHLAND E3 -. . Alluvial '-' BRUSHLAND Figure 2. Cajon Mesa vegetation zones (After Weir, 1976) 12... to th do i nts, Pinus edulis a d ~J i e s ~o teos enaa oth , m jo pla ts i this zone incl d tl s 2 mbel'I, ~nt I la canesce s, p rshi t id t t . G mus tecto m, 1 b t nmar th s sp. , d ~Cheno odi m alb m. This o ts i eludes othe grasses, shrubs, herbs...

Chapman, Donna Ruth

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Solution to the transverse-phase-space time-dependence problem with LAMPF's high-intensity H/sup +/ beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 750 keV H/sup +/ beam at LAMPF has a transverse phase-space time-dependent transient during the first 200 ..mu..s of each 750-..mu..s-long macro-pulse. The time dependence is documented in an earlier report. Further studies indicate that the time dependence is due to space-charge neutralization resulting from secondary emission of electrons produced by collisions of the H/sup +/ and H/sub 2//sup +/ beams on the transport walls. One of several possible solutions has been tested and has proven successful in eliminating the time dependence of the beam entering the linac.

Hurd, J.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Coherence and Decay of Higher Energy Levels of a Superconducting Transmon Qubit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present measurements of coherence and successive decay dynamics of higher energy levels of a superconducting transmon qubit. By applying consecutive $\\pi$-pulses for each sequential transition frequency, we excite the qubit from the ground state up to its fourth excited level and characterize the decay and coherence of each state. We find the decay to proceed mainly sequentially, with relaxation times in excess of 20 $\\mu$s for all transitions. We also provide a direct measurement of the charge dispersion of these levels by analyzing beating patterns in Ramsey fringes. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using higher levels in transmon qubits for encoding quantum information.

Michael J. Peterer; Samuel J. Bader; Xiaoyue Jin; Fei Yan; Archana Kamal; Ted Gudmundsen; Peter J. Leek; Terry P. Orlando; William D. Oliver; Simon Gustavsson

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

479

High Performance of InSe and InSeGraphene Heterostructure Based Wide Spectral Photodetectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigated both the few-layered InSe/metal photodetectors and InSe/graphene heterostructure photodetectors. Both types of the photodetectors show broad spectral range at 400-1000 nm. The few-layered InSe/metal photodetectors have higher photoresponsivity than that of the InSe/graphene heterostructure photodetectors. However, the InSe/graphene heterostructure photodetectors possesses a fast response time down to 100 {\\mu}s, which is about 40 times faster than that of the InSe/metal devices. The design of 2D crystal/graphene heterostructure could be important for high performace optoelectronic devices.

Luo, Wengang; Hu, Pingan; Cai, Kaiming; Feng, Qi; Yan, Faguang; Yan, Tengfei; Zhang, Xinhui; Wang, Kaiyou

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Hi-speed versatile serial crate controller for CAMAC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A serial crate controller, primarily for use in the SLC CAMAC control system, has been designed, and has been in use for about 2 years. The design supports a party line approach, with up to 16 crates on a single twisted pair for data transfers, plus another pair for prompt L response. The bit rate is 5 megabits/s, and complete transaction times of about 10 ..mu..s are achieved for 16-bit data transfers over cables up to 1000 feet long. One of the primary objects of the design was simplicity - there are approximately 60 chips in the two-board unit.

Horelick, D.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Nov Zland Compiled 24.6.2014 11:35:35 by Document Globe 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: www.otago.ac.nz participující fakulty: FSV, FF, PF, PF jazyková zkouska: aktuáln dle webu University anglickém jazyce (dle webových stránek zahranicní univerzity) Výpis dosavadních studijních výsledk na UK zkouskách AJ ­ dle aktuálních pozadavk univerzity. �rove jazykových znalostí student musí prokázat

Cerveny, Vlastislav

482

Storing images in warm atomic vapor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reversible and coherent storage of light in atomic medium is a key-stone of future quantum information applications. In this work, arbitrary two-dimensional images are slowed and stored in warm atomic vapor for up to 30 $\\mu$s, utilizing electromagnetically induced transparency. Both the intensity and the phase patterns of the optical field are maintained. The main limitation on the storage resolution and duration is found to be the diffusion of atoms. A techniqueanalogous to phase-shift lithography is employed to diminish the effect of diffusion on the visibility of the reconstructed image.

M. Shuker; O. Firstenberg; R. Pugatch; A. Ron; N. Davidson

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

483

Note: Voltage and intensity dependence of the saturation curves of free-air ionization chambers irradiated with chopped synchrotron radiation beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current saturation characteristics of free-air ionization chambers with electrode gaps of 4.2 and 8.4 mm were investigated using pulsed photon beam obtained by periodically interrupting synchrotron radiation beams with a chopper. Pulsed photon beams of 10 and 15 keV with pulse duration of 2.5 {mu}s and a frequency of 230 Hz were produced by chopping the beam. The measured recombination rate was found to be proportional to the intensity and inversely proportional to the applied voltage.

Nariyama, Nobuteru [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Light Source and Optics Division, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

Supplement 12, Authors: A To Z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Book of Fur Farming. Every Day Reference Guide for All Ranchers. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Bol. Funda??o Gon?alo Moniz, Bahia.?Boletim da Funda??o Gon?alo Moniz. Bahia, Brasil. Bol. Mus. Paraense Emilio Goeldi.?Boletim do Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi... Pu- bli?e avec le Concours du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Paris. Manadsblad Tidskr. Skand. Kreatursfors?rings- bol.?Manadsblad. Tidskrift f?r Skandinaviska Kreaturesf?rs?kringsbolaget. Och F?rs?krings- bolaget f?r Smittsamma...

Doss, Mildred A.; Humphrey, Judith M.; Segal, Dorothy B.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

NuSTORM {\\mu} Ring -- Design and Injection Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of the NuSTORM muon production beam line and storage ring is discussed. The facility includes a pion production target station with a pion collection horn and transport into a straight section of a storage ring. {\\pi} decay within that straight section provides {\\mu}'s that are stored within the ring for subsequent decay providing precision electron and muon neutrino beams. The ring and transport designs are described and optimized. Genetic Algorithm optimization of the horn and transport into the ring has been performed, providing a significant increase in intensity

Neuffer, David; Bross, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Giant Radio Pulses from the Millisecond Pulsar PSR B1937+21 at 327 MHz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seven giant radio pulses were recorded from the millisecond pulsar PSR B1937+21 during $\\approx$ 8.1 minutes observation by the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) at 326.5 MHz. Although sparse, these observations support most of the giant pulse behavior reported at higher radio frequencies (430 to 2380 MHz). Within the main componentof the integrated profile, they are emitted only in a narrow ($\\la$ 47 $\\mu$s) window of pulse phase, close to its peak. This has important implications for doing super-high precision timing of PSR B1937+21 at low radio frequencies.

M. Vivekanand

2002-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

487

Supplement 20, Part 1, Authors: A To Z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hong Kong Biol- ogical Circle. Hong Kong. [Cz.] II KEY TO SERIALABBREVIATIONS Mem. National Sc. Mus., Tokyo. ? Memoirs of the National Science Museum. Tokyo. [lA (Ql80. J3K6) ] Micro-organisms, Function, Form and Environment (Hawker and Linton...).? Micro-organisms. Function, Form and En- vironment. Edited by Lilian E. Hawker and Alan H. Lin- ton. (American Elsevier Publishing Co., Inc.). New York. [W3. (QR58.H3) ] Mikrobiologija, Beograd. See Acta Biol. Iugoslav., s. B, Mikrobio1. Milli T...

Podani, Jule M.; Hood, Martha W.; Tolson, Deborah A.; Kirby, Margie D.; Crawley, Lila R.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Shaw, Judith H.; Edwards, Shirley J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Plume Image Profiling of UV Laser Desorbed Biomolecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental system, based upon the techniques of UV and IR laser desorption with time of flight mass spectrometry, has been constructed to enable the production and characterization of neutral biomolecular targets. The feasibility of the laser desorption technique for the purpose of radiation interaction experiments is investigated here. Fluorescent dye tagging and laser induced fluorescence imaging has been used to help characterize the laser produced plumes of biomolecules revealing their spatial density profiles and temporal evolution. Peak target thicknesses of 2x10{sup 12} molecules cm{sup -2} were obtained 30 {mu}s after laser desorption.

Merrigan, T. L.; Hunniford, C.A.; McCullough, R. W. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Timson, D. J. [School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK, BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); Catney, M. [Andor Technology plc., 7 Millennium Way, Springvale Business Park, Belfast, UK, BT12 7AL (United Kingdom)

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

489

Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009 Department ofHallam® MU.S. Department

490

Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009 Department ofHallam® MU.S. DepartmentJuly 28,

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - asthma dust mite Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cell Summary: -cockroach, anti-mouse, and anti-dust mite IgE levels, wheeze, cough, eczema and asthma. Results: Correlations... , maternal asthma, prenatal cockroach...

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - atopic hand eczema Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

eczema and degree... -cockroach, anti-mouse, and anti-dust mite IgE levels, wheeze, cough, eczema and asthma. ... Source: Columbia University, Department of Environmental...

493

E-Print Network 3.0 - atopic eczema reveals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

eczema and degree... -cockroach, anti-mouse, and anti-dust mite IgE levels, wheeze, cough, eczema and asthma. ... Source: Columbia University, Department of Environmental...

494

E-Print Network 3.0 - atopic eczema joint Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

eczema and degree... -cockroach, anti-mouse, and anti-dust mite IgE levels, wheeze, cough, eczema and asthma. ... Source: Columbia University, Department of Environmental...

495

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged mammalian ovaries Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Suppression of Notch Signaling in the Neonatal Mouse Ovary Decreases ... Source: Mayo, Kelly E. - Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Cell Biology, Northwestern...

496

A Sensor-Based Interactive Digital Installation System for Virtual Painting Using MAX/MSP/Jitter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The JitterListener tutorial patch ............................................................... 68 45 A hardware-based patch for OpenGL line drawing based on mouse movement...

Arenas, Anna G.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

497

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult polycystic kidney Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, David... polycystic kidney disease (PKD) in transgenic mice. We used a customized mouse coil to acquire serial MR... for this new application. Keywords--Transgenic mice,...

498

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute non-traumatic marrow Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, University of California at San Diego Collection: Engineering 38 Animal Models of Gaucher Disease Transgenic mouse lines engineered to express the human GBA enzyme...

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - artery spasm demonstrated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as Summary: , electromyography; FTA, frontalis type A test; HFS, hemifacial spasm; IPA, immunoprecipitation assay; MPA, mouse... dystonia Limb dystonia Tardive dystonia Other...

500

E-Print Network 3.0 - akodon molinae rodentia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

evidence Summary: Samples of Akodon azarae and Akodon molinae were collected in Argentina during MarchApril 1998. Remaining... of the eld mouse Akodon azarae (Cricetidae,...