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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

The south-eastern house mouse Mus musculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of the biogeographic history and precise characterization of the genetic make-up of a taxon are essential to investigate speciation processes and achieve sound evolutionary comparisons. A case in point is the house mouse Mus musculus and its three parapatric subspecies, which have become a model for such studies. However, although Mus musculus domesticus and Mus musculus musculus constitute genetically wellcharacterized homogeneous entities, the case of Mus musculus castaneus remains poorly documented. Using mtDNA control region variation in a sample of 402 individuals, covering much of the distribution range of this subspecies, we identify four haplogroups that show largely non-overlapping geographic distributions. They appear to have undergone post-Neolithic expansions, presumably through commensalism with humans, but exhibit a much more ancient divergence. These results point towards a strong past subdivision and a vicariant origin of the different haplogroups, with each retaining a subfraction of the total variability. The genomic consequences of this spatial heterogeneity on the present taxonomic partition will have to be appraised, and may challenge the use of this subspecies as a single entity in evolutionary studies. © 2012 The Linnean Society of London, Biological

Pierre Boursot; Jamshid Darvish; François Bonhomme

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Comparing disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus William Liu 1 , Benjamin Haley 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 From 1969 to 1992, the Janus program at Argonne National Laboratory performed a large series of radiobiology experiments, examining the effects of varying doses of neutron and gamma radiation on two disparate species of mice, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus. Much of this data has since been digitized and made freely accessible online. This study aims to revisit

3

MicroRNA targeting in mus musculus and Caenorhabditis elegans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, approximately 22 nucleotide RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally by base-pairing to complementary sites in the target mRNA. The first miRNA, lin-4, was discovered in 1993 ...

Lafkas, Ginamarie N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation Carcinogenesis—A Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) remains one of the best animal model systems for cancer research due to its molecular and physiological similarities to man, small size, ease of breeding in captivity and a fully sequenced genome. This work reviews relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models and methodologies of induction of radiation-induced leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast, and lung cancer in these models. Where available, the associated molecular pathologies are also included.

Leena Rivina; Robert Schiestl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Evolution of major milk proteins in Mus musculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Charlie Matulka, who lost to Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska the same year, does not trust the results- counting machines, which happen to have been manufactured by a company Mr. Hagel used to run. Mr. Matulka, against Mr. Matulka, he won more than 80 percent of the vote. What gets conspiracy theorists excited

6

Transcriptional regulation at multiple steps of cortical development in Mus musculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

migration and axonal projection of cerebellar granuleand corticothalamic projection neurons (Plachez et al. ,the migration and axonal projection of cerebellar granule

Betancourt, Jennifer A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Isolation and gene flow: inferring the speciation history of European house mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inferring the history of isolation and gene flow during species differentiation can inform us on the processes underlying their formation. Following their recent expansion in Europe, two subspecies of the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus and Mus musculus musculus) have formed a hybrid zone maintained by hybrid incompatibilities and possibly behavioural reinforcement, offering a good model of incipient speciation. We reconstruct the history of their divergence using an approximate Bayesian computation framework and sequence variation at 57 autosomal loci. We find support for a long isolation period preceding the advent of gene flow around 200 000 generations ago, much before the formation of the European hybrid zone a few thousand years ago. The duration of the allopatric episode appears long enough (74 % of divergence time) to explain the accumulation of many post-zygotic incompatibilities expressed in the present hybrid zone. The ancient contact inferred could have played a role in mating behaviour divergence and laid the ground for further reinforcement. We suggest that both subspecies originally colonized the Middle East from the northern Indian subcontinent, domesticus settling on the shores of the Persian Gulf and musculus on those of the Caspian Sea. Range expansions during interglacials would have induced secondary contacts, presumably in Iran, where they must have also interacted with Mus musculus castaneus. Future studies should incorporate this possibility, and we point to Iran and its surroundings as a hot spot for house mouse diversity and speciation studies.

Ludovic Duvaux; Khalid Belkhir; Matthieu Boulesteix; Pierre Boursot

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Lifelong voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the heart A. M. BRONIKOWSKI,1,7 P. A. CARTER,2 T. J. MORGAN,2 T. GARLAND, JR.,3 N. UNG,1 T. D. PUGH,4 R voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart. Physiol changes that normally occur in the aging heart. Male mice (Mus domesticus) were sampled from the 16th

Bronikowski, Anne

9

Mouse heart rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse heart rate Name: amj Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Is it possible to get the heart rate of a mouse without special equipment?...

10

Genomic analysis of mouse tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences has spurred a growing interest in analyzing mouse models of human cancer using genomic techniques. Comparative genomic studies on mouse and human tumors can be ...

Tam, Mandy Chi-Mun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Mammalian Diversification: From Chromosomes to Phylogeography (A Celebration of the Career of James L. Patton)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publ. , Mus. Zool. , Univ. Michigan 177:1–104 + iv. Nelson-Pubs. Mus. Zool. , Univ. Michigan 177:1-104. Patterson, B.Nematoda), prevalence in Michigan deer mouse populations.

Lacey, Eileen A.; Myers, Philip

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Can we trust the transgenic mouse? insights from computer simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several decades, the mouse has gained prominence in the cardiac electrophysiology literature as the animal model of choice. Using computer models of the mouse and human ECG, this paper is a step toward understanding when themouse succeeds ...

Joseph Tranquillo; Adhira Sunkara

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Lyme disease in an experimental mouse model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research was directed at developing a murine model for the investigation of Lyme disease. This study sought to define the route of inoculation necessary to establish infection or disease in susceptible C3H/HeJ mice and also, to determine the virulence of four Borrelia burgdorferi isolates. Further, the influence of MHC Class I and Class 11 genes of the mouse H-2 complex on the susceptibility and/or resistance to Lyme disease was studied. This thesis demonstrates the development of multisysternic infection in the mouse model, namely, dermatological, cardiac, and arthritic lesions in C3HJHeJ mouse. It also demonstrates the involvement of Class I genes (K and D regions) and Class 11 genes (I-A and I-E regions) of the mouse H-2 complex on the quantitative antibody titers. This was achieved by using genetically stable B IO congenic and recombinant strains. The data presented in this thesis strongly supports use of C3HJHeJ and BIO congenic and recombinant strains as potential laboratory animal models for Lyme disease research.

Reddy, Sunitha

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Characterization of the mouse thrombospondin 2 gene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have characterized the exon/intron organization, complete 3[prime] untranslated region (3[prime]-UTR), and approximately 2.5 kb of the promoter/5[prime] flanking region of the mouse thrombospondin 2 (TSP2) gene. The sizes of exons and the pattern of interruption of the reading frame by introns are highly conserved in mouse TSP2 in comparison with mouse or human TSP1, a finding that suggests a close evolutionary relationship between the two genes. The TSP2 and TSP1 genes are also similar in that the 3[prime]-UTRs of both genes contain multiple TATT and ATTT(A) motifs that might function as mediators of mRNA stability. However, the sequences of the promoter regions in TSP1 and TSP2 are very different; in particular, the TSP2 gene lacks the serum response element and the NF-Y binding site that have been implicated in the serum response of the human TSP1 gene. The structure of the TSP2 gene is consistent with emerging evidence supporting the view that TSP1 and TSP2 perform overlapping but distinct functions. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Tetsuji Shingu; Bornstein, P. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Procedure for MOUs Between Fermilab & Foreign SUBJECT NUMBER ...  

SUBJECT: Procedure for MOUs Between Fermilab & Foreign Partners NUMBER: 4501 RESPONSIBILITY: Fermilab Chief Operating Officer REVISION: 01 APPROVED BY: Fermilab Chief ...

16

Laboratory Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) with Foreign Partners  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This memorandum establishes policy and procedures for any Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between DOE National Laboratories and any foreign entity, whether ...

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Mouse House: a brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947-2009  

SciTech Connect

The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable source of mouse models for human genetic disorders.

Russell, Liane B [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

Pennacchio, Len A.

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Mus(tidimensional autsresonant mode conversion L. Friedland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the gyroresonancecyclic accel- erator (GYRAC)6 and the spatial autoresonancecyclotron (SAC)7acceleratorarebasedon

Friedland, Lazar

20

Procyon: 18-MJ, 2-{mu}s pulsed power system  

SciTech Connect

The Procyon high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system was designed to drive plasma z-pinch experiments that produce Megajoule soft x-ray pulses when the plasma stagnates on axis. In the proceedings of the Ninth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, we published results from system development tests. At this time, we have fielded seven tests in which the focus was on either vacuum switching or load physics. Four of the tests concentrated on the performance of a Plasma Flow Switch (PFS) which employed a 1/r mass distribution in the PFS barrel. Of the four tests, two had dummy loads and one had an implosion load. In addition, one of the tests broke down near the vacuum dielectric interface, and the result demonstrated what Procyon could deliver to an 18 nH load. We will summarize PFS results and the 18 nH test which is pertinent to upcoming solid/liquid liner experiments. On our other three tests, we eliminated the PFS switching and powered the z-pinch directly with the HEPP system. From the best of these direct drive tests we obtained 1.5 MJ of radiation in a 250 ns pulse, our best radiation pulse to date. We will also summarize direct drive test results. More details are given in other papers in this conference for both the PFS and direct drive experiments, and an updated analysis of our opening switch performed is also included. The remainder of this paper describes the parameters and capabilities of our system, and we will use the data from several experiments to provide more precise information than previously available.

Goforth, J.H.; Anderson, B.G.; Anderson, W.E. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Identification of Mouse Genetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Allan Balmain University of California, San Francisco San Francisco, CA. (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Why this Project? To identify pathways that control genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage and tumor development using novel developments in genomics together with mouse genetics. Project Goals To identify genetic loci that trigger rapid tumor development of mice after radiation. To characterize new genes at these loci that act as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. Experimental Approach New candidate-radiation susceptibility genes will be identified using a unique haplotyping approach. Using DNA from radiation-induced lymphoma, changes in the gene copy number can be detected using BAC microarrays. The

22

Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse January 10, 2012 - 4:19pm Addthis A look at tools that can help consumers save money and...

23

Young children's ability to use a computer mouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because there is little empirical data available on how well young children are able to use a computer mouse, the present study examined their proficiency in clicking on small objects at various positions on the screen and their skill in moving objects ... Keywords: Elementary education, Human-computer interaction, Interface, Media in education, Navigation

Afke Donker; Pieter Reitsma

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependent upon maintenance of a healthy and functioning riparian system and associated uplands. AlterationsCONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE ON THE U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Suite 40 USAF Academy, CO 80840-2400 October 26, 1999 #12;CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR PREBLE

25

Experimental Cerenkov luminescence tomography of the mouse model with SPECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental Cerenkov luminescence tomography of the mouse model with SPECT imaging validation imaging resulting from Cerenkov radiation has become a motivating topic recently and will potentially open new avenues for the study of small animal imaging. Cerenkov-based optical imaging taken from living

Tian, Jie

26

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

27

Evaluation of an in vitro toxicogenetic mouse model for hepatotoxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous studies support the fact that a genetically diverse mouse population may be useful as an animal model to understand and predict toxicity in humans. We hypothesized that cultures of hepatocytes obtained from a large panel of inbred mouse strains can produce data indicative of inter-individual differences in in vivo responses to hepato-toxicants. In order to test this hypothesis and establish whether in vitro studies using cultured hepatocytes from genetically distinct mouse strains are feasible, we aimed to determine whether viable cells may be isolated from different mouse inbred strains, evaluate the reproducibility of cell yield, viability and functionality over subsequent isolations, and assess the utility of the model for toxicity screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 15 strains of mice (A/J, B6C3F1, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CAST/EiJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, AKR/J, MRL/MpJ, NOD/LtJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ and WSB/EiJ males) and cultured for up to 7 days in traditional 2-dimensional culture. Cells from B6C3F1, C57BL/6J, and NOD/LtJ strains were treated with acetaminophen, WY-14,643 or rifampin and concentration-response effects on viability and function were established. Our data suggest that high yield and viability can be achieved across a panel of strains. Cell function and expression of key liver-specific genes of hepatocytes isolated from different strains and cultured under standardized conditions are comparable. Strain-specific responses to toxicant exposure have been observed in cultured hepatocytes and these experiments open new opportunities for further developments of in vitro models of hepatotoxicity in a genetically diverse population.

Martinez, Stephanie M.; Bradford, Blair U. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Soldatow, Valerie Y. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); CellzDirect/Invitrogen (a part of Life Technologies), Durham, NC 27703 (United States); Kosyk, Oksana; Sandot, Amelia [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Witek, Rafal; Kaiser, Robert; Stewart, Todd; Amaral, Kirsten; Freeman, Kimberly; Black, Chris; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Ferguson, Stephen S. [CellzDirect/Invitrogen (a part of Life Technologies), Durham, NC 27703 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Adaptive Evolution and Effective Population Size in Wild House Mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of the proportion of amino acid substitutions that have been fixed by selection (a) vary widely among taxa, ranging from zero in humans to over 50 % in Drosophila. This wide range may reflect differences in the efficacy of selection due to differences in the effective population size (Ne). However, most comparisons have been made among distantly related organisms that differ not only in Ne but also in many other aspects of their biology. Here, we estimate a in three closely related lineages of house mice that have a similar ecology but differ widely in Ne: Mus musculus musculus (Ne; 25,000–120,000), M. m. domesticus (Ne; 58,000–200,000), and M. m. castaneus (Ne; 200,000–733,000). Mice were genotyped using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array, and the proportions of replacement and silent mutations within subspecies were compared with those fixed between each subspecies and an outgroup, Mus spretus. There was significant evidence of positive selection in M. m. castaneus, the lineage with the largest Ne, with a estimated to be approximately 40%. In contrast, estimates of a for M. m. domesticus (a 5 13%) and for M. m. musculus (a 5 12 %) were much smaller. Interestingly, the higher estimate of a for M. m. castaneus appears to reflect not only more adaptive fixations but also more effective purifying selection. These results support the hypothesis that differences in Ne contribute to differences among species in the efficacy of selection.

Megan Phifer-rixey; Francxois Bonhomme; Pierre Boursot; Gary A. Churchill; Jaroslav Piálek; Priscilla K. Tucker; Michael W. Nachman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Stem Cell Marker Expression in Mouse Lung after Exposure to Acute...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stem cell specific marker expression in mouse lung after whole-body exposure to irradiation with either photons or protons and evaluate modulating effects of preirradiation...

30

Population genetics of the striped-mouse, Rhabdomys Pumilio (Sparrman, 1784).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The striped-mouse, Rhabdomys pumilio, is widely distributed throughout southern Africa within a variety of habitats and rainfall regimes. It is found at sea level in… (more)

Mahida, Harendra.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Diarrhea as a cause of mortality in a mouse model of infectious colitis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Comparative characterization of genome-wide transcriptional changes during infection can help elucidate the mechanisms underlying host susceptibility. In this study, transcriptional profiling of the mouse colon ...

Borenshtein, Diana

32

526 CARCINOMA OF THE SEMINAL VESICLE IN THE MOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRIMARY carcinoma of the seminal vesicle is very rare. Dalgaard and Giertsen (1956) in a critical assessment accepted 23 out of a total of 34 published cases in man and there have been 5 cases reported since (Ewell, 1963 (2 cases) ; Rodriguez Kees, 1964; Balint, 1965; Dawson and Mekie, 1965). Spontaneous malignant tumours of the seminal vesicle are also rare in rodents, although carcinoma of the seminal vesicle has been induced experimentally in rats (Bielschowsky and Hall, 1951). The Flexner-Jobling tumour was originally described as a mixed cell sarcoma (Flexner and Jobling, 1907), later as a teratoma from which an adenocarcinoma developed (Flexner and Jobling, 1910) and now is considered to be a carcinosarcoma (Stewart et al., 1959). A papillary adenoma was found (Upton et al., 1960) in a mouse 19 months after irradiation during the atomic-bomb tests at Eniwetok and 2 spontaneous sarcomas have been reported (Slye, Holmes and Wells, 1919; Guerin, 1954). In the present paper a carcinoma of seminal vesicle in a mouse is described. MATERIALS AND METHODS The tumour was found in an apparently healthy C57B1 male mouse killed at 30 months. Tissue for light microscopy was fixed in Zenker's fluid and paraffin sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin. FINDINGS To the naked eye the prostate appeared normal but both seminal vesicles were enlarged to approximately 4 cm. in length and about 0 5 cm. in their greatest diameter. The left seminal vesicle contained normal white opalescent rather viscous secretion while in the right the secretion was pale fawn in colour although of normal consistency. On section there was a papillary tumour in the right seminal vesicle (Fig. 1). The structure was varied and included relatively well differentiated papillary (Fig. 1) and small acinar areas (Fig. 2). Another area was anaplastic and the pattern could be described as pseudosarcomatous (Fig. 3). Mitoses were frequent in this area. Dilated blood vessels were found throughout the tumour, and there were areas of degeneration. There was some endothelial EXPLANATION OF PLATE FIG. 1. General view of the papillary adenocarcinoma projecting into the lumen of the seminal vesicle. H. & E. 33 x.

C. Rowlatt

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome  

SciTech Connect

Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, ?-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human DNA helicase RECQL and its mouse homologue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have determined the chromosomal location of the human and mouse genes encoding the RECQL protein, a putative DNA helicase homologous to the bacterial DNA helicase, RecQ. RECQL was localized to human chromosome 12 by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid DNA, fine mapping of RECQL by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed its chromosomal location to be 12p11-p12. The corresponding mouse gene, Recql, was mapped to the telomeric end of mouse chromosome 6 by analysis of DNA from an interspecific cross. 19 refs., 2 figs.

Puranam, K.L.; Kennington, E.; Blackshear, P.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

1995-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Tissues from the irradiated dog/mouse archive  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to organize the databases/information and organize and move the tissues from the long-term dog (4,000 dogs) and mouse (over 30,000 mice) radiation experiments done at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1970's and 80's to Northwestern University. These studies were done with the intention of understanding the effects of exposure to radiation at a variety of different doses, dose-rates, and radiation qualities on end-points such as life-shortening, carcinogenesis, cause of death, shifts in disease incidence and other biological parameters. Organ and tissue samples from these animals including cancers, metastases and other significant degenerative and inflammatory lesions and those in a regular protocol of normal tissues were preserved in paraffin blocks, tissue impressions and sections and represent a great resource for the radiation biology community. These collections are particularly significant since these experiments are not likely to be repeated because of the extreme cost of monies and time for such large-scale animal studies. The long-term goal is to make these tissues and databases available to the wider scientific community so that questions such as tissue sensitivity, early and late effects, low dose and protracted dose responses of normal and tumor tissues, etc. can be examined and defined. Recent advances in biology particularly at the subcellular and molecular level now permit microarray-based gene expression array analyses from paraffin-embedded tissues (where RNA samples are significantly degraded), synchrotron-based studies of metal and other elemental distribution patterns in tissues, PCR-based analyses for mutation detection, and other similar approaches that were not available when the long¬ term animal studies were designed and initiated. Understanding the basis and progression of radiation damage should also permit rational approaches to prevention and mitigation of those damages. Therefore, as stated earlier, these tissues and their related documentation, represent a significant resource for future studies. For this project, we propose to accomplish the following objectives: (1) inventory and organize the tissues, blood smears, wet-tissues and paper-¬based information that is available in the tissue bank at Argonne National Laboratory; (2) convert the existing Oracle database of the mouse studies to MS Access( the dog data is already in this format which is far more user friendly and widely used in business and research) , (3) move the remaining samples and documentation from dogs that had been transferred from ANL to New Mexico (in Dr. F. Hahn's care) to Northwestern University and add these to the inventory; (4) move the tissues and Access database at Argonne National Laboratory to Northwestern University.

Gayle Woloschak

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains J.R. Brogan Colorado State University Abstract We have recently developed a ‘low dose rate’ gamma-H2AX assay that is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish differences in response for cells from normal Atm +/+ (mouse) or ATM+/+ (human) and the phenotypes associated with the corresponding heterozygous genotypes(1, 2). The assay is also capable of distinguishing mild hypersensitivities for cells from an appreciable proportion of apparently normal individuals(3). We used this assay to determine whether the genetic background of four commonly used

37

Gender differences in methionine accumulation and metabolism in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes: Potential roles in toxicity  

SciTech Connect

L-Methionine (Met) is hepatotoxic at high concentrations. Because Met toxicity in freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes is gender-dependent, the goal of this study was to assess the roles of Met accumulation and metabolism in the increased sensitivity of male hepatocytes to Met toxicity compared with female hepatocytes. Male hepatocytes incubated with Met (30 mM) at 37 {sup o}C exhibited higher levels of intracellular Met at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 h, respectively, compared to female hepatocytes. Conversely, female hepatocytes had higher levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine compared to male hepatocytes. Female hepatocytes also exhibited higher L-methionine-L-sulfoxide levels relative to control hepatocytes, whereas the increases in L-methionine-D-sulfoxide (Met-D-O) levels were similar in hepatocytes of both genders. Addition of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), an inhibitor of Met transamination, significantly increased Met levels at 1.5 h and increased Met-D-O levels at 1.0 and 1.5 h only in Met-exposed male hepatocytes. No gender differences in cytosolic Met transamination activity by glutamine transaminase K were detected. However, female mouse liver cytosol exhibited higher methionine-DL-sulfoxide (MetO) reductase activity than male mouse liver cytosol at low (0.25 and 0.5 mM) MetO concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that increased cellular Met accumulation, decreased Met transmethylation, and increased Met and MetO transamination in male mouse hepatocytes may be contributing to the higher sensitivity of the male mouse hepatocytes to Met toxicity in comparison with female mouse hepatocytes.

Dever, Joseph T. [Department of Comparative Biosciences and Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Elfarra, Adnan A. [Department of Comparative Biosciences and Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)], E-mail: aelfarra@wisc.edu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

MouseLight: bimanual interactions on digital paper using a pen and a spatially-aware mobile projector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MouseLight is a spatially-aware standalone mobile projector with the form factor of a mouse that can be used in combination with digital pens on paper. By interacting with the projector and the pen bimanually, users can visualize and modify the virtually ... Keywords: digital pen input, mobile projector, spatially-aware display

Hyunyoung Song; Francois Guimbretiere; Tovi Grossman; George Fitzmaurice

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT  

SciTech Connect

Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT{sup Cre/+};ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

Pavone, Luigi Michele [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: pavone@dbbm.unina.it; Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mastellone, Vincenzo [Department of Experimental Medicine 'G. Salvatore', University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Avallone, Luigi [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

40

Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550.12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presentation: Lithium ameliorates behavioral deficits in mouse model of fragile X syndrome-550 deficits. Lithium is used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, and it has been used to treat mood dysregulation in individuals with FrX. Lithium has also been shown to reverse learning deficits and improve

Smith, Carolyn Beebe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human  

SciTech Connect

We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

42

Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

Aiming and clicking in young children's use of the computer mouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study investigated the abilities of young children to aim and click with a computer mouse. Young children have not yet fully developed their motor skills and they are therefore more likely than adults to click next to targets on the computer ... Keywords: Elementary education, Human-computer interaction, Input device, Interface, Media in education, Navigation

Afke Donker; Pieter Reitsma

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOD protein level (140%) and activity (75%). The increase in MnSOD was not due to a substantial proliferationDietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain Ellen L oxidative stress. In vitro studies have shown an increase in antioxidant enzyme activities following

Stuart, Jeffrey A.

45

Failure of catalase to protect against aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced mouse lung tumorigenicity  

SciTech Connect

The carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) induces 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in mouse lung, an effect that can be prevented by treatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT). G {yields} T transversion mutation in K-ras, an early event in AFB{sub 1}-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis, is thought to result from AFB{sub 1}-8,9-exo-epoxide binding to DNA to form AFB{sub 1}-N{sup 7}-guanine, but may also result from formation of 8-OHdG. Therefore, oxidative DNA damage may be important in AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity. The objective of this study was to determine whether PEG-CAT would prevent AFB{sub 1} tumorigenicity. Mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed following treatment of female A/J mice with 300 kU/kg PEG-CAT ip and/or 50 mg/kg AFB{sub 1}. Mice were killed 7 months post-treatment and tumors greater than 1 mm in diameter were excised. Unexpectedly, the mean number of tumors per mouse in the PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} group (8.81 {+-} 3.64, n = 47) was greater than that of the group treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (7.05 {+-} 3.45, n = 42) (P < 0.05). The tumors obtained from mice treated with PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} were larger than those from mice treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (P < 0.05). There was no difference in K-ras exon 1 mutation spectrum or in the histological diagnosis of tumors between AFB{sub 1} and PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} groups (P > 0.05). In vitro incubation with mouse liver catalase (CAT) resulted in conversion of [{sup 3}H]AFB{sub 1} into a DNA-binding species, a possible explanation for the results observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that PEG-CAT is not protective against AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity in mouse lung despite preventing DNA oxidation.

Guindon, Katherine A. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Foley, Julie F.; Maronpot, Robert R. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Massey, Thomas E. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)], E-mail: masseyt@queensu.ca

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

MUS420/EE367A Lecture 7A Digital Waveguide Modeling of Horns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(n) = (h x)(n) = N m=0 hmx(n - m) · Transfer function: HFIR(z) = h0 + h1z-1 + . . . + hNz-N = z-N C off the tail of the impulse response gives HFIR(z) = h0 + h0pz-1 + · · · + h0pN z-N = h0 + h0pz-1(z)/A(z). The general procedure is to find the "tail filter" H IIR(z) and subtract it off: HFIR(z) = HIIR(z) - H IIR

Smith III, Julius Orion

47

A filtered database search algorithm for endogenous serum protein carbonyl modifications in a mouse model of inflammation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During inflammation, the resulting oxidative stress can damage surrounding host tissue, forming protein-carbonyls. The SJL mouse is an experimental animal model used to assess in vivo toxicological responses to reactive ...

Slade, Peter G.

48

Flow cytometry quantitation of dopamine receptor D2 loss as a sensitive measure of Huntington's Disease progression in mouse neurons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mouse models of Huntington's Disease (HD) are often used for testing potential therapeutic compounds. These experiments require substantial investments in time and resources, and have yet to produce any intervention that ...

Crook, Zachary R. (Zachary Ryan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Consensus Coding Sequence (Ccds) Project: Identifying a Common Protein-Coding Gene Set for the Human and Mouse Genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but ...

Kellis, Manolis

50

Gene Expression Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain After Low-dose and Acute Radiation Exposure Daila Gridley Loma Linda University & Medical Center Abstract Purpose: 1) To examine the induction of oxidative stress and apoptosis-associated gene expression profiles in brain after whole-body irradiation with low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) photons and acute exposure to photons 2) to compare these radiation-induced effects with those produced by LDR and acute exposure to protons. Material and Methods: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 2 Gy of photons or protons at 0.8 Gy/min and 0.9 Gy/min, respectively, both with and without pre-exposure to 0.01 Gy LDR γ-rays (57Co) at 0.03 cGy/h. Brain tissues were harvested and quick-frozen for analyses by quantitative RTPCR at 56

51

Low LET Radiation Alters the Fetal Epigenome of the Avy Mouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LET Radiation Alters the Fetal Epigenome of the Avy Mouse LET Radiation Alters the Fetal Epigenome of the Avy Mouse Randy Jirtle Duke University Medical Center Abstract Exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation significantly alters the epigenome in somatic cells and gametes (Filkowski and others, 2009), yet it has not been determined if epigenomic modifications occur below 10 cGy. Epigenetic dysregulation during early development is mechanistically linked to the pathogenesis of adult-onset diseases (Jirtle and Skinner, 2007). Thus, we sought to determine whether low doses of ionizing radiation during early gestation affect susceptibility to adult-onset diseases by deregulating the establishment of DNA methylation patterns. Agouti viable yellow (Avy) mice were used to test this novel postulate because they are

52

The low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends on genotype, tissue compartment, exposure regimen, and sampling times Joe Gray & Andrew Wyrobek Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The objectives of this research are to characterize the early and persistent low-dose and adaptive response (AR) damage surveillance networks in mammary glands of radiation sensitive and resistant strains of mice to identify the molecular signatures/mechanisms associated with nonlinear modifications of risk for mammary gland cancer. Our approach uses low-dose exposure regimens that have been reported to induce mammary gland cancer in sensitive strains to determine whether low-dose induced pathways are differentially expressed in epithelial or stromal cells and to determine

53

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland as a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer Antoine M. Snijders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Our goal is to develop an in vivo mechanistic model of genetic variation in the low-dose damage responses of mammary glands using inbred mice known to vary in their sensitivity to low-dose induced mammary gland cancer, and to develop molecular predictors for susceptibility or resistance to low-dose induced breast cancer. Background and Significance: It is increasingly believed that individuals differ in their genetic susceptibilities to environmental insults for diseases such as cancer. This concern is especially important for the large numbers of individuals receiving low-dose exposures in the nuclear energy

54

Imaging and differentiation of mouse embryo tissues by ToF-SIMS  

SciTech Connect

Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) equipped with a gold ion gun was used to image mouse embryos and differentiate tissue types (brain, spinal cord, skull, rib, heart and liver). Embryos were paraffin-embedded and then de-paraffinized. The robustness and repeatability of the method was determined by analyzing nine tissue slices from three different embryos over a period of several weeks. Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to reduce the spectral data generated by ToF-SIMS, histopathologically identified tissue types of the mouse embryos can be differentiated based on the characteristic differences in their mass spectra. These results demonstrate the ability of ToF-SIMS to determine subtle chemical differences even in fixed histological specimens.

Wu, L; Lu, X; Kulp, K; Knize, M; Berman, E; Nelson, E; Felton, J; Wu, K J

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

55

The mouse angiogenin gene family: Structures of an angiogenin-related protein gene and two pseudogenes  

SciTech Connect

Angiogenin, a homologue of pancreatic ribonuclease, is a potent inducer of blood vessel formation. As an initial step toward investigating the in vivo functional role of this protein via gene disruption, we undertook the isolation of the angiogenin gene (Ang) from the 129 strain mouse, which will be used for generating targeting constructs. Unexpectedly, screening of a genomic library with an Ang gene probe obtained previously from the BALB/c strain yielded two new genes closely similar to Ang rather than Ang itself. One of these encodes a protein with 78% sequence identity to angiogenin and is designated {open_quotes}Angrp{close_quotes} for {open_quotes}angiogenin-related protein.{close_quotes} The ribonucleolytic active site of angiogenin, which is critical for angiogenic activity, is completely conserved in Angrp, whereas a second essential site, thought to bind cellular receptors, is considerably different. Thus, the Angrp product may have a function distinct from that of angiogenin. The second gene obtained by library screening is a pseudogene, designated {open_quotes}Ang-ps1,{close_quotes} that contains a frame shift mutation in the early part of the coding region. Although the Ang gene was not isolated from this library, it was possible to amplify this gene from 129 mouse genomic DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sequence analysis showed that the 129 strain Ang gene is identical to the BALB/c gene throughout the coding region. PCR cloning also yielded a second Ang-like pseudogene, designated {open_quotes}Ang-ps2.{close_quotes} Southern blotting of genomic DNA confirmed the presence of Ang, Angrp, and at least one of the pseudogenes in an individual mouse and suggested that the mouse Ang gene family may contain more than the four members identified here. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Brown, W.E.; Nobile, V.; Shapiro, R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse Saving Money and Fuel with a Click of a Mouse January 10, 2012 - 4:19pm Addthis A look at tools that can help consumers save money and fuel, whether you’re in the market for a new vehicle or trying to make the most of your current one. | Photo courtesy of Auto Guide. A look at tools that can help consumers save money and fuel, whether you're in the market for a new vehicle or trying to make the most of your current one. | Photo courtesy of Auto Guide. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager What does this mean for me? Quickly compare cars based on their projected fuel costs, price, safety ratings and MPG. Calculate the long-term costs of your next vehicle. Discover simple tips and tricks that can start saving you fuel and

57

Structural comparison and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse IL-13 genes  

SciTech Connect

The genomic structure of the recently described cytokine IL-13 has been determined for both human and mouse genes. The nucleotide sequence of a 4.6-kb DNA segment of the human gene is described. The human IL-13 gene (IL 13) occurs as a single copy in the haploid genome and maps to human chromosome 5. A 4.3-kb DNA fragment of the mouse IL-13 gene (Il 13) has been sequenced and found to occur as a single copy, mapping to mouse chromosome 11. Intrachromosomal mapping studies revealed that both genes contain four exons and three introns and show a high degree of sequence identify throughout their length. Potential recognition sequences for transcription factors that are present in the 5'-flanking region and are conserved between both genes include IFN-responsive elements, binding sites for AP-1, AP-2, and AP-3, an NF-lL 6 site, and a TATA-like sequence. Both genes map to chromosomal locations adjacent to genes encoding other cytokines, including IL-3, GM-CSF, IL-5, and IL-4 suggesting that IL-13 is another member of this cytokine gene family that may have arisen by gene duplication. 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

McKenzie, A.N.J.; Sato, A.; Doyle, E.L.; Zurawski, G. (DNAX Research Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Li, X.; Milatovich, A.; Francke, U. (Stanford Univ. Medical School, CA (United States)); Largaespada, D.A.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. (National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States))

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

TBX3 over-expression causes mammary gland hyperplasia and increases mammary stem-like cells in an inducible transgenic mouse model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study, we created doxycycline inducible double transgenicexpression of TBX3 in our doxycycline inducible mouse modelthe mammary glands of doxycycline induced double transgenic

Liu, Jing; Esmailpour, Taraneh; Shang, Xiying; Gulsen, Gultekin; Liu, Andy; Huang, Taosheng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Retention of plutonium in mouse tissues as affected by antiviral compounds and their analogs  

SciTech Connect

The chelating agent DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) is an effective therapeutic substance for decorporation of extracellar monomeric plutonium in the mouse and dog, but is much less effective in removing intracellular polymeric plutonium (Pu-P). In the absence of effective therapy, this intracellular plutonium is long retained in the body, particularly in reticuloendothelial tissues like the liver. Our interest, therefore, turned to the development of adjunct substances capable of removing additional plutonium from the liver beyond that removable by DTPA alone. We showed that glucan, a yeast cell wall polysaccharide, is a useful adjunct to DTPA for removal of Pu-P from the mouse liver. Its toxicity, however, makes it a less than desirable drug for potential human use. Therefore, we initiated a search for more soluble (and presumably less hazardous) therapeutic agents similar to glucan, i.e., capable of adjunct action with DTPA. Of over 20 substances tested the most successful results were obtained with two antiviral, antitumor compounds, the pyran copolymers XA-124-177 and XA-146-85-2. These are condensation products of divinyl ether and maleic anhydride. Another analog, EMH-227, prepared by condensation of acrylic acid and itaconic acid, was similarly successful. Maximal removal of plutonium from mouse liver was obtained with a single intravenous (I.V.) injection of 10 to 90 mg/kg of pyran copolymer given 5 days after I.V. Pu-P administration. Although these doses increased splenic uptake of plutonium, a dose of 10 mg/kg produced a minimal increase in the splenic burden while producing maximal removal of hepatic plutonium. (auth)

Lindenbaum, A.; Rosenthal, M.W.; Guilmette, R.A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Mouse Infestations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would like to trap them or drive them out without killing them if possible. We have two cats in the house so we can't use an open poison. We have been trapping them with Havahart...

63

Arsenic- and cadmium-induced toxicogenomic response in mouse embryos undergoing neurulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) are well-characterized teratogens in animal models inducing embryotoxicity and neural tube defects (NTDs) when exposed during neurulation. Toxicological research is needed to resolve the specific biological processes and associated molecular pathways underlying metal-induced toxicity during this timeframe in gestational development. In this study, we investigated the dose-dependent effects of As and Cd on gene expression in C57BL/6J mouse embryos exposed in utero during neurulation (GD8) to identify significantly altered genes and corresponding biological processes associated with embryotoxicity. We quantitatively examined the toxicogenomic dose-response relationship at the gene level. Our results suggest that As and Cd induce dose-dependent gene expression alterations representing shared (cell cycle, response to UV, glutathione metabolism, RNA processing) and unique (alcohol/sugar metabolism) biological processes, which serve as robust indicators of metal-induced developmental toxicity and indicate underlying embryotoxic effects. Our observations also correlate well with previously identified impacts of As and Cd on specific genes associated with metal-induced toxicity (Cdkn1a, Mt1). In summary, we have identified in a quantitative manner As and Cd induced dose-dependent effects on gene expression in mouse embryos during a peak window of sensitivity to embryotoxicity and NTDs in the sensitive C57BL/6J strain.

Robinson, Joshua F.; Yu, Xiaozhong [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Moreira, Estefania G. [Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Physiological Sciences, State University of Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Hong, Sungwoo [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Faustman, Elaine M., E-mail: faustman@u.washington.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center on Human Development and Disability, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Phytoestrogens are partial estrogen agonists in the adult male mouse, Environ. Health Perspect. 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intake, as well as serum and urinary concentrations, of phytoestrogens is high in countries where incidence of prostate cancer is low, suggesting a chemopreventive role for phytoestrogens. Their significance could be explained by the ability to antagonize the action of more potent endogenous estrogens in initiation or promotion of tumor formation. We have studied estrogenicity and antiestrogenicity of dietary soy and two phytoestrogens, coumestrol and daidzein, in our neoDES mouse model for the study of prostatic neoplasia. Soy was chosen because it is rich in phytoestrogens, is widely used in Oriental diets, and has antiestrogenic and anticarcinogenic properties in the neoDES mouse when given from fertilization onward. In short-term tests with adult animals, no evidence for estrogenicity or antiestrogenicity (capability to antagonize the action of 1 7,B-estradiol) of soy was found when development of epithelial metaplasia and expression of c-fos protooncogene in prostate were used as end points of estrogen action. Estrogenic activity of coumestrol and daidzein on c-fos expression was subtle. Coumestrol, either given alone or in combination with 17,B-estradiol, had no effect on development of epithelial metaplasia. These marginal or missing effects in adult males could be interpreted by assuming that the neonatal period is more critical for estrogenic or antiestrogenic action of soy and phytoestrogens. Once initiated, estrogen-related lesions would develop spontaneously. Alternatively, the chemopreventive action of soy is not due to antiestrogenicity of soyderived

Sari Makela; Risto Santti; Leena Salo; John A. Mclachlan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the Avy Mouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A vy Mouse Autumn Bernal 1,2,3 , Dale Huang 1 , Yue Li 4 , Dana Dolinoy 5 , and Randy Jirtle 1 Department of Radiation Oncology 1 , University Program in Genetics and Genomic 2 , Integrated Toxicology & Environmental Health Program 3 , Department of Community and Family Medicine 4 , Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA, Department of Environmental and Health Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 4 Background: Humans have evolved and thrived amidst constant low-dose (0-10 cGy) background radiation exposure from natural sources. Currently, however, the frequency of exposures to low doses of radiation is increasing due to man-made sources such as diagnostic imaging and nuclear power. This increased exposure has led to concerns amongst the general public and the government about the

66

A simple, low-cost, data logging pendulum built from a computer mouse  

SciTech Connect

Lessons and homework problems involving a pendulum are often a big part of introductory physics classes and laboratory courses from high school to undergraduate levels. Although laboratory equipment for pendulum experiments is commercially available, it is often expensive and may not be affordable for teachers on fixed budgets, particularly in developing countries. We present a low-cost, easy-to-build rotary sensor pendulum using the existing hardware in a ball-type computer mouse. We demonstrate how this apparatus may be used to measure both the frequency and coefficient of damping of a simple physical pendulum. This easily constructed laboratory equipment makes it possible for all students to have hands-on experience with one of the most important simple physical systems.

Gintautas, Vadas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hubler, Alfred [UIUC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Generation and Characterization of the Anp32e-Deficient Mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Accumulated literature suggests that the acidic nuclear phosphoprotein 32 kilodalton (Anp32) proteins control multiple cellular activities through different molecular mechanisms. Like other Anp32 family members, Anp32e (a.k.a. Cpd1, PhapIII) has been conserved throughout vertebrate evolution, suggesting that it has an important function in organismal survival. Principal Findings: Here, we demonstrate that the Anp32e gene can be deleted in mice without any apparent effect on their wellbeing. No defects in thymocyte apoptosis in response to various stresses, fibroblast growth, gross behaviour, physical ability, or pathogenesis were defined. Furthermore, combined deletion of Anp32a and Anp32e also resulted in a viable and apparently healthy mouse. Significance: These results provide evidence that significant functional redundancy exists among Anp32 family members.

Patrick T. Reilly; Samia Afzal; Andrew Wakeham; Jillian Haight; Annick You-ten; Joanna Dembowy ¤b; Ashley Young; Tak W. Mak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

MONICA: a compact, portable dual gamma camera system for mouse whole-body imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction We describe a compact, portable dual-gamma camera system (named "MONICA" for MObile Nuclear Imaging CAmeras) for visualizing and analyzing the whole-body biodistribution of putative diagnostic and therapeutic single photon emitting radiotracers in animals the size of mice. Methods Two identical, miniature pixelated NaI(Tl) gamma cameras were fabricated and installed ?looking up? through the tabletop of a compact portable cart. Mice are placed directly on the tabletop for imaging. Camera imaging performance was evaluated with phantoms and field performance was evaluated in a weeklong In-111 imaging study performed in a mouse tumor xenograft model. Results Tc-99m performance measurements, using a photopeak energy window of 140 keV?10%, yielded the following results: spatial resolution (FWHM at 1 cm), 2.2 mm; sensitivity, 149 cps (counts per seconds)/MBq (5.5 cps/?Ci); energy resolution (FWHM, full width at half maximum), 10.8%; count rate linearity (count rate vs. activity), r2=0.99 for 0?185 MBq (0?5 mCi) in the field of view (FOV); spatial uniformity, <3% count rate variation across the FOV. Tumor and whole-body distributions of the In-111 agent were well visualized in all animals in 5-min images acquired throughout the 168-h study period. Conclusion Performance measurements indicate that MONICA is well suited to whole-body single photon mouse imaging. The field study suggests that inter-device communications and user-oriented interfaces included in the MONICA design facilitate use of the system in practice. We believe that MONICA may be particularly useful early in the (cancer) drug development cycle where basic whole-body biodistribution data can direct future development of the agent under study and where logistical factors, e.g., limited imaging space, portability and, potentially, cost are important.

Choyke, Peter L.; Xia, Wenze; Seidel, Jurgen; Kakareka, John W.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Milenic, Diane E.; Proffitt, James; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Green, Michael V.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Two structurally distinct {kappa}B sequence motifs cooperatively control LPS-induced KC gene transcription in mouse macrophages  

SciTech Connect

The mouse KC gene is an {alpha}-chemokine gene whose transcription is induced in mononuclear phagocytes by LPS. DNA sequences necessary for transcriptional control of KC by LPS were identified in the region flanking the transcription start site. Transient transfection analysis in macrophages using deletion mutants of a 1.5-kb sequence placed in front of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene identified an LPS-responsive region between residues -104 and +30. This region contained two {kappa}B sequence motifs. The first motif (position -70 to -59, {kappa}B1) is highly conserved in all three human GRO genes and in the mouse macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) gene. The second {kappa}B motif (position -89 to -78, {kappa}B2) was conserved only between the mouse and the rat KC genes. Consistent with previous reports, the highly conserved {kappa}B site ({kappa}B1) was essential for LPS inducibility. Surprisingly, the distal {kappa}B site ({kappa}B2) was also necessary for optimal response; mutation of either {kappa}B site markedly reduced sensitivity to LPS in RAW264.7 cells and to TNF-{alpha} in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Although both {kappa}B1 and {kappa}B2 sequences were able to bind members of the Rel homology family, including NF{kappa}B1 (P50), RelA (65), and c-Rel, the {kappa}B1 site bound these factors with higher affinity and functioned more effectively than the {kappa}B2 site in a heterologous promoter. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional control of the KC gene requires cooperation between two {kappa}B sites and is thus distinct from that of the three human GRO genes and the mouse MIP-2 gene. 71 refs., 8 figs.

Ohmori, Y.; Fukumoto, S.; Hamilton, T.A. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Automatic Seedpoint Selection and Tracing of Microstructures in the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope Mouse Brain Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM) enables imaging of an entire mouse brain at sub-micrometer resolution. By using the data sets from the KESM, we can trace the neuronal and vascular structures of the whole mouse brain. I investigated effective methods for automatic seedpoint selection on 3D data sets from the KESM. Furthermore, based on the detected seedpoints, I counted the total number of somata and traced the neuronal structures in the KESM data sets. In the first step, the acquired images from KESM were preprocessed as follows: inverting, noise filtering and contrast enhancement, merging, and stacking to create 3D volumes. Second, I used a morphological object detection algorithm to select seedpoints in the complex neuronal structures. Third, I used an interactive 3D seedpoint validation and a multi-scale approach to identify incorrectly detected somata due to the dense overlapping structures. Fourth, I counted the number of somata to investigate regional differences and morphological features of the mouse brain. Finally, I traced the neuronal structures using a local maximum intensity projection method that employs moving windows. The contributions of this work include reducing time required for setting seedpoints, decreasing the number of falsely detected somata, and improving 3D neuronal reconstruction and analysis performance.

Kim, Dongkun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel oxides and nickel-copper oxides to rat, mouse, and dog pulmonary alveolar macrophages  

SciTech Connect

Metal oxides containing either Ni alone (NiO's) or both Ni and Cu (Ni-CuO's) are encountered during Ni refining. Six NiO compounds calcined at temperatures ranging from < 650 to 1045/sup 0/ and four Ni-CuO's containing from 6.9 to 28% Cu and 44 to 69% Ni were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity to alveolar macrophages (AM). NiO's were less toxic to rat AM than were the Ni-CuO compounds. The toxicity of the Ni-CuO compounds increased with increasing Cu content and decreasing Ni content of the molecules, indicating that the toxicity was due to the Cu content of the molecules. AM obtained from beagle dogs, F344/N rats, and B6C3F/sub 1/ mice displayed the following species sensitivities: dog > rat approx. = mouse, with dog AM being most sensitive. The observed differences in species sensitivities correlated with differences in the phagocytic abilities of dog, rat, and mouse AM, with the ranking of phagocytic abilities of the AM in decreasing order of ability being dog > rat > mouse.

Benson, J.M.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY OF MALE GERM CELLS TO MAINSTREAM AND SIDESTREAM TOBACCO SMOKE IN THE MOUSE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cigarette smoking in men has been associated with increased chromosomal abnormalities in sperm and with increased risks for spontaneous abortions, birth defects and neonatal death. Little is known, however, about the reproductive consequences of paternal exposure to second-hand smoke. We used a mouse model to investigate the effects of paternal exposure to sidestream (SS) smoke, the main constituent of second-hand smoke, on the genetic integrity and function of sperm, and to determine whether male germ cells were equally sensitive to mainstream (MS) and SS smoke. A series of sperm DNA quality and reproductive endpoints were investigated after exposing male mice for two weeks to MS or SS smoke. Our results indicated that: (i) only SS smoke significantly affected sperm motility; (ii) only MS smoke induced DNA strand breaks in sperm; (iii) both MS and SS smoke increased sperm chromatin structure abnormalities; and (iv) MS smoke affected both fertilization and the rate of early embryonic development, while SS smoke affected fertilization only. These results show that MS and SS smoke have differential effects on the genetic integrity and function of sperm and provide further evidence that male exposure to second-hand smoke, as well as direct cigarette smoke, may diminish a couple's chance for a successful pregnancy and the birth of a healthy baby.

Polyzos, Aris; Schmid, Thomas Ernst; Pina-Guzman, Belem; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Marchetti, Francesco

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

74

Successful radioimmunotherapy for micro and occult metastases in a SCID mouse model  

SciTech Connect

It is often addressed that the most appropriate candidate, theoretically, for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is not bulky tumor burden but for micro or occult metastatic foci, The major obstacles in the verification for veracious efficacy of RIT had been clinically and preclinically the difficulty in obtaining such a model. We have developed the model of testicular tumor (primary site) with visible small metastases to the lymph nodes (LNs) and non-visible (occult) lesions to distant organs in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. And thus, the suppression of minute tumor depositions after RIT was evaluated. One week after hemilateral intratesticular injection of 2 million of HELA Hep 2 cells that expressed placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), the group of the mice were treated with a single dose of I-131 labeled HPMS-1, anti-PLAP MoAb or with saline control. The I-131 labeled HPMS-1 (5.6 MBq / 150 {mu}g) was intravenously administered and at 2 weeks after, the testis, retroperitoneal and intraperitoneal LNs and other gans were removed. For the control group, the testicular tumor and LNs metastases were found in 100% and 86% of the mice. The metastases in the liver and lung were not observed by histological examination but in all mouse samples, the PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assay could identify the human {beta}-globin gene derived from HeLa cells, indicating the presence of definitive metastases. For the treated group, the average testicular tumor weight was significantly reduced by the factor of 2.4 (132 mg vs 311 mg, p<0.01). The LNs metastases were even more distinctively suppressed by the factor of 45.7 (13 mg vs 599 mg, p,0.05). Remarkably, the PCR products from the occult metastases were almost completely controlled; 97% suppression found for the liver and 81% for the lung. Thus, we conclude that using I-131 as a label, RIT is justified to used for targeting and killing minute tumor foci.

Yokoyama, K.; Koshida, K.; Kinuya, S. [Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan)]|[Asahikawa Medical College (Japan)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

Ross, Pamela K. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, NJ (United States); Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cunningham, Michael L. [National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Dose-dependent transitions in Nrf2-mediated adaptive response and related stress responses to hypochlorous acid in mouse macrophages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is potentially an important source of cellular oxidative stress. Human HOCl exposure can occur from chlorine gas inhalation or from endogenous sources of HOCl, such as respiratory burst by phagocytes. Transcription factor Nrf2 is a key regulator of cellular redox status and serves as a primary source of defense against oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that HOCl activates Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response in cultured mouse macrophages in a biphasic manner. In an effort to determine whether Nrf2 pathways overlap with other stress pathways, gene expression profiling was performed in RAW 264.7 macrophages exposed to HOCl using whole genome mouse microarrays. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis on gene expression data revealed that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response and protein ubiquitination were the most sensitive biological pathways that were activated in response to low concentrations of HOCl (< 0.35 mM). Genes involved in chromatin architecture maintenance and DNA-dependent transcription were also sensitive to very low doses. Moderate concentrations of HOCl (0.35 to 1.4 mM) caused maximal activation of the Nrf2 pathway and innate immune response genes, such as IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IL-10 and chemokines. At even higher concentrations of HOCl (2.8 to 3.5 mM) there was a loss of Nrf2-target gene expression with increased expression of numerous heat shock and histone cluster genes, AP-1-family genes, cFos and Fra1 and DNA damage-inducible Gadd45 genes. These findings confirm an Nrf2-centric mechanism of action of HOCl in mouse macrophages and provide evidence of interactions between Nrf2, inflammatory, and other stress pathways.

Woods, Courtney G. [Division of Computational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences Incorporated, Annandale, NJ 08801 (United States); Fu Jingqi; Xue Peng; Hou Yongyong [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Pluta, Linda J.; Yang Longlong; Zhang Qiang; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E. [Division of Computational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi Jingbo [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)], E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Assessment of Cerebellar and Hippocampal Morphology and Biochemical Parameters in the Compound Heterozygous, Tottering/leaner Mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to two different mutations in the gene that encodes the a1A subunit of voltage-activated CaV 2.1 calcium ion channels, the compound heterozygous tottering/leaner (tg/tgla) mouse exhibits numerous neurological deficits. Human disorders that arise from mutations in this voltage dependent calcium channel are familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia-2, and spinocerebellar ataxia 6. The tg/tgla mouse exhibits ataxia, movement disorders and memory impairment, suggesting that both the cerebellum and hippocampus are affected. To gain greater understanding of the many neurological abnormalities that are exhibited by the 90-120 day old tg/tgla mouse the following aspects were investigated: 1) the morphology of the cerebellum and hippocampus, 2) proliferation and death in cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and 3) changes in basic biochemical parameters in granule cells of the cerebellum and hippocampus. This study revealed no volume abnormalities within the hippocampus of the mutant mice, but a decrease in cell density with the pyramidal layer of CA3 and the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Cell size in the CA3 region was unaffected, but cell size in the hilus of the dentate gyrus did not exhibit the gender difference seen in the wild type mouse. The cerebellum showed a decrease in volume without any decrease in cerebellar cellular density. Cell proliferation and differentiation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus remained normal. This region also revealed a decrease in cell death in the tg/tgla mice. Basal intracellular calcium levels in granule cells show no difference within the hippocampus, but an increase in the tg/tgla male cerebellum compared to the wild type male cerebellum. There was no significant difference in granule cell mitochondrial membrane potential within the wild type and mutant animals in either the hippocampus or cerebellum. The rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in granule cells revealed no variation within the hippocampus or cerebellum. The amount of ROS was decreased in cerebellar granule cells, but not granule cells of the hippocampus. Inducing ROS showed no alteration in production or amount of ROS produced in the hippocampus, but did show a ceiling in the amount of ROS produced, but not rate of production, in the cerebellum.

Murawski, Emily M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Dietary composition modulates brain mass and amyloid beta levels in a mouse model of aggressive Alzheimer's amyloid pathology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Western Diet (TWD). Neurobiol Dis 2007, 28:16-29. 9. Cao D, Lu H, Lewis TL, Li L: Intake of sucrose-sweetened water induces insulin resistance and exacerbates memory deficits and amyloidosis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease. J Biol Chem... Diets, Inc, so as to avoid diets associated with predictable organ toxicity. Mice were supplied with food and water ad libi- tum and were weighed weekly. At the age of 18 weeks, mice were sacrificed via isoflurane inhalation, and the brains were removed...

Pedrini, Steve; Thomas, Carlos; Brautigam, Hannah; Schmeidler, James; Ho, Lap; Fraser, Paul; Westaway, David; St George Hyslop, Peter; Martins, Ralph N; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Pasinetti, Giulio M; Dickstein, Dara L; Hof, Patrick R; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Gandy, Sam

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Diurnal Variations of Mouse Plasma and Hepatic Bile Acid Concentrations as well as Expression of Biosynthetic Enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Diurnal fluctuation of bile acid (BA) concentrations in the enterohepatic system of mammals has been known for a long time. Recently, BAs have been recognized as signaling molecules beyond their well-established roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis. Methods and Results: The current study depicted diurnal variations of individual BAs detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) in serum and livers collected from C57BL/6 mice fed a regular chow or a chow containing cholestyramine (resin). Circadian rhythms of mRNA of vital BA-related nuclear receptors, enzymes, and transporters in livers and ilea were determined in control- and resin-fed mice, as well as in farnesoid X receptor (FXR) null mice. The circadian profiles of BAs showed enhanced bacterial dehydroxylation during the fasting phase and efficient hepatic reconjugation of BAs in the fed phase. The resin removed more than 90 % of BAs with b-hydroxy groups, such as muricholic acids and ursodeoxycholic acid, from serum and livers, but did not exert as significant influence on CA and CDCA in both compartments. Both resin-fed and FXR-null mouse models indicate that BAs regulate their own biosynthesis through the FXR-regulated ileal fibroblast growth factor 15. BA flux also influences the daily mRNA levels of multiple BA transporters. Conclusion: BA concentration and composition exhibit circadian variations in mouse liver and serum, which influences the

Transporters; Yu-kun Jennifer Zhang; Grace L. Guo; Curtis D. Klaassen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Genome-wide identification of Ago2 binding sites from mouse embryonic stem cells with and without mature microRNAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 19–22-nucleotide noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate mRNA targets. We have identified endogenous miRNA binding sites in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), by performing photo-cross-linking ...

Leung, Anthony K. L.

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81

STUDIES ON THE EFFECTOR CELL OF ANTI-TUMOUR IMMUNITY IN A CHEMICALLY INDUCED MOUSE TUMOUR SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Spleen cells from mice immunized against a methylcholanthrene induced rhabdomyosarcoma inhibited tumour cell colony formation in vitro and prevented tumour development in vivo in an adoptive transfer test. Treatment of the immune spleen cells with anti-mouse immunoglobulin serum or passage through a nylon wool column, both of which reduced the percentage of immunoglobulin bearing cells in the population to less than 3-4%, did not alter their antitumour effects. In contrast, treatment of the spleen cells with anti-BAO serum abolished their anti-tumour effects both in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that T cells are the mediators of tumour immunity in this chemically induced tumour system. THE EFFECTOR cell(s) in anti-tumour immune responses has not yet been clearly identified. A previous study using Moloney sarcoma virus (MSV) induced tumours indicated that non-T cells were responsible

R. B. Whitney; J. G. Levy; A. G. Smith

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ortho-aminoazotoluene activates mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car{sup -/-}) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car{sup -/-} livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. - Highlights: > The azo dye and mouse carcinogen OAT is a very effective mCAR activator. > OAT increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. > OAT CAR-dependently increases the expression of a specific subset of CAR target genes. > OAT induces an unexpectedly deferred, but CAR-dependent hepatocyte proliferation.

Smetanina, Mariya A., E-mail: maria.smetanina@gmail.com [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Group of Pharmacogenomics, Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 8, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Pakharukova, Mariya Y. [Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kurinna, Svitlana M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Unit 1000, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Merkulova, Tatyana I. [Laboratory of Gene Expression Control, Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, prospekt Lavrentyeva 10, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary glandas a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland as a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer Antoine M. Snijders 1 , Francesco Marchetti 1 , Ju Han 1 , Sandhya Bhatnagar 1 , Nadire Duru 1 , Zhi Hu 1 , Jian-Hua Mao 1 , Mina Bissell 1 , Joe Gray 1,2 , Gary H. Karpen 1 , Priscilla K. Cooper 1 and Andrew J. Wyrobek 1 1 Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2 Current affiliation: Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health Science Univ, Portland, OR Goal: Our goal is to develop an in vivo mechanistic model of genetic variation in the low-dose damage responses of mammary glands using inbred mice known to vary in their sensitivity to low-dose induced mammary gland cancer, and to develop molecular predictors for susceptibility or resistance to low-dose induced breast cancer.

84

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

85

Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using 16O /18O labeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) hold great promise for regenerative medicine as well as for investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases. Understanding of key intracellular signaling pathways and protein targets that control development of iPSC from somatic cells is essential for designing new approaches to improve reprogramming efficiency. Here we report the development and application of an integrated quantitative proteomics platform for investigating differences in protein expressions between mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and MEF-derived iPSC. This platform consists of 16O/18O labeling, multidimensional peptide separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, and data analysis with UNiquant software. Using this platform a total of 2,481 proteins were identified and quantified from the 16O/18O-labeled MEF-iPSC proteome mixtures with a false discovery rate of 0.01. Among them, 218 proteins were significantly upregulated, while 247 proteins were significantly downregulated in iPSC compared to MEF. Many nuclear proteins, including Hdac1, Dnmt1, Pcna, Ccnd1, Smarcc1, and subunits in DNA replication and RNA polymerase II complex were found to be enhanced in iPSC. Protein network analysis revealed that Pcna functions as a hub orchestrating complicated mechanisms including DNA replication, epigenetic inheritance (Dnmt1) and chromatin remodeling (Smarcc1) to reprogram MEF and maintain stemness of iPSC.

Huang, Xin; Tian, Changhai; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yongxiang; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Sharma, Seema; Yu, Fang; Fu, Kai; Zheng, Jialin; Ding, Shi-Jian

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a new modulatory cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit from mouse retina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels play a key role in olfactory and visual transduction. Native CNG channels are heteromeric complexes consisting of the principal ? subunits (CNG1–3), which can form functional channels by themselves, and the modulatory ? subunits (CNG4–5). The individual ? and ? subunits that combine to form the CNG channels in rod photoreceptors (CNG1 ? CNG4) and olfactory neurons (CNG2 ? CNG4 ? CNG5) have been characterized. In contrast, only an ? subunit (CNG3) has been identified so far in cone photoreceptors. Here we report the molecular cloning of a new CNG channel subunit (CNG6) from mouse retina. The cDNA of CNG6 encodes a peptide of 694 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 80 kDa. Among the CNG channel subunits, CNG6 has the highest overall similarity to the CNG4 ? subunit (47% sequence identity). CNG6 transcripts are present in a small subset of retinal photoreceptor cells and also in testis. Heterologous expression of CNG6 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells did not lead to detectable currents. However, when coexpressed with the cone photoreceptor ? subunit, CNG6 induced a flickering channel gating, weakened the outward rectification in the presence of extracellular Ca 2 ? , increased the sensitivity for L-cis diltiazem, and enhanced the cAMP efficacy of the channel. Taken together, the data indicate that CNG6 represents a new CNG channel ? subunit that may associate with the CNG3 ? subunit to form the native cone channel. Key words: cone photoreceptor; cyclic nucleotide; cation channel; L-cis diltiazem; single-channel recording Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are expressed in various cell types and tissues. Although the functional significance of CNG channel expression in most nonsensory tissues is still unclear, the role of the channels in signal transduction pathways of vertebrate sensory neurons has been well defined (Baylor, 1996;

Andrea Gerstner; Xiangang Zong; Franz Hofmann; Martin Biel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Physical analysis of the region deleted in the t{sup w18} allele of the mouse tcl-4 complementation group  

SciTech Connect

We have generated a YAC config of at least 3.3 Mb from the proximal region of In(17)4 of mouse chromosome 17. This region corresponds to DNA lost in the gastrulation mutant t{sup w18}, which belongs to the tcl-4 complementation group. Our most proximal and distal probes lie within the deletion-3.3 Mb apart-indicating that we have not cloned the entire region. The deleted region is contained in a genetic interval of less than 1 cM, suggesting that some suppression of recombination must occur. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Barclay, J.; King, T.F.; Crossley, P.H. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)] [and others] [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); and others

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Three conazoles increase hepatic microsomal retinoic acid metabolism and decrease mouse hepatic retinoic acid levels in vivo  

SciTech Connect

Conazoles are fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals. In a previous toxicogenomic study of triazole-containing conazoles we found gene expression changes consistent with the alteration of the metabolism of all trans-retinoic acid (atRA), a vitamin A metabolite with cancer-preventative properties (Ward et al., Toxicol. Pathol. 2006; 34:863-78). The goals of this study were to examine effects of propiconazole, triadimefon, and myclobutanil, three triazole-containing conazoles, on the microsomal metabolism of atRA, the associated hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme(s) involved in atRA metabolism, and their effects on hepatic atRA levels in vivo. The in vitro metabolism of atRA was quantitatively measured in liver microsomes from male CD-1 mice following four daily intraperitoneal injections of propiconazole (210 mg/kg/d), triadimefon (257 mg/kg/d) or myclobutanil (270 mg/kg/d). The formation of both 4-hydroxy-atRA and 4-oxo-atRA were significantly increased by all three conazoles. Propiconazole-induced microsomes possessed slightly greater metabolizing activities compared to myclobutanil-induced microsomes. Both propiconazole and triadimefon treatment induced greater formation of 4-hydroxy-atRA compared to myclobutanil treatment. Chemical and immuno-inhibition metabolism studies suggested that Cyp26a1, Cyp2b, and Cyp3a, but not Cyp1a1 proteins were involved in atRA metabolism. Cyp2b10/20 and Cyp3a11 genes were significantly over-expressed in the livers of both triadimefon- and propiconazole-treated mice while Cyp26a1, Cyp2c65 and Cyp1a2 genes were over-expressed in the livers of either triadimefon- or propiconazole-treated mice, and Cyp2b10/20 and Cyp3a13 genes were over-expressed in the livers of myclobutanil-treated mice. Western blot analyses indicated conazole induced-increases in Cyp2b and Cyp3a proteins. All three conazoles decreased hepatic atRA tissue levels ranging from 45-67%. The possible implications of these changes in hepatic atRA levels on cell proliferation in the mouse tumorigenesis process are discussed.

Chen, P.-J. [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, B143-06, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Padgett, William T.; Moore, Tanya; Winnik, Witold; Lambert, Guy R.; Thai, Sheau-Fung; Hester, Susan D. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, B143-06, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Nesnow, Stephen [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, B143-06, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)], E-mail: nesnow.stephen@epa.gov

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)  

SciTech Connect

The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

755 THE CARCINOGENIC ACTION OF 2-AMINODIPHENYLENE OXIDE ANTD 4-AMINODIPHENYL ON THE BLADDER AND LIVER OF THE C57 x IF MOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLAYSON, Lawson, Santana and Bonser (1965) suggested that in the mouse the oral administration of chemical bladder carcinogens induced hyperplasia of the bladder epithelium in the first days or weeks of the experiment. Subsequently, Clayson and Pringle (1966) showed that the number of mitoses in the normal adult mouse bladder epithelium is very low and suggested that it is necessary to increase the mitotic rate in order to induce tumours. They showed that the implantation of a paraffin wax or cholesterol pellet, or a small glass bead, into the lumen of the bladder increased the mitotic rate. Subsequently, Clayson, Pringle and Bonser (1967) found that a single oral administration of 4-ethylsulphonylnaphthalene-1sulphonamide, a murine bladder carcinogen, greatly increased the number of mitoses in the bladder epithelium, while Wood (personal communication) observed a smaller increase in mice given 2-acetamidofluorene in the diet. Thus, the correlation of early hyperplasia and subsequent malignancy can be explained on the grounds of an initial increase in the number of mitoses in the bladder epithelium. In the course of the experiments of Clayson et al. (1965) a number of chemicals

D. B. Clayson; T. A. Lawson; J. A. S. Pringle

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Cytotoxic Effects of CdSe Quantum Dots on Maturation of Mouse Oocytes, Fertilization, and Fetal Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Quantum dots (QDs) are useful novel luminescent markers, but their embryonic toxicity is yet to be fully established, particularly in oocyte maturation and sperm fertilization. Earlier experiments by our group show that CdSe-core QDs have cytotoxic effects on mouse blastocysts and are associated with defects in subsequent development. Here, we further investigate the influence of CdSe-core QDs on oocyte maturation, fertilization, and subsequent pre- and postimplantation development. CdSe-core QDs induced a significant reduction in the rates of oocyte maturation, fertilization, and in vitro embryo development, but not ZnS-coated CdSe QDs. Treatment of oocytes with 500 nM CdSe-core QDs during in vitro maturation (IVM) led to increased resorption of postimplantation embryos and decreased placental and fetal weights. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the negative impact of CdSe-core QDs on mouse oocyte development. Moreover, surface modification of CdSe-core QDs with ZnS effectively prevented this cytotoxicity.

Ming-shu Hsieh; Nion-heng Shiao; Wen-hsiung Chan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Immunochemical approach to indoor aeroallergen quantitation with a new volumetric air sampler: studies with mite, roach, cat, mouse, and guinea pig antigens  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new high-volume air sampler for determining antigen concentrations in homes and illustrate its use for quantitating airborne house dust mite, cat, cockroach, mouse, and guinea pig antigens. The concentration of house dust-mite antigen was similar from houses in Rochester, Minn. and tenement apartments in Harlem, N. Y., but cockroach and mouse urinary proteins were present only in Harlem. The amount of cat or guinea pig antigen varied as expected with the number of pets in the home. In calm air the airborne concentration of mite and cat antigen was similar throughout the house but increased greatly in a bedroom when bedding was changed. In calm air most of the cat and mite antigens were associated with respirable particles less than 5 microns mean aerodynamic mass diameter, but in air sampled after the bedding was changed, more cat antigen was found in particles greater than 5 microns. The apparatus and technique described can provide objective data concerning the magnitude and the relative distribution and duration of suspended particles of defined sizes, which contain allergen activity.

Swanson, M.C.; Agarwal, M.K.; Reed, C.E.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Montana University System (MUS) is comprised of sixteen institutions: two flagship universities, four regional universities, and ten two-year colleges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and confirmed by the Senate, to seven year overlapping terms. Current Regents: Chair ­ Angela McLean, Anaconda

Maxwell, Bruce D.

94

Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor alters levels of key sex steroids and steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles  

SciTech Connect

Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by decreasing antral follicle numbers and increasing follicular death. MXC is metabolized in the body to mono-hydroxy MXC (mono-OH). Little is known about the effects of mono-OH on the ovary. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that mono-OH exposure decreases production of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) by cultured mouse antral follicles. Antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mice (age 35-39 days) and exposed to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or mono-OH (0.1-10 {mu}g/mL) for 96 h. Media and follicles were collected for analysis of sex steroid levels and mRNA expression, respectively. Mono-OH treatment (10 {mu}g/mL) decreased E{sub 2} (DMSO: 3009.72 {+-} 744.99 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1679.66 {+-} 461.99 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 1752.72 {+-} 532.41 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 45.89 {+-} 33.83 ng/mL), testosterone (DMSO: 15.43 {+-} 2.86 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 17.17 {+-} 4.71 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 13.64 {+-} 3.53 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 1.29 {+-} 0.23 ng/mL), androstenedione (DMSO: 1.92 {+-} 0.34 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1.49 {+-} 0.43 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 0.64 {+-} 0.31 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 0.12 {+-} 0.06 ng/mL) and progesterone (DMSO: 24.11 {+-} 4.21 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 26.77 {+-} 4.41 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 20.90 {+-} 3.75 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 9.44 {+-} 2.97 ng/mL) levels. Mono-OH did not alter expression of Star, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1 and Cyp1b1, but it did reduce levels of Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 mRNA. Collectively, these data suggest that mono-OH significantly decreases levels of key sex steroid hormones and the expression of enzymes required for steroidogenesis.

Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@gmail.co [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Leslie, Traci C., E-mail: traci.leslie@gmail.co [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Hatfield, Kimberly P., E-mail: kpm9786@yahoo.co [Program in Toxicology and Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@illinois.ed [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.ed [Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Misregulation of Stromelysin-1 in Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells Accompanies Acquisition of Stromelysin-1 dependent Invasive Properties  

SciTech Connect

Stromelysin-1 is a member of the metalloproteinase family of extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes that regulates tissue remodeling. We previously established a transgenic mouse model in which rat stromelysin-1 targeted to the mammary gland augmented expression of endogenous stromelysin-1, disrupted functional differentiation, and induced mammary tumors. A cell line generated from an adenocarcinoma in one of these animals and a previously described mammary tumor cell line generated in culture readily invaded both a reconstituted basement membrane and type I collagen gels, whereas a nonmalignant, functionally normal epithelial cell line did not. Invasion of Matrigel by tumor cells was largely abolished by metalloproteinase inhibitors, but not by inhibitors of other proteinase families. Inhibition experiments with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides revealed that Matrigel invasion of both cell lines was critically dependent on stromelysin-1 expression. Invasion of collagen, on the other hand, was reduced by only 40-50%. Stromelysin-1 was expressed in both malignant and nonmalignant cells grown on plastic substrata. Its expression was completely inhibited in nonmalignant cells, but up-regulated in tumor cells, in response to Matrigel. Thus misregulation of stromelysin-1 expression appears to be an important aspect of mammary tumor cell progression to an invasive phenotype. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes that have been implicated in a variety of normal developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. The MMP family comprises at least 15 members with different, albeit overlapping, substrate specificities. During activation of latent MMPs, their propeptides are cleaved and they are converted to a lower molecular weight form by other enzymes, including serine proteinases, and by autocatalytic cleavage. Among the MMPs, stromelysin-1 (SL1) possesses the broadest substrate specificity. Despite increasing knowledge about its enzymatic properties and the regulation of its expression, little is known about its function. We have generated transgenic animals that express an autoactivating mutant of rat SL1 targeted to the epithelial compartment of the mammary gland. Phenotypically, SL1 transgenic mice display increased branching morphogenesis and lactogenic differentiation at prepubertal stages and premature involution during late pregnancy. Branching morphogenesis requires the invasion of epithelial cells into the adipose tissue, a process reminiscent of invasion of stromal compartments by tumor cells. Strikingly, a large number of SL1 transgenic animals also develop mammary tumors of various histotypes, including invasive adenocarcinomas. Because tumor development is a late response of SL1 transgenic mice to overexpression of the transgene, it remains unclear whether SL1 plays a direct role in tumor growth and/or invasion or whether the observed tumors are a consequence of other molecular alterations in the microenvironment of the mammary gland before the onset of tumor growth. Studies performed with synthetic inhibitors of MMP activity and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) have shown that suppression of MMP activity also suppresses tumor growth and metastasis. In many cases, the level of SL1 expression in tumors of the mammary gland and other tissues is positively correlated with the degree of malignancy. However, the only direct evidence for the nature of the MMPs involved was provided by the demonstration that function-blocking antibodies against gelatinase A and antisense inhibition of matrilysin expression decreased the invasiveness of tumor cells in a reconstituted basement membrane assay. These studies encouraged us to investigate whether SL1 plays a direct role in invasion of ECM. We used two carcinoma cell lines, TCL1 and SCg6 that formed rapidly growing, invasive tumors in vivo and migrated through Matrigel and collagen gels in culture. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against SL1 inhibited Matrigel invasion by TCL1 and SCg

Lochter, A.; Srebrow, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Terracio, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

1997-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Inhibitory actions of Ah receptor agonists and indole-containing compounds in breast cancer cell lines and mouse models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) binds synthetic and chemoprotective phytochemicals, and research in this laboratory has developed selective AhR modulators (SAhRMs) for treatment of breast cancer. Activation of the AhR through agonists such as TCDD inhibits hormone activation of several E2-responsive genes in breast cancer cell lines. In this study, inhibition of E2-induced proliferation and gene expression by TCDD has been investigated in the uterus of wildtype, ERKO and AhRKO mice. Cyclin D1, DNA polymerase ?, and VEGF mRNA levels are induced by E2 through ER? in the uterus as determined by in situ hybridization studies. TCDD down-regulated E2-induced cyclin D1 and DNA polymerase ? expression, but not E2-induced VEGF expression, in wild-type mice, but not AhRKO mice, confirming the role of the AhR. Furthermore, protein synthesis was not necessary for induction of cyclin D1 or DNA polymerase ?gene expression by E2 or inhibition of these responses by TCDD. Therefore, AhR-ER? crosstalk directly regulates the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation in vivo. AhR agonists induce down-regulation of ErbB family receptors in multiple tissues/organs suggesting possible inhibitory interactions with chemotherapeutic potential. Recently, it has been reported that the SAhRM 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane inhibited DMBA-induced mammary tumor growth in rats and also inhibited MAPK and PI3-K pathways in human breast cancer cells. BT-474 and MDA-MB-453 cell lines are ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells that express functional AhR and exhibit constitutive activation of MAPK and PI3-K pathways. Therefore, 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane-induced inhibition of ErbB2 signaling was investigated in these cells lines and in the MMTV-c-neu mouse mammary tumor model, which overexpresses ErbB2 in the mammary gland. The growth of ErbB2 overexpressing cell lines and mammary tumors was inhibited by 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane; however, modulation of MAPK or PI3-K pathways and cell cycle proteins nor induction of apoptosis by 1,1',2,2'-tetramethyldiindolylmethane was observed in the ErbB2overexpressing cell lines. Current studies are investigating mitochondrial effects of 1,1??,2,2??-tetramethyldiindolylmethane in the ErbB2-overexpressing cell lines, as well as continuing studies on gene expression profiles in the mammary glands of MMTV-c-neu mice to better understand and identify critical genes that are responsible for ErbB2-mediated transformation and growth of cancer cells/tumors.

Walker, Kelcey Manae Becker

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Interference by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin with cultured mouse submandibular gland branching morphogenesis involves reduced epidermal growth factor receptor signaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to mouse embryonic teeth, sharing features of early development with salivary glands in common, involves enhanced apoptosis and depends on the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. EGF receptor signaling, on the other hand, is essential for salivary gland branching morphogenesis. To see if TCDD impairs salivary gland morphogenesis and if the impairment is associated with EGF receptor signaling, we cultured mouse (NMRI) E13 submandibular glands with TCDD or TCDD in combination with EGF or fibronectin (FN), both previously found to enhance branching morphogenesis. Explants were examined stereomicroscopically and processed to paraffin sections. TCDD exposure impaired epithelial branching and cleft formation, resulting in enlarged buds. The glands were smaller than normal. EGF and FN alone concentration-dependently stimulated or inhibited branching morphogenesis but when co-administered with TCDD, failed to compensate for its effect. TCDD induced cytochrome P4501A1 expression in the glandular epithelium, indicating activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. TCDD somewhat increased epithelial apoptosis as observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated nick end-labeling method but the increase could not be correlated with morphological changes. The frequency of proliferating cells was not altered. Corresponding to the reduced cleft sites in TCDD-exposed explants, FN immunoreactivity in the epithelium was reduced. The results show that TCDD, comparably with EGF and FN at morphogenesis-inhibiting concentrations, impaired salivary gland branching morphogenesis in vitro. Together with the failure of EGF and FN at morphogenesis-stimulating concentrations to compensate for the effect of TCDD this implies that TCDD toxicity to developing salivary gland involves reduced EGF receptor signaling.

Kiukkonen, Anu [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland) and Department of Oral Pathology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: anummela@mappi.helsinki.fi; Sahlberg, Carin [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Partanen, Anna-Maija [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Alaluusua, Satu [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Pohjanvirta, Raimo [Academy of Finland, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Tuomisto, Jouko [Department of Environmental Health, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland); Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa [Department of Oral Pathology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Department of Pathology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Using ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional differences of mammary glands derived from mouse strains that differ in cancer susceptibility to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation sensitivity or resistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional differences of mammary glands derived from mouse strains that differ in cancer susceptibility to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation sensitivity or resistance Alvin Lo, Joni D. Mott, Jian-Hua Mao, and Mina J. Bissell Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 Goal: Within the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Low Dose SFA, as part of Project 2, we are using a systems genetics approach to determine the contribution of non-targeted and targeted radiation effects for risk of mammary carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to characterize the mammary gland of the parental mouse strains, and the F1 and F2 generations used in these studies with respect to tissue

99

HH Domain of Alzheimer’s Disease Ab Provides Structural Basis for Neuronal Binding in PC12 and Mouse Cortical/Hippocampal Neurons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key question in understanding AD is whether extracellular Ab deposition of parenchymal amyloid plaques or intraneuronal Ab accumulation initiates the AD process. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is endocytosed from the cell surface into endosomes where it is cleaved to produce soluble Ab which is then released into the brain interstitial fluid. Intraneuronal Ab accumulation is hypothesized to predominate from the neuronal uptake of this soluble extracellular Ab rather than from ER/Golgi processing of APP. We demonstrate that substitution of the two adjacent histidine residues of Ab40 results in a significant decrease in its binding with PC12 cells and mouse cortical/hippocampal neurons. These substitutions also result in a dramatic enhancement of both thioflavin-T positive fibril formation and binding to preformed Ab fibrils while maintaining its plaque-binding ability in AD transgenic mice. Hence, alteration of the histidine domain of Ab prevented neuronal binding and drove Ab to enhanced fibril formation and subsequent amyloid plaque deposition- a potential mechanism for removing toxic species of Ab. Substitution or even masking of these Ab histidine residues might provide a new therapeutic direction for minimizing neuronal uptake and subsequent neuronal degeneration and

Joseph F. Poduslo; Emily J. Gilles; Muthu Ramakrishnan; Kyle G. Howell; Thomas M. Wengenack; Geoffry L. Curran; Karunya K. K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

In vivo immunomodulatory effects of Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides in a T1/T2 doubly transgenic mouse model for inhibiting infection of Schistosoma mansoni  

SciTech Connect

Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata) is a fungus commonly used for treatment of viral hepatitis and cancer in Chinese folk medicine. Extract of A. camphorate is reported to possess anti-inflammatory, antihepatitis B virus and anticancer activities. In this study, we tested the in vivo effects of polysaccharides derived from A. camphorata (AC-PS) on immune function by detection of cytokine expression and evaluation of the immune phenotype in a T1/T2 doubly transgenic mouse model. The protective effect of AC-PS in mice was tested by infection with Schistosoma mansoni. The induction of large amounts of IFN-{gamma}, IL-2 and TNF-a mRNA were detected after 2 and 4 weeks of oral AC-PS administration in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. In transgenic mice, 3 to 6 weeks of oral AC-PS administration increased the proportion of CD4{sup +} T cells and B cells within the spleen. More specifically, there was an increase of Th1 CD4{sup +} T cells and Be1 cells among spleen cells as observed by detection the of Type1/Type2 marker molecules. By using a disease model of parasitic infection, we found that AC-PS treatment inhibited infection with S. mansoni in BALB/C and C57BL/6 mice. AC-PS appears to influence the immune system of mice into developing Th1 responses and have potential for preventing infection with S. mansoni.

Cheng, P.-C. [Institute of Tropical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, C.-Y. [Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.-C. [Biotechnology Center, Grape King Inc., Chungli, Taiwan (China); Lee, K.-M. [Institute of Tropical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kmlee@ctust.edu.tw

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ZIP4H (TEX11) Deficiency in the Mouse Impairs Meiotic Double Strand Break Repair and the Regulation of Crossing Over  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have recently shown that hypomorphic Mre11 complex mouse mutants exhibit defects in the repair of meiotic double strand breaks (DSBs). This is associated with perturbation of synaptonemal complex morphogenesis, repair and regulation of crossover formation. To further assess the Mre11 complex’s role in meiotic progression, we identified testis-specific NBS1interacting proteins via two-hybrid screening in yeast. In this screen, Zip4h (Tex11), a male germ cell specific X-linked gene was isolated. Based on sequence and predicted structural similarity to the S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana Zip4 orthologs, ZIP4H appears to be the mammalian ortholog. In S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana, Zip4 is a meiosis-specific protein that regulates the level of meiotic crossovers, thus influencing homologous chromosome segregation in these organisms. As is true for hypomorphic Nbs1 (Nbs1 DB/DB) mice, Zip4h 2/Y mutant mice were fertile. Analysis of spermatocytes revealed a delay in meiotic double strand break repair and decreased crossover formation as inferred from DMC1 and MLH1 staining patterns, respectively. Achiasmate chromosomes at the first meiotic division were also observed in Zip4h 2/Y mutants, consistent with the observed reduction in MLH1 focus formation. These results indicate that meiotic functions of Zip4 family members are conserved and support the view that the Mre11 complex and ZIP4H interact functionally during the execution of the

Carrie A. Adelman; John H. J. Petrini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Molecular analysis of the mouse agouti gene and the role of dominant agouti-locus mutations in obesity and insulin resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lethal yellow (A{sup y/-}) and viable yellow (A{sup vy/-}) mouse agouti mutants have a predominantly yellow pelage and display a complex syndrome that includes obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance, hallmark features of obesity-associated noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in humans. A new dominant agouti allele, A{sup iapy}, has recently been identified; like the A{sup vy} allele, it is homozygous viable and confers obesity and yellow fur in heterozygotes. The agouti gene was cloned and characterized at the molecular level. The gene is expressed in the skin during hair growth and is predicted to encode a 131 amino acid protein, that is likely to be a secreted factor. In both Ay/- and A{sup iapy}/- mice, the obesity and other dominant pleiotropic effects are associated with an ectopic expression of agouti in many tissues where the gene product is normally not produced. In Ay, a 170-kb deletion has occurred that causes an upstream promoter to drive the ectopic expression of the wild-type agouti coding exons. In A{sup iapy}, the coding region of the gene is expressed from a cryptic promoter within the LTR of an intracisternal A-particle (IAP), which has integrated within the region just upstream of the first agouti coding exon. Transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing the cloned agouti gene under the influence of the beta-actin and phosphoglycerate kinase promoters display obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and yellow coat color. This demonstrates unequivocally that ectopic expression of agouti is responsible for the yellow obese syndrome.

Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkinson, J.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of the Genetic and Nutritional Control of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in a Novel Mouse Model on Chromosome 7: An Insight into Insulin Signaling and Glucose Homeostasis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes, accounting for 90-95% of all diabetes cases in the US. Human obesity is a complex trait and can be studied using appropriate mouse models. A novel polygenic mouse model for studying the genetic and environmental contributions to and the physiological ramifications of obesity and related phenotypes is found in specific lines of mice bred and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Heterozygous mice with a maternally inherited copy of two radiation-induced deletions in the p region of mouse chromosome 7, p23DFioD and p30PUb, have significantly greater body fat and show hyperinsulinemia compared to the wild-type. A single gene, Atp10c, maps to this critical region and codes for a putative aminophospholipid translocase. Biochemical and molecular studies were initiated to gain insight into obesity and glucose homeostasis in these animals and to study the biological role of Atp10c in creating these phenotypes. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were standardized for the heterozygous p23DFioD and control mice on a custom-made diet containing 20% protein, 70% carbohydrate, and 10% fat (kcal). Atp10c expression profiles were also generated using Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Heterozygous p23DFioD animals showed insulin resistance after receiving a dose of either 0.375 or 0.75 U/kg Illetin R insulin. RT-PCR data also shows differences in Atp10c expression in the mutants versus control mice. Using these standardized biochemical assays, future studies will further the understanding of genetic and nutritional controls of glucose homeostasis and obesity in animal models and subsequently in human populations.

Nelson, S.; Dhar, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Effect of Dose Rate on the Frequency of Specific-Locus Mutations Induced in Mouse Spermatogonia is Restricted to Larger Lesions; a Retrospective Analysis of Historical Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of 19 large-scale germ-cell mutagenesis experiments conducted several decades ago led to the conclusion that low-LET radiation delivered to mouse spermatogonia at dose rates of 0.8 R/min and below induced only about one-third as many specific-locus mutations as did single, acute exposures at 24 R/min and above. A two-hit origin of the mutations was deemed unlikely in view of the then prevailing evidence for the small size of genetic lesions in spermatogonia. Instead, the dose-rate effect was hypothesized to be the result of a repair system that exists in spermatogonia, but not in more mature male reproductive cells. More recent genetic and molecular studies on the marker genes have identified the phenotypes associated with specific states of the mutant chromosomes, and it is now possible retrospectively to classify individual past mutations as "large lesions" or "other lesions". The mutation-frequency difference between high and low dose rates is restricted to the large lesion mutations, for which the dose-curve slopes differ by a factor exceeding 3.4. For other lesion mutations, there is essentially no difference between the slopes for protracted and acute irradiations; induced other lesions frequencies per unit dose remain similar for dose rates ranging over more than 7 orders of magnitude. For large lesions, these values rise sharply at dose rates >0.8 R/min, though they remain similar within the whole range of protracted doses, failing to provide evidence for a threshold dose rate. The downward bend at high doses that had been noted for X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations as a whole and ascribed to a positive correlation between spermatogonial death and mutation load is now found to be restricted to large lesion mutations. There is a marked difference between the mutation spectra (distributions among the seven loci) for large lesions and other lesions. Within each class, however, the spectra are similar for acute and protracted irradiation.

Russell, Liane B [ORNL; Hunsicker, Patricia R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

9. international mouse genome conference  

SciTech Connect

This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning  

SciTech Connect

mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]|[Kingston General Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci Mouse Strain-Dependent Variations in Sensitivity to Induction of Gamma-H2AX Foci after Continuous Low Dose-Rate Irradiation: The Atm-/- vs Atm +/+ genotypes on Balb/c, 129S6, C57BL/6J, and A/J inbred strains. J.R.Brogan 1 , H. Nagasawa 1 , T.A Kato 1 , C.Fallgren 1 , T.Wade 1 . P.Genik 1 , J.B.Little 2 , J.S.Bedford 1 , and M.M.Weil 1 1 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523; 2 Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston MA 02115 We have recently developed a 'low dose rate' gamma-H2AX assay that is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish differences in response for cells from normal Atm +/+ (mouse) or ATM+/+ (human) and the phenotypes associated with the corresponding

110

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-binding protein (PBP) but not PPAR-interacting protein (PRIP) is required for nuclear translocation of constitutive androstane receptor in mouse liver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates transcription of phenobarbital-inducible genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in liver. CAR is localized to the hepatocyte cytoplasm but to be functional, it translocates into the nucleus in the presence of phenobarbital-like CAR ligands. We now demonstrate that adenovirally driven EGFP-CAR, as expected, translocates into the nucleus of normal wild-type hepatocytes following phenobarbital treatment under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. Using this approach we investigated the role of transcription coactivators PBP and PRIP in the translocation of EGFP-CAR into the nucleus of PBP and PRIP liver conditional null mouse hepatocytes. We show that coactivator PBP is essential for nuclear translocation of CAR but not PRIP. Adenoviral expression of both PBP and EGFP-CAR restored phenobarbital-mediated nuclear translocation of exogenously expressed CAR in PBP null livers in vivo and in PBP null primary hepatocytes in vitro. CAR translocation into the nucleus of PRIP null livers resulted in the induction of CAR target genes such as CYP2B10, necessary for the conversion of acetaminophen to its hepatotoxic intermediate metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. As a consequence, PRIP-deficiency in liver did not protect from acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis, unlike that exerted by PBP deficiency. These results establish that transcription coactivator PBP plays a pivotal role in nuclear localization of CAR, that it is likely that PBP either enhances nuclear import or nuclear retention of CAR in hepatocytes, and that PRIP is redundant for CAR function.

Guo Dongsheng [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sarkar, Joy [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Ahmed, Mohamed R. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Viswakarma, Navin [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Jia Yuzhi [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Yu Songtao [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sambasiva Rao, M. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Reddy, Janardan K. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)]. E-mail: jkreddy@northwestern.edu

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pully-Belmont Chailly-Vuachre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mirabeau Rasude Jordils Beau- Rivage Elysée Dapples Epinettes Cour Beauregard Musée Olympique Pierraz

Lehmann, Laurent

112

Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment and are generated by many sources. Though the potential of PAH-rich mixtures to cause health effects has been known for almost a century, there are still unanswered questions about the levels of PAHs in the environment, the potential for human exposure to PAHs, the health effects associated with exposure, and how genetic susceptibility influences the extent of health effects in individuals. The first objective of this research was to quantify concentrations of PAHs in samples of settled house dust collected from homes in Azerbaijan, China, and Texas. The trends of PAH surface loadings and percentage of carcinogenic PAHs were China > Azerbaijan > Texas, indicating that the risk of health effects from exposure to PAHs in house dust is highest in the Chinese population and lowest in the Texas population. PAHs in China and Azerbaijan were derived mainly from combustion sources; Texas PAHs were derived from unburned fossil fuels such as petroleum. The second objective of this research was to investigate the effect of pregnane X receptor (PXR) on the genotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). BaP treatment resulted in significantly lower DNA adduct levels in PXR-transfected HepG2 cells than in parental HepG2 cells. Total GST enzymatic activity and mRNA levels of several metabolizing enyzmes were significantly higher in cells overexpressing PXR. These results suggest that PXR protects cells against DNA damage by PAHs such as BaP, possibly through a coordinated regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The third objective of this research was to investigate biomarkers of exposure in house mice (Mus musculus) exposed to PAH mixtures in situ. Mice and soil were collected near homes in Sumgayit and Khizi, Azerbaijan. Mean liver adduct levels were significantly higher in Khizi than in Sumgayit. Mean lung and kidney adduct levels were similar in the two regions. The DNA lesions detected may be a combination of environmentally-induced DNA adducts and naturally-occurring I-compounds. PAHs were present at background levels in soils from both Khizi and Sumgayit. It appears that health risks posed to rodents by soil-borne PAHs are low in these two areas.

Naspinski, Christine S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Developmental transitions of germ cell lineage of the mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mammalian germ cells arise during early embryogenesis and migrate to the developing gonad where, under the direction of the somatic environment, they initiate distinct sex-specific developmental programs resulting in the ...

Baltus, Andrew Edmund

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mouse Work: New Insights on a Fundamental DNA Repair ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of chemistry that keeps living cells alive, a team of researchers from the University of Vermont (UVM), the University of Utah, Vanderbilt University ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

From Mechanism to Mouse: A Tale of Two Bioorthogonal Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ioorthogonal reactions are chemical reactions that neither interact with nor interfere with a biological system. The participating functional groups must be inert to biological moieties, must selectively reactive with each other under biocompatible conditions, and, for in vivo applications, must be nontoxic to cells and organisms. Additionally, it is helpful if one reactive group is small and therefore minimally perturbing of a biomolecule into which it has been introduced either chemically or biosynthetically. Examples from the past decade suggest that a promising strategy for bioorthogonal reaction development begins with an analysis of functional group and reactivity space outside those defined by Nature. Issues such as stability of reactants and products (particularly in water), kinetics, and unwanted side reactivity with biofunctionalities must be addressed, ideally guided by detailed mechanistic studies. Finally, the reaction must be tested in a variety of environments, escalating from aqueous media to biomolecule solutions to cultured cells and, for the most optimized transformations, to live organisms. Work in our laboratory led to the development of two bioorthogonal transformations that exploit the azide as a small, abiotic, and bioinert reaction partner: the Staudinger ligation and strain-promoted azide alkyne cycloaddition. The Staudinger ligation is based on the classic Staudinger reduction of azides with triarylphosphines first reported in 1919. In the ligation reaction, the intermediate aza-ylide undergoes intramolecular reaction with an ester, forming an amide bond faster than aza-ylide hydrolysis would otherwise occur in water. The Staudinger ligation is highly selective and reliably forms its product in environs as demanding as live mice. However, the Staudinger ligation has some liabilities, such as the propensity of phosphine reagents to undergo air oxidation and the relatively slow kinetics of the reaction.

Ellen M. Sletten; Carolyn; R. Bertozzi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man  

SciTech Connect

We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

Haas, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Monitoring transient repolarization segment morphology deviations in mouse ECG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis details the design, implementation and validation of a system that facilitates partial automation for detection of anomalous repolarization segment morphologies in the ECG of mice. The technology consists of ...

Oefinger, Matthew Blake, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Investigation of the dog and mouse tissue archives using complementary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1952 and 1991 beagle dog experiments were carried out and the effects of external irradiation with Cobalt-60 were the main focus of this study. Numerous different 'standard'...

119

Cochlear hair cell regeneration from neonatal mouse supporting cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike lower vertebrates, capable of spontaneous hair cell regeneration, mammals experience permanent sensorineural hearing loss following hair cell damage. Although low levels of hair cell regeneration have been demonstrated ...

Bramhall, Naomi F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Pathology of EMT in Mouse Mammary Tumorigenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of experimental cancer research. A review. New York:London: Imperial Cancer Research Fund; 1911. 17. Jensen CO.of The Imperial Cancer Research Fund. London: Taylor and

Cardiff, Robert Darrell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mammalian genetics pioneer Liane Russell writes Mouse House history...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

effects of radiation as the developing Cold War provoked concern about radioactive fallout. William Russell's discovery of the factors that affect the frequency and nature of...

122

Conservation of exon scrambling in human and mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exon scrambling is a phenomenon in which the exons of an mRNA transcript are spliced in an order inconsistent with that of the genome. In this thesis, I present a computational analysis of scrambled exons in human and ...

Hamilton, Monica L. (Monica Lauren)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Tuning the photophysical properties of amidophosphine complexes of copper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of monomeric copper complexes that allow for the tuning of the emission properties is reported. Luminescence lifetimes up to 150 [mu]s are observed in benzene solution at ambient temperature, which are comparable ...

Mickenberg, Seth F. (Seth Fox)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Recombinant Production and Properties of Binding of the Full Set of Mouse Secreted Phospholipases A2 to the Mouse M-Type Receptor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is recommendations range from 10-80cm/d (Morel, 2006). Effect of surfactant such as LAS on irrigated soils and CWs feeding. 4. This study used Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS) as an indicator of surfactant in greywater. Effects of varying HLR (10-30cm/d), WL (0.3-0.5m) and N concentration (5-20mg/L) were determined 5

Gelb, Michael

125

Uterine deletion of Trp53 compromises antioxidant responses in mouse decidua  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preterm birth is a global health issue impacting both mothers and children. However, the etiology of preterm birth is not clearly understood. From our recent finding that premature decidual senescence with terminal differentiation is a cause of preterm birth in mice with uterine Trp53 deletion, encoding p53 protein, led us to explore other potential factors that are related to preterm birth. Utilizing proteomics approaches, here we show that 183 candidate proteins cause significant changes in decidua with Trp53 deletion as compared to normal decidua. Functional categorization of these proteins unveiled new pathways that are influenced by p53. In particular, downregulation of a cluster of antioxidant proteins in p53 deficient decidua suggests that increased oxidative stress could be one cause of preterm birth in mice with uterine deletion of Trp53.

Burnum, Kristin E.; Hirota, Yasushi; Baker, Erin Shammel; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Daikoku, Takiko; Dey, Sudhansu K.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Sex Chromosome Trisomy mouse model of XXY and XYY: metabolism and motor performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synuclein shows improvement in motor function and reductionof XXY and XYY: metabolism and motor performance. Biology ofand XYY: metabolism and motor performance Xuqi Chen 1,3† ,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Mechanisms of ocular dominance plasticity in the juvenile and adult mouse visual cortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocular dominance (OD) plasticity is a classic example of bidirectional experience-dependent plasticity in the primary visual cortex. This form of plasticity is most robust during early postnatal development (termed the ...

Khibnik, Lena A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Dicer deletion and short RNA expression analysis in mouse embryonic stem cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RNA interference (RNAi) manages many aspects of eukaryotic gene expression through sequence-specific interactions with RNA. Short RNAs, 20-30 nucleotides in length, guide the various effector proteins of RNAi to silence ...

Calabrese, Joseph Mauro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Auditory Processing and Ultrasonic Vocalization Production in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A rate tuning index (RTI) was quantified to determine theTrujillo et al. , 2011): RTI = [(n /(n-1)] x [1 – (mean/The rate tuning index (RTI) was used as a measure of FM rate

Rotschafer, Sarah Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cortical Processing of Frequency Modulated Sweeps in a Mouse Model of Presbycusis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

79 Figure 3.7 RTI is influenced by sweepHigh frequency inhibition RTI: Rate Tuning Index SP: Slow-the rate tuning index (RTI) was calculated for each neuron

Trujillo, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Neuroinformatics for Genome-Wide 3-D Gene Expression Mapping in the Mouse Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large scale gene expression studies in the mammalian brain offer the promise of understanding the topology, networks and ultimately the function of its complex anatomy, opening previously unexplored avenues in neuroscience. High-throughput methods permit ... Keywords: Bioinformatics (genome or protein) databases, Data mining, Registration, Segmentation, Information Visualization

Lydia Ng; Sayan Pathak; Chihchau Kuan; Chris Lau; Hong-wei Dong; Andrew Sodt; Chinh Dang; Brian Avants; Paul Yushkevich; James Gee; David Haynor; Ed Lein; Allan Jones; Mike Hawrylycz

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A new mouse model to probe the role of aflatoxin B? in liver carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One and a half million new cancer cases are reported each year in the United States. Despite this overwhelming burden of disease, current preventative treatments and early detection techniques are inadequate. With cancers, ...

Bouhenguel, Jason T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development, characterization and transcriptional profiling of a mouse model of fatal infectious diarrhea and colitis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Citrobacter rodentium is a naturally occurring murine bacterial pathogen which is used to model human diarrheagenic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC) infections in mice. C. rodentium causes colonic hyperplasia and a variable degree ...

Borenshtein, Diana

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Behavior of Tritium in the Mouse Body After Oral Intake and Estimation of the Absorbed Dose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biology / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Masahiro Saito

135

Analysis of pluripotent mouse stem cell proteomes : insights into post- transcriptional regulation of pluripotency and differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX24 D19Bwg1357e D19Bwg1357eof Probable ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX27 Nol10 NucleolarDdx18 ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX18 Nolc1 Plk1 Rrp12

O'Brien, Robert Norman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Predicted mouse peroxisome-targeted proteins and their actual subcellular locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sequences that con- tained only motifs incompatible with peroxisomal locali- zation (e.g., RNA-helicase (IPR0006050)), or that were supported by an unequivocal PSORT II [17] nuclear local- ization were eliminated. In addition, we predicted protein solubility...

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

137

Interspecies Scaling of Self-Organ Doses from a Voxel Mouse to Voxel Humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dose/Dose Rate / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 1) / Radiation Protection

Sakae Kinase; Shinpei Matsuhashi; Kimiaki Saito

138

System for remote multichannel real-time monitoring of mouse ECG via the Internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hardware/software system was developed to allow real-time monitoring of multiple physiological signals simultaneously via the Internet. The hardware is specifically designed for measuring ECG signals from mice, while the ...

Oefinger, Matthew Blake, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Inactivation of mouse Twisted gastrulation reveals its role in promoting Bmp4 activity during forebrain development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1452. Meyers, E. N. , Lewandoski, M. and Martin, G. R. (Sun, X. , Meyers, E. N. , Lewandoski, M. and Martin, G. R. (

De Robertis, Edward M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE An Fgf8 mouse mutant phenocopies human 22q11 deletion syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microdeletion detected in humans, is associated with a lifethreatening array of birth defects. Although 90 % of affected individuals share the same three megabase deletion, their phenotype is highly variable and includes craniofacial and cardiovascular anomalies, hypoplasia or aplasia of the thymus with associated deficiency of T cells, hypocalcemia with hypoplasia or aplasia of the parathyroids, and a variety of central nervous system abnormalities. Because ablation of neural crest in chicks produces many features of the deletion 22q11 syndrome, it has been proposed that haploinsufficiency in this region impacts neural crest function during cardiac and pharyngeal arch development. Few factors required for migration, survival, proliferation and subsequent differentiation of pharyngeal arch neural crest and

Deborah U. Frank; Lori K. Fotheringham; Judson A. Brewer; Louis J. Muglia; Martin Tristani-firouzi; Mario R. Capecchi; Anne M. Moon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Early tissue patterning recreated by mouse embryonic fibroblasts in a three-dimensional environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular self-organization studies have been mainly focused on models such as Volvox, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and animal (metazoan) embryos. Moreover, animal tissues undergoing regeneration also exhibit ...

Quintana, Lluis

142

Comparative meta-analysis between human and mouse cancer microarray data reveals critical pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of deregulated biomolecular pathways in cancer may be more important than identification of individual genes through differential expression. We have analysed data from 87 microarray datasets, spanning 25 different types of cancer, and ...

Pankaj Chopra; Jaewoo Kang; Seung-Mo Hong

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Eye-opening and control of visual synapse development in the mouse superior colliculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mammalian superior colliculus (SC) coordinates visual, somatosensory, and auditory stimuli to guide animal behavior. The superficial layers (sSC) receive visual information via two major afferent projections: 1) A ...

Phillips, Marnie A. (Marnie Ann)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Cognitive dysfunction and prefrontal synaptic abnormalities in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the hallmark phenotypes reported in individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are deficits in attentional function, inhibitory control, and cognitive flexibility, a set of cognitive skills thought to be associated ...

Krueger, Dilja D.

145

16 January 09 MHVUniversity College London Nick 07Mouse Health Monitoring Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are controlled through a secure LIMS and released on the approval of the Laboratory Services Manager. Harlan are controlled through a secure LIMS and released on the approval of the Laboratory Services Manager. Harlan a secure LIMS and released on the approval of the Laboratory Services Manager. Harlan Laboratories, Inc

Richardson, William D.

146

The bone diagnostic instrument III: Testing mouse femora Connor Randall,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the maximum load is used in instrumented inden- tation analysis, as discussed by Oliver and Pharr,3 for obtain and distance are monitored by transducers, which are then analyzed through OSTEOPROBE IITM software. Each cycle and to minimize the effect of the remaining creep during the linear decrease in load. This type of hold

Hansma, Paul

147

MOUSE ORGAN HARVEST PROTOCOL 10/01 TO FREEZE TISSUES FOR FROZEN SECTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bits of dry ice and 2 methyl butane. This will be the freezing mixture which will freeze the organs OCT turns white 9. Remove plastic molds with frozen organs from dry ice/ 2 methyl butane and let them No 15160-215 3. Frozen sample write-on bags: VWR Cat. No: 01-002-37 4. 2 methyl butane: Fisher Cat. No

Abagyan, Ruben

148

Regionalisation of the mouse visceral endoderm as the blastocyst transforms into the egg cylinder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, respectively E5.5L and E5.5D. Green fluorescent projection of a confocal z series merged with a transmitted light section are shown. (B, E) VE clones labelled with a red nuclear marker. The two sides of the conceptus are shown as a red fluorescent projection... with labelled VE cells. Only E4.7-E5.0 conceptuses which had a clearly visible extra-embryonic region (EEC stage) were considered. *Frequencies as in Weber et al., 1999 A B C D ...

Perea-Gomez, Aitana; Meilhac, Sigolene M; Piotrowska-Nitsche, Karolina; Gray, Dionne; Collignon, Jerome; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

Mouse and touchscreen selection in the upper and lower visual fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neuroanatomical evidence indicates the human eye's visual field can be functionally divided into two vertical hemifields, each specialized for specific functions. The upper visual field (UVF) is specialized to support perceptual tasks in the distance, ... Keywords: Fitts Law, interactive displays, mice, pointing, touchscreens, visual fields

Barry A. Po; Brian D. Fisher; Kellogg S. Booth

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the Avy Mouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Center Abstract Background: Humans have evolved and thrived amidst constant low-dose (0-10 cGy) background radiation exposure from natural sources. Currently, however, the...

151

Particulate Matter in Polluted Air May IncreaseBiomarkers of Inflammation in Mouse Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sample and unlabelled NF-kB consensus oligonu- cleotide, NSCendothelial cells: role of NF-kB activation. J Immunol 2001;EN, Krappmann D, Scheidereit C. NF-kB and the innate immune

Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effects of melatonin and age on gene expression in mouseCNS using microarray analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gene contains an activation site for NF-kB (Cowland et al. ,and levels of activated NF-kB increase in murine cortex withThus, increased levels of NF-kB activation in the aged brain

Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Characterisation of microRNA expression in post-natal mouse mammary gland development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Inmaculada Spiteri1, Konstantina Karagavriilidou1, Christine J Watson6, Simon Tavaré2,5, Eric A Miska*4 and Carlos Caldas*1 Address: 1Breast Cancer Functional Genomics Laboratory, Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute and Department of Oncology... .spiteri@cancer.org.uk; Konstantina Karagavriilidou - kk406@cam.ac.uk; Christine J Watson - cjw53@mole.bio.cam.ac.uk; Simon Tavaré - simon.tavare@cancer.org.uk; Eric A Miska* - e.miska@gurdon.cam.ac.uk; Carlos Caldas* - carlos.caldas@cancer.org.uk * Corresponding authors †Equal...

Avril-Sassen, Stefanie; Goldstein, Leonard D; Stingl, John; Blenkiron, Cherie; Le Quesne, John; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Karagavriilidou, Konstantina; Watson, Christine J; Tavare, Simon; Miska, Eric A; Caldas, Carlos

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

Histone deacetylase 2 is required for chromatin condensation and subsequent enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: During the final stages of differentiation of mammalian erythroid cells, the chromatin is condensed and enucleated. We previously reported that Rac GTPases and their downstream target, mammalian homolog of ...

Ji, Peng

155

Spatial Arrangement of Microglia in the Mouse Hippocampus: A Stereological Study in Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solitons Fractals 7, 585 (1996); P. Kastanek, J. Kosek, D. Snita, I. Schreiber, and M. Marek, Physica (Amsterdam) 84D, 79 (1995); H. Sevciková, J. Kosek, and M. Marek, J. Phys. Chem. 100, 1666 (1996); M. Gómez

Schmidt, Volker

156

The role of vitamin D3 upregulated protein 1 in thioacetamide-induced mouse hepatotoxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thioacetamide (TA) is a commonly used drug that can trigger acute hepatic failure (AHF) through generation of oxidative stress. Vitamin D3 upregulated protein 1 (VDUP1) is an endogenous inhibitor of thioredoxin, a ubiquitous thiol oxidoreductase, that regulates cellular redox status. In this study, we investigated the role of VDUP1 in AHF using a TA-induced liver injury model. VDUP1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to a single intraperitoneal TA injection, and various parameters of hepatic injury were assessed. VDUP1 KO mice displayed a significantly higher survival rate, lower serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, and less hepatic damage, compared to WT mice. In addition, induction of apoptosis was decreased in VDUP1 KO mice, with the alteration of caspase-3 and -9 activities, Bax-to-Bcl-2 expression ratios, and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Importantly, analysis of TA bioactivation revealed lower plasma clearance of TA and covalent binding of [{sup 14}C]TA to liver macromolecules in VDUP1 KO mice. Furthermore, the level of oxidative stress was significantly less in VDUP1 KO mice than in their WT counterparts, as evident from lipid peroxidation assay. These results collectively indicate that VDUP1 deficiency protects against TA-induced acute liver injury via lower bioactivation of TA and antioxidant effects.

Kwon, Hyo-Jung [Biomedical Mouse Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jong-Hwan [B and C Biopharm, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jong-Tak; Lee, Sae-Bhom; Yoon, Won-Kee; Nam, Ki-Hoan [Biomedical Mouse Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, In-Pyo [Cell Therapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae-Yong [Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Young-Suk, E-mail: yswon@kribb.re.k [Biomedical Mouse Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-Chin, E-mail: hckim@kribb.re.k [Biomedical Mouse Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Functional studies of signaling pathways in peri-implantation development of the mouse embryo by RNAi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work... % of group 1 embryos (n = 11), Lefty-1 expression was found at or close to the DVE (f') (E6.5 n = 3/6; E7.5 n = 3/5). Accordingly, the expression of Cer-l was also found to be restricted to the DVE in all defective embryos essayed (n') (n = 5). In over 50...

Soares, Miguel L; Haraguchi, Seiki; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena; Kalmar, Tibor; Carpenter, Lee; Bell, Graham; Morrison, Alastair; Ring, Christopher J A; Clarke, Neil J; Glover, David M; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

2005-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Gene copy number studies in archived and fresh mouse tissue samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sections from archived samples were used for DNA isolation and quantitative real time PCR amplification that revealed variations in mitochondrial gene copy numbers in different...

159

Conservation and divergence in the transcriptional programs of the human and mouse immune systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much of the knowledge about cell differentiation and function in the immune system has come from studies in mice, but the relevance to human immunology, diseases, and therapy has been challenged, perhaps more from anecdotal ...

Shay, Tal

160

A novel cell culture model for studying differentiation and apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for approxi- mately 20 passages. No change in phenotype is observed with careful handling. Immunocytochemistry Cells were grown subconfluently on collagen-coated glass coverslips in four-well plates or on plastic slide flasks (Nunc/Nalge Europe, Hereford, UK... ). The cells were fixed in methanol:acetone for 10 min, washed with Tris-buffered saline (TBS) pH 7.6, blocked in TBS + 20% goat serum for 1 h, and then immunostained with a panel of primary antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies to cytokeratin 18 and 19 were from...

Gordon, Katrina E; Binas, Bert; Chapman, Rachel S; Kurian, Kathreena M; Clarkson, Richard W E; Clark, A John; Birgitte Lane, E; Watson, Christine J

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development and characterization of a novel variable low-dose rate irradiator for in vivo mouse studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation exposure of humans generally results in low doses delivered at low dose rate. Our limited knowledge of the biological effects of low dose radiation is mainly based on data from the atomic bomb Life Span Study ...

Davidson, Matthew Allen

163

The characterization of a mouse model of transient stroke using ex vivo MR microscopy and in vivo MR imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disrupted blood-brain barrier after an ischemic attack can cause vasogenic edema and increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation. Therefore, early detection and monitoring of BBB damage is important in the pathological ...

Huang, Shuning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Loss of Hsp70 Exacerbates Pathogenesis But Not Levels of Fibrillar Aggregates in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Endogenous protein quality control machinery has long been suspected of influencing the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of misfolded proteins. Huntington's disease (HD) ...

Lindquist, Susan

165

Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man. Annual performance report, June 1, 1991--October 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable? Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells? What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate? During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

Haas, M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Chronic cisplatin treatment promotes enhanced damage repair and tumor progression in a mouse model of lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment, yet the mechanisms of response to specific therapies have been largely unexplored in vivo. Employing genetic, genomic, and imaging approaches, we examined ...

Oliver, Trudy Gale

167

Underlying mitochondrial dysfunction triggers flutamide-induced oxidative liver injury in a mouse model of idiosyncratic drug toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Flutamide, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-androgen, but not its bioisostere bicalutamide, has been associated with idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. Although the susceptibility factors are unknown, mitochondrial injury has emerged as a putative hazard of flutamide. To explore the role of mitochondrial sensitization in flutamide hepatotoxicity, we determined the effects of superimposed drug stress in a murine model of underlying mitochondrial abnormalities. Male wild-type or heterozygous Sod2{sup +/-} mice were injected intraperitoneously with flutamide (0, 30 or 100 mg/kg/day) for 28 days. A kinetic pilot study revealed that flutamide (100 mg/kg/day) caused approximately 10-fold greater exposure than the reported therapeutic mean plasma levels. Mutant (5/10), but not wild-type, mice in the high-dose group exhibited small foci of hepatocellular necrosis and an increased number of apoptotic hepatocytes. Hepatic GSSG/GSH, protein carbonyl levels, and serum lactate levels were significantly increased, suggesting oxidant stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Measurement of mitochondrial superoxide in cultured hepatocytes demonstrated that mitochondria were a significant source of flutamide-enhanced oxidant stress. Indeed, mitochondria isolated from flutamide-treated Sod2{sup +/-} mice exhibited decreased aconitase activity as compared to vehicle controls. A transcriptomics analysis using MitoChips revealed that flutamide-treated Sod2{sup +/-} mice exhibited a selective decrease in the expression of all complexes I and III subunits encoded by mitochondrial DNA. In contrast, Sod2{sup +/-} mice receiving bicalutamide (50 mg/kg/day) did not reveal any hepatic changes. These results are compatible with our concept that flutamide targets hepatic mitochondria and exerts oxidant stress that can lead to overt hepatic injury in the presence of an underlying mitochondrial abnormality.

Kashimshetty, Rohini [University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Desai, Varsha G. [Center for Functional Genomics, Division of Systems Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR, 72079 (United States); Kale, Vijay M. [University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Korea University, Department of Information and Mathematics, Jochiwon, 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Moland, Carrie L.; Branham, William S. [Center for Functional Genomics, Division of Systems Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR, 72079 (United States); New, Lee S.; Chan, Eric C.Y. [National University of Singapore, Department of Pharmacy, 117543 Singapore (Singapore); Younis, Husam [Pfizer Global Research and Development, San Diego, CA, 92121 (United States); Boelsterli, Urs A. [University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Storrs, CT, 06269 (United States)], E-mail: urs.boelsterli@uconn.edu

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Response of the mouse fetus to radiation from Na/sup 99m/TcO$sub 4$  

SciTech Connect

The element technetium has recently assumed ecological importance as a source of low-level radiation, with the use of /sup 99m/Tc in nuclear medicine and production of /sup 99m/Tc during generation of electricity by nuclear reaction. When technetium is introduced as pertechnetate into the blood stream of pregnant females, it is transported across the placental barrier to the fetus, where a portion appears to be incorporated into biomolecules. When combined as biomolecules, radionuclides that decay by electron capture or isomeric transition show a lethality greater than that predicted in cell cultures and radiation therapy. The decay of /sup 99m/Tc by isomeric transition, together with the other considerations, places a high priority on the investigation of its radiation effects due to clinical doses of up to 25 mCi. Female mice were given daily i.v. injections of 0, 5, 50, and 500 $mu$ Ci of /sup 99m/Tc as pertechnetate in isotonic saline throughout gestation, gestation and lactation, or lactation. At two months of age, the progeny were mated with randomly selected litter mates to produce a second generation; the process was repeated with their progeny for production of the third generation.Preliminary results reinforce the existing concern about use of /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate in pregnant or potentially pregnant subjects. (auth)

Lathrop, K.A.; Gloria, I.V.; Harper, P.V.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

GLUCOSE METABOLITE PATTERNS AS MARKERS OF FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN FRESHLY ISOLATED AND CULTURED MOUSE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS  

SciTech Connect

In the mammary gland of nonruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lactation. We have measured the incorporation of glucose carbon from [U-{sup 14}C] glucose into intermediary metabolites and metabolic products in mammary epithelial cells from virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice and demonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate were important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells from pregnant mice have a pattern similar to freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. The pattern of cells from lactating mice is different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of the cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

2008 Special Issue: Combining experts in order to identify binding sites in yeast and mouse genomic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification of cis-regulatory binding sites in DNA is a difficult problem in computational biology. To obtain a full understanding of the complex machinery embodied in genetic regulatory networks it is necessary to know both the identity of the ... Keywords: Computational biology, Imbalanced data, Sampling, Support vector machine, Transcription factor binding sites

Mark Robinson; Cristina González Castellano; Faisal Rezwan; Rod Adams; Neil Davey; Alastair Rust; Yi Sun

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recombinant stromelysin-1 (SL-1) on invasion and migration?2, ?6, or ?1 integrin subunits with (+ SL-1, black bars)or without (- SL-1, white bars) the addition of recombinant

Lochter, Andre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mutation rate in the post-chernobyl families from ukraine.mutation rate after the Chernobyl accident. Nature 380, 683-fallout following the Chernobyl accident (Dubrova et al. ,

Marchetti, Francesco

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Epigenetic Effects on Integration of Limb Lengths in a Mouse Model: Selective Breeding for High Voluntary Locomotor Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physiology, 65, 1231–1237. Herring, S. W. , Decker, J. D. ,doi:10.1002/ar.10049. Herring, S. W. , & Teng, S. (2000).relate to strains on bone (Herring and Teng 2000), and that

Young, Nathan M.; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Garland, Theodore

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Analysis of the mouse embryonic stem cell regulatory networks obtained by ChIP-chip and ChIP-PET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Genome-wide approaches have begun to reveal the transcriptional networks responsible for pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed either by hybridization to a ...

Mathur, Divya

175

Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

smoke for 2 weeks. Arch Bio- chem Biophys 465:336–346 Genessupplementation. J Nutr Bio- chem 16:385–397 66. Siler U,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Multiple nuclear loci reveal patterns of incomplete lineage sorting and complex species history within western mouse lemurs (Microcebus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of karyotypic fission theory. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 97: 9493­9497. KOUYOS, R.D., OTTO, S.P. & BONHOEFFER, S

Yoder, Anne

177

Chromatin condensation in terminally differentiating mouse erythroblasts does not involve special architectural proteins but depends on histone deacetylation  

SciTech Connect

Terminal erythroid differentiation in vertebrates is characterized by progressive heterochromatin formation, chromatin condensation and, in mammals, culminates in nuclear extrusion. To date, although mechanisms regulating avian erythroid chromatin condensation have been identified, little is known regarding this process during mammalian erythropoiesis. To elucidate the molecular basis for mammalian erythroblast chromatin condensation, we used Friend virus-infected murine spleen erythroblasts that undergo terminal differentiation in vitro. Chromatin isolated from early and late stage erythroblasts had similar levels of linker and core histones, only a slight difference in nucleosome repeats, and no significant accumulation of known developmentally-regulated architectural chromatin proteins. However, histone H3(K9) dimethylation markedly increased while histone H4(K12) acetylation dramatically decreased and became segregated from the histone methylation as chromatin condensed. One histone deacetylase, HDAC5, was significantly upregulated during the terminal stages of Friend virus-infected erythroblast differentiation. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A, blocked both chromatin condensation and nuclear extrusion. Based on our data, we propose a model for a unique mechanism in which extensive histone deacetylation at pericentromeric heterochromatin mediates heterochromatin condensation in vertebrate erythroblasts that would otherwise be mediated by developmentally-regulated architectural proteins in nucleated blood cells.

Popova, Evgenya Y.; Krauss, Sharon Wald; Short, Sarah A.; Lee, Gloria; Villalobos, Jonathan; Etzell, Joan; Koury, Mark J.; Ney, Paul A.; Chasis, Joel Anne; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

Jian Li

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

High concentrations of morphine sensitize and activate mouse dorsal root ganglia via TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Nature 1980, 284:351-353. 19. Coggeshall RE, Zhou S, Carlton SM: Opioid receptors on periph- eral sensory axons. Brain Res 1997, 764:126-132. 20. Truong W, Cheng C, Xu QG, Li XQ, Zochodne DW: Mu opioid receptors and analgesia at the site of a peripheral...

Forster, Alexander B; Reeh, Peter; Messlinger, Karl; Fischer, Michael J M

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

Relationship between the tissue-specificity of mouse gene expression and the evolutionary origin and function of the proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to few tissues [9]. In germ cells, where lactate is a preferred energy source [10], we observe specific expression of Ldhc (testis-specific expression). The expression of Ldhc is an example of a function occurring in the ancestral unicellular cell... , Schaffer AA, Zhang J, Zhang Z, Miller W, Lip- man DJ: Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs. Nucleic Acids Res 1997, 25:3389-3402. 25. Janssen P, Enright AJ, Audit B, Cases I, Goldovsky L, Harte N, Kunin V...

Freilich, Shiri; Massingham, Tim; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Ponstingl, Hannes; Lyons, Paul A; Freeman, Tom C; Thornton, Janet M

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from ...

Hamblin, Michael R.

182

Chromatin condensation in terminally differentiating mouse erythroblasts does not involve special architectural proteins but depends on histone deacetylation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P.T. (2004) To the 30-nm chromatin fiber and beyond. BiochimC.D. ( 2005) RNA meets chromatin. Genes Dev, 19, 1635-1655.proteins induce large-scale chromatin reorganization during

Popova, Evgenya Y.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Investigation of T cell-mediated immune surveillance against tumor-specific antigens in genetically engineered mouse models of cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The association of tumor cells and lymphocytes has led to the hypothesis that our immune system actively inhibits the formation and progression of cancer, a phenomenon called tumor immune surveillance. T cells specific to ...

Du Page, Michel Justin Porter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Integrin alpha 5 beta 1 is necessary for regulation of radial migration of cortical neurons during mouse brain development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During cerebral cortex development, post-mitotic neurons interact with radial glial fibers and the extracellular environment to migrate away from the ventricular region and form a correct laminar structure. Integrin receptors ...

Marchetti, Giovanni

185

Synergistic Effects of Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles and Doxorubicin on Short-Term Survival of Mouse Mammary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synergistic Effects of Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles and Doxorubicin on Short-Term Survival and incubated for 24 hours at 37 °C, 100% humidity and 5% CO2 . The efficacies of the drug only and ultrasound-activated 24 hoursof treat- ment using the MTT Cell Proliferation Assay. The combined therapy resulted in 60

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

186

Google's Loss: The Public's Gain APRIL 28, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google's Loss: The Public's Gain APRIL 28, 2011 Robert Darnton Musée du Louvre, Paris Jean a postmortem on Google's attempt to digitize and sell millions of books, despite the decision by Judge Denny Chin on March 23 to reject the agreement that seemed to make Google's project possible. Google Book

Hofri, Micha

187

Between MDPs and Semi-MDPs: A Framework for Temporal Abstraction in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a distant city, as well as primitive actions such as mus- cle twitches and joint torques. Overall, we show to a distant city. To decide whether or not to go, the benefits of the trip must be weighed against the expense this ability to work flexibly with multiple overlapping time scales? Temporal abstraction has been explored

Sutton, Richard S.

188

Primordial Germ Cell Differentiation in Vitro: A Model for Understanding Epigenetic Reprogramming and Genome-Wide DNA Demethylation in Mouse Primordial Germ Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Merge C IAP ESC e10.5 Oct4 D iPGC A Figure 2-2. iPGCs haveBlimp1 fl/fl G Fold Change in iPGC Differentiation F 2° Ab %Library CG CHG CHH CA CC CT iPGC mBS44 ES mBS47 iPGC mBS48

Vincent, John J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The MAPKERK-1,2 pathway integrates distinct and antagonistic signals from TGF alpha and FGF7 in morphogenesis of mouse mammary epithelium  

SciTech Connect

Transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF7) exhibit distinct expression patterns in the mammary gland. Both factors signal through mitogen-activated kinase/extracellular regulated kinase-1,2 (MAPK{sup ERK1,2}); however, their unique and/or combined contributions to mammary morphogenesis have not been examined. In ex vivo mammary explants, we show that a sustained activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} for 1 h, induced by TGF{alpha}, was necessary and sufficient to initiate branching morphogenesis, whereas a transient activation (15 min) of MAPK{sup ERK1,2}, induced by FGF7, led to growth without branching. Unlike TGF{alpha}, FGF7 promoted sustained proliferation as well as ectopic localization of, and increase in, keratin-6 expressing cells. The response of the explants to FGF10 was similar to that to FGF7. Simultaneous stimulation by FGF7 and TGF{alpha} indicated that the FGF7-induced MAPK{sup ERK1,2} signaling and associated phenotypes were dominant: FGF7 may prevent branching by suppression of two necessary TGF{alpha}-induced morphogenetic effectors, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3/stromelysin-1), and fibronectin. Our findings indicate that expression of morphogenetic effectors, proliferation, and cell-type decisions during mammary organoid morphogenesis are intimately dependent on the duration of activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} activation.

Fata, Jimmie E; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ewald, Andrew J; Zhang, Hui; Yao, Evelyn; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

190

Construction and analysis of tag single nucleotide polymorphism maps for six human-mouse orthologous candidate genes in type 1 diabetes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acad Sci U S A 100:14982-14987, 2003 4. Lyons PA, Hancock WW, Denny P, Lord CJ, Hill NJ, Armitage N, Siegmund T, Todd JA, Phillips MS, Hess JF, Chen SL, Fischer PA, Peterson LB, Wicker LS: The NOD Idd9 genetic interval influences the pathogenicity... AV, Alt FW, Faccio R, Brown T, Hoog J, Fredericks J, Nishi S, Mildiner S, Moores SL, Brugge J, Rosen FS, Swat W: Vav1/2/3-null mice define an essential role for Vav family proteins in lymphocyte development and activation but a differential...

Maier, Lisa M; Smyth, Deborah J; Vella, Adrian; Payne, Felicity; Cooper, Jason D; Pask, Rebecca; Lowe, Christopher E; Hulme, John S; Smink, Luc J; Fraser, Heather; Moule, Carolyn; Hunter, Kara M; Chamberlain, Giselle; Walker, Neil M; Nutland, Sarah; Undlien, Dag E; Ronningen, Kjersti S; Guja, Cristian; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; Savage, David A; Strachan, David P; Peterson, Laurence B; Todd, John A; Wicker, Linda S; Twells, Rebecca C J

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

Integrated analyses of chromatin accessibility and gene expression data for elucidating the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms during early hematopoietic development in mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a given cellular differentiation state. Acknowledgements MS Vijayabaskar presents the computational part of the work on behalf of the group. Author details 1School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK. 2School... 2013 1School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK Full list of author information is available at the end of the article Viiavabaskar et al. Epigenetics & Chromatin 2013, 6(Suppl 1):P50 http...

Viiavabaskar, Mahalingam S; Obier, Nadine; Pearson, Stella; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Lichtinger, Monika; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; Gottgens, Bertie; Bonifer, Constanze; Westhead, David R

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

CELL POPULATIONS AND CELL PROLIFERATION IN THE IN VITRO RESPONSE OF NORMAL MOUSE SPLEEN TO HETEROLOGOUS ERYTHROCYTES*,$ ANALYSIS BY "£1i1 ~ HOT PULSE TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown in the accompanying paper (1) that spleen cell suspensions from normal mice can be immunized to heterologous erythrocytes in an in vitro system. When sheep erythrocytes are added at the initiation of culture, the number of antibody-forming cells (as determined by the hemolytic plaque assay) rises from an initial value of approximately 1 per 106 to 1,000 per 10 e recovered cells 4 days later in a typical experiment. The kinetics of the response follow an approximately exponential form at least in the later time periods. The assay system measures 19S antibodyforming cells (2) and the response is "primary " in the sense that it follows the first experimental exposure to antigen. Previous in vivo studies have indicated that the increase is largely the result of proliferation of precursor cells and they have further suggested that cell proliferation begins after an 18-24 hr lag period (for a review see reference 3). These studies, however, leave some room for doubt, as will be discussed below, and the problem has been reinvestigated in this in vitro system as part of a more general analysis of the cellular response to antigen. The questions asked here are: (a) at what times during the

W. Dutton, Ph.D.; Robert; I. Mishell

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Parity induces differentiation and reduces Wnt/Notch signaling ratio and proliferation potential of basal stem/progenitor cells isolated from mouse mammary epithelium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meier-Abt et al. Breast Cancer Research 2013, 15:R36 http://Meier-Abt et al. Breast Cancer Research 2013, 15:R36 http://epithelium. Breast Cancer Research 2013 15:R36. Submit your

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate causes limited transcriptional change in mouse embryonic stem cells but selectively overrides Polycomb-mediated Hoxb silencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, perhaps because this facilitates the transient attachment of HATs and HDACs [21]. Gene silencing is a multi-layered process, involving the combinatorial actions of histone and DNA modifications, chromatin condensation, DNA binding proteins, small RNAs... of other antisera are shown in Additional file 1: Table S4. Specificities were assayed by inhibition ELISA for all in-house and commercial antisera [55] and checked by western blotting. Protein analysis Histones were extracted from ES cells by acid...

Boudadi, Elsa; Stower, Hannah; Halsall, John A; Rutledge, Charlotte E; Leeb, Martin; Wutz, Anton; O’Neill, Laura P; Nightingale, Karl P; Turner, Bryan M

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Systematic examination of the impact of pre-stimulus alpha- mu and gamma band oscillations on perception : correlative and causal manipulation in mouse and human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The over-arching hypothesis that drives my work is that neural dynamics, fluctuating on millisecond to second time scales, powerfully impact perception. In this thesis, I employ correlative electrophysiological recording ...

Pritchett, Dominique L. (Dominique Leon)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Increased hepatic oxidative metabolism distinguishes the action of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta from Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the ob/ob mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, consistent with this receptor being involved in regulating white adipose tissue storage of triglycerides and adipocyte expandability [25]. The glucogenic amino acids (those that are precursors of glucose in gluconeogenesis), glycine, glutamate, glutamine... HDL cholesterol concentrations. Activation of PPAR? increases the expres- sion of the cholesterol efflux pump ATP-binding cassette transporter1, promoting the efflux of cholesterol from peripheral tissues, which may lead to the observed increase in HDL...

Roberts, Lee D; Hassall, David G; Winegar, Deborah A; Haselden, John N; Nicholls, Andrew W; Griffin, Julian L

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

197

Frictional lichenified dermatosis from prolonged use of a computer mouse: Case report and review of the literature of computer-related dermatoses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dermatitis possible caused by computer wrist rest. ContactS, Phillips RM, et al. Computer palms. J Am Acad DermatolGoksugur N, Cakici H. A new computer-associated occupational

Ghasri, Pedram; Feldman, Steven R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A lentiviral system for RNAi transgenesis and the Ena/VASP triple-knockout defines neuronal and non-neuronal functions in mouse development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mammalian development extends and exploits signaling pathways that function exclusively in axon guidance in lower organisms. This emerging paradigm employs complex expression patterns of expanded protein families to achieve ...

Rubinson, Douglas A. (Douglas Adam), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Astroglial Inhibition of NF-kB Does Not Ameliorate Disease Onset and Progression in a Mouse Model for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is considered a ‘‘non-cell autonomous’ ’ process, with astrocytes playing a critical role in disease progression. Glial cells are activated early in transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1, suggesting that neuroinflammation has a relevant role in the cascade of events that trigger the death of motor neurons. An inflammatory cascade including COX2 expression, secretion of cytokines and release of NO from astrocytes may descend from activation of a NF-kB-mediated pathway observed in astrocytes from ALS patients and in experimental models. We have attempted rescue of transgenic mutant SOD1 mice through the inhibition of the NF-kB pathway selectively in astrocytes. Here we show that despite efficient inhibition of this major pathway, double transgenic mice expressing the mutant SOD1 G93A ubiquitously and the dominant negative form of IkBa (IkBaAA) in astrocytes under control of the GFAP promoter show no benefit in terms of onset and progression of disease. Our data indicate that motor neuron death in ALS cannot be prevented by inhibition of a single inflammatory pathway because alternative pathways are activated in the

Claudia Crosio; Cristiana Valle; Arianna Casciati; Ciro Iaccarino; Maria Teresa Carrì

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Anti-CD45 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy using Bismuth-213: High Rates of Complete Remission and Long-Term Survival in a Mouse Myeloid Leukemia Xenograft Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) using an anti-CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate and DOTA-biotin labeled with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored as a strategy to decrease relapse and toxicity. Alpha-emitting radionuclides exhibit high cytotoxicity coupled with a short path-length, potentially increasing the therapeutic index and making them an attractive alternative to beta-emitting radionuclides for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Accordingly, we have used 213Bi in mice with human leukemia xenografts. Results demonstrated excellent localization of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin to tumors with minimal uptake into normal organs. After 10 minutes, 4.5 ± 1.1% of the injected dose of 213Bi was delivered per gram of tumor. Alpha imaging demonstrated uniform radionuclide distribution within tumor tissue 45 minutes after 213Bi-DOTA-biotin injection. Radiation absorbed doses were similar to those observed using a beta-emitting radionuclide (90Y) in the same model. We conducted therapy experiments in a xenograft model using a single-dose of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin given 24 hours after anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate. Among mice treated with anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate followed by 800 ?Ci of 213Bi- or 90Y-DOTA-biotin, 80% and 20%, respectively, survived leukemia-free for >100 days with minimal toxicity. These data suggest that anti-CD45 PRIT using an alpha-emitting radionuclide may be highly effective and minimally toxic for treatment of AML.

Pagel, John M.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Back, Tom; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Park, Steven I.; Frayo, Shani; Axtman, Amanda; Orgun, Nural; Orozoco, Johnnie; Shenoi, Jaideep; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, Ajay K.; Green, Damian J.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Selective HDAC 1/2 Inhibitor Modulates Chromatin and Gene Expression in Brain and Alters Mouse Behavior in Two Mood-Related Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Psychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression, are projected to lead global disease burden within the next decade. Pharmacotherapy, the primary – albeit often ineffective – treatment ...

Schroeder, Frederick A.

202

Mouse skin tumor initiation-promotion and complete carcinogenesis bioassays: mechanisms and biological activities of emission samples. Environ. Health Perspect. 47  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extracts of soots obtained from various sources were applied to the skin of mice in an effort to identify carcinogens in these mixtures and to link these materials to the etiology of human cancer. Samples of coal chimney soot, coke oven materials, industrial carbon black, oil shale soot, and gasoline vehicle exhaust materials have been examined by this method. The studies reported here have been constructed to compare the carcinogenic and tumorigenic potency of extracts from various particulate emissions: coke ovens, diesel and gasoline vehicles and a roofing tar pot. Automobile emission samples were obtained by collecting the diluted and cooled exhaust on Teflon-coated glass fiber filters. Coke oven and roofing tar samples were particulate emission samples collected by impaction and filtration. The organic components associated with each of the particles were extracted with dichloromethane and dermally applied to SENCAR mice. All agents were applied as tumor initiators by using a five-dose protocol. Selected extracts were also applied as complete carcinogens and as tumor promotors. Statistical analyses of the resulting tumor data were performed by using nonlinear Poisson and probit models. The results from these experiments provide a suitable data base for comparative potency estimation of complex mixtures.

S. Nesnow; L. L. Triplettt; T. J. Slagat

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Wheel running from a juvenile age delays onset of specific motor deficits but does not alter protein aggregate density in a mouse model of Huntington's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of age (Fig. 2B; wheel running: F [1, 25] = 0.40, P = 0.72; 2-way ANOVA). At 5 months, an effect of the HD BMC Neuroscience 2008, 9:34 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/9/34 mutation on performance was observed (Fig. 2B; HD: F[1, 28] = 8.58, P < 0... in activity on the second day of testing (2nd blocks in Fig. 3B) in non-enriched HD mice (F[1,38] = 38.25, P < 0.001; 2-way ANOVA). Thus environmental enrichment and wheel running both rescued the abnor- mal habituation of rearing behavior in HD mice...

van Dellen, Anton; Cordery, Patricia M; Spires, Tara L; Blakemore, Colin; Hannan, Anthony J

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

Motley, R.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

CoalFleet IGCC Permitting Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to owners of planned Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in order to assist them in permitting these advanced coal power generation facilities. The CoalFleet IGCC Permitting Guidelines summarize U.S. federal requirements for obtaining air, water, and solid waste permits for a generic IGCC facility, as described in EPRI report 1012227, the CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification (UDBS). The Guidelines present characteristics of IGCC emissions that mus...

2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitively pulsed, intense- ion beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of intense ion beams applications are emerging requiring repetitive high-average-power beams. These applications include ablative deposition of thin films, rapid melt and resolidification for surface property enhancement, advanced diagnostic neutral beams for the next generation of Tokamaks, and intense pulsed-neutron sources. We are developing a 200-250 keV, 15 kA, 1 {mu}s duration, 1-30 Hz intense ion beam accelerator to address these applications.

Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.; Reass, W.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coates, D.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Schleinitz, H.M. [Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Wilmington, DE (United States). Central Research and Development Dept.; Lovberg, R.H. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Greenly, J.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Plasma Studies

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Limiting fragmentation of chemical potentials in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal models have been used to successfully describe the hadron yields from heavy ion collisions at a variety of energies. For root(S)chemical potentials, muS = 0.21 +-0.01muB. Using this relation we are able to describe the energy dependence of Lambda, Xsi and Omega ratios from other experiments. We also find that the chemical potentials are consistent with limiting fragmentation.

Laura A. Stiles; Michael Murray

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

IDR Neutrino Factory Front End and Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Design Report (IDR) neutrino factory scenario for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of {mu}'s produced from a proton source target is explored. It requires a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a {phi}-{delta}E rotation section leading into the cooling channel. Optimization and variations are discussed. Important concerns are rf limitations within the focusing magnetic fields and large losses in the transport.

Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab; Alekou, A.; /Imperial Coll., London; Rogers, C.; /Rutherford; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago; Yoshikawa, C.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Research Program Office/Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 1998 Baseline Review Subsystem MOUs and SOWs Subsystem MOUs for M&O Institution Budget Reports Subsystem MS Project Files and Reports Endcap Muon Hadron Calorimeter Trigger...

210

Retrieving and Processing BT-1 Files  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... p pipe output to stout rather than create an ... The right mouse button zooms out and the middle mouse button opens a window for manual scaling. ...

211

Non-Human Cell Line Authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... BMC Biotechnology 2011, 11:102. Mouse STR markers: Submitted for publication. A patent is pending on the mouse primer sequences.

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

212

Plasma end-loss studies on Scylla I-C  

SciTech Connect

The end-loss process in the collision dominated Scylla I-C plasma has been investigated with a local pressure sensitive diagnostic, integrated density measurement and axially arrayed diamagnetic loop probes. The development of a plasma loss orifice, well within the theta-pinch coil, has been identified. The magnitude of the observed orifice is found to be in excellent agreement with that predicted from collisional MHD theories. The axially flowing plasma is well confined until it flows through the loss orifice. After passing through the orifice, rapid axial expansion is observed. An indication of the existence of inward traveling rarefaction waves has been observed from the plasma midplane temperature data; an abrupt decrease in the plasma temperature at t approximately equal to 6.5 ..mu..s corresponds to the predicted time of arrival of rarefaction waves at the coil midplane. The plasma loss rate derived from the pressure data indicates an initial period (t < 4 ..mu..s) of rapid particle loss followed by a period (t > 4 ..mu..s) of gradual decay in the loss rate. This initial period of high loss rate is predicted from the MHD flow theories when the measured, time dependent plasma parameters are substituted into the analytical models. The loss rate determined from the end-on interferograms does not respond to the detailed structure of the plasma loss process.

McKenna, K.F.; York, T.M.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Merit Review Search | Merit Review Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Merit Review Search Merit Review Search Search Searches on title, presenter, presenting organization and date Search Title Presenting Organization Technology Area Presentation Date Document Overview of the DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Program U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Combustion Combustion and Emissions Control 05/14/2013 ace00a_singh_2013_o.pdf Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Combustion Combustion and Emissions Control 05/14/2013 ace001_musculus_2013_o.pdf Light-Duty Diesel Combustion Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Combustion Combustion and Emissions Control 05/14/2013 ace002_miles_2013_o.pdf HCCI and Stratified-Charge CI Engine Combustion Research Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

214

Beam and radiation tests of a fast, warm liquid {open_quotes}swimming pool{close_quotes} calorimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast, warm liquid calorimeter module with lead absorber immersed in tetramethyl pentane (TMP) as the liquid medium (i.e. a {open_quotes}swimming pool{close_quotes} configuration) has been built and tested in a high energy beam at FNAL, and exposed to intense radiation from a strong Co{sup 60} source. A two-tower prototype, incorporating the concept of the electrostatic transformer for fast readout, exhibited very good uniformity and small cross-talk in the beam test. This same calorimeter was exposed to over 10 Mrad of radiation from the Co{sup 60} source, and the electron drift lifetime was measured as a function of accumulated dose. The lifetime improved significantly with small doses of radiation, up to a few hundred krad, then decreased gradually at higher doses, and extrapolated to a minimum useful lifetime of 0.1 {mu}s at over 150 Mrad. This result was confirmed by measurements on a small single-electrode test cell which was irradiated to more than 25 Mrad. In this case, the lifetime decreased from 10{mu}s to 0.1 {mu}s when extrapolated to a dose of over 600 Mrad. This cell was also used to measure the effect of positive ion {open_quotes}space charge{close_quotes} buildup under intense radiation. The results suggest that such effects are small even at the highest intensity available, about 1.3 Mrad/day, for applied fields {ge}25 kV/cm.

Kadyk, J.; WALIC Collaboration

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

" " i~;~ "j- .> ~ ~ :~:~'J .'J [fl ."j > >, '~~ i~ *1j ~~~1 tri I ~~~}:. ~ }~ t~ ~~.~ :tf:· ~:~ "'1 ~},~~l ~ ~;> * ... 7'· ~~~1 ;i.:~ ·0 I 9{ / ~ o 1 2 MUS I I I I o 3KM ORNL·DWG 87M·70S3R2 CITY OF OAK RIDGE 01 1- - DOE BOUNDARY \ Fig. 2. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation boundaries. :~. 1 ":j':' f. ~! 'J :'f '-1 .~~ c j ~~:; i1 :.,, ~ t('1 ~!J ~ ; . . , t ~..,,: ~i ." , '~'J' ~:, ~>, :}I! 1 v ~~ ~ ~ ~ m o ~ d ~~: ~ ~ ~ t~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1, '.,! "l' ~l ~ ~ ~J ·1 ~ ~ "-'--.) rMO .. _- o I o 80 KM MISS * i I * ~i~

216

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.  

SciTech Connect

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

Preston, Eric F. (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO); Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Data acquisition using the 168/E. [CERN ISR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Event sizes and data rates at the CERN anti p p collider compose a formidable environment for a high level trigger. A system using three 168/E processors for experiment UA1 real-time event selection is described. With 168/E data memory expanded to 512K bytes, each processor holds a complete event allowing a FORTRAN trigger algorithm access to data from the entire detector. A smart CAMAC interface reads five Remus branches in parallel transferring one word to the target processor every 0.5 ..mu..s. The NORD host computer can simultaneously read an accepted event from another processor.

Carroll, J.T.; Cittolin, S.; Demoulin, M.; Fucci, A.; Martin, B.; Norton, A.; Porte, J.P.; Rossi, P.; Storr, K.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Beam instrumentation for the SSC RFQ  

SciTech Connect

A detailed description of the SSC RFQ beam instrumentation is presented. Most of the instrumentation is located in the RFQ end walls. The upstream end wall contains a segmented Faraday cup, a segmented aperture and a wire scanner. The down stream end wall contains a segmented aperture and wire scanner. Two current toroids are used to measure the transmission through the RFQ. The output of the RFQ is a low emittance, pulsed 2.5 Mev H{sup {minus}} beam with peak current of 25 mA and maximum pulse length of 35 {mu}s. Typical beam data are shown with the emphasis being on instrumentation performance.

Datte, P.; Jamieson, G.; Aiello, R.; Beechy, D.; Jones, A.; Martin, D.; Riordon, J.; Webber, R.; Wood, F.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Iodine photodissociation laser with an intracavity space - time light modulator  

SciTech Connect

A scheme of an iodine laser with two different intracavity space - time modulators based on electrooptic PLZT ceramics is experimentally studied. It is shown that lasing can occur in different angular directions with the use of both modulators. The output laser energy is 10 mJ with a pulse duration of 200 {mu}s and a beam divergence of 6.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} rad. The laser field of view (5.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} rad) consists of a discrete set of 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 directions. (control of laser radiation parameters)

Kachalin, G N; Pevny, S N; Pivkin, A N; Safronov, A S [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics', Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod region (Russian Federation)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Review of the Procyon explosive pulsed power system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Procyon explosive pulsed power system is designed for powering plasma z-pinch experiments. It begins with a helical explosive-driven magnetic flux compression generator (MCG) for amplifying seed current from a capacitor bank into a storage inductor. One conductor element of the storage inductor is an explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switch tailored to divert current to a plasma flow switch (PFS) in less than 3 [mu]s. The PFS, in turn, delivers current to a z-pinch load. Experiments to date have concentrated on the explosive pulsed power components and PFS. This paper focuses on the results of a recent full energy MCG/EFF/PFS test.

Goforth, J.H.; Oona, H.; Greene, A.E. (and others)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Review of the Procyon explosive pulsed power system  

SciTech Connect

The Procyon explosive pulsed power system is designed for powering plasma z-pinch experiments. It begins with a helical explosive-driven magnetic flux compression generator (MCG) for amplifying seed current from a capacitor bank into a storage inductor. One conductor element of the storage inductor is an explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switch tailored to divert current to a plasma flow switch (PFS) in less than 3 {mu}s. The PFS, in turn, delivers current to a z-pinch load. Experiments to date have concentrated on the explosive pulsed power components and PFS. This paper focuses on the results of a recent full energy MCG/EFF/PFS test.

Goforth, J.H.; Oona, H.; Greene, A.E. [and others

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Centrality Dependence of Chemical Freeze-out in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We will report centrality dependence of chemical freeze-out temperature ($T_{ch}$), light quark chemical potential ($\\mu_{q}$), strange quark chemical potential ($\\mu_{s}$), and strangeness saturation factor ($\\gamma_{s}$) in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 130 and 200 GeV. A systematic study for combination of ratios for chemical freeze-out fit is studied and we have found small ombination dependences. The results show $\\gamma_{s}$ increasing with centrality but the other parameters have less sensitivity to the centralities.

Masashi Kaneta; Nu Xu

2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nonlinear increase in the interaction efficiency of a second pulse with a target upon excitation of a plasma by a train of pulses from a Nd:YAG laser  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of hole drilling in an aluminium plate was studied experimentally upon excitation of a plasma on its surface in air by a train of pulses from a Nd:YAG laser, the interval between pulses being 15-20 {mu}s. It was found that the crater depth increases nonmonotonically with each successive pulse of the train. A nonlinear, more than by a factor of six, increase in the depth was detected upon interaction of the second pulse with the target. The mechanism explaining this increase in the interaction efficiency of the second pulse in the train with the target is proposed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Pershin, Sergei M [Wave Research Centre, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hi-speed versatile serial crate controller for CAMAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A serial crate controller, primarily for use in the SLC CAMAC control system, has been designed, and has been in use for about 2 years. The design supports a party line approach, with up to 16 crates on a single twisted pair for data transfers, plus another pair for prompt L response. The bit rate is 5 megabits/s, and complete transaction times of about 10 ..mu..s are achieved for 16-bit data transfers over cables up to 1000 feet long. One of the primary objects of the design was simplicity - there are approximately 60 chips in the two-board unit.

Horelick, D.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nonylphenol-mediated CYP induction is PXR-dependent: The use of humanized mice and human hepatocytes suggests that hPXR is less sensitive than mouse PXR to nonylphenol treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonylphenol (NP), a by-product of alkylphenol ethoxylates, is a pervasive surfactant that activates the xenosensing nuclear receptor, the pregnane X-receptor (PXR) in transactivation assays in vitro. We are interested in determining if NP activates PXR in vivo, determining if hPXR and mPXR act similarly, and investigating the role of PXR in protecting individuals from NP. Wild-type (WT), PXR-null, and humanized PXR (hPXR) mice were treated with NP at 0, 50 or 75 mg/kg/day for one week, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, liver histopathology, and serum NP concentrations were examined. WT mice treated with NP showed induction of Cyp2b, and male-specific induction of Cyp2c and Cyp3a. CYPs were not induced in PXR-null mice, demonstrating that PXR is necessary for NP-mediated CYP induction. CAR-mediated CYP induction was not observed in the PXR-null mice despite previous data demonstrating that NP is also a CAR activator. hPXR mice only showed moderate Cyp induction, suggesting that hPXR is not as sensitive to NP as mPXR in vivo. NP-mediated Cyp3a induction from three human hepatocyte donors was not significant, confirming that hPXR is not very sensitive to NP-mediated CYP induction. Lastly, mice with PXR (mPXR and hPXR) showed lower NP serum concentrations than PXR-null mice treated with NP suggesting that PXR plays a role in decreasing liver toxicity by basally regulating phase I-III detoxification enzymes that promote the metabolism and elimination of NP. In summary, PXR is required for NP-mediated CYP-induction, mPXR mediates greater CYP induction than hPXR in vivo, and the presence of PXR, especially mPXR, is associated with altered histopathology and increased clearance of NP.

Mota, Linda C. [Clemson University, Environmental Toxicology, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Barfield, Christina [Clemson University, Biological Sciences, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Hernandez, Juan P. [University of Texas at El Paso, Biological Sciences, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Baldwin, William S., E-mail: baldwin@clemson.edu [Clemson University, Environmental Toxicology, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Clemson University, Biological Sciences, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Tracking multiple mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring mouse social behaviors over long periods of time is essential for neurobehavioral analysis of social mouse phenotypes. Currently, the primary method of social behavioral plienotyping utilizes human labelers, ...

Braun, Stav

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

House Shrews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have a mouse problem each winter as the field mice enter from the 120 acres around the house. I read the answer in the archives on mouse house infestation. My question is are the...

228

Overview of LInC Course Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Files to and from a Server; and of course, Writing Web Pages Also, Shockwave animations with video and sound are available that provide mouse-click by mouse-click...

229

Feiqiao Brian Yu 2012.03.16  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

individual cell (5). Another example deals with the study of NF-kB expression in mouse fibroblast cells (5). (B) Contrary to previous studies, NF-kB expression in mouse fibroblast cells occur digitally

Bejerano, Gill

230

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following document is a sample Memorandum of Understanding for DOE laboratories to use as guidance in drafting lab MOUs.

231

The Rockefeller University Press $30.00 J. Cell Biol. Vol. 191 No. 5 915922  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Gly-Asn­enriched protein; mInsc, mouse Insc; SCD, symmetric cell division; TRE, tetracycline/doxycycline

Rockey, Don

232

Aspect Ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with the mouse. Use the {mlx - false color - directional palette} menu. DOG - Direction of Gradient top. This display is useful ...

233

Microsoft 2.4GHz Wireless Protocol White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to turn on the light-emitting diode in the keyboard's Caps Lock, or change the functions of the mouse

Narasayya, Vivek

234

Available Technologies: Rapid Discovery and Optimization of Enzyme ...  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

235

Available Technologies: Synthesis of High Quality Graphene  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

236

Available Technologies: Nanometer Precision Manipulation and ...  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

237

Available Technologies: Black Ge-based On Crystalline Amorphous ...  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

238

Cathodic Arc Plasma System with Twist Filter - Triggerless method ...  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

239

Nanoparticles for Highly Detectable Contrast Agents in Medical Imaging  

Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies.

240

Available Technologies: Acid Hydrolysis of Biomass and Increased ...  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Available Technologies: Acid-Degradeable and Bioerodible Materials  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

242

Available Technologies: Membrane-Electrode Structures for Low Cost ...  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

243

Available Technologies: Cell-based Therapy for Neurological Disorders  

Medical Devices; Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy. Energy Efficiency; Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy;

244

User performance with trackball-mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trackball-mice are devices that include both a trackball and a mouse. In this paper we discuss our experiences in building and testing trackball-mouse prototypes. We report four experiments on user performance with the prototypes used as trackball-mice, ... Keywords: Dual-stream input, Fitts' Law, Optical mouse, Pointing device, Trackball, Trackmouse, Two-cursor, Two-handed interaction

Poika Isokoski; Roope Raisamo; Benoít Martin; Grigori Evreinov

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Recent Upgrade of the Klystron Modulator at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory employs 244 klystron modulators on its two-mile-long linear accelerator that has been operational since the early days of the SLAC establishment in the sixties. Each of these original modulators was designed to provide 250 kV, 262 A and 3.5 {mu}S at up to 360 pps using an inductance-capacitance resonant charging system, a modified type-E pulse-forming network (PFN), and a pulse transformer. The modulator internal control comprised of large step-start resistor-contactors, vacuum-tube amplifiers, and 120 Vac relays for logical signals. A major, power-component-only upgrade, which began in 1983 to accommodate the required beam energy of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project, raised the modulator peak output capacity to 360 kV, 420 A and 5.0 {mu}S at a reduced pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. In an effort to improve safety, performance, reliability and maintainability of the modulator, this recent upgrade focuses on the remaining three-phase AC power input and modulator controls. The upgrade includes the utilization of primary SCR phase control rectifiers, integrated fault protection and voltage regulation circuitries, and programmable logic controllers (PLC) -- with an emphasis on component physical layouts for safety and maintainability concerns. In this paper, we will describe the design and implementation of each upgraded component in the modulator control system. We will also report the testing and present status of the modified modulators.

Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.P.; Lam, B.K.; Morris, B.; /SLAC

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

Detection of charged particles and X-rays by scintillator layers coupled to amorphous silicon photodiode arrays  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n diodes with transparent metallic contacts are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. When coupled to a suitable scintillator using CsI(Tl) as the scintillator we show a capability to detect minimum ionizing particles with S/N {approximately}20. We demonstrate such an arrangement by operating a p-i-n diode in photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). Moreover, we show that a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3-8 higher light sensitivity for shaping times of 1 {mu}s. n-i-n devices have similar optical gain as the p-i-n photoconductor for short integrating times ( < 10{mu}s). However, n-i-n devices exhibit much higher gain for a long term integration (10ms) than the p-i-n ones. High sensitivity photosensors are very desirable for X-ray medical imaging because radiation exposure dose can be reduced significantly. The scintillator CsI layers we made have higher spatial resolution than the Kodak commercial scintillator screens due to their internal columnar structure which can collimate the scintillation light. Evaporated CsI layers are shown to be more resistant to radiation damage than the crystalline bulk CsI(Tl).

Jing, T.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Goodman, C.A.; Wildermuth, D. [Air Techniques, Inc. Hicksville, NY (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Intense ion beam research at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect

Two new interdisciplinary programs are underway at Los Alamos involving the physics and technology of intense light ion beams. In contrast to high-power ICF applications, the LANL effort concentrates on the development of relatively low-voltage (50 to 800 kV) and long-pulsewidth (0.1 to 1 {mu}s) beams. The first program involves the 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Anaconda generator which has been fitted with an extraction ion diode. Long pulsewidth ion beams have been accelerated, propagated, and extracted for a variety of magnetic field conditions. The primary application of this beam is the synthesis of novel materials. Initial experiments on the congruent evaporative deposition of metallic and ceramic thin films are reported. The second program involves the development of a 120-keV, 50-kA, 1-{mu}s proton beam for the magnetic fusion program as an ion source for an intense diagnostic neutral beam. Ultra-bright, pulsed neutral beams will be required to successfully measure ion temperatures and thermalized alpha particle energy distributions in large, dense, ignited tokamaks such as ITER.

Rej, D.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Gautier, D.C.; Greenly, J.B.; Henins, I.; Linton, T.W.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Waganaar, W.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Intense ion beam research at Los Alamos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two new interdisciplinary programs are underway at Los Alamos involving the physics and technology of intense light ion beams. In contrast to high-power ICF applications, the LANL effort concentrates on the development of relatively low-voltage (50 to 800 kV) and long-pulsewidth (0.1 to 1 {mu}s) beams. The first program involves the 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Anaconda generator which has been fitted with an extraction ion diode. Long pulsewidth ion beams have been accelerated, propagated, and extracted for a variety of magnetic field conditions. The primary application of this beam is the synthesis of novel materials. Initial experiments on the congruent evaporative deposition of metallic and ceramic thin films are reported. The second program involves the development of a 120-keV, 50-kA, 1-{mu}s proton beam for the magnetic fusion program as an ion source for an intense diagnostic neutral beam. Ultra-bright, pulsed neutral beams will be required to successfully measure ion temperatures and thermalized alpha particle energy distributions in large, dense, ignited tokamaks such as ITER.

Rej, D.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Gautier, D.C.; Greenly, J.B.; Henins, I.; Linton, T.W.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Waganaar, W.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Interplay between Np95 and Eme1 in the DNA damage response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mus81 (methyl methansulfonate UV sensitive clone 81) and Eme1 (essential meiotic endonuclease 1, also known as MMS4) form a heterodimeric endonuclease that is critical for genomic stability and the response to DNA crosslink damage and replication blockade. However, relatively little is known as to how this endonuclease is regulated following DNA damage. Here, we report mammalian Eme1 interacts with Np95, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in chromatin modification, replication-linked epigenetic maintenance and the DNA damage response. Np95 and Eme1 co-localize on nuclear chromatin following exposure of cells to camptothecin, an agent that promotes the collapse of replication forks. The observed co localization following DNA damage was found to be dependent on an intact RING finger, the structural motif that encodes the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Np95. Taken together, these findings link Mus81-Eme1 with the replication-associated chromatin modifier functions of Np95 in the cellular response to DNA damage.

Mistry, Helena; Gibson, Lianne; Yun, J.W.; Sarras, Haya; Tamblyn, Laura [Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada); McPherson, John Peter [Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada)], E-mail: peter.mcpherson@utoronto.ca

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

High power operation of the university of Maryland coaxial gyroklystron experiment  

SciTech Connect

We report the experimental studies of high power amplification in a coaxial three-cavity X-band gyroklystron. A single-anode magnetron injection gun (MIG) is used to produce a 520 A beam of 470 keV electrons with an average ratio of perpendicular-to-parallel velocity of about one. The voltage flat top is nearly 2 {mu}s. All cavities are designed to operate in the TE{sub 011} coaxial mode near 8.6 GHz. The input cavity is driven by a 150 kW, 3 {mu}s coaxial magnetron through a single slot in the radial wall. Peak powers of 75{endash}85 MW are measured with a conversion efficiency of nearly 32{percent} and a large signal gain of about 30 dB. This performance is in good agreement with simulations and represents approximately a tri-fold increase in the peak power capability of pulsed X-band gyroklystrons. We also report on the design of a three cavity second harmonic gyroklystron which is expected to produce 100 MW at 17.14 GHz. We close with a general discussion of scaling our designs to higher frequencies. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Lawson, W.; Arjona, M.; Castle, M.; Hogan, B.; Granatstein, V.; Reiser, M. [Institute for Plasma Research and Electrical Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

High power operation of the university of Maryland coaxial gyroklystron experiment  

SciTech Connect

We report the experimental studies of high power amplification in a coaxial three-cavity X-band gyroklystron. A single-anode magnetron injection gun (MIG) is used to produce a 520 A beam of 470 keV electrons with an average ratio of perpendicular-to-parallel velocity of about one. The voltage flat top is nearly 2 {mu}s. All cavities are designed to operate in the TE{sub 011} coaxial mode near 8.6 GHz. The input cavity is driven by a 150 kW, 3 {mu}s coaxial magnetron through a single slot in the radial wall. Peak powers of 75-85 MW are measured with a conversion efficiency of nearly 32% and a large signal gain of about 30 dB. This performance is in good agreement with simulations and represents approximately a tri-fold increase in the peak power capability of pulsed X-band gyroklystrons. We also report on the design of a three cavity second harmonic gyroklystron which is expected to produce 100 MW at 17.14 GHz. We close with a general discussion of scaling our designs to higher frequencies.

Lawson, W.; Arjona, M.; Castle, M.; Hogan, B.; Granatstein, V.; Reiser, M. [Institute for Plasma Research and Electrical Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

252

Geochemical modeling at Raft River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical analysis of water from three depth regimes at the Raft River KGRA indicate the presence of at least two distinct hydrothermal fluids. One fluid predominates in the fracture system on the west side of the valley, known as the Bridge Fault. This fluid is characterized by low conductivity (2,000 to 3,000 ..mu..s) and 6 to 9 ..mu..g/ml F/sup -/. The second fluid, encountered in the center of the valley, appears to be associated with the Narrows Structure and is characterized by a conductivity of 6,000 to 11,000 ..mu..s and F/sup -/ of 3 to 6 ..mu..g/ml. Contour mapping of conductivity and Cl/sup -//F/sup -/ ratios indicates upwelling of both deep geothermal fluids into the shallow system. This recharge into the intermediate and shallow zones produces high-conductivity water which is used for irrigation. Application of a simple mixing model shows that all the water sampled in intermediate and deep zones can be described by mixtures of two nearly pure fluids. One mechanism, consistent with the known data, is deep upwelling of a highly mineralized fluid which is heated by the basement rock and then penetrates sediment layers through fractures. The second fluid is relatively recent meteoric water conductively heated by the basement rock.

Allen, C.A.; Chaney, R.E.; McAtee, R.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Electromagnetic decays of excited states in {sup 261}Sg (Z=106) and {sup 257}Rf (Z=104)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An isomeric one-quasineutron state, likely based on the [725]11/2{sup -} Nilsson level, was identified in {sup 261}Sg by its decay via internal conversion electrons. The state has an excitation energy of approx =200 keV and a half-life of 9.0{sub -1.5}{sup +2.0} mus. {sup 261}Sg has the highest Z and A of any nucleus in which the electromagnetic decay of an isomeric state was observed to date. A separate experiment was performed on the alpha daughter nucleus of {sup 261}Sg, namely {sup 257}Rf. Spectroscopy of delayed gamma rays and converted electrons from {sup 257}Rf resulted in the identification of a K isomer at an excitation energy of approx =1125 keV with a half-life of 134.9 +- 7.7 mus. The spin of the isomeric state is tentatively assigned I=21/2,23/2 and the state likely decays to a rotational band built on the [725]11/2{sup -} Nilsson level via a DELTAK=5 or 6 transition. The present results provide new information on excited states in the transactinide region, which is important for testing models of the heaviest elements.

Berryman, J. S.; Clark, R. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Cromaz, M.; Dvorak, J.; Fallon, P.; Gros, S.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Qian, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Allmond, J. M. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States); Bleuel, D. L.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wiedeking, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Dragojevic, I.; Ellison, P. A.; Garcia, M. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Heavy ion fusion half-year report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major elements of the program in the first half of Fiscal Year 1980 included: (1) characterization of the 1 amp, 1 MV, 2 ..mu..s beam after acceleration through one pulsed drift tube; (2) observation of current and energy spikes at the onset of the beam pulse occasioned by the unusually long transit-time (approx. 1 ..mu..sec) of the mass 133 ions across the diode gap; (3) completion of the full system, comprising of source and three drift-tubes, in February 1980; (4) development of new beam diagnostic probes for high-intensity ion beams; and (5) a major re-direction of the design effort on the Induction Linac Test Bed to bring costs, based on R/D funds that include overhead, down from the 40 million system (described in LBL PUB-5031) to the canonical 25 million.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Pulse shaping of transversely excited atmospheric CO{sub 2} laser using a simple plasma shutter  

SciTech Connect

The pulse from a transversely excited atmospheric CO{sub 2} laser consists of a sharp spike followed by a long, drawn out tail region spanning about 2-5 {mu}s caused by the nitrogen gas in the laser cavity. The nitrogen tail is undesirable in many applications because it decreases the average power of the laser pulse. We employ a pinhole plasma shutter for eliminating the nitrogen tail and shortening the pulse width. The pinhole shutter optically triggers plasma at a certain point in time with respect to the temporal profile of the laser pulse. This way, a good portion of the sharp spike is transmitted, while the energy stored in the nitrogen tail is consumed in heating the plasma. This simplistic plasma shutter is easy to build and inexpensive compared to other existing plasma shutter designs.

Hurst, Noah [Hyperion Scientific, Inc., 455 Science Dr., Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Harilal, S. S. [Hyperion Scientific, Inc., 455 Science Dr., Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); School of Nuclear Engineering, 400 Central Dr., Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

A high voltage pulsed power supply for capillary discharge waveguide applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an all solid-state, high voltage pulsed power supply for inducing stable plasma formation (density {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) in gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides. The pulser (pulse duration of 1 {mu}s) is based on transistor switching and wound transmission line transformer technology. For a capillary of length 40 mm and diameter 265 {mu}m and gas backing pressure of 100 mbar, a fast voltage pulse risetime of 95 ns initiates breakdown at 13 kV along the capillary. A peak current of {approx}280 A indicates near complete ionization, and the r.m.s. temporal jitter in the current pulse is only 4 ns. Temporally stable plasma formation is crucial for deploying capillary waveguides as plasma channels in laser-plasma interaction experiments, such as the laser wakefield accelerator.

Abuazoum, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Issac, R. C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Ganciu, M. [Low Temperature Plasma Department, National Institute of Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

SlISANA MARTINEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SlISANA MARTINEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor March 13, 2013 Jose Franco, Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Resource Protection Division Harold Runnels Building 1190 Saint Francis Drive (87505) P.O. Box 5469, Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Phone (505) 827-0419 Fax (505) 827-0310 www.nrnenv.state.l1m.us CERTIFIED MAIL - RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED M. Farok Sharif, Project Manager Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC P.O. Box 2078 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-5608 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-3090 RE: FINAL DETERMINATION, CLASS 2 MODIFICATION REQUEST WIPP HAZARDOUS WASTE FACILITY PERMIT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088 Dear Messrs. Franco and Sharif: DAVE MARTIN Cabinet Secretary BUTCH TONGA TE

258

Aggregation behavior of hexaoxyethyleneglycol myristate and hexaoxyethyleneglycol mono (1-methyltridecane) ether and dynamics of their micelles in aqueous solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The title surfactants have similar critical micelle concentrations and cloud temperatures. Their micellar solutions have been investigated by time resolved fluorescence quenching in the range 2--25 c. The micelle aggregation numbers of both surfactants do not differ much, and increase with temperature. Aggregation numbers are large, suggesting anisotropic micelles, and the results show that the micelles are polydisperse. Fast intermicellar exchange of material becomes detectable on the fluorescence timescale ([approximately]1 [mu]s) above T [approx] 10 C, i.e., some 35--40 C below the cloud temperature of the solution. This exchange probably occurs via micelle collisions with temporary merging. Overall the behavior of these two surfactants is very similar to that of the other ethoxylated nonionic surfactants previously examined.

Alami, E.; Zana, R. (Inst. Charles Sadron, Strasbourg (France)); Van Os, N.M.; Jong, B. de; Kerkhof, F.J.M. (Koninklijke/Shell Lab., Amsterdam, (Netherlands)); Rupert, L.A.M. (Thornton Research Centre, Chester, (United Kingdom))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Scalable distributed consensus to support MPI fault tolerance.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As system sizes increase, the amount of time in which an application can run without experiencing a failure decreases. Exascale applications will need to address fault tolerance. In order to support algorithm-based fault tolerance, communication libraries will need to provide fault-tolerance features to the application. One important fault-tolerance operation is distributed consensus. This is used, for example, to collectively decide on a set of failed processes. This paper describes a scalable, distributed consensus algorithm that is used to support new MPI fault-tolerance features proposed by the MPI 3 Forum's fault-tolerance working group. The algorithm was implemented and evaluated on a 4,096-core Blue Gene/P. The implementation was able to perform a full-scale distributed consensus in 305 {mu}s and scaled logarithmically.

Buntinas, D. (Mathematics and Computer Science)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A digital optical phase-locked loop for diode lasers based on field programmable gate array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have designed and implemented a highly digital optical phase-locked loop (OPLL) for diode lasers in atom interferometry. The three parts of controlling circuit in this OPLL, including phase and frequency detector (PFD), loop filter and proportional integral derivative (PID) controller, are implemented in a single field programmable gate array chip. A structure type compatible with the model MAX9382/MCH12140 is chosen for PFD and pipeline and parallelism technology have been adapted in PID controller. Especially, high speed clock and twisted ring counter have been integrated in the most crucial part, the loop filter. This OPLL has the narrow beat note line width below 1 Hz, residual mean-square phase error of 0.14 rad{sup 2} and transition time of 100 {mu}s under 10 MHz frequency step. A main innovation of this design is the completely digitalization of the whole controlling circuit in OPLL for diode lasers.

Xu Zhouxiang; Zhang Xian; Huang Kaikai; Lu Xuanhui [Physics Department, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Recent Results on Muon Capture for a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

Scenarios for capture, bunching and phase-energy rotation of {mu}'s from a proton source have been developed. The goal is capture of a maximal number of muons in a string of rf bunches with applications in neutrino factories and {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} colliders. In this note we begin with the bunching, phase rotation and cooling scenario used in neutrino factory study 2B and adapted by R. Palmer as the initial stage of a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} collider scenario. However the scenario produces a relatively large number of bunches that must be recombined for maximal collider luminosity. In this paper we modify the scenario to obtain a smaller number of bunches, and, after some optimization, obtain cases that are better for both n-factory and collider scenarios. We describe these examples and consider some variations toward an optimal {nu}-factory + collider scenario.

Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Design of an electron gun for terahertz radiation source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the aim to obtain short-pulse bunches with high peak current for a terahertz radiation source, an EC-ITC (External-Cathode Independently Tunable Cells) RF gun was employed. As the external injecting electron source of the ITC RF gun, a gridded DC gun plays a key role, the performance of which determines the beam quality in the injector and transport line. In order to make the beam well compressed in the ITC RF gun, the energy of the electrons acquired from the gridded DC gun should be 15 KeV at most. A proper structure of the gridded gun is shown to overcome the strong space- charge force on the cathode, which is able to generate 6 {\\mu}s beam with 4.5A current successfully.

Li, Ji; Hu, Tongning; Chen, Qushan; Feng, Guangyao; Shang, Lei; Li, Chenglong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Time dependence of liquid-helium fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

The time dependence of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluorescence following an ionizing radiation event in liquid helium is observed and studied in the temperature range from 250 mK to 1.8 K. The fluorescence exhibits significant structure including a short ({approx}10 ns) strong initial pulse followed by single photons whose emission rate decays exponentially with a 1.6-{mu}s time constant. At an even longer time scale, the emission rate varies as '1/time' (inversely proportional to the time after the initial pulse). The intensity of the '1/time' component from {beta} particles is significantly weaker than those from {alpha} particles or neutron capture on {sup 3}He. It is also found that for {alpha} particles, the intensity of this component depends on the temperature of the superfluid helium. Proposed models describing the observed fluorescence are discussed.

McKinsey, D.N.; Brome, C.R.; Dzhosyuk, S.N.; Mattoni, C.E.H.; Yang, L.; Doyle, J.M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Golub, R.; Habicht, K.; Korobkina, E. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin-Wannsee (Germany); Huffman, P.R.; Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Lamoreaux, S.K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Some aspects of superconducting accelerator design  

SciTech Connect

The performance of an accelerator can be characterized by the efficiency with which electrical energy, the minimumm energy needed to generate a given beam voltage. The current accelerator improvement program at SLAC aims at raising the beam voltage to 50 GV which will use 240 klystrons each capable of producing a pulse 5 ..mu..s in length at a peak power of 36 MW. The Linear Collider requires 50 MW klystrons to achieve 60 GV which will raise the concomittant power consumption to 32.3 MW. We show that with superconducting elements we can increase the rf and ac conversion efficiencies and achieve the necessary 50 GV using only 1/3 of the present power requirements, provided that we exclude CW operation. We will further demonstrate that this increase in efficiency is crucial and highly significant in the design of a proposed 1000 GV linear accelerator.

Farkas, Z.D.; St. Lorant, S.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Effect of BPSH post treatment on DMFC performance and properties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are being investigated for applications ranging from milliwatt (cell phones) to kilowatt (MUS) size scales. A common pitfall for DMFCs has been the inability of the electrolyte, typically Nafion, to act as an effective methanol barrier. Methanol crossover adversely affects the cell by lowering the cell voltage due to a mixed potential at the cathode and lower fuel utilization. Improved DMFC performance was demonstrated with sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymer membranes (1). Another study has shown the dependence of polymer properties and morphology on the post treatment of such membranes (2). In agreement with measurements on free-standing films, the fuel cell characteristics of these membranes have been found to have a strong dependence on acidification treatment. Methanol permeability, proton conductivity, and electro-osmotic drag coefficient all were found to increase when the membranes were acidified under boiling conditions versus a low-temperature process.

Kickner, M. (Michael); Yuseung, K. (Kim); McGrath, James E.; Zelenay, P. (Piotr); Pivovar, B. S. (Bryan Scott)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun  

SciTech Connect

The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

Palmer, D.T.; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; /Brookhaven; Miller, R.H.; /SLAC; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; /Brookhaven; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; /Brookhaven; Winick, H.; /SLAC; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Deposition and surface treatment with intense pulsed ion beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense pulsed ion beams (500 keV, 30 kA, 0.5 {mu}s) are being investigated for materials processing. Demonstrated and potential applications include film deposition, glazing and joining, alloying and mixing, cleaning and polishing, corrosion improvement, polymer surface treatments, and nanophase powder synthesis. Initial experiments at Los Alamos have emphasized thin-film formation by depositing beam ablated target material on substrates. We have deposited films with complex stoichiometry such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, and formed diamond-like-carbon films. Instantaneous deposition rates of 1 mm/sec have been achieved because of the short ion range (typically 1{mu}m), excellent target coupling, and the inherently high energy of these beams. Currently the beams are produced in single shot uncomplicated diodes with good electrical efficiency. High-voltage modulator technology and diodes capable of repetitive firing, needed for commercial application, are being developed.

Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stinnett, R.W.; McIntyre, D.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

268

Regulation of Meiotic Recombination  

SciTech Connect

Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system for assaying recombination using tetrad analysis in a higher eukaryotic system (6). This system enabled the measurement of the frequency and distribution of recombination events at a genome wide level in wild type Arabidopsis (7), construction of genetic linkage maps which include positions for each centromere (8), and modeling of the strength and pattern of interference (9). This proposal extends the use of tetrad analysis in Arabidopsis by using it as the basis for assessing the phenotypes of mutants in genes important for recombination and the regulation of crossover interference and performing a novel genetic screen. In addition to broadening our knowledge of a classic genetic problem - the regulation of recombination by crossover interference - this proposal also provides broader impact by: generating pedagogical tools for use in hands-on classroom experience with genetics, building interdisciplinary collegial partnerships, and creating a platform for participation by junior scientists from underrepresented groups. There are three specific aims: (1) Isolate mutants in Arabidopsis MUS81 homologs using T-DNA and TILLING (2) Characterize recombination levels and interference in mus81 mutants (3) Execute a novel genetic screen, based on tetrad analysis, for genes that regulate meiotic recombination

Gregory p. Copenhaver

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Radiation-induced transient attenuation of optical fibers at 800 and 1300 nm  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced absorption in optical fibers has been a subject of considerable interest throughout the world. As availability and applications of fibers have evolved from ''first window'' systems operating near 850 nm to ''second window'' systems near 1300 nm, interest in wavelength dependence of radiation effects in optical fibers has similarly evolved. The present work summarizes second-window, radiation-induced transient absorption measurements in optical fibers for times shorter than 5 ..mu..s. Comparisons to first window data for these fibers are also presented. Only high purity silica fibers with low-OH concentrations were used in the present study to avoid the large OH absorption band in this region. This paper also collects first window data on several high-OH optical fibers.

Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Beam emission imaging system for 2D plasma turbulence measurements  

SciTech Connect

A two-dimensional analog to the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic has been designed to acquire vorticity and plasma flow-field information by resolving the spatial and temporal intermittency of plasma turbulent structures. The beam emission imaging diagnostic measures collisionally induced neutral beam fluorescence to infer local plasma density variations. It consists of a high-throughput, interline-transfer CCD camera viewing, with narrow spectral bandwidth, a 10 cm high diagnostic neutral beam as it traverses the plasma. The camera is coupled to a gated image intensifier that provides for two images with exposure times up to a few ms to be separated by as little as 10 [mu]s. Sensitivity to density fluctuations of [ital [tilde n

Thorson, T.A.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Overview and status of RF systems for the SSC Linac  

SciTech Connect

The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Linear Accelerator (Linac) produces a 600-MeV, 35-{mu}s, H-beam at a 10-Hz repetition rate. The beam is accelerated by a series of RF cavities. These consist of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), two bunchers, and four Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tanks at 427.617 MHz, and two bunchers, nine side-coupled Linac modules, and an energy compressor at 1282.851 MHz. The RFQ amplifier and the low-frequency buncher cavity amplifiers use gridded tubes, while the other cavities use klystron amplifier systems. The RF control system consists of a reference line and cavity feedback and feedforward loops for each amplifier. The RF amplifier system for each of these accelerator cavities is described, and the current status of each system is presented.

Mynk, J.; Grippe, J.; Cutler, R.I.; Rodriguez, R.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Efficient pulsed Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe laser continuously tunable in the spectral range from 2.26 to 3.61 {mu}m  

SciTech Connect

The efficient lasing of a Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe single crystal pumped by 1.94-{mu}m, 300-{mu}s pulses from a Tm:YAP laser was obtained. The Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe laser with a nonselective resonator emitted up to 17 mJ at a wavelength of {approx}2.65 {mu}m with the quantum slope efficiency of 63% with respect to the absorbed pump energy. The absorption coefficient of the Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe crystal at the laser wavelength did not exceed 0.045 cm{sup -1}. By using a resonator with a dispersion prism, the laser wavelength was continuously tuned in the spectral range from 2.26 to 3.61 {mu}m. (lasers)

Akimov, V A [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kozlovskii, V I; Korostelin, Yu V; Landman, A I; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Skasyrskii, Ya K; Frolov, M P [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Compact toroid experiments: spheromaks and field-reversed configurations  

SciTech Connect

Compact toroids (CT) containing both poloidal and toroidal magnetic field spheromaks, are generated in the CTX experiment using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun, and are trapped and stably confined in an oblate flux conserver. Total configuration lifetimes are observed up to approx. 0.8 ms, consistent with classical resistive decay. The field reversed configuration (FRC) is a high beta, axisymmetric, highly prolate compact toroid, containing only poloidal magnetic field, formed in a field-reversed theta pinch. A quiescent confinement period of 30 to 90 ..mu..s with T/sub i/ approx. 200 to 500 eV and n approx. 5 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/ is terminated by an n = 2 rotational instability. The FRC is stable to MHD modes including the tilting instability.

Quinn, W.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fast microtomography using bright monochromatic x-rays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast microtomography system for high-resolution high-speed imaging has been developed using bright monochromatic x-rays at the BL29XU beamline of SPring-8. The shortest scan time for microtomography we attained was 0.25 s in 1.25 {mu}m effective pixel size by combining the bright monochromatic x-rays, a fast rotating sample stage, and a high performance x-ray imaging detector. The feasibility of the tomography system was successfully demonstrated by visualization of rising bubbles in a viscous liquid, an interesting issue in multiphase flow physics. This system also provides a high spatial (a measurable feature size of 300 nm) or a very high temporal (9.8 {mu}s) resolution in radiographs.

Jung, J. W.; Lee, J. S.; Park, S. J.; Chang, S.; Pyo, J. [X-ray Imaging Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, N.; Kim, J. [X-ray Imaging Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kohmura, Y.; Nishino, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Ishikawa, T. [RIKEN/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Je, J. H. [X-ray Imaging Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); RIKEN/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Synergetic effects of double laser pulses for the formation of mild plasma in water: Toward non-gated underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We experimentally study the dynamics of the plasma induced by the double-laser-pulse irradiation of solid target in water, and find that an appropriate choice of the pulse energies and pulse interval results in the production of an unprecedentedly mild (low-density) plasma, the emission spectra of which are very narrow even without the time-gated detection. The optimum pulse interval and pulse energies are 15-30 {mu}s and about {approx}1 mJ, respectively, where the latter values are much smaller than those typically employed for this kind of study. In order to clarify the mechanism for the formation of mild plasma we examine the role of the first and second laser pulses, and find that the first pulse produces the cavitation bubble without emission (and hence plasma), and the second pulse induces the mild plasma in the cavitation bubble. These findings may present a new phase of underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

Sakka, Tetsuo [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Institute of Sustainability Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tamura, Ayaka; Nakajima, Takashi; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Ogata, Yukio H. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Distillation of Strangelets for low initial mu/T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the evolution of quark-gluon-plasma droplets during the hadronization in a thermodynamical model. It is speculated that cooling as well as strangeness enrichment allow for the formation of strangelets even at very high initial entropy per baryon $S/A^{\\rm init}\\approx 500$ and low initial baryon numbers of $A_{\\rm B}^{\\rm init}\\approx 30$. It is shown that the droplet with vanishing initial chemical potential of strange quarks and a very moderate chemical potential of up/down quarks immediately charges up with strangeness. Baryon densities of $\\approx 2\\rho_0$ and strange chemical potentials of $\\mu_s>350$~MeV are reached if strangelets are stable. The importance of net--baryon and net--strangeness fluctuations for the possible strangelet formation at RHIC and LHC is emphasized.

C. Spieles; C. Greiner; H. Stoecker; J. P. Coffin

1995-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

A prototype chopper for synchrotron time-resolved crystallographic measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanical x-ray chopper has been designed to perform microsecond time-resolved crystallographic studies at the DIAMOND synchrotron I19 beamline. It consists of two asymmetric absorbers rotating synchronously at frequencies from 0 to 50 Hz in the same direction around a rotation axis that is parallel to the x-ray beam. The duration of the x-ray pulses produced by the chopper is determined by the relative phase between the two blades, which can be adjusted. The chopper system presented in this paper offers a time resolution suitable for conducting in situ experiments that afford the crystal structure of materials while in their transient (>10 {mu}s) photoactivated excited states.

Husheer, S. L. G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Synchrotron Radiation Source, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Cole, J. M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada); D'Almeida, T. [Department of Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Teat, S. J. [Synchrotron Radiation Source, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Decay Study of {sup 257}Rf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The isotope {sup 257}Rf was produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti, n){sup 257}Rf. Reaction products were separated by the Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer. Radioactive decay and spontaneous fission of {sup 257}Rf and its decay products were investigated. An isomeric state in {sup 257}Rf, with a half-life of 160{sub -31}{sup 42} {mu}S, was discovered by detecting internal conversion electrons followed by alpha decays. It is interpreted as a three-quasiparticle high-K isomer. A second group of internal-conversion electrons which were succeeded by alpha decay, with a half-life of 4.1{sub -1.3}{sup +2.4} s, was observed. These events might originate from the decay of excited states in {sup 257}Lr, populated by electron-capture decay of {sup 257}Rf, or from another isomer in {sup 257}Rf.

Qian, J.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R. [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Seweryniak, D.; Peterson, D.; Back, B. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Jiang, C. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Pardo, R. C.; Robinson, A.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Wang, X.; Zhu, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] (and others)

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

279

An advanced plasma control system for the DIII-D tokamak  

SciTech Connect

An advanced plasma control system is being implemented for the DIII-D tokamak utilizing digital technology. This system will regulate the position and shape of tokamak discharges that range from elongated limiter to single-null divertor and double-null divertor with elongation as high as 2.6. Development of this system is expected to lead to control system technology appropriate for use on future tokamaks such as ITER and BPX. The digital system will allow for increased precision in shape control through real time adjustment of the control algorithm to changes in the shape and discharge parameters such as {beta}{sub p}, {ell}{sub i} and scrape-off layer current. The system will be used for research on real time optimization of discharge performance for disruption avoidance, current and pressure profile control, optimization of rf antenna loading, or feedback on heat deposition patterns through divertor strike point position control, for example. Shape control with this system is based on linearization near a target shape of the controlled parameters as a function of the magnetic diagnostic signals. This digital system is unique in that it is designed to have the speed necessary to control the unstable vertical motion of highly elongated tokamak discharges such as those produced in DIII-D and planned for BPX and ITER. a 40 MHz Intel i860 processor is interfaced to up to 112 channels of analog input signals. The commands to the poloidal field coils can be updated at 80 {mu}s intervals for the control of vertical position with a delay between sampling of the analog signal and update of the command of less than 80 {mu}s.

Ferron, J.R.; Kellman, A.; McKee, E.; Osborne, T.; Petrach, P.; Taylor, T.S.; Wight, J. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Lazarus, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

AN ARECIBO SEARCH FOR PULSARS AND TRANSIENT SOURCES IN M33  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a systematic and sensitive search for pulsars and transient sources in the nearby spiral galaxy M33, conducted at 1.4 GHz with the Arecibo telescope's seven-beam receiver system, ALFA. Data were searched for both periodic and aperiodic sources, up to 1000 pc cm{sup -3} in dispersion measure and on timescales from {approx}50 {mu}s to several seconds. The galaxy was sampled with 12 ALFA pointings, or 84 pixels in total, each of which was searched for 2-3 hr. We describe the observations, search methodologies, and analysis strategies applicable to multibeam systems, and comment on the data quality and statistics of spurious events that arise due to radio frequency interference. While these searches have not led to any conclusive signals of periodic or transient nature that originate in the galaxy, they illustrate some of the underlying challenges and difficulties in such searches and the efficacy of simultaneous multiple beams in the analysis of search output. The implied limits are {approx}<5 {mu}Jy Mpc{sup 2} in luminosity (at 1400 MHz) for periodic sources in M33 with duty cycles {approx}<5%. For short-duration transient signals (with pulse widths {approx}<100 {mu}s ), the limiting peak flux density is 100 mJy, which would correspond to a 5{sigma} detection of bright giant pulses ({approx}20 kJy) from Crab-like pulsars if located at the distance of M33. We discuss the implications of our null results for various source populations within the galaxy and comment on the future prospects to conduct even more sensitive searches with the upcoming next-generation instruments including the Square Kilometer Array and its pathfinders.

Bhat, N. D. R.; Cox, P. J. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hankins, T. H. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Lazio, T. J. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}CHO studied by matrix infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heated SiC microtubular reactor has been used to decompose acetaldehyde and its isotopomers (CH{sub 3}CDO, CD{sub 3}CHO, and CD{sub 3}CDO). The pyrolysis experiments are carried out by passing a dilute mixture of acetaldehyde (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of a buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 50-200 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range 1200-1900 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 50-200 {mu}s after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 {mu}Torr. The reactor has been modified so that both pulsed and continuous modes can be studied, and results from both flow regimes are presented. Using various detection methods (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and both fixed wavelength and tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry), a number of products formed at early pyrolysis times (roughly 100-200 {mu}s) are identified: H, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}, CO, CH{sub 2}=CHOH, HC{identical_to}CH, H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 2}=C=O; trace quantities of other species are also observed in some of the experiments. Pyrolysis of rare isotopomers of acetaldehyde produces characteristic isotopic signatures in the reaction products, which offers insight into reaction mechanisms that occur in the reactor. In particular, while the principal unimolecular processes appear to be radical decomposition CH{sub 3}CHO (+M) {yields} CH{sub 3}+ H + CO and isomerization of acetaldehyde to vinyl alcohol, it appears that the CH{sub 2}CO and HCCH are formed (perhaps exclusively) by bimolecular reactions, especially those involving hydrogen atom attacks.

Vasiliou, AnGayle K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Piech, Krzysztof M.; Reed, Beth; Ellison, G. Barney [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Zhang Xu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States); Nimlos, Mark R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg [Chemical Sciences Division, LBNL MS 6R-2100, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Osborn, David L. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969 MS 9055, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States); David, Donald E. [Integrated Instrument Design Facility, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0216 (United States); Urness, Kimberly N.; Daily, John W. [Center for Combustion and Environmental Research, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0427 (United States); Stanton, John F. [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. Methods: We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. Results: We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. Conclusions: As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

Kry, Stephen F.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; White, R. Allen; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Gillin, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Physics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Web-enabled Milestones Chart, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

achieved, including many firsts in government web search technology. Mouse over the year to view the related milestone. Web-enabled milestones pioneered by OSTI 1994 dot First...

284

Slow Magic Angle Spinning - Available Technologies - PNNL  

The technique has also been successfully used to obtain relatively well-resolved spectral data from the liver and heart of a live mouse.

285

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

286

Zeiss Ultra-60 Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cover panels, particularly those on the electro-optic ... Units in the vacuum display windows can be ... mouse button) in the parameter display window. ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

287

Microsoft Word - S07121_CY2010 Annual Rpt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

monitoring, wildlife surveys (including birds, small mammals, frogs, insects, and fish), Preble's mouse habitat characterization and telemetry tracking, a small amount of...

288

VisVIP: Installation Instructions for UNIX Executable  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... invokes Xlib for graphic input (mouse, spaceball, keyboard) and exchanges information with the Tcl/Tk menu via generated X events. ...

289

Sequence analysis of the rat Brca1 homolog and its promoter region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

dog, and human to help identify the important functional domains ... regions among the rat, mouse, and human genes. .... resulted in Taq polymerase errors.

290

Genes order and phylogenetic reconstruction ... - ResearchGate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

criterion, based on the least-squared error. We have used the retree .... of ancestral mammals: lessons from human, mouse and rat genomes. Genome Res .,.

291

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation Alters Epithelial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

digital fluorescence microscopy. Typical integrin immunolocalization in mouse mammary gland is shown in Figure 2. text needed Figure 3 Relative immunoreactivity of a6 integrin...

292

Investigation of non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the mammary gland utilizing three-dimensional culture models of mammary cells derived from mouse strains...

293

Title of Technology to Present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Micro-MRML of the left breast cancer in a mouse with the G6 (9 nm) contrast agent Mammary gland Superficial cervical node Lateral thoracic ...

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Past Funded Projects-Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley, CA A Quantitative Assessment of Bystander Mutagenesis in the Mouse Mammary Gland In Vivo Bruce E. Lehnert Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM Low Dose...

295

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2011 Current Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the mammary gland utilizing three-dimensional culture models of mammary cells derived from mouse strains...

296

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Trainer for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

began development in early 1999. ETEM HVAC engages the user via numerous animations and interactions such as mouse-overs, 'more info' drill-down options, radio button...

297

Kinder, Gentler Cell Capture Method Could Aid Medical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... effective in creating arrays of human liver cells and mouse pluripotent cells—which, similar to stem cells, can develop into more than one cell type. ...

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Bernoulli Process - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bernoulli Process. From WebEQ, this applet displays mathematical text, and allows various forms of interactivity with that text. Here, mousing over the equation ...

299

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPII Map Clean Coal Demonstrations Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) Project Location Map Place mouse cursor over state for and select the project you are interested in....

300

Retrotransposition of gene transcripts leads to structural variation in mammalian genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Broad Institute Genome Sequencing and Analysis Programsequenced by the Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium [49] andto the Chimp Genome Sequencing Consortium 2.1/panTro2

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Combinatorial methods in computational genomics : mammalian phylogenetics using microinversions and fragment assembly with short reads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A diagram of whole genome sequencing strategies contrastingInternational Human Genome Sequencing Consortium. Initial921, 2008. [28] Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium. Initial

Chaisson, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analysis of human mRNAs with the reference genome sequence reveals potent errors, polymorphisms, and RNA editing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

977. International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium 2001.Res. 32: D32–D34. Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium 2002.95064, USA; 2 Genome Sequencing Center, Washington

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The complete sequence of human chromosome 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium. Initialof problem solving in genome sequencing. Genome Res. 8, 562-8 (2001). 23. Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium. Initial

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: An Expression Array Strategy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Strain Specific DNA Damage Response Pathways in Mammary Tissue Allan Balmain Cancer Research Institute, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco CA...

305

Reflred - Attenuator controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mouse: click to change cell Keys: / to move up/down Tab>/ to move right/left to accept value without moving ...

306

NIST GC Methods / RI Search Program and Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Program's Desktop has three tab-activated Windows, each ... On the left side of the Title Bar ... The Right Mouse button menu has many functions. ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

NIST Standard Reference Database 1A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... All Rights Reserved. ... imported from the Windows Clipboard into the Spec List via a Right Mouse button ... Version 2.0 of the Program uses tab displays ...

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

EXPGUI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The notebook panel tabs. ... Pressing the right mouse button selects all entries in a list. ... contains the commands for reading and writing experiment files ...

309

Interactive Map Shows Geothermal Resources - Energy Innovation Portal  

Interactive Map Shows Geothermal Resources. February 12, 2013. Source: Jeff Barnard, AP Environmental Writer GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — With the click of a mouse ...

310

Available Technologies: Tissue-Engineering Phage Therapy for ...  

This shows promise both for medical therapies and basic molecular biological research. ... Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy.

311

Fermilab | Office of Partnerships and Technology Transfer ...  

Quantum Diaries; MOUs — U.S. Procedure. This section is under development. Model. This section is under development . Last modified: 03/19/2013 | ...

312

An Apolipoprotein that Strongly Modulates Plasma Triglyceride ...  

A human/mouse sequence comparison plot reveals apolipoprotein AV adjacent to the gene ZNF259. The sequence conservation curve is ...

313

A novel approach to determine normal variation in gene expression data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animal models for human diseases are of crucial importance for studying gene expression and regulation. In the last decade the development of mouse models for cancer, diabetes, neuro-degenerative and many other diseases has been on steady rise. Microarray ... Keywords: gene expression, hypertension, immune response, mouse models, normal variance, principal component analysis, replicates

Vinay Nadimpally; Mohammed J. Zaki

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Drosophila huntingtin-interacting protein 14 is a presynaptic protein required for photoreceptor synaptic transmission and expression of the palmitoylated proteins synaptosome-associated protein 25 and cysteine string protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cysteine string protein (CSP) were mislocalized and/orDlg (4F3), 1:50; mouse anti-CSP (6D6), 1:50; mouse anti-in mammals. SNAP-25 and CSP expression are altered in dHIP14

Stowers, R Steven; Isacoff, Ehud Y

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Intelligent Systems, Robotics, &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mighty Mouse (M2) Mighty Mouse (M2) Mighty Mouse Mighty Mouse, or M2, earned its heroic name by saving the day at the White Sands Missile Range in southern New Mexico when a radioactive cylinder became jammed inside a metal sleeve. Its radiation field was far too dangerous for a human, even in a protective suit, to get near enough to free it. The White Sands team knew they needed a robot for the job and called Sandia's Intelligent Systems, Robotics, & Cybernetics (ISRC) team. Mighty Mouse Challenge Typically the cylinder moved back and forth within the metal sleeve, driven by forced air. From a safe distance, technicians tried to free the cylinder by increasing the air pressure. It turned out the cylinder hit a signal switch in the metal sleeve's pathway and the increased pressure lodged it

316

Evaluation of ultrasound and other sources of information to predict beef carcass traits and final carcass value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purebred Beefmaster steers (n = 160) from five owners were fed at a commercial feedlot in South Texas beginning in November of 2004; 68 steers possessed pedigree information. Beginning in mid-November, steers were individually weighed and evaluated for ultrasound body composition at 56-d intervals by a certified technician. Feeder calf frame (FRM) and muscle (MUS) scores were assigned at initial ultrasound evaluation. Steers were fed and marketed through a lean-based, branded beef program and were harvested in two groups in May and June of 2005 at a commercial beef plant. Analyses were conducted to investigate the ability to predict carcass traits from the different sources of information available on these cattle. Evaluation of carcass traits were investigated using four sets of independent variables referred to as sources A, B, C, or D and ultrasound scan session (1 Â? 4). An analysis included initial weight at first scan session (IWT), FRM and MUS as independent variables through GLM procedures. B analyses utilized ultrasound measures of the longissimus area, intramuscular fat, fat thickness, rump fat, and gluteus medius depth along with IWT as independent variables. Multiple regression was performed on each carcass trait using IWT and ultrasound traits at each scan session. MallowÂ?s CP was used to select a model that best described each carcass trait. C analyses (GLM) utilized variables from A and B analyses combined plus ranch. D analyses (GLM) included variables from C analyses plus sire nested within ranch. Respective R-square values (scan 1 Â? 4) for marbling score were .02, .04, .05, and .10 using A information, .14, .17, .42, and .54, using B information, .35, .35, .47, and .55 using C information, and .56, .59, .65, and .76 using D information. R-square values ranged from .34 to .86 for carcass weight, .11 to .77 for fat thickness, .06 to .82 for ribeye area, and .10 to .81 for yield grade. Ultrasound data obtained closer to harvest and increasing amount of data related to genetic and management background showed increased R-square values, but may be best utilized in conjunction with one another to predict carcass traits and final carcass value.

Dean, Dustin Tyler

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Dosimetric research on intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy planning for left breast cancer after breast-preservation surgery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has played an important role in breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-preservation surgery. Our aim was to study the dosimetric and implementation features/feasibility between IMRT and intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (Varian RapidArc, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). The forward IMRT plan (f-IMRT), the inverse IMRT, and the RapidArc plan (RA) were generated for 10 patients. Afterward, we compared the target dose distribution of the 3 plans, radiation dose on organs at risk, monitor units, and treatment time. All 3 plans met clinical requirements, with RA performing best in target conformity. In target homogeneity, there was no statistical significance between RA and IMRT, but both of homogeneity were less than f-IMRT's. With regard to the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the left lung, those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT; for V{sub 20} and V{sub 30}, the lowest was observed in RA; and in the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the right lung, as well as the mean dose in normal-side breast and right lung, there was no statistically significance difference between RA and IMRT, and the lowest value was observed in f-IMRT. As for the maximum dose in the normal-side breast, the lowest value was observed in RA. Regarding monitor units (MUs), those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT. Treatment time of RA was 84.6% and 88.23% shorter than f-IMRT and IMRT, respectively, on average. Compared with f-IMRT and IMRT, RA performed better in target conformity and can reduce high-dose volume in the heart and left lung-which are related to complications-significantly shortening treatment time as well. Compared with IMRT, RA can also significantly reduce low-dose volume and MUs of the afflicted lung.

Yin Yong, E-mail: yinyongsd@yahoo.com.cn [School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji'nan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Scienses, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology (China); Chen Jinhu; Sun Tao; Ma Changsheng; Lu Jie; Liu Tonghai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Scienses, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology (China); Wang Ruozheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xinjiang Medical University, Affiliated Hospital, Urumchi (China)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Llwybrau Pos Puzzle Trails  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'm a broadleaf tree often called mountain ash, I have lots of red berries in the autumn which birds like to eat mouse! I have colourful wings, From flower to flower I fly, Sipping nectar on long summer days

319

Global methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

comprises a very large proportion of the mouse and human genomes. Using bisulphite modification and quantitative real-time PCR, the method can be used to analyse a very large pool...

320

Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation and its role in active mechanics and force generation of the heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Stretch Activation in Heart Muscle. J. Gen. Physiol. 127:by Chronic Stretch of Mouse Heart Muscle. MCB 124:1-15. 45.transients in extracted rabbit heart muscle preparations. J.

Patel, Sejal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Genetic engineering of cardiac progenitor cells for the treatment of cardiovascular disease and heart failure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stem cells for the treatment of heart failure. Int J Hematolniches in the adult mouse heart. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S Acells reverses the failing heart senescent phenotype and

Fischer, Kimberlee Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Conserved expression and functions of PDE4 in rodent and human heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cAMP early repressor in the heart. Circ Res 100(4):489–501.PDE4 subtypes in rodent and human heart. Detergent extractsfrom mouse, rat or failing human hearts were subjected to

Richter, Wito; Xie, Moses; Scheitrum, Colleen; Krall, Judith; Movsesian, Matthew A.; Conti, Marco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

move "Mouse House" research OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 4, 2008 - Following more than six decades of developing a unique population of mice to study human diseases, the U.S. Department...

324

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groundbreaking held for new Mouse House OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Nov. 13, 2001 - Construction began today for a state-of-the-art genomics facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that...

325

Topic 1. Why Use STEM?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with 512 pixels has a pixel size of 10A or 1 nm. If this is incorrect for some reason, enter the correct value by clicking the mouse on the appropriate area. Note that the pixel...

326

Modeling hematologic malignancies and their treatment in humanized mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximately 10% of all cancer deaths in the United States are due to neoplasms of the hematopoietic system, such as leukemias and lymphomas. Genetically engineered mouse models of these diseases have yielded invaluable ...

Leskov, Ilya, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Tracking multiple mice through severe occlusions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mouse m if 2 standard deviations of row and the Gaussianto 2 standard deviations of the Gaussians. top row and therow and the Gaussian parameters estimated by our algo- rithm. The ellipses correspond to 2 standard

Branson, Kristin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Act Via TGFβ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

effect that mediates microenvironment composition. TGF is activated in mouse mammary gland following whole body exposure to doses of as low as 0.1 Gy and persists in the stroma...

329

An integrated genetics approach to systemic low-dose radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mammary tumor formation by combining our genetic diverse mouse model with the mammary gland radiation chimera model pioneered in the Barcellos-Hoff laboratory (3,4). As it takes...

330

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the technical expertise to support a 12.7 million funding opportunity from the NIH for ORNL and the Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium. They also received a Science and...

331

Intestinal Microbiota Composition of Interleukin-10 Deficient C57BL/6J Mice and Susceptibility to Helicobacter hepaticus-Induced Colitis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mouse pathobiont Helicobacter hepaticus can induce typhlocolitis in interleukin-10-deficient mice, and H. hepaticus infection of immunodeficient mice is widely used as a model to study the role of pathogens and commensal ...

Yang, Ines

332

Deficient experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex of Arc null mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the visual cortex a vast assortment of molecules work in concert to sharpen and refine neuronal circuits throughout development. With the advent of genetic mouse models it is now possible to probe the individual ...

McCurry, Cortina (Cortina Luann)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2011.00078 Mice lacking Ras-GRF1 show contextual fear conditioning but not spatial memory impairments: convergent evidence from two independently generated mouse mutant lines

Steven J. Clapcote; Vootele Voikar; David P. Wolfer; Karl Peter Giese; Stefania Fasano; Stefania Fasano; Division Of; Steven J. Clapcote

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Radiation-induced responses involved in intercellular signaling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

blood lymphocytes irradiated ex vivo and in vivo from patients undergoing total body irradiation, as well as in studies employing mouse models. In addition to genes with roles in...

335

Partnerships and Technology Transfer - ORNL  

Dr. Culiat’s discoveries at the laboratory were based on studies of a unique mutant mouse stock generated from a large-scale mutagenesis program funded by DOE.

336

Partnerships and Technology Transfer - ORNL  

Dr. Culiat’s discoveries at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were based on studies of a special and unique mutant mouse stock generated from a large-scale mutagenesis ...

337

Paul B. Selby, 1981 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Life Sciences: For development of a series of radiation-induced dominant skeletal mutations in the mouse that have important applications...

338

What do we gain from gamma? Local dynamic gain modulation drives enhanced efficacy and efficiency of signal transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma oscillations in neocortex are hypothesized to improve information transmission between groups of neurons. We recently showed that optogenetic drive of fast-spiking interneurons (FS) at 40 Hz in mouse neocortex in ...

Knoblich, Ulf

339

References 16.1 Haptic Input 3 January, 2013 Buxton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-feedback joystick for telemanipulaion. Proceedings of the NASA Workshop on Space Telerobotics, 341-348. Ahlberg, C issues. Human Factors, 14(4), 275-293. Alford, R. (1990). The mouse that roared. Byte, 15(12), 395

Buxton, William

340

One patient's artificial retina story  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eyeing the Future, A New Kind of Vision One Patient's Story Linda M meets Mickey Mouse Linda M., a petite brunette in her early 60s (pictured at right), first realized that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Template:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the mouse-over behavior Usage For rendering a cloud of logos. Parameters include: query - The query content to pass into the ask query (querying for logos) size - (small,...

342

www.ScienceTranslationalMedicine.org 18 January 2012 Vol 4 Issue 117 117fs3 1 Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the blood vessel endothelial cells of the mouse brain vasculature by admin- istering the drug doxycycline, which rap- idly down-regulates Notch4* expression; removal of doxycycline turns Notch4 sig- naling back

Schaffer, Chris B.

343

The role of psychostimulants in addiction-related learning and memory in mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mouse line contains a doxycycline-dependent, cfos driven GFPneurons active during a doxycycline-dependent tagging windowa diet enriched with doxycycline (40 mg/kg). In the presence

Shuman, Tristan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

OOF: Finite Element Analysis of Microstructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with the word ``OOF'' prominently in the upper left hand corner. ... nx and ny of about 20 are about right if you ... Use the mouse or the tab key to set more ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

345

Reflred - Reduce controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mouse: click to select, click again to clear Keys: Tab>/Tab> to focus ... show line segment click on y-axis to toggle linear/log scale right-click on ...

346

Leveraging high-throughput datasets for studies of gene regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I leveraged computational methods on biological data to better understand gene regulation and development of the human body, as well as of the model organisms mouse and yeast. Firstly, I tackled biological ...

Yen, Angela

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Low Dose Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations Found in Agouti...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations Found in Agouti Mouse Model Autumn Bernal Autumn Bernal Randy Jirtle Randy Jirtle In a paper published in The FASEB Journal, Low...

348

Kangaroo Mice and Deer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

quiet. As an experiment, he tossed it onto the snow In front of his cocker spaniel. The dog, trained to retrieve birds, tossed it in the air. The mouse dropped back on the snow...

349

Copyright 1997-2003 GAMS Development Corporation Documentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation 1217 Potomac Street, NW Washington, DC 20007, USA Phone: (202) 342-0180 Fax: (202) 342-0181 Web ................................................................................................................................... 118 Using the mouse Part III Menus and Windows 14 As .......................................................................................................................................................... 17File | Open in New Window

Ferris, Michael C.

350

Meadow Mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

They also will eat flesh if available. A meadow mouse will actually swim under water and dive to underwater holes. It is a vest-pocket edition of its close relative, the muskrat...

351

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ MOLECULAR, CELL, AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and agarose gel electrophoresis; mouse colony management and genotyping; perform biochemical experiments procedures and in vivo virus work. Laboratory Organization/Maintenance: maintain lab equipment; keep records research laboratory. Good organizational, time management and problem solving skills. The abilities

California at Santa Cruz, University of

352

Guided Neuronal Growth on Arrays of Biofunctionalized GaAs/InGaAs Semiconductor Microtubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate embedded growth of cortical mouse neurons in dense arrays of semiconductor microtubes. The microtubes, fabricated from a strained GaAs/InGaAs heterostructure, guide axon growth through them and enable electrical and optical probing of propagating action potentials. The coaxial nature of the microtubes -- similar to myelin -- is expected to enhance the signal transduction along the axon. We present a technique of suppressing arsenic toxicity and prove the success of this technique by overgrowing neuronal mouse cells.

Cornelius S. Bausch; Aune Koitmäe; Eric Stava; Amanda Price; Pedro J. Resto; Yu Huang; David Sonnenberg; Yuliya Stark; Christian Heyn; Justin C. Williams; Erik W. Dent; Robert H. Blick

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation has been developed and tested. The stack design includes a free wheeling diode assembly for current reversal. Triggering of the device is achieved by a high side biased, self supplied gate driver unit using gating energy derived from a local snubber network. The structure guarantees a hard firing gate pulse for the required high dI/dt application. A single fiber optic command is needed to achieve a simultaneous turn on of the thyristors. The stack assembly is used for switching a series resonant circuit with a ringing frequency of 30 kHz. In the prototype pulsed power system described here an inductive discharge has been generated with a pulse duration of 120 {mu}s and a pulse energy of 50 J. A maximum power transfer efficiency of 84% and a peak power of 480 kW inside the discharge were achieved. System tests were performed with a purely inductive load and an inductively generated plasma acting as a load through transformer action at a voltage level of 4.1 kV, a peak current of 5 kA, and a current switching rate of 1 kA/{mu}s.

Teske, C.; Jacoby, J.; Schweizer, W.; Wiechula, J. [Plasmaphysics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources  

SciTech Connect

A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of {approx}1275 deg. C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of {approx}40 h at {approx}1275 deg. C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of {approx}6 {mu}s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

The underground electromagnetic pulse: Four representative models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I describe four phenomenological models by which an underground nuclear explosion may generate electromagnetic pulses: Compton current asymmetry (or ''Compton dipole''); Uphole conductor currents (or ''casing currents''); Diamagnetic cavity plasma (or ''magnetic bubble''); and Large-scale ground motion (or ''magneto-acoustic wave''). I outline the corresponding analytic exercises and summarize the principal results of the computations. I used a 10-kt contained explosion as the fiducial case. Each analytic sequence developed an equivalent source dipole and calculated signal waveforms at representative ground-surface locations. As a comparative summary, the Compton dipole generates a peak source current moment of about 12,000 A/center dot/m in the submicrosecond time domain. The casing-current source model obtains an equivalent peak moment of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 5/ A/center dot/m in the 10- to 30-/mu/s domain. The magnetic bubble produces a magnetic dipole moment of about 7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ A/center dot/m/sup 2/, characterized by a 30-ms time structure. Finally, the magneto-acoustic wave corresponds to a magnetic dipole moment of about 600 A/center dot/m/sup 2/, with a waveform showing 0.5-s periodicities. 8 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

Wouters, L.F.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

[Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, June 1, 1992--June 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most interesting discovery made over the past year derives from sequence analysis of cDNAs from the putative mus308 gene. The theoretical translation product of this gene contains a DNA polymerase domain near the carboxy terminus and DNA/RNA helicase motifs near the amino terminus. There is currently no precedent in the literature for a single polypeptide containing both of these domains. The protein appears to be a novel DNA repair enzyme which should be fruitful ground for future enzymological analysis. The authors have identified two ORFs by sequence analysis of the transforming fragment containing the mei-41 gene and of corresponding cDNAs. ORF 1 includes the P element insertion sites and encodes a peptide of 757 amino acids. ORF 2 starts 900 base pairs downstream of ORF 1 and encodes a peptide of 1,037 amino acids. This putative peptide shows homology to the yeast DNA repair genes, rad50 of S. cerevisiae and rad3 of S. pombe.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 {mu}s. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

Kia, Kaveh Kazemi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Bonab, Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bonabi, Fahimeh [Department of Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Bonab, Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fringe jump analysis and electronic corrections for the Tore Supra far infrared interferometer  

SciTech Connect

On the Tore Supra tokamak, the ten-channel far infrared interferometer consists of a double color (119 and 195 {mu}m) system with two detectors for each channel to measure the plasma density. The phase measurement is obtained by combining a 100 kHz shifted reference beam with the probing beam that has crossed the plasma. The achieved precision--a few percent of a fringe--is very good compared with the expected variations due to plasma, which are on the order of several fringes. However, the counting of the fringe variations can be affected when the signal is perturbed by electromagnetic interferences or when it deviates in the presence of strong plasma refraction changes occurring during ICRH breakdowns, pellet injections, or disruptions. This induces a strong decrease in the reliability of the measurement, which is an important concern when the diagnostic is used for density control. We describe in this paper the renewing of the electronics that has been achieved to reduce and correct the number of the so-called fringe jumps. A new zero crossing method for phase measurement is used, together with a field programable gate array semiconductor integration, to measure the phase and activate the algorithm of corrections every 10 {mu}s. Comparisons between a numerical oscilloscope analysis and the corrected acquired data in the case of laboratory amplitude modulation tests and in the case of real plasma perturbations are also discussed.

Gil, C.; Barbuti, A.; Elbeze, D.; Pastor, P.; Philip, J.; Toulouse, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Shaped excitation current for synchrotron magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 500-MeV synchrotron at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operates at 30 Hz with its beam spill locked to neutron choppers with a precision of +- 0.5 ..mu..s. The average beam will be increased by running the magnets at 45 Hz. Three 45-Hz circuits are discussed which differ greatly in overall cost and complexity. The first is a conventional 45-Hz sine wave circuit. The reduction in time for beam acceleration results in a costly increase in peak rf power. This problem is avoided in the other two circuits by making the field rise slowly and fall rapidly. The second circuit discussed is resonant at 45 Hz and 90 Hz. Exciting this circuit with a mixture of dc, 45 Hz, and 90 Hz can produce a magnetic field with the same maximum dB/dt as the present 30-Hz field. A third, and possibly least expensive, solution is a novel circuit which produces 30 Hz during acceleration and 90 Hz when the magnets are reset. The rf requirements are, of course, identical to present requirements during acceleration. Circuit details are given.

Foss, M.; Praeg, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Temperature peaking at beginning of breakdown in 2.45 GHz pulsed off-resonance electron cyclotron resonance ion source hydrogen plasma  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study of temperature and density evolution during breakdown in off-resonance ECR hydrogen plasma is presented. Under square 2.45 GHz microwave excitation pulses with a frequency of 50 Hz and relative high microwave power, unexpected transient temperature peaks that reach 18 eV during 20 {mu}s are reported at very beginning of plasma breakdown. Decays of such peaks reach final stable temperatures of 5 eV at flat top microwave excitation pulse. Evidence of interplay between incoming power and duty cycle giving different kind of plasma parameters evolutions engaged to microwave coupling times is observed. Under relative high power conditions where short microwave coupling times are recorded, high temperature peaks are measured. However, for lower incoming powers and longer coupling times, temperature evolves gradually to a higher final temperature without peaking. On the other hand, the early instant where temperature peaks are observed also suggest a possible connection with preglow processes during breakdown in ECRIS plasmas.

Cortazar, O. D. [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha. E.T.S.I.I., Camilo J. Cela s/n, 13071-C. Real (Spain); Megia-Macias, A.; Vizcaino-de-Julian, A. [E.S.S. Bilbao, Edificio Cosimet, Landabarri 2, 48940-Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Shock initiation studies of low density HMX using electromagnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress rate gauges have been used to measure the shock response of low density octotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) (1.24 &/cm{sup 3}). In experiments done at LANL, magnetic particle velocity gauges were located on both sides of the explosive. In nearly identical experiments done at SNL, PVDF stress rate gauges were located at the same positions so both particle velocity and stress histories were obtained for a particular experimental condition. Unreacted Hugoniot data were obtained and an EOS was developed by combining methods used by Hayes, Sheffield and Mitchell (for describing the Hugoniot of HNS at various densities) with Hermann`s P-{alpha} model. Using this technique, it is only necessary to know some thermodynamic constants or the Hugoniot of the initially solid material and the porous material sound speed to obtain accurate unreacted Hugoniots for the porous explosive. Loading and reaction paths were established in the stress-particle velocity plane for some experimental conditions. This information was used to determine a global reaction rate of {approx} 0.13 {mu}s{sup {minus}1} for porous HMX shocked to 0.8 GPa. At low input stresses the transmitted wave profiles had long rise times (up to 1 {mu}s) due to the compaction processes.

Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Alcon, R.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Low-energy x-ray emission from magnetic-fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Complex, transient, spatially inhomogeneous tokamak plasmas require careful diagnosis. As the reactor regime is approached, soft x rays become more important as a versatile diagnostic tool and an energy-loss mechanism. Continuum emission provides a measure of electron temperature and light impurity content. Impurity lines serve as a probe for ion and electron temperature, impurity behavior, and radiative cooling. The entire spectrum yields vital information on instabilities and disruptions. The importance of impurities is illustrated by the extensive efforts toward understanding impurity production, effects, and control. Minute heavy impurity concentrations can prevent reactor ignition. Si(Li) - detector arrays give a broad overview of continuum and line x-ray emission (.3 to 50 keV) with moderate energy (200 eV) and time (50 ms) resolution. Bragg crystal and grating spectrometers provide detailed information on impurity lines with moderate to excellent (E/..delta..E = 100 to 23,000) resolving power and 1 to 50 ms time resolution. Imaging detector arrays measure rapid (approx. 10 ..mu..s) fluctuations due to MHD instabilities and probe impurity behavior and radiative cooling. Future tokamaks require more diagnostic channels to avoid spatial scanning, higher throughput for fast, single-shot diagnosis, increased spectral information per sample period via fast scanning or use of multi-element detectors with dispersive elements, and radiation shielding and hardening of detectors.

Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; Eames, D.; von Goeler, S.; Goldman, M.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Silver, E.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Vacuum interrupters and thyratrons as opening switches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The clear advantages of inductive storage for large scale energy storage applications are creating an increasing interest in the research and development of the opening switches required. Opening switches for single-shot inductive transfers have received considerable attention and are fairly well advanced. The problem addressed by this workshop of high power opening switches for high repetition rate applications is much more severe, however, and may well require a major research and development effort. Two candidates for such an opening switch, the triggered vacuum interrupter and the magnetically quenched thyratron, are discussed. By electrically retriggering the discharge in the vacuum interrupter between pulses, the dependence on mechanical motion is eliminated. This should enable repetition rate operation at 10 to 15 kHz while still maintaining the vacuum interrupter's proven interrupting performance of tens of kiloamps at tens of kilovolts. The magnetically quenched thyratron, on the other hand, uses a cross magnetic field to raise the switch impedance by decreasing the electron mobility and driving the discharge into an arc chute wall where it is quenched. Successful interruptions of 1 kA at 15 kV and 100 A at 50 kV after conduction for 10 ..mu..s have been demonstrated by previous researchers. Work at Los Alamos is directed toward understanding the basic mechanisms involved and increasing the switch ratings, particularly the conduction time.

Honig, E.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Spectrographic temperature measurement of a high power breakdown arc in a high pressure gas switch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A procedure for obtaining an approximate temperature value of conducting plasma generated during self-break closure of a RIMFIRE gas switch is described. The plasma is in the form of a breakdown arc which conducts approximately 12 kJ of energy in 1 {mu}s. A spectrographic analysis of the trigger-section of the 6-MV RIMFIRE laser triggered gas switch used in Sandia National Laboratory's ''Z-Machine'' has been made. It is assumed that the breakdown plasma has sufficiently approached local thermodynamic equilibrium allowing a black-body temperature model to be applied. This model allows the plasma temperature and radiated power to be approximated. The gas dielectric used in these tests was pressurized SF{sub 6}. The electrode gap is set at 4.59 cm for each test. The electrode material is stainless steel and insulator material is poly(methyl methacrylate). A spectrum range from 220 to 550 nanometers has been observed and calibrated using two spectral irradiance lamps and three spectrograph gratings. The approximate plasma temperature is reported.

Yeckel, Christopher; Curry, Randy [Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering, Center for Physical and Power Electronics, University of Missouri--Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Use of a high repetition rate neutron generator for in vivo body composition measurements via neutron inelastic scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small D-T neutron generator with a high pulse rate is used for the in vivo measurement of body carbon, oxygen and hydrogen. The core of the neutron generator is a 13 cm-long Zetatron tube pulsed at a rate of 10 kHz delivering 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ neutrons per pulse. A target-current feedback system regulates the source of the accelerator to assure constant neutron output. Carbon is measured by detecting the 4.44 MeV ..gamma..-rays from inelastic scattering. The short half-life of the 4.44 MeV state of carbon requires detection of the ..gamma..-rays during the 10 ..mu..s neutron pulse. Generators with low pulsing rate were found inappropriate for carbon measurements because of their low duty-cycle (high neutron output during the pulse). In vivo measurements were performed with normal volunteers using a scanning bed facility for a dose less than 25 mrem. This technique offers medical as well as general bulk analysis applications. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Kehayias, J.J.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.; Weinlein, J.H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

LIMITS ON PROMPT, DISPERSED RADIO PULSES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have searched for prompt radio emission from nine gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a 12 m telescope at 1.4 GHz, with a time resolution of 64 {mu}s to 1 s. We detected single dispersed radio pulses with significances >6{sigma} in the few minutes following two GRBs. The dispersion measures of both pulses are well in excess of the expected Galactic values, and the implied rate is incompatible with known sources of single dispersed pulses. The arrival times of both pulses also coincide with breaks in the GRB X-ray light curves. A null trial and statistical arguments rule out random fluctuations as the origin of these pulses with >95% and {approx}97% confidence, respectively, although a simple population argument supports a GRB origin with confidence of only 2%. We caution that we cannot rule out radio frequency interference (RFI) as the origin of these pulses. If the single pulses are not related to the GRBs, we set an upper limit on the flux density of radio pulses emitted between 200 and 1800 s after a GRB of 1.27w {sup -1/2} Jy, where 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s 1 s) variations. These limits are some of the most constraining at high time resolution and GHz frequencies in the early stages of the GRB phenomenon.

Bannister, K. W.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics A29, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Reynolds, J. E., E-mail: keith.bannister@csiro.au [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Pyrochemical multiplicity counter development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impure plutonium-bearing materials from pyrochemical processes often display both significant self-multiplication and variable ({alpha},n) reaction rates. Standard neutron coincidence counting techniques usually fail to accurately measure these materials. Neutron multiplicity counters measure the third moment of the neutron multiplicity distribution and thus make it possible to deduce the fertile plutonium mass of a sample even when both the self-multiplication and the ({alpha},n) reaction rate are unknown. A multiplicity counter suitable for measuring pyrochemical materials has been designed and built. This paper describes the results of characterization studies for the new counter. The counter consists of 126 helium-3 tubes arranged in 4 concentric rings in a polyethylene moderator; the average spacing between the tubes is 1.59 cm. The end plugs for the counter are made of graphite, and the 24.1- by 37.5-cm sample cavity is cadmium lined. The counter consists of two distinct halves from which the neutron counts are summed. The counter is capable of operation in either a freestanding mode with the two halves coupled together by an external cabinet or in a glove-box mode with the two halves placed around a glovebox well and then mated. For a {sup 252}Cf source centered in the sample cavity, the measured efficiency of the new multiplicity counter is 57.7% and its die-away time is 47.2{mu}s. 8 refs., 9 figs.

Langner, D.G.; Dytlewski, N.; Krick, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hyperfine Structure Measurements of Antiprotonic $^3$He using Microwave Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to measure the hyperfine structure of $\\overline{\\text{p}}^3$He$^+$ using the technique of laser-microwave-laser spectroscopy. Antiprotonic helium ($\\overline{\\text{p}}$He$^+$) is a neutral exotic atom, consisting of a helium nucleus, an electron and an antiproton. The interactions of the angular momenta of its constituents cause a hyperfine splitting ({HFS}) within the energy states of this new atom. The 3\\% of formed antiprotonic helium atoms which remain in a metastable, radiative decay-dominated state have a lifetime of about 1-3~$\\mu$s. This time window is used to do spectroscopic studies. The hyperfine structure of $\\overline{\\text{p}}^4$He$^+$ was already extensively investigated before. From these measurements the spin magnetic moment of the antiproton can be determined. A comparison of the result to the proton magnetic moment provides a test of {CPT} invariance. Due to its higher complexity the new exotic three-body system of $\\overline{\\text{p}}^3$He$^+$ is a cross-check...

Friedreich, Susanne

369

Coherence of a qubit stored in Zeeman levels of a single optically trapped atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally investigate the coherence properties of a qubit stored in the Zeeman substates of the 5S1/2, F=1 hyperfine ground level of a single optically trapped Rb-87 atom. Larmor precession of a single atomic spin-1 system is observed by preparing the atom in a defined initial spin-state and then measuring the resulting state after a programmable period of free evolution. Additionally, by performing quantum state tomography, maximum knowledge about the spin coherence is gathered. By using an active magnetic field stabilization and without application of a magnetic guiding field we achieve transverse and longitudinal dephasing times of T2*=75..150 \\mus and T1>0.5 ms respectively. We derive the light-shift distribution of a single atom in the approximately harmonic potential of a dipole trap and show that the measured atomic spin coherence is limited mainly by residual position- and state-dependent effects in the optical trapping potential. The improved understanding enables longer coherence times, an i...

Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Weber, Markus; Weinfurter, Harald

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Coherence of a qubit stored in Zeeman levels of a single optically trapped atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally investigate the coherence properties of a qubit stored in the Zeeman substates of the 5S1/2, F=1 hyperfine ground level of a single optically trapped Rb-87 atom. Larmor precession of a single atomic spin-1 system is observed by preparing the atom in a defined initial spin-state and then measuring the resulting state after a programmable period of free evolution. Additionally, by performing quantum state tomography, maximum knowledge about the spin coherence is gathered. By using an active magnetic field stabilization and without application of a magnetic guiding field we achieve transverse and longitudinal dephasing times of T2*=75..150 \\mus and T1>0.5 ms respectively. We derive the light-shift distribution of a single atom in the approximately harmonic potential of a dipole trap and show that the measured atomic spin coherence is limited mainly by residual position- and state-dependent effects in the optical trapping potential. The improved understanding enables longer coherence times, an important prerequisite for future applications in long-distance quantum communication and computation with atoms in optical lattices or for a loophole-free test of Bell's inequality.

Wenjamin Rosenfeld; Jürgen Volz; Markus Weber; Harald Weinfurter

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Deuterium analysis in zircaloy using ps laser-induced low pressure plasma  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study on picosecond laser induced plasma spectroscopy of a zircaloy sample with low-pressure surrounding helium gas has been carried out to demonstrate its potential applicability to three-dimensional quantitative micro-analysis of deuterium impurities in zircaloy. This was achieved by adopting the optimal experimental condition ascertained in this study, which is specified as 7 mJ laser energy, 1.3 kPa helium pressure, and 50 {mu}s measurement window, and which was found to result in consistent D emission enhancement. Employing these operational parameters, a linear calibration line exhibiting a zero intercept was obtained from zircaloy-4 samples doped with various concentrations of D impurity, regarded as surrogates for H impurity. An additional measurement also yielded a detection limit of about 10 {mu}g/g for D impurity, well below the acceptable threshold of damaging H concentration in zircaloy. Each of these measurements was found to produce a crater size of only 25 {mu}m in diameter, promising its application for performing less-destructive measurements. The result of this study has thus paved the way for conducting a further experiment with hydrogen-doped zircaloy samples and the further technical development of a three-dimensional quantitative micro-analysis of detrimental hydrogen impurity in zircaloy vessels used in nuclear power plants.

Marpaung, Alion Mangasi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Jakarta State University, 10 Rawamangun, Jakarta (Indonesia); Lie, Zener Sukra; Niki, Hideaki [Department of Nuclear Power and Energy Safety Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Kagawa, Kiichiro; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Ramli, Muliadi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Hedwig, Rinda [Department of Computer Engineering, Bina Nusantara University, 9 K. H. Syahdan, Jakarta 14810 (Indonesia); Tjia, May On [Physics of Magnetism and Photonics Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, 10 Ganesha, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Pardede, Marincan [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M. H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Vilage, Tangerang, 15811 (Indonesia); Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha [Research Center for Physics, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong Tangerang Selatan 15314, Banten (Indonesia); Jobiliong, Eric [Industrial Engineering Department, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M. H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Vilage, Tangerang, 15811 (Indonesia); Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Detection of charged particles and X-rays by scintillator layers coupled to amorphous silicon photodiode arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n diodes with transparent metallic contacts are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. When coupled to a suitable scintillator using CsI(Tl) as the scintillator we show a capability to detect minimum ionizing particles with S/N {approximately}20. We demonstrate such an arrangement by operating a p-i-n diode in photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). Moreover, we show that a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3-8 higher light sensitivity for shaping times of 1 {mu}s. n-i-n devices have similar optical gain as the p-i-n photoconductor for short integrating times ( radiation exposure dose can be reduced significantly. The scintillator CsI layers we made have higher spatial resolution than the Kodak commercial scintillator screens due to their internal columnar structure which can collimate the scintillation light. Evaporated CsI layers are shown to be more resistant to radiation damage than the crystalline bulk CsI(Tl).

Jing, T.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Goodman, C.A.; Wildermuth, D. [Air Techniques, Inc. Hicksville, NY (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams  

SciTech Connect

We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 {mu}m) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm{sup 2}) of these short-pulsed ({le} 1 {mu}s) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10{sup 10} K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology.

Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Specific features of photoluminescence properties of copper-doped cadmium selenide quantum dots  

SciTech Connect

The effect of doping with copper on the photoluminescence properties of cadmium selenide quantum dots 4 nm in dimension is studied. The quenching of the excitonic photoluminescence band related to the quantum dots and the appearance of an impurity photoluminescence band in the near-infrared region are observed after doping of the quantum dots with copper. It is established that, on doping of the quantum dots, the photoluminescence kinetics undergoes substantial changes. The photoluminescence kinetics of the undoped quantum dots is adequately described by a sum of exponential relaxation relations, whereas the photoluminescence kinetics experimentally observed in the region of the impurity band of the copper-doped samples follows stretched exponential decay, with the average lifetimes 0.3-0.6 {mu}s at the photon energies in the range of 1.47-1.82 eV. The experimentally observed changes in the photoluminescence properties are attributed to transformation of radiative centers in the quantum dots when doped with copper atoms.

Tselikov, G. I., E-mail: gleb@vega.phys.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Dorofeev, S. G.; Tananaev, P. N. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

MT DOE/EPSCoR planning grant. [Annual Technical Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Montana DOE/EPSCoR planning process has made significant changes in the state of Montana. This is exemplified by notification from the Department of Energy's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (DOE/EPSCoR) recommendation to fund Montana's 1992 graduate traineeship grant proposal in the amount of $500,000. This is a new award to Montana. DOE traineeship reviewers recognized that our planning grant enabled us to develop linkages and build the foundation for a competitive energy-related research and traineeship program in Montana. During the planning, we identified three major focus areas: Energy Resource Base, Energy Production, and Environmental Effects. For each focus area, we detailed specific problem areas that the trainees may research. We also created MORE, a consortium of industrial affiliates, state organizations, the Montana University System (MUS), tribal colleges, and DOE national laboratories. MORE and our state-wide Research and Education Workshop improved and solidified working relationships. We received numerous letters of support. DOE reviewers endorsed our traineeship application process. They praised the linkage of each traineeship with a faculty advisor, and the preference for teams of faculty members and two or more students. Particularly commendable'' were our programs to involve Native American educators and the leveraging effect'' of this on the human resources in the state. Finally, the DOE reviewers indicated that cost-sharing via support of Native Americans was creative and positive.

Bromenshenk, J.J.; Scruggs, V.L.

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

377

Recent advances in RF power generation  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a review of the progress and methods used in RF generation for particle accelerators. The frequencies of interest are from a few megahertz to 100 GHz, and the powers are for super linear collider applications, but in this case the pulses are short, generally below 1 {mu}s. The very high-power, short-pulse generators are only lightly reviewed here, and for more details the reader should follow the specialized references. Different RF generators excel over various parts of the frequency spectrum. Below 100 MHz solid-state devices and gridded tubes prevail, while the region between 400 MHz and 3 GHz, the cyclotron-resonant devices predominate, and above 250 GHz, Free-Electron Lasers and ubitrons are the most powerful generators. The emphasis for this review is on microwave generation at frequencies below 20 GHz, so the cyclotron-resonant devices are only partially reviewed, while the progress on free-electron laser and ubitrons is not reviewed in this paper. 39 refs., 4 figs.

Tallerico, P.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Position-sensitive detector for the 6-meter optical telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Position-Sensitive Detector (PSD) for photometrical and spectral observation on the 6-meter optical telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia) is described. The PSD consists of a position-sensitive tube, amplifiers of output signals, analog-to-digital converters (ADC) and a digital logic plate, which produces a signal for ADC start and an external strob pulse for reading information by registration system. If necessary, the thermoelectric cooler can be used. The position-sensitive tube has the following main elements: a photocathode, electrodes of inverting optics, a block of microchannel plates (MCP) and a position-sensitive collector of quadrant type. The main parameters of the PSD are the diameter of the sensitive surface is 25 mm, the spatial resolution is better than 100 (\\mu)m in the centre and a little worse on the periphery; the dead time is near 0.5 (\\mu)s; the detection quantum efficiency is defined by the photocathode and it is not less than 0.1, as a rule; dark current is about hundreds of cps, or less, when cooling. PSD spectral sensitivity depends on the type of photocathode and input window material. We use a multialkali photocathode and a fiber or UV-glass, which gives the short- wave cut of 360 nm or 250 nm, respectively.

V. Debur; T. Arkhipova; G. Beskin; V. Plokhotnichenko; M. Pakhomov; M. Smirnova; A. Solin

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Interfacial temperature measurements, high-speed visualization and finite-element simulations of droplet impact and evaporation on a solid surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to investigate the coupling of fluid dynamics, heat transfer and mass transfer during the impact and evaporation of droplets on a heated solid substrate. A laser-based thermoreflectance method is used to measure the temperature at the solid-liquid interface, with a time and space resolution of 100 {\\mu}s and 20 {\\mu}m, respectively. Isopropanol droplets with micro- and nanoliter volumes are considered. A finite-element model is used to simulate the transient fluid dynamics and heat transfer during the droplet deposition process, considering the dynamics of wetting as well as Laplace and Marangoni stresses on the liquid-gas boundary. For cases involving evaporation, the diffusion of vapor in the atmosphere is solved numerically, providing an exact boundary condition for the evaporative flux at the droplet-air interface. High-speed visualizations are performed to provide matching parameters for the wetting model used in the simulations. Numerical and experimental results are compar...

Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Attinger, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 {mu}s temporal resolution and approximately 100 {mu}m spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Very Fast Losses of the Circulating LHC Beam, their Mitigation and Machine Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has a nominal energy of 362MJ stored in each of its two counter-rotating beams - over two orders of magnitude more than any previous accelerator and enough to melt 880kg of copper. Therefore, in case of abnormal conditions comprehensive machine protection systems extract the beams safely from the LHC within not more than three turns $\\approx$270$\\mu$s. The first years of LHC operation demonstrated a remarkable reliability of the major machine protection systems. However, they also showed that the LHC is vulnerable to losses of the circulating beams on very fast timescales, which are too fast to ensure an active protection. Very fast equipment failures, in particular of normal-conducting dipole magnets and the transverse damper can lead to such beam losses. Whereas these failures were already studied in the past, other unexpected beam loss mechanisms were observed after the LHC start-up: so-called (un)identified falling objects (UFOs), which are believed to be micrometer-sized m...

Baer, Tobias; Elsen, Eckhard

382

High speed curved position sensitive detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

Hendricks, Robert W. (Montgomery County, VA); Wilson, Jack W. (Knox County, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

First results from the J-TEXT high-resolution three-wave polarimeter-interferometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laser-based far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented on the J-TEXT tokamak. The polarimeter determines the Faraday effect by measuring the phase difference between two collinear, counter-rotating, circularly polarized laser beams. The first results of the polarimeter-interferometer designed for J-TEXT have been obtained in the most recent J-TEXT experimental campaign. Simultaneous polarimetric and interferometric measurement is achieved, with phase resolution up to 0.1 Degree-Sign , at bandwidth of 50 kHz. The temporal resolution, which is dependent on the laser's frequency offset, is {approx}1 {mu}s. Continual spatial measurement covering 45 cm (80% of the plasma cross-section) is realized by utilizing 1D parabolic beam expansion optics. Three initial test chords are installed and future plans call for expansion up to 30 chords with 1.5 cm chord spacing, providing high spatial resolution for measurement of electron density and current density profiles. Reliability of both polarimetric and interferometric measurement is confirmed by comparison with computation and data from a hydrocyanic acid (HCN) interferometer. With the high temporal and phase resolution, perturbations associated with the sawtooth cycle and MHD activity have been observed.

Chen, J.; Zhuang, G.; Wang, Z. J.; Gao, L.; Li, Q.; Chen, W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Characterization of converging shock waves generated by underwater electrical wire array explosion  

SciTech Connect

Results of {approx}200 kbar pressure generation at 50 {mu}m distance from the implosion axis of the converging shock wave produced by an underwater electrical explosion of a cylindrical wire array are reported. The array was exploded using a submicrosecond high-current generator (stored energy of {approx}4.2 kJ, current amplitude of {approx}325 kA, rise time of {approx}1 {mu}s). Multiframe shadow imaging of the shock wave was used to determine its time of flight. These data were applied for calculating the pressure at the vicinity of the implosion axis using one dimensional hydrodynamic calculations and the Whitham approach. However, it was found that in the case of wire array radius {<=}5 mm, multiframe imaging cannot be used at the final stage of the shock wave implosion because of possible changes in the optical properties of the water. Optical and spectroscopic methods based on either the change in the refraction index of the optical fiber or spectroscopy of the plasma formed inside the capillary placed at the implosion axes were used for shock wave characterization. A satisfactory agreement was found between the results obtained by these methods.

Efimov, S.; Fedotov, A.; Gleizer, S.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Bazalitski, G.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Department of Physics, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

A fast spectroscopic diagnostic for the measurement of plasma impurity ion dynamics  

SciTech Connect

A high-resolution spectrometer has been developed and used to measure simultaneously impurity ion temperature and flow velocities in high temperature plasmas with 10 {mu}s temporal resolution (limited by digitization rate). This device is actually a duo-spectrometer: measurements from two different chordal views of the plasma can be made simultaneously via two separate quartz input fiber optic bundles coupled to the entrance slits which are tilted to compensate for line curvature. The dispersed spectra on the exit plane of the duo-spectrometer are coupled via quartz fiber optics to two arrays of 16 photomultiplier tubes each. Measurement made by recording the Doppler broadened and shifted 227.091 nm emission from the CV impurity ions in the MST reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma have achieved precisions of <6 eV for temperatures of 150 Ev and <0.7 km/s for flow velocities of 6 km/s. Representative results from the MsT RFP indicate that the toroidal flow velocity drops and ion temperature increases during saw tooth events in MST.

Den Hartog, D.J.; Fonck, R.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Extended Defects in Cdznte Radiation Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-volume CdZnTe (CZT) single crystals with electron lifetime exceeding 10 mus have recently become commercially available. This opened the opportunity for making room temperature CZT gamma-ray detectors with extended thicknesses and larger effective areas. However, the extended defects that are present even in the highest-quality material remain a major drawback which affects the availability and cost of large CZT detectors. In contrast to the point defects that control electron lifetime and whose effects on the charge collection can be electronically corrected, the extended defects introduce significant fluctuations in the collected charge, which increase with a crystal's thickness. The extended defects limit the uniformity in the electrons' drift distance in CZT crystals, above which electron trapping cannot effectively be corrected. In this paper, we illustrate the roles of the extended defects in CZT detectors with different geometries. We emphasize that the crystallinity of commercial CZT materials remains a major obstacle on the path to developing thick, large-volume CZT detectors for gamma-ray imaging and spectroscopy.

Bolotnikov, A.; Babalola, S; Camarda, G; Chen, H; Awadalla, S; Cui, Y; Egarievwe, S; Fochuk, P; Hawrami, R; et. al.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Pulsed operation of a segmented longitudinal discharge CO/sub 2/ laser without ballast impedance  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that a longitudinal CO/sub 2/ laser with two discharge tubes electrically coupled in parallel can be operated in pulsed mode without ballast impedance. This scheme not only yields much higher efficiency (up to 13% at the maximum output energy) and eliminates component failure at high pulse repetition frequency (prf) but also facilitates short pulse availability. In the absence of ballast, current and laser pulse width decrease on increasing the voltage applied to the discharge tubes but these quantities remain unaffected on varying the value of the energy storage capacitor. This enables an independent control of the laser pulse duration and energy. Threshold energy for the onset of nonuniformities in the glow discharge reduces almost exponentially on increasing the discharge current pulse duration but rises on decreasing the operating value of E/N, the electric field to neutral gas density ratio. The maximum output laser energy of about 1 J/pulse, adjustable pulse duration from 30 ..mu..s to about 2 ms, and prf up to 50 Hz have been obtained.

Kukreja, L.M.; Sehgal, S.K.; Chatterjee, U.K.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Spectroscopy of {sup 257}Rf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The isotope {sup 257}Rf was produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti,n){sup 257}Rf. Reaction products were separated and identified by mass. Delayed spectroscopy of {sup 257}Rf and its decay products was performed. A partial decay scheme with configuration assignments is proposed based on {alpha} hindrance factors. The excitation energy of the 1/2{sup +}[620] configuration in {sup 253}No is proposed. The energy of this 1/2{sup +} state in a series of N=151 isotones increases with nuclear charge, reflecting an increase in the N=152 gap. This gap is deduced to grow substantially from 850 to 1400 keV between Z=94 and 102. An isomeric state in {sup 257}Rf, with a half-life of 160{sub -31}{sup +42} {mu}s, was discovered by detecting internal conversion electrons followed by {alpha} decay. It is interpreted as a three-quasiparticle high-K isomer. A second group of internal conversion electrons, with a half-life of 4.1{sub -1.3}{sup +2.4} s, followed by {alpha} decay, was also observed. These events might originate from the decay of excited states in {sup 257}Lr, populated by electron-capture decay of {sup 257}Rf. Fission of {sup 257}Rf was unambiguously detected, with a branching ratio of b{sub Rf}{sup SF}=0.02{+-}0.01.

Qian, J.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R. [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Khoo, T. L.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Peterson, D.; Seweryniak, D.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Jiang, C. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Robinson, A.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Wang, X. [Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)] (and others)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

QAARM: Quasi-anharmonic auto-regressive model reveals molecular recognition pathways in ubiquitin  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have dramatically improved the atomistic understanding of protein motions, energetics and function. These growing datasets have necessitated a corresponding emphasis on trajectory analysis methods for characterizing simulation data, particularly since functional protein motions and transitions are often rare and/or intricate events. Observing that such events give rise to long-tailed spatial distributions, we recently developed a higher-order statistics based dimensionality reduction method, called quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA), for identifying biophysically-relevant reaction coordinates and substates within MD simulations. Further characterization of conformation space should consider the temporal dynamics specific to each identified substate. Our model uses hierarchical clustering to learn energetically coherent substates and dynamic modes of motion from a 0.5 {mu}s ubiqutin simulation. Autoregressive (AR) modeling within and between states enables a compact and generative description of the conformational landscape as it relates to functional transitions between binding poses. Lacking a predictive component, QAA is extended here within a general AR model appreciative of the trajectory's temporal dependencies and the specific, local dynamics accessible to a protein within identified energy wells. These metastable states and their transition rates are extracted within a QAA-derived subspace using hierarchical Markov clustering to provide parameter sets for the second-order AR model. We show the learned model can be extrapolated to synthesize trajectories of arbitrary length.

Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL; Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

cc.rtf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MOUs; 14 Sectors Now Assigned MOUs; 14 Sectors Now Assigned To date, 14 sectors on the APS experiment hall floor have been assigned to Collaborative Access Teams (CATs) that have signed Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with the APS. An MOU can be signed after a CAT has received approval of its scientific proposal and conceptual design, obtained the necessary funding commitments, and developed an appropriate management plan. At the time of MOU signing, the APS assigns sector locations on the experiment hall floor. (On each sector, radiation can be extracted from an insertion-device and a bending-magnet source.) The first MOU was signed in December of 1993 with DND-CAT (E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.-Northwestern University-The Dow Chemical Company CAT), which has been assigned to Sector 5. The second, with SBC-CAT (Structural Biology

391

Introduction to High Performance Computers Richard Gerber NERSC User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the main parts of a What are the main parts of a computer? Merit Badge Requirements ... 4. Explain the following to your counselor: a. The five major parts of a computer. ... Boy Scouts of America Offer a Computers Merit Badge 5 What are the "5 major parts"? 6 Five Major Parts eHow.com Answers.com Fluther.com Yahoo! Wikipedia CPU CPU CPU CPU Motherboard RAM Monitor RAM RAM Power Supply Hard Drive Printer Storage Power Supply Removable Media Video Card Mouse Keyboard/ Mouse Video Card Secondary Storage Monitor Motherboard Keyboard Motherboard Motherboard Sound Card Case / Power Supply IO Peripherals 7 * What is a computer? - It depends what you are interested in. * CPU, memory, video card, motherboard, ... * Monitor, mouse, keyboard, speakers, camera,

392

Murine chromosomal location of five bHLH-Zip transcription factor genes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The genes for the bHLH-Zip transcription factors Tfap4, Mxi1, Tcfeb, Usf1, and Usf2 have been mapped in mouse by interspecific backcross analysis. Mxi1, Usf1, and Usf2 have been mapped previously by in situ hybridization, but their positions on the meiotic linkage map had not been determined. The other two genes have not previously been mapped in mouse. These transcription factors belong to a growing family of transcriptional regulators, some of which are known to form a complex network of interacting proteins that control cell proliferation and apoptosis. As expected, based on mapping studies of other bHLH-Zip genes, these loci were well distributed among mouse chromosomes. In addition, some of the probes used in this study detected multiple, independently segregating loci, suggesting the possible existence of additional family members or species-specific pseudogenes. 34 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Steingrimsson, E.; Gilbert, D.J.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

1995-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Improvements in dose accuracy delivered with static-MLC IMRT on an integrated linear accelerator control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Dose accuracy has been shown to vary with dose per segment and dose rate when delivered with static multileaf collimator (SMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by Varian C-series MLC controllers. The authors investigated the impact of monitor units (MUs) per segment and dose rate on the dose delivery accuracy of SMLC-IMRT fields on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (LINAC), which delivers dose and manages motion of all components using a single integrated controller. Methods: An SMLC sequence was created consisting of ten identical 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} segments with identical MUs. Beam holding between segments was achieved by moving one out-of-field MLC leaf pair. Measurements were repeated for various combinations of MU/segment ranging from 1 to 40 and dose rates of 100-600 MU/min for a 6 MV photon beam (6X) and dose rates of 800-2400 MU/min for a 10 MV flattening-filter free photon (10XFFF) beam. All measurements were made with a Farmer (0.6 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber placed at the isocenter in a solid-water phantom at 10 cm depth. The measurements were performed on two Varian LINACs: C-series Trilogy and TrueBeam. Each sequence was delivered three times and the dose readings for the corresponding segments were averaged. The effects of MU/segment, dose rate, and LINAC type on the relative dose variation ({Delta}{sub i}) were compared using F-tests ({alpha} = 0.05). Results: On the Trilogy, large {Delta}{sub i} was observed in small MU segments: at 1 MU/segment, the maximum {Delta}{sub i} was 10.1% and 57.9% at 100 MU/min and 600 MU/min, respectively. Also, the first segment of each sequence consistently overshot ({Delta}{sub i} > 0), while the last segment consistently undershot ({Delta}{sub i} dose rates greater than 100 MU/min. The linear trend of decreasing dose accuracy as a function of increasing dose rate on the Trilogy is no longer apparent on TrueBeam, even for dose rates as high as 2400 MU/min. Dose inaccuracy averaged over all ten segments in each beam delivery sequence was larger for Trilogy than TrueBeam, with the largest discrepancy (0.2% vs 3%) occurring for 1 MU/segment beams at both 300 and 600 MU/min. Conclusions: Earlier generations of Varian LINACs exhibited large dose variations for small MU segments in SMLC-IMRT delivery. Our results confirmed these findings. The dose delivery accuracy for SMLC-IMRT is significantly improved on TrueBeam compared to Trilogy for every combination of low MU/segment (1-10) and high dose rate (200-600 MU/min), in part due to the faster sampling rate (100 vs 20 Hz) and enhanced electronic integration of the MLC controller with the LINAC. SMLC-IMRT can be implemented on TrueBeam with higher dose accuracy per beam ({+-}0.2% vs {+-}3%) than previous generations of Varian C-series LINACs for 1 MU/segment delivered at 600 MU/min).

Li Ji; Wiersma, Rodney D.; Stepaniak, Christopher J.; Farrey, Karl J.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, 5758 South Maryland Avenue, MC9006, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Networked alpha and gamma spectral acquisition and analysis system  

SciTech Connect

This manual assumes a knowledge of (terminology used and a working familiarity with) the windowing system and mouse of the Sun computer workstation. See the appropriate Sun manuals for additional information. ALDO, the alpha detector control program, is used to control, monitor, and edit log information associated with the collection of alpha spectra. Actual data collection and control functions are performed by Mizar Real-Time computers for which ALDO acts as a friendly user command interface and status display. It is normally started as part of your login procedure, but may also be started from the ``NETSPEC Utilities`` submenu of the root menu. The root menu is obtained by pushing the right mouse button when the cursor is over the root window (background picture). To become a user of ALDO and the other programs in the NETSPEC system, contact the person who performs systems administration tasks for the Sun computers. Most user interaction with ALDO is by means of mouse manipulation of screen items such as buttons, checkboxes, and sliders. The action of pushing the left mouse button when the cursor is over an item is called selecting that item. The left mouse button is therefore called the select button. The right mouse button is the menu button because a limited number of options may be displayed when that button is pressed when the cursor is over an item with a triangle (inverted delta). In this document, names of selectable items are printed in bold when they are first mentioned or when emphasis is helpful. In general, items which do not apply to the current context are either disabled or made invisible in order to prevent selection.

Wilcox, C.M.; Gross, J.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

High-power SRS lasers - coherent summators (the way it was)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The history of the research works performed under the guidance of H.G. Basov and aimed at developing high-energy lasers - coherent summators (CSs) - based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen is reported. The work was performed jointly by researchers of FIAN [the Laboratory of Quantum Radiophysics (LQRP)] and VNIIEF. Many problems were solved as a result of these studies. Liquid nitrogen and oxygen were found to be optimal active media for high-power SRS lasers with high energy per pulse. A method for purifying these cryogenic liquids from micro- and nanoimpurities was developed, which made it possible to eliminate nonlinear loss of pump radiation and converted radiation in the active medium and ensure effective operation of SRS lasers - coherent summators (SRSL CSs) with high output energy. Cryogenic cells providing high optical homogeneity of liquid nitrogen and oxygen were developed, which ensured low (at a level of 0.1 mrad) divergence of converted radiation with high energy density. Raster focusing systems providing optimal concentration of pump radiation in the active medium were designed. These studies resulted in the development of high-power highenergy SRSL CSs with a low beam divergence, based on liquid nitrogen ({lambda}{sub S} = 1.89 {mu}m) and liquid oxygen ({lambda}{sub S} = 1.65 {mu}m), with pumping by explosively pumped iodine lasers (EPILs) ({lambda}{sub p} = 1.315 {mu}m). The characteristics of the SRSL CSs developed were record for that time (the end of 1960s and the beginning of 1970s): energy up to 2.5 kJ per 10-{mu}s pulse, beam divergence {approx}10{sup -4} rad, and beam energy density of several hundreds of J cm{sup -2}. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of n.g. basov)

Grasiuk, Arkadii Z; Zubarev, I G; Efimkov, V F; Smirnov, V G [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Detection of THz radiation with devices made from wafers with HgTe and InSb quantum wells  

SciTech Connect

In this study we present measurements of the Terahertz (THz) photoconductivity of 2D electron system realized at HgTe/HgCdTe and AlInSb/InSb/AlInSb quantum wells (QWs) in Corbino geometry (inner and outer radius: 500 {mu}m and 1500 {mu}m) with different mobilities and electron densities. To characterize the devices, the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect up to magnetic fields B of 7T and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics at various magnetic fields were measured. The THz radiation is provided by a p-Ge laser which operates with a magnetic field and a high voltage for the electrical pumping. The stimulated emission is caused by transitions between Landau levels of light holes [1]. The laser is tunable in the range between 1.7 to 2.5 THz (corresponding to wavelengths between 120 to 180 {mu}m or energies of 7 to 12 meV). The laser is pulsed with a pulse rate of 1 Hz and pulse lengths of about 1 {mu}s with low switching times (about 20 ns). The monochromatic THz radiation is transferred to our samples via a 0.32m long brass waveguide immersed in liquid Helium. The detection of a change in the conductivity of the sample due to absorption of THz-radiation (photoresponse) requires a low-noise circuit. For the Corbino-shaped samples the photoresponse (PR) is measured via a resistor R{sub V} of 1 k{Omega}. The signal is transferred via in a high-frequency cable and detected with a digital oscilloscope.

Gouider, F.; Nachtwei, G. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Vasilyev, Yu. B.; Koenemann, J. [A. F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Buckle, P. D. [QinetiQ Ltd, Malvern WR14 3PS (United Kingdom); Bruene, C.; Buhmann, H. [Julius-Maximilians-University Wuerzburg, D-97074 (Germany)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Very Intense Neutrino Super Beam Experiment for Leptonic CP Violation Discovery based on the European Spallation Source Linac: A Snowmass 2013 White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few $\\mu$s with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 $\\sigma$ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 $\\sigma$ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

E. Baussan; M. Blennow; M. Bogomilov; E. Bouquerel; J. Cederkall; P. Christiansen; P. Coloma; P. Cupial; H. Danared; C. Densham; M. Dracos; T. Ekelof; M. Eshraqi; E. Fernandez Martinez; G. Gaudiot; R. Hall-Wilton; J. -P. Koutchouk; M. Lindroos; R. Matev; D. McGinnis; M. Mezzetto; R. Miyamoto; L. Mosca; T. Ohlsson; H. Ohman; F. Osswald; S. Peggs; P. Poussot; R. Ruber; J. Y. Tang; R. Tsenov; G. Vankova-Kirilova; N. Vassilopoulos; E. Wildner; J. Wurtz

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

398

Quantum Structure of Field Theory and Standard Model Based on Infinity-free Loop Regularization/Renormalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand better the quantum structure of field theory and standard model in particle physics, it is necessary to investigate carefully the divergence structure in quantum field theories (QFTs) and work out a consistent framework to avoid infinities. The divergence has got us into trouble since developing quantum electrodynamics in 1930s, its treatment via the renormalization scheme is satisfied not by all physicists, like Dirac and Feynman who have made serious criticisms. The renormalization group analysis reveals that QFTs can in general be defined fundamentally with the meaningful energy scale that has some physical significance, which motivates us to develop a new symmetry-preserving and infinity-free regularization scheme called loop regularization (LORE). A simple regularization prescription in LORE is realized based on a manifest postulation that a loop divergence with a power counting dimension larger than and equal to the space-time dimension must vanish. The LORE method is achieved without modifying original theory and leads the divergent Feynman loop integrals well-defined to maintain the divergence structure and meanwhile preserve basic symmetries of original theory. The crucial point in LORE is the presence of two intrinsic energy scales which play the roles of ultraviolet cut-off $M_c$ and infrared cut-off $\\mu_s$ to avoid infinities. The key concept in LORE is the introduction of irreducible loop integrals (ILIs) on which the regularization prescription acts, which leads to a set of gauge invariance consistency conditions between the regularized tensor-type and scalar-type ILIs. The evaluation of ILIs with ultraviolet-divergence-preserving (UVDP) parametrization naturally leads to Bjorken-Drell's analogy between Feynman diagrams and electric circuits. The LORE method has been shown to be applicable to both underlying and effective QFTs.

Yue-Liang Wu

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

399

Substation voltage upgrading  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses specific issues to support sound yet not unduly conservative uprating practices for substations. The main parts of the report cover the insulation withstand and overvoltage protection aspects, environmental measurements, reliability criteria, and industry experience. First the insulation design concerns are addressed. Substation stress by a backflashover of the line insulation due to lightning in the vicinity of the substation is recognized as a critical stress. A representative part of a 550 kV BIL substation was erected at the EPRI High Voltage Transmission Research Center, where also a special test circuit was assembled to produce a fast front, slow tail (0.2/200 {mu}s) wave. The substation as well as some special configurations were tested for line-to-ground and line-to-line withstand. Computer studies were performed to complement the test results. A number of important conclusions was reached. The most prominent result in that the high frequency oscillations, as caused by reflections within the substation, do not effect the Critical Flashover Voltage (CFO). The present practice, based on the highest peak is therefore very conservative. The slow tail of the wave appears to dictate the CFO. An arrester model for computer studies to represent very fast as well as slow phenomena was derived. It is based on full scale arrester test data, made available in this project. The computer program to calculate arrester model parameters is also a part of the report. The electric environmental measurements are reported for the tested substation at the HVTRC and for the uprated substation of Public Service Company of Colorado, both before and after the uprating. The performance is satisfactory when corona free hardware is used. Insulation design criteria are analyzed based on substation reliability, the system viewpoint and consequences of the failure. Utility experience with uprated substations is reviewed.

Panek, J.; Elahi, H.; Lux, A.; Imece, A.F. (General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States). Power Systems Engineering Dept.); LaPanse, R.A.; Stewart, J.R. (Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

Frederick, B.deB. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Estimation of electron temperature and density of the decay plasma in a laser-assisted discharge plasma extreme ultraviolet source by using a modified Stark broadening method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the plasma expansion behaviors and the electrical recovery process after the maximum implosion in our tin fueled laser-assisted discharge plasma (LDP) 13.5 nm EUV source, we developed and evaluated a cost-efficient spectroscopic method to determine the electron temperature T{sub e} and density n{sub e} simultaneously, by using Stark broadenings of two Sn II isolated lines (5s{sup 2}4f{sup 2}F{sup o}{sub 5/2} - 5s{sup 2}5d{sup 2}D{sub 3/2} 558.9 nm and 5s{sup 2}6d{sup 2}D{sub 5/2} - 5s{sup 2}6p{sup 2}P{sup o}{sub 3/2} 556.2 nm) spontaneously emitted from the plasma. The spatial-resolved evolutions of T{sub e} and n{sub e} of the expansion plasma over 50 to 900 ns after the maximum implosion were obtained using this modified Stark broadening method. According to the different n{sub e} decay characteristics along the Z-pinch axis, the expansion velocity of the electrons was estimated as {approx}1.2 x 10{sup 4} ms{sup -1} from the plasma shell between the electrodes towards the cathode and the anode. The decay time constant of n{sub e} was measured as 183 {+-} 24 ns. Based on the theories of plasma adiabatic expansion and electron-impact ionization, the minimum time-span that electrical recovery between the electrodes needs in order to guarantee the next succeeding regular EUV-emitting discharge was estimated to be 70.5 {mu}s. Therefore, the maximum repetition rate of our LDP EUV source is {approx}14 kHz, which enables the output to reach 125 W/(2{pi}sr).

Zhu Qiushi; Muto, Takahiro; Yamada, Junzaburo; Kishi, Nozomu; Watanabe, Masato; Okino, Akitoshi; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Hotta, Eiki [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Generalizable Class Solutions for Treatment Planning of Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) continues to emerge as an effective therapeutic approach to spinal metastases; however, treatment planning and delivery remain resource intensive at many centers, which may hamper efficient implementation in clinical practice. We sought to develop a generalizable class solution approach for spinal SBRT treatment planning that would allow confidence that a given plan provides optimal target coverage, reduce integral dose, and maximize planning efficiency. Methods and Materials: We examined 91 patients treated with spinal SBRT at our institution. Treatment plans were categorized by lesion location, clinical target volume (CTV) configuration, and dose fractionation scheme, and then analyzed to determine the technically achievable dose gradient. A radial cord expansion was subtracted from the CTV to yield a planning CTV (pCTV) construct for plan evaluation. We reviewed the treatment plans with respect to target coverage, dose gradient, integral dose, conformality, and maximum cord dose to select the best plans and develop a set of class solutions. Results: The class solution technique generated plans that maintained target coverage and improved conformality (1.2-fold increase in the 95% van't Riet Conformation Number describing the conformality of a reference dose to the target) while reducing normal tissue integral dose (1.3-fold decrease in the volume receiving 4 Gy (V{sub 4Gy}) and machine output (19% monitor unit (MU) reduction). In trials of planning efficiency, the class solution technique reduced treatment planning time by 30% to 60% and MUs required by {approx}20%: an effect independent of prior planning experience. Conclusions: We have developed a set of class solutions for spinal SBRT that incorporate a pCTV metric for plan evaluation while yielding dosimetrically superior treatment plans with increased planning efficiency. Our technique thus allows for efficient, reproducible, and high-quality spinal SBRT treatment planning.

Weksberg, David C.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Vu, Khoi N.; Rebueno, Neal C.; Sharp, Hadley J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Luo, Dershan; Yang, James N.; Shiu, Almon S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McAleer, Mary Frances; Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L., E-mail: eric.L.chang@usc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Norris Cancer Hospital, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Microsoft Word - S09641_2012Annual.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8 8 biocontrol release locations, vegetation and wildlife monitoring locations (transect endpoints and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's mouse habitat, wetland locations, wildfire/prescribed burn locations, Preble's mouse and wetland mitigation areas, and rare plant locations. These data are available in various ArcGIS-compatible formats. In addition to these types of spatial data, orthorectified aerial and satellite imagery is also available for the Site for different time frames, including pre- and post-closure. 3.4 Validation and Data Quality Assessment Data validation and verification (V&V) during CY 2012 was performed by Legacy Management Support contractor personnel at the Grand Junction, Colorado, office. Data quality assessment

404

6-Acetyldihydrohomopterin and sepiapterin affect some GTP cyclohydrolase I's and not others  

SciTech Connect

The first enzyme in pteridine biosynthesis, GTP cyclohydrolase I, is a likely site for regulation of pteridine biosynthesis to occur. GTP cyclohydrolase I responds to hormonal treatment and is found altered in a variety of mice with genetically based neurological and immunological disorders. Genetic loci can greatly modify the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase: Punch mutant in Drosophila hph-1 in mouse and atypical phenylketonuria in human. This report examines the ability of Ahp and sepiapterin to alter the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I from mouse liver, rat liver and Drosophila head. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

Jacobson, K.B.; Manos, R.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Neurite outgrowth on a fibronectin isoform expressed during peripheral nerve regeneration is mediated by the interaction of paxillin with alpha4beta1 integrins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expressed ?4 subunits into which alanine substitutions had been inserted into either or both of two amino acids essential for paxillin binding; Glu983 and Tyr991 [25]. As controls we expressed either full-length ?4 or ?4 lacking the cytoplasmic domain... and growth cone motility at the end of a cell process or axon. Methods Reagents The following antibodies were used: mouse anti-human ?4, clone HP2/1 (Chemicon); hamster anti-rat ?1, clone HA2/5 (Pharmingen), mouse anti-paxillin, clone 349 (Transduction...

Vogelezang, Mariette; Forster, Ulrike B; Han, Jaewon; Ginsberg, Mark H; ffrench-Constant, Charles

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Travel Planning Online for Dummies, 2nd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Find out how you can quickly and easily book plane tickets, rent a car and find a hotel room -- all with a few clicks of the mouse! Whether you're going on a short business strip or planning your dream vacation, Travel Planning ...

Noah Vadnai; Julian Smith

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

How someone with a neuromuscular disease experiences operating a PC (and how to successfully counteract that)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the experiences of the first author, who has been diagnosed with the neuromuscular disease Friedreich's Ataxia more than 25 years ago, with the innovative approach to human-computer interaction characterized by the software tool ... Keywords: Friedreich's Ataxia, ambiguous keyboard, dysarthria, human-computer interaction, keyboard replacement, mouse emulator, neuromuscular disease, word prediction

Torsten Felzer, Stephan Rinderknecht

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cellular/Molecular Spine Neck Plasticity Controls Postsynaptic Calcium Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.42 s B = 0.41 s mouse cortex rat hippocampus C FRAPYFP[s] 0 1 2 3 in vivo naïve depol. slice hippocampal slices (naive/depol.), we replotted the data from Figure 1D scaled by the experimentally

Oertner, Thomas

409

Lithium Treatment of APPSwDI/NOS22/2 Mice Leads to Reduced Hyperphosphorylated Tau, Increased Amyloid Deposition and Altered Inflammatory Phenotype  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium is an anti-psychotic that has been shown to prevent the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein through the inhibition of glycogen-synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3b). We recently developed a mouse model that progresses from amyloid pathology to tau pathology and neurodegeneration due to the genetic deletion of NOS2 in an APP transgenic mouse; the APPSwDI/NOS22/2 mouse. Because this mouse develops tau pathology, amyloid pathology and neuronal loss we were interested in the effect anti-tau therapy would have on amyloid pathology, learning and memory. We administered lithium in the diets of APPSwDI/NOS22/2 mice for a period of eight months, followed by water maze testing at 12 months of age, immediately prior to sacrifice. We found that lithium significantly lowered hyperphosphorylated tau levels as measured by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. However, we found no apparent neuroprotection, no effect on spatial memory deficits and an increase in histological amyloid deposition. Ab levels measured biochemically were unaltered. We also found that lithium significantly altered the neuroinflammatory phenotype of the brain, resulting in enhanced alternative inflammatory response while concurrently lowering the classical inflammatory response. Our data suggest that lithium may

Tiffany L. Sudduth; Joan G. Wilson; Angela Everhart; Carol A. Colton; Donna M. Wilcock

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

An autonomous hybrid robot system to navigate through unknown maze environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a fully complete autonomous hybrid robot system, named YAM (Yet Another Mouse), that is able to navigate through an unknown maze environment. YAM effectively tackles the problem of how to represent the environment using its sensor ... Keywords: intelligent agents, knowledge representation, path planning, robot competitions

Pedro Ribeiro

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Exposing and understanding scrolling transfer functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scrolling is controlled through many forms of input devices, such as mouse wheels, trackpad gestures, arrow keys, and joysticks. Performance with these devices can be adjusted by introducing variable transfer functions to alter the range of expressible ... Keywords: control-display gain, scroll acceleration, scrolling, transfer functions

Philip Quinn; Andy Cockburn; Géry Casiez; Nicolas Roussel; Carl Gutwin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Video communications system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A video communications system having at least one command network formed by a combination of subsystems to include a video subsystem, an audio subsystem, a communications subsystem, and a control subsystem. The video communications system to be window driven and mouse operated, and having the ability to allow for point-to-point real-time teleconferencing. 4 figs.

Smith, R.L.

1990-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

413

Secure video communications system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secure video communications system having at least one command network formed by a combination of subsystems. The combination of subsystems to include a video subsystem, an audio subsystem, a communications subsystem, and a control subsystem. The video communications system to be window driven and mouse operated, and having the ability to allow for secure point-to-point real-time teleconferencing.

Smith, Robert L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Web Lit and the eBook by Albert R. Vogeler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Lit and the eBook by Albert R. Vogeler Be assured of a quiet household and an hour, for purposes of this discussion, the World Wide Web. By a series of mouse clicks and keystrokes you nor the demure concision of Emily Dickinson, both awaiting your nod on the web, suit your mood

de Lijser, Peter

415

January 29, 2004 2:46 WSPC/Trim Size: 9in x 6in for Review Volume practical-bioinformatician MOLECULAR BIOLOGY FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was established using mouse isotype-matched control Abs to define background fluorescence. Propidium iodide (PI by fluorescent microscopy. Results FDC effects on CXCR4, CCR5 and CD4 expression on CD4 T cells To begin by quantitative flow cytometry with fluorescence in- tensity plotted on a log10 scale. CD4 expression was 33

Wong, Limsoon

416

Proximal visceral endoderm and extraembryonic ectoderm regulate the formation of primordial germ cell precursors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dyn 2004, 231(2):416-424. 23. Sun X, Meyers EN, Lewandoski M, Martin GR: Targeted disruption of Fgf8 causes failure of cell migration in the gastrulating mouse embryo. Genes Dev 1999, 13(14):1834-1846. 24. Yamaguchi TP, Bradley A, McMahon AP, Jones S...

Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Surani, M Azim

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Underwater Augmented Reality Game using the DOLPHYN Abdelkader Bellarbi2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater Augmented Reality Game using the DOLPHYN Abdelkader Bellarbi2 , Christophe Domingues1 technologies. With the extension of Internet to underwater applications, the innovative character, such as the mouse, to underwater uses [1]. The Dolphyn is an underwater-computerized display system with various

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

418

MOLECULAR SIEVING ACTION OF THE CELL MEMBRANE DURING GRADUAL OSMOTIC HEMOLYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.IM NaCI Human CO-Hb, Mouse IM ::: iodoacetamide BALBI cJ+ 1M BALBI cJ - 1M C3H/HeJ + 1M C3H/HeJ - 1M DBA/2J + 1M

MacGregor II, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Beyond the data deluge: data integration and bio-ontologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomedical research is increasingly a data-driven science. New technologies support the generation of genome-scale data sets of sequences, sequence variants, transcripts, and proteins; genetic elements underpinning understanding of biomedicine and disease. ... Keywords: bio-ontologies, biomedical ontologies, data integration, gene ontology, mouse genome informatics

Judith A. Blake; Carol J. Bult

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Human computer interaction with hand gestures in virtual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the ever increasing and flourishing phenomena of growth in virtual environments based upon computer systems; demands for new kind of interaction devices have emerged. The present used devices like keyboard, mouse and pen are cumbrousome within these ... Keywords: hand gestures, human computer interaction, virtual environment

Siddharth S. Rautaray; Anand Kumar; Anupam Agrawal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Soap: a Pointing Device that Works in Mid-Air Patrick Baudisch, Mike Sinclair, and Andrew Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soap: a Pointing Device that Works in Mid-Air Patrick Baudisch, Mike Sinclair, and Andrew Wilson,sinclair,awilson@.microsoft.com} ABSTRACT Soap is a pointing device based on hardware found in a mouse, yet works in mid-air. Soap consists. ACM Classification: H5.2 [Information interfaces and presentation]: User Interfaces. Input devices

Baudisch, Patrick

422

National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov Volume 4, Issue 9 May 2008 GoddardViewThe Mouse That Roared: Pipsqueak Star Unleashes Monster Flare Pg 8 Goddard Employees Get an Introduction That Roared: Pipsqueak Star Unleashes Monster Flare ­ 8 Goddard Employees Get an Introduction to GLAST ­ 9

Christian, Eric

423

User and network interplay in internet telemicroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote access of electron microscopes over the Internet (i.e., Telemicroscopy) is a unique network-dependent immersive multimedia application. It demands high-resolution (2D and 3D) video image transfers with simultaneous real-time mouse and keyboard ...

Prasad Calyam; Nathan Howes; Abdul Kalash; Mark Haffner

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

RICE: a reliable and efficient remote instrumentation collaboration environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote access of scientific instruments over the Internet (i.e., remote instrumentation) demand high-resolution (2D and 3D) video image transfers with simultaneous real-time mouse and keyboard controls. Consequently, user quality of experience (QoE) ...

Prasad Calyam; Abdul Kalash; Ramya Gopalan; Sowmya Gopalan; Ashok Krishnamurthy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

09/13/2007 08:42 PMTweaking Genes Could Extend ALS Survival Page 1 of 1http://health.usnews.com/usnews/health/healthday/070913/tweaking-genes-could-extend-als-survival.htm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

09/13/2007 08:42 PMTweaking Genes Could Extend ALS Survival Page 1 of 1http://health.usnews.com/usnews/health/healthday/070913/tweaking-genes-could-extend-als-survival.htm Tweaking Genes Could Extend ALS Survival Mouse study.S. scientists say they've spotted genes that influence survival in mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS

Engelhardt, John F.

426

A virtual touchscreen with depth recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While touch interfaces have become more popular, they are still mostly confined to mobile platforms such as smart phones and notebooks. Mouse interfaces still dominate desktop platforms due to their portability, ergonomic design and large number of possible ... Keywords: gesture recognition, shadow detection, stereo vision, touch interface

Gabriel Hartmann, Burkhard C. Wünsche

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Tuning Wnt Signals for More or Fewer Ming-Xing Lei1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., 2007), the extrafollicular dermal macroenvironment also has an important role in regulating/inhibitors is critical in regu- lating hair cycle progression. The extra- follicular macroenvironment in the adult mouse WntsWnts Wnt 3, 4, 6, 16 Fz Wnt 2, 7a, 7b, 10a, 10b DKKs, sfrp4 from macroenvironment Other inhibitors

Chuong, Cheng-Ming

428

Ninja Cursors: Using Multiple Cursors to Assist Target Acquisition on Large Screens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method to improve pointing performance, our study is the first to explore a variable number of cursors to a distant target located beyond many obstructions, as the user must move the cursor all the way to the distant target. In a desktop configuration, the user is forced to repeatedly reposition the mouse to reach

Igarashi, Takeo

429

Presence of Terminal EPIYA Phosphorylation Motifs in Helicobacter pylori CagA Contributes to IL-8 Secretion,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ba phosphorylation and confirmed CagA involvement in NF-kB activation. Furthermore, we observed that presence of EPIYA-C functional phosphorylation motifs contributed to NF-kB activation. NF-kB upstream signaling-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) failed to induce NF-kB activity, unlike the respective control MEFs

430

Cancer Cell A Transcriptional Signature and Common  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. As in atherosclerosis, oxidized LDL and its receptor OLR1 activate the inflammatory pathway through NF-kB, leading, 2006; De Marzo et al., 2007; Naugler and Karin, 2008; Pierce et al., 2009). Constitutively active NF-kB, and mouse models provide evidence for a causative role of NF-kB in malignant conversion and progression

Bulyk, Martha L.

431

NF kappa B expression and matrix metalloproteinase activity in hypertension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

299-306, 1995. Baldwin A.S. The NF-kB and IkB Proteins: Newof transcription factor NF-kB in mouse glomerular mesangialwere then labeled with anti-NF-kB p65 rabbit polyclonal

Wu, Kwan-I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

www.osa-opn.org36 | OPN July/August 2008 1047-6938/08/0??/0036/6-$15.00 OSA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

light through an optical fiber to the scanner. For hemoglobin imaging, the laser wavelength is typically. This system is safe for human imaging because it delivers a fluence of only about 6 mJ/cm2 at the optical in the ear of a nude mouse is captured using transmission optical microscopy. #12;OPN July/August 2008 | 37

Wang, Lihong

433

Back to Article page Steven Shapin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has a fishy tail'). At Harvard, the celebrations included `free drinks, science-themed rock bands magnets, mouse mats, scatter cushions and pet bowls; the `Darwin Loves You' bumper-stickers, the `Darwin Science and the Visual Arts (at the Fitzwilliam in Cambridge and the Yale Center for British Art), rightly

Shapin, Steven

434

02preview.windows.compreview.windows.com Release Preview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

02preview.windows.compreview.windows.com Windows 8 Release Preview Product guidepreview.windows.com #12;03 01preview.windows.compreview.windows.com © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. #12;Contents Windows 7, only better 06 The new Start screen 06 Touch, keyboard, and mouse: seamless integration

Fähndrich, Manuel A.

435

2011, ProQuest, LLC All rights reserved 1 COS Pivot Profile Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

if you want to search By text (default) or By faculty name. b. Choose your preference and enter your term(s or select both options. By default, Faculty within my institution is selected. Search Terms: Enter a term of the search terms entered occurs within the same faculty profile. Example: Entering 'rat OR mouse

Chinnam, Ratna Babu

436

Knowledge Transfer in Semi-automatic Image Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

application for updating road maps using aerial images. 2 Road annotation in aerial images Updating of road. This requires normally an interpreta- tion of maps where aerial images are used as the source of update. In real Geological Survey, manual road annotation is mouse- or command- driven. A simple road drawing operation can

437

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ MOLECULAR, CELL AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

culture, and running experiments. In addition, lab organization duties include mouse colony management and maintenance of lab equipment and safety records. RANK: Junior Specialist I ­ II SALARY: $33,672 ­ $35 team, and demonstrate exceptional organizational, time management, and decision-making skills

California at Santa Cruz, University of

438

Recent acquisition of imprinting at the rodent Sfmbt2 locus correlates with insertion of a large block of miRNAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this region. These transcripts represent a very narrow imprinted gene locus. We also demonstrate that rat Sfmbt2 is imprinted in extraembryonic tissues. An interesting feature of both mouse and rat Sfmbt2 genes is the presence of a large block of mi...

Wang, Qianwei; Chow, Jacqueline; Hong, Jenny; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Moreno, Carol; Seaby, Peter; Vrana, Paul; Miri, Kamelia; Tak, Joon; Chung, Eu Ddeum; Mastromonaco, Gabriela; Cannigia, Isabella; Varmuza, Susannah

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

[CANCER RESEARCH 64, 31713178, May 1, 2004] Activation of Akt-1 (PKB-) Can Accelerate ErbB-2-Mediated Mammary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[CANCER RESEARCH 64, 3171­3178, May 1, 2004] Activation of Akt-1 (PKB- ) Can Accelerate ErbB-2 is associated with activation of Akt-1. To directly assess the importance of Akt-1 activation in ErbB-2 mammary tumor progression, we interbred separate strains of transgenic mice carrying mouse mammary tumor virus/activated

Woodgett, Jim

440

Genomes & Developmental Control Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in second heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors in second heart field-derived mesoderm Jione Kang a , Elisha Nathan b , Shan-Mei Xu a , Eldad 2009 Available online 4 July 2009 Keywords: Isl1 Second heart field Anterior heart field Transgenic Transcription factor Forkhead FoxC2 FoxA2 FoxF1 Mouse The cells of the second heart field (SHF) contribute

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mouse mus musculus" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Dosimetric properties of an amorphous-silicon EPID used in continuous acquisition mode for application to dynamic and arc IMRT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dosimetric properties of an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in a real-time acquisition mode were investigated. This mode will be essential for time-resolved dose verification of dynamic (sliding window) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and intensity modulated arc radiation therapy (arc-IMRT). The EPID was used in continuous acquisition mode (i.e., ''cine'' mode) where individual sequential image frames are acquired in real time. The properties studied include dose linearity, reproducibility of response, and image stability. Results of using the continuous acquisition mode with several example treatments including dynamic IMRT, arc treatment, and single-arc-IMRT are compared to results using the well-studied integrated acquisition mode (i.e., ''frame averaging'' or ''IMRT'' mode). Real-time EPID response was also compared to real-time ion-chamber data for selected points in the deliveries. The example treatment deliveries in both continuous and integrated acquisition modes were converted to arbitrary EPID dose units via a calibration field. The summation of all acquired continuous mode images was compared using percentage dose difference to the single image acquired in the integrated mode using in-field pixels only (defined as those pixels >10% of maximum, in-field signal). Using the continuous acquisition mode, the EPID response was not linear with dose. It was found that the continuous mode dose response corresponded approximately to dropping one image per acquisition session. Reproducibility of EPID response to low monitor units (MUs) was found to be poor but greatly improved with increasing MU. Open field profiles were found to be stable in the cross-plane direction but required several frames to become stable in the in-plane direction. However, both of these issues are clinically insignificant due to arc-IMRT deliveries requiring relatively large monitor units (>100 MU). Analysis of the five IMRT, arc, and arc-IMRT tests revealed that all examples compared to within 2% of maximum dose for more than 95% of in-field pixels. The continuous acquisition mode is suited to time-resolved dosimetry applications including arc-IMRT and dynamic IMRT, giving comparable dose results to the well-studied integrated acquisition mode, although caution should be used in low MU applications. Time-resolved EPID dose information also compared well to time-resolved ion-chamber measurements.

McCurdy, B. M. C.; Greer, P. B. [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada) and Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales 2298 (Australia) and School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

A Two Bunch Beam Position Monitor  

SciTech Connect

A new beam position monitor digitizer module has been designed, tested and tuned at SLAC. This module, the electron-positron beam position monitor (epBPM), measures position of single electron and positron bunches for the SLC, LINAC, PEPII injections lines and final focus. The epBPM has been designed to improve resolution of beam position measurements with respect to existing module and to speed feedback correction. The required dynamic range is from 5 x 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 11} particles per bunch (46dB). The epBPM input signal range is from {+-}2.5 mV to {+-}500 mV. The pulse-to-pulse resolution is less than 2 {mu}m for 5 x 10{sup 10} particles per bunch for the 12 cm long striplines, covering 30{sup o} at 9 mm radius. The epBPM module has been made in CAMAC standard, single width slot, with SLAC type timing connector. 45 modules have been fabricated. The epBPM module has four input channels X{sup +}, X{sup -}, Y{sup +}, Y{sup -} (Fig. 1), named to correspond with coordinates of four striplines - two in horizontal and two in vertical planes, processing signals to the epBPM inputs. The epBPM inputs are split for eight signal processing channels to catch two bunches, first - the positron, then the electron bunch in one cycle of measurements. The epBPM has internal and external trigger modes of operations. The internal mode has two options - with or without external timing, catching only first bunch in the untimed mode. The epBPM has an on board calibration circuit for measuring gain of the signal processing channels and for timing scan of programmable digital delays to synchronize the trigger and the epBPM input signal's peak. There is a mode for pedestal measurements. The epBPM has 3.6 {mu}s conversion time.

Medvedko, E.; Aiello, R.; Smith, S.; /SLAC

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

FY2011 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for SNM. This project entails isomer identification and characterization and neutron population studies. This document summarizes activities from its third year - completion of the isomer identification characterization experiments and initialization of the neutron population experiments. The population and decay of the isomeric state in 235U remain elusive, although a number of candidate gamma rays have been identified. In the course of the experiments, a number of fission fragment isomers were populated and measured [Ressler 2010]. The decays from these isomers may also provide a suitable signature for the presence of fissile material. Several measurements were conducted throughout this project. This report focuses on the results of an experiment conducted collaboratively by PNNL, LLNL and LBNL in December 2010 at LBNL. The measurement involved measuring the gamma-rays emitted from an HEU target when bombarded with 11 MeV neutrons. This report discussed the analysis and resulting conclusions from those measurements. There was one strong candidate, at 1204 keV, of an isomeric signature of 235U. The half-life of the state is estimated to be 9.3 {mu}s. The measured time dependence fits the decay time structure very well. Other possible explanations for the 1204-keV state were investigated, but they could not explain the gamma ray. Unfortunately, the relatively limited statistics of the measurement limit, and the lack of understanding of some of the systematic of the experiment, limit the authors to labeling the 1204-keV gamma ray as a very strong candidate for isomeric transition in 235U. Regardless of the physics origins, the time structure of the 1204-keV gamma ray can be used as at a minimum as an indication of fissile material, if the 1204-keV gamma ray is attributed to a fission product, or it may be a unique signature for 235U, if it is a signature of an isomeric state in 235U.

Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Hatarik, R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Induction Linac Pulsers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pulsers used in most of the induction linacs evolved from the very large body of work that was done in the U.S. and Great Britain during the development of the pulsed magnetron for radar. The radar modulators started at {approx}100 kW and reached >10 MW by 1945. A typical pulse length was 1 {mu}s at a repetition rate of 1,000 pps. A very comprehensive account of the modulator development is Pulse Generators by Lebacqz and Glasoe, one of the Radiation Laboratory Series. There are many permutations of possible modulators, two of the choices being tube type and line type. In earlier notes I wrote that technically the vacuum tube pulser met all of our induction linac needs, in the sense that a number of tubes, in series and parallel if required, could produce our pulses, regulate their voltage, be useable in feed-forward correctors, and provide a low source impedance. At a lower speed, an FET array is similar, and we have obtained and tested a large array capable of >10 MW switching. A modulator with an electronically controlled output only needs a capacitor for energy storage and in a switched mode can transfer the energy from the capacitor to the load at high efficiency. Driving a full size Astron induction core and a simulated resistive 'beam load' we achieved >50% efficiency. These electronically controlled output pulses can produce the pulses we desire but are not used because of their high cost. The second choice, the line type pulser, visually comprises a closing switch and a distributed or a lumped element transmission line. The typical switch cannot open or stop conducting after the desired pulse has been produced, and consequently all of the initially stored energy is dissipated. This approximately halves the efficiency, and the original cost estimating program LIACEP used this factor of two, even though our circuits are usually worse, and even though our inveterate optimists often omit it. The 'missing' energy is that which is reflected back into the line from mismatches, the energy left in the accelerator module's capacitance, the energy lost in the switch during switching and during the pulse, and the energy lost in the pulse line charging circuit. For example, a simple resistor-limited power supply dissipates as much energy as it delivers to the pulse forming line, giving a factor if two by itself, therefore efficiency requires a more complicated charging system.

Faltens, Andris

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

Oxygen-diffusion limited metal combustions in Zr, Ti, and Fe foils: Time- and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transient phase and chemical transformations of diffusion controlled metal combustions in bulk Zr, Ti, and Fe foils have been investigated, in situ, using novel time- and angle-resolved x-ray diffraction (TARXD). The TARXD employs monochromatic synchrotron x-rays and a fast-rotating diffracted beam chopper resolving the diffraction image temporally in time-resolution of {approx}45 {mu}s along the azimuth on a 2D pixel array detector. The metal foil strips (10-25 {mu}m in thickness) are ignited using a pulsed electrical heating with a typical heating rate of {approx}10{sup 6} K/s. The x-ray results indicate that the combustion occurs in molten metals, producing a wide range of stoichiometric solid oxides. It reflects an enhanced oxygen solubility and mobility of molten metals with respect to those of solid metals. However, the initial oxides formed are mainly oxygen-deficient metal oxides of ZrO, TiO, and FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} - the lowest suboxides stable at these high temperatures. These transition metal monoxides further react with unreacted molten metals, yielding the secondary products of Zr{sub 3}O, Ti{sub 3}O, and Ti{sub 2}O - but not in FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. On the other hand, the higher stoichiometric oxides of ZrO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} are formed in the later time only on the metal surface. These results clearly indicate that the combustion process of metal strips is diffusion limited and strongly depends on the solubility and diffusivity of oxygen into molten metals. The time-resolved diffraction data reveals no evidence for metal oxidation in solids, but a series of temperature-induced polymorphic phase transitions. The dynamic thermal expansibility of Fe measured in the present fast heating experiments is similar to those in static conditions (3.3*10{sup -5}/K vs 3.5*10{sup -5}/K for {alpha}-Fe and 6.5*10{sup -5}/K versus 7.0*10{sup -5}/K for {gamma}-Fe).

Wei, Haoyan; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Chen, Jing-Yin; Shen, Guoyin (CIW); (WSU)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Geek-Up[2.11.2011]: Fuels from Fungi & Medical Probes from Fireflies |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2.11.2011]: Fuels from Fungi & Medical Probes from 2.11.2011]: Fuels from Fungi & Medical Probes from Fireflies Geek-Up[2.11.2011]: Fuels from Fungi & Medical Probes from Fireflies February 11, 2011 - 5:34pm Addthis Bioluminescent signal from firefly luciferase lights up a mouse 30 minutes after injection with PCL-1. Source: Christopher Chang Bioluminescent signal from firefly luciferase lights up a mouse 30 minutes after injection with PCL-1. Source: Christopher Chang Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Scientists at Sandia National Lab, in collaboration with Montana State University Professor Gary Strobel, are working to advance fuels from fungi. More specifically, to modify a class of fungi - endrophytes - to produce biofuels for internal combustion engines.

447

Using ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional differences of mammary glands derived from mouse strains that differ in cancer susceptibility to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation sensitivity or resistance Alvin Lo Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Within the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Low Dose SFA, as part of Project 2, we are using a systems genetics approach to determine the contribution of non-targeted and targeted radiation effects for risk of mammary carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to characterize the mammary gland of the parental mouse strains, and the F1 and F2 generations used in these studies with respect to tissue architecture and morphogenesis

448

Supercomputing: Eye-Opening Possibilities in Imaging | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supercomputing: Eye-Opening Possibilities in Imaging Supercomputing: Eye-Opening Possibilities in Imaging Supercomputing: Eye-Opening Possibilities in Imaging September 20, 2013 - 5:00pm Addthis This overlay of mass spectrometry images shows the spatial distribution of three different kind of lipids across a whole mouse cross-section. Lipids act as the structural components of cell membranes and are responsible for energy storage, among other things. | Photo courtesy of Wolfgang Reindl (Berkeley Lab). This overlay of mass spectrometry images shows the spatial distribution of three different kind of lipids across a whole mouse cross-section. Lipids act as the structural components of cell membranes and are responsible for energy storage, among other things. | Photo courtesy of Wolfgang Reindl (Berkeley Lab).

449

Microsoft Word - S08568_CY2011 Annual Rpt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

383 383 3.2 Ecological Monitoring 3.2.1 Introduction The Ecology group conducts ecological monitoring of the Site's ecological resources to ensure regulatory compliance and to preserve, protect, and manage those resources. Ecological monitoring is an integral aspect of determining whether the management objectives and goals for the natural resources at the Site are being achieved. This report summarizes the results of the ecological monitoring that was conducted at the Site during 2011. It includes a brief summary of the monitoring conducted for Preble's meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei; Preble's mouse) mitigation and wetland mitigation activities; however, the details of those monitoring efforts are summarized in separate regulatory reports provided to the

450

Transmission/Resource Library/MOU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transmission/Resource Library/MOU < Transmission‎ | Resource Library Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Public Involvement Resources GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General Transmission Documents Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs)for Interstate Transmission Projects Multi-state transmission siting and permitting projects benefit from effective collaboration between government entities, tribes, project

451

Microsoft Word - S05993_CY2009 Annual Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

6 6 and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's meadow jumping mouse habitat, wetland locations, wildfire/prescribed burn locations, Preble's meadow jumping mouse and wetland mitigation work, and rare plant locations. These data are available in various ArcGIS ® compatible formats. In addition to these types of spatial data, orthorectified aerial and satellite imagery is also available for the Site for different time frames, including pre- and post-closure. 3.4 Validation and Data Quality Assessment Data validation and verification (V&V) during CY 2009 was performed by Legacy Management Support contractor personnel at the Grand Junction, Colorado, office. Data quality assessment (DQA) is performed by personnel at the Site. The following section distinguishes DQA from

452

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 30, November 30, 2012 Injury/Illness Cases - November 2012 * Strain of right forearm * The Executive Assistant reported periodic discomfort associated with keyboard and mouse activity. * Repetitive strain of forearm * The Administrative Services Supervisor reported recent development of soreness in the forearm thought to be associated with use of keyboard and mouse. 2 Environment / Health / Safety / Security DIVISION Ergonomic Injury/Illness Cases - November 2012 3 Environment / Health / Safety / Security DIVISION * Fracture of upper arm * The Mechanical Engineer suffered a fracture of the upper arm after skidding to a stop and falling from a motor scooter at the shuttle bus circle intersection stop sign in the downhill lane of Chu Road. * Foreign object in eye

453

title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 21, 2003 April 21, 2003 April 21, 2003 Bakul Banerjee Bakul Banerjee Project Engineer Project Engineer MOU/SOW MOU/SOW NEU MOU and FY03 SOW are waiting for Mont's signature. SOW NEU MOU and FY03 SOW are waiting for Mont's signature. SOW contains work for three engineers. contains work for three engineers. Princeton FY03 SOW and Caltech FY03 SOW were signed in March. Princeton FY03 SOW and Caltech FY03 SOW were signed in March. Caltech FY03 SOW and MOU will be modified to include T2 Caltech FY03 SOW and MOU will be modified to include T2 operations work after UCSD and UFL MOUs are approved. operations work after UCSD and UFL MOUs are approved. UCDavis UCDavis FY03SOW was signed by Dr. Ko and waiting for FY03SOW was signed by Dr. Ko and waiting for Bauerdick

454

ChIP-seq Identification of Weakly Conserved Heart Enhancers  

SciTech Connect

Accurate control of tissue-specific gene expression plays a pivotal role in heart development, but few cardiac transcriptional enhancers have thus far been identified. Extreme non-coding sequence conservation successfully predicts enhancers active in many tissues, but fails to identify substantial numbers of heart enhancers. Here we used ChIP-seq with the enhancer-associated protein p300 from mouse embryonic day 11.5 heart tissue to identify over three thousand candidate heart enhancers genome-wide. Compared to other tissues studied at this time-point, most candidate heart enhancers are less deeply conserved in vertebrate evolution. Nevertheless, the testing of 130 candidate regions in a transgenic mouse assay revealed that most of them reproducibly function as enhancers active in the heart, irrespective of their degree of evolutionary constraint. These results provide evidence for a large population of poorly conserved heart enhancers and suggest that the evolutionary constraint of embryonic enhancers can vary depending on tissue type.

Blow, Matthew J.; McCulley, David J.; Li, Zirong; Zhang, Tao; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Chen, Feng; Afzal, Veena; Bristow, James; Ren, Bing; Black, Brian L.; Rubin, Edward M.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

MATERIALS AND METHODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A PREVIOUS publication from these Laboratories (Day, 1967) reported the carcinogenic action to mouse skin of cigarette smoke condensate applied either as 24 hour condensate, stored condensate or the neutral fraction from stored condensate. The work now reported is a comparison of the specific mouse skin carcinogenicity of smoke condensates prepared from small cigars, cigarettes manufactured from cigar tobacco, and cigarettes manufactured from flue-cured tobacco. Previous studies reported by other workers (Croninger et al., 1958, Kensler, 1962, Homburger et al., 1963) using tobacco products commercially available in the United States at that time, have suggested a greater carcinogenic activity of smoke condensate from cigars than smoke condensate from cigarettes manufactured from blends containing both air and flue-cured tobacco, but statistically significant differences have not been obtained.

R. F. Davies; T. D. Day; R. F. Davies; T. D. Day

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21  

SciTech Connect

Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Heart Rate Variability in Mice with Coronary Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat fluctuation of the heart rate, is a noninvasive test that measures the autonomic regulation of the heart. Assessment of HRV has been shown to predict the risk of mortality in patients after an acute myocardial infarction. Recently, the Krieger lab at MIT developed genetically engineered double knockout (dKO) mice that develop coronary artery disease accompanied by spontaneous myocardial infarctions and die at a very young age. This thesis investigated whether HRV could function as a prognostic indicator in the dKO mouse. A novel method for estimating physiological state of the mouse from the electrocardiogram using an innovative activity index was developed in order to compare HRV variables at different times while controlling for physiologic state. Traditional time and frequency domain variables were used to assess the prognostic power of HRV. Results have shown that none of the HRV variables were helpful in predicting

Laurence Zapanta; Roger G. Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)  

SciTech Connect

The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

459

Leukemia/Lymphoma in Mice Exposed to 60-Hz Magnetic Fields: Preliminary Studies and Protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible health risks from magnetic field exposure establish the need for a high quality experimental database for assessing risk. This report describes preliminary studies of a mouse lymphatic leukemia cancer model used to develop a large-scale (2800-animal) lifetime 60-Hz magnetic field exposure study. This animal model is useful for evaluating whether magnetic fields act as either a complete carcinogen or as a cancer promoter or have no effect at all with respect to lymphatic cancer. A protocol for th...

1997-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

460

Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mouse Thymic Virus (MTV) Bacterial pathogens Mycoplasma pulmonis; Salmonella spp.; Citrobacer rodentium; Clostridium piliforme; Cilia Associated Respiratory (CAR) Bacillus Parasitic pathogens Endoparasites; Pinworms (Syphaciasp, Aspiculuris tetraptera... and quantitated using a spectrophotometer (260 lamba). The extinction coefficient aliquots of 40 ?g (260/ 280 was less than 1.6) were utilized for hybridization For hybridization experiments 40 ?g total RNA was mixed with a 17 mer dT oligo (Sigma) and reverse...

Hermes, Gretchen; Ajioka, James W; Kelly, Krystyna A; Mui, Ernest; Roberts, Fiona; Kasza, Kristen; Mayr, Thomas; Kirisits, Michael J; Wollman, Robert; Ferguson, David J P; Roberts, Craig W; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Trendler, Toria; Kennan, Richard P; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Reardon, Catherine; Hickey, Adam William; Chen, Lieping; McLeod, Rima

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Predicting stimulus-locked single unit spiking from cortical local field potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapidly increasing use of the local field potential (LFP) has motivated research to better understand its relation to the gold standard of neural activity, single unit (SU) spiking. We addressed this in an in vivo, awake, restrained mouse ... Keywords: A1, Auditory cortex, Bayesian algorithm, Beta band, Despiking, EEG, Electroencephalography, Evoked potentials, Gamma band, Hilbert transform, LFP, Oscillation, Phase, Single cortical cells, Spike prediction, Theta band

Edgar E. Galindo-Leon; Robert C. Liu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Ingredients of conveyor belts. U.S. Bur Mines Rep Invest, (RI):8235  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cincinnati, OH, 41. Albrecht WN. 1987. Central nervous system toxicity of some common environmental residues in the mouse. J Toxicol Environ Health 21(4):405-421. *Alpert JR. 1982. Acute toxicity studies with 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Report to Shell Oil Co. OTS 0515726. [Unpublished study] *Atkinson R. 1987. A structure-activity relationship for the estimation of rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with organic compounds. J Chem Kinet 19:799-828.

unknown authors

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Endometrial glands as a source of nutrients, growth factors and cytokines during the first trimester of human pregnancy: A morphological and immunohistochemical study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

labelling with anti- cathepsin D (rabbit) and glycodelin (mouse). Samples were frozen in cryoembedding medium. Sections (10–12 µm) were cut on a Reichert cryomicrotome, air-dried, fixed briefly in cold methanol/acetone (at -20°C) and per- meabilised in TBS... layer of the syncytioplasm abutting the intervillous space, whereas lysosomes positive only for cathepsin D were observed in the basal region. In the midzone of the syncytioplasm the two labels were co-localised, indicating lysosomal fusion...

Hempstock, Joanne; Cindrova-Davies, Tereza; Jauniaux, Eric; Burton, Graham

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

464

Small mammal study of Sandia Canyon, 1994 and 1995  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilize water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to gather baseline data of small mammal populations and compare small mammal characteristics within three areas of Sandia Canyon, which receives outfall effluents from multiple sources. Three small mammal trapping webs were placed in the upper portion of Sandia Canyon, the first two were centered in a cattail-dominated marsh with a ponderosa pine overstory and the third web was placed in a much drier transition area with a ponderosa pine overstory. Webs 1 and 2 had the highest species diversity indices with deer mice the most commonly captured species in all webs. However, at Web 1, voles, shrews, and harvest mice, species more commonly found in moist habitats, made up a much greater overall percentage (65.6%) than did deer mice and brush mice (34.5%). The highest densities and biomass of animals were found in Web 1 with a continual decrease in density estimates in each web downstream. There is no statistical difference between the mean body weights of deer mice and brush mice between sites. Mean body length was also determined not to be statistically different between the webs (GLM [deer mouse], F = 0.89, p = 0.4117; GLM [brush mouse], F = 2.49, p = 0.0999). Furthermore, no statistical difference between webs was found for the mean lean body masses of deer and brush mice (GLM [deer mouse], F = 2.54, p = 0.0838; GLM [brush mouse], F = 1.60, p = 0.2229). Additional monitoring studies should be conducted in Sandia Canyon so comparisons over time can be made. In addition, rodent tissues should be sampled for contaminants and then compared to background or control populations elsewhere at the Laboratory or at an off-site location.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Corresponding author:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reuse of this article is permitted in accordance with the Creative Commons Deed, Attribution 2.5, which does not permit commercial exploitation. Familial Danish dementia (FDD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by the presence of cataracts, hearing impairment, cerebellar ataxia and dementia. Neuropathologically, FDD is characterized by the presence of widespread cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), parenchymal amyloid deposition and neurofibrillary tangles. FDD is caused by a 10-nucleotide duplication-insertion in the BRI2 gene that generates a larger-than-normal precursor protein, of which the Danish amyloid subunit (ADan) comprises the last 34 amino acids. Here, we describe a transgenic mouse model for FDD (Tg-FDD) in which the mouse Prnp (prion protein) promoter drives the expression of the Danish mutant form of human BRI2. The main neuropathological findings in Tg-FDD mice are the presence of widespread CAA and parenchymal deposition of ADan. In addition, we observe the presence of amyloid-associated gliosis, an inflammatory response and deposition of oligomeric ADan. As the animals aged, they showed abnormal grooming behavior, an arched back, and walked with a wide-based gait and shorter steps. This mouse model may give insights on the pathogenesis of FDD and will prove useful for the development of therapeutics. Moreover, the study of Tg-FDD mice may offer new insights into the role of amyloid in neurodegeneration in other disorders, including Alzheimer disease. doi:10.1111/j.1750-3639.2008.00164.x

Amyloid Angiopathy; Parenchymal Amyloid; Form Of Human Bri; Ruben Vidal; Ana G. Barbeito; Leticia Miravalle; Bernardino Ghetti; Ruben Vidal, Ph.D.; Department Of

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Jian Jian Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jian Jian Li Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University Newly Funded Projects Regulation of NF-kB and Mn SOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshops: NF-kB Mediated Signaling Network in Low Dose X-Ray Induced Adaptive Protection on Mouse and Human Skin Epithelial Cells Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Spitz, and Li, J.J. 2005 Workshops: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1. Li, J.J., Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Dong, S., Spitz, D.R., and Yu, C.-R. 2003 Workshops: Gene Expression Profiles of Human Skin Keratinocytes Exposed to Acute and Chronic Ionizing Radiation Li, J.J., Ozeki, M., Wang, T., Tamae, D., Nelson, D., Wyrobek, A., and

467

Deer Mice and White-Footed Mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deer Mice and White-Footed Mice Deer Mice and White-Footed Mice Nature Bulletin No. 545-A November 23. 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation DEER MICE AND WHITE-FOOTED MICE At night, sitting on a wooded shore, waiting for fish to bite or quietly gazing into the coals of a camp fire, you often become aware of mysterious small noises nearby in the darkness. Sometimes it is only a faint scratching on a tree trunk, or a rustling in the fallen leaves. But, again, you may hear a tiny drumming sound or a musical buzzing hum. Spooks? No. The best guess is that you have disturbed the night life of a wild mouse. He makes the drumming sound by rapidly tapping a dry leaf or hollow stem with his front feet. Unlike house mice, his voice is more of a song than a mere squeak. If you catch him in the beam of a flashlight you see an alert animal face with big ears, large black bulging eyes, and a beautiful coat -- rich brown above with snow-white underparts and feet. From these prominent characteristics came the common names of our two local species, the Deer Mouse and the White-footed Mouse.

468

Analysis of the function of the agouti gene in obesity and diabetes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter discusses the agouti gene and dominant mutations in that gene that lead to agouti-induced obesity, and recent work with transgenic mice to elucidate the role of agouti in obesity. Agouti was cloned in 1992 by the lab of Rick Woychik at Oak Rid