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1

Repository site data report for unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is currently considering the thick sequences of unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, on the southwestern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, as a possible candidate host rock for a nuclear-waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in one of the most arid areas in the United States. The site is within the south-central part of the Great Basin section of the Basin and Range physiographic province and is located near a number of silicic calderas of Tertiary age. Although localized zones of seismic activity are common throughout the province, and faults are present at Yucca Mountain, the site itself is basically aseismic. No data are available on the composition of ground water in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. It has been suggested that the composition is bounded by the compositions of water from wells USW-H3, UE25p-1, J-13, and snow or rain. There are relatively few data available from Yucca Mountain on the moisture content and saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and characteristic curves of the unsaturated zone. The available literature on thermomechanical properties of tuff does not always distinguish between data from the saturated zone and data from the unsaturated zone. Geochemical, hydrologic, and thermomechanical data available on the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain are tabulated in this report. Where the data are very sparse, they have been supplemented by data from the saturated zone or from areas other than Yucca Mountain. 316 refs., 58 figs., 37 tabs.

Tien, P.L.; Updegraff, C.D.; Siegel, M.D.; Wahi, K.K.; Guzowski, R.V.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Environmental review and regulation for siting a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed that the first geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States be sited at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Repository sitting was exempted by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act from the requirements for an environmental impact statement under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and, additionally, the DOE was prohibited by law from acquiring new empirical information for environmental assessment. Thus, no systematic, interdisciplinary evaluation of impacts based on site-specific data will occur before the Yucca Mountain environment is irreparably altered by site characterization. Exemption of siting activities for the nation's first geologic repository for high-level nuclear wastes from NEPA review is further evidence of the eclipse of NEPA in decision making, a trend that may foretell how controversial, technologically complex projects will be carried out in the future.

Charles R. Malone

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Sequential evaluation of the potential geologic repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the changes that are planned for the characterization program at Yucca Mountain due to budget changes. Yucca Mountain is the only site being studied in the US for a geologic repository. Funding for the site characterization program at Yucca Mountain program was cut by roughly one half from the 1994 projected budget to complete three major milestones. These project milestones included: (1) a time-phased determination of site suitability, and if a positive finding, (2) completion of an Environmental Impact Statement, and (3) preparation of a License Application to the US NRC to authorize repository construction. In reaction, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has shifted from parallel development of these milestones to a sequenced approach with the site suitability evaluation being replaced with a management assessment. Changes to the regulatory structure for the disposal program are under consideration by DOE and the NRC. The possibility for NRC and Doe to develop a site-specific regulatory structure follows from the National Energy Policy Act of 1992 that authorized the US EPA to develop a site specific environmental standard for Yucca Mountain.

Bjerstedt, T.W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

5

Report of the Peer Review Panel on the early site suitability evaluation of the Potential Repository Site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Yucca mountain Site Characterization Project Office (YMPO) assigned Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Technical and Management Support Services (T&MSS) contractor to the YmPo, the task of conducting an Early Site Suitability Evaluation (ESSE) of the Yucca mountain site as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. First, the assignment called for the development of a method to evaluate a single site against the DOE General Guidelines for Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories, 10 CFR Part 960. Then, using this method, an evaluation team, the ESSE Core Team, of senior YMP scientists, engineers, and technical experts, evaluated new information obtained about the site since publication of the final Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1986) to determine if new suitability/unsuitability findings could be recommended. Finally, the Core Team identified further information and analyses needed to make final determinations for each of the guidelines. As part of the task, an independent peer review of the ESSE report has been conducted. Expertise was solicited that covered the entire spectrum of siting guidelines in 10 CFR Part 960 in order to provide a complete, in-depth critical review of the data evaluated and cited in the ESSE report, the methods used to evaluate the data, and the conclusions and recommendations offered by the report. Fourteen nationally recognized technical experts (Table 2) served on the Peer Review Panel. The comments from the Panel and the responses prepared by the ESSE Core Team, documented on formal Comment Response Forms, constitute the body of this document.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

MRS system study for the repository: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), has initiated a waste management system study to identify the impacts of the presence or absence of a monitored retrievable storage facility (hereinafter referred to as ``MRS``) on system costs and program schedules. To support this study, life-cycle cost estimates and construction schedules have been prepared for the surface and underground facilities and operations geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Nine different operating scenarios (cases) have been identified by OCRWM for inclusion in this study. For each case, the following items are determined: the repository design and construction costs, operating costs, closure and decommissioning costs, required staffing, construction schedules, uncertainties associated with the costs and schedules, and shipping cask and disposal container throughputs. This document contains A-D.

Sinagra, T.A. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Harig, R. [Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Preclosure radiological safety analysis for accident conditions of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository: Underground facilities; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preliminary preclosure radiological safety analysis assesses the scenarios, probabilities, and potential radiological consequences associated with postulated accidents in the underground facility of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. The analysis follows a probabilistic-risk-assessment approach. Twenty-one event trees resulting in 129 accident scenarios are developed. Most of the scenarios have estimated annual probabilities ranging from 10{sup {minus}11}/yr to 10{sup {minus}5}/yr. The study identifies 33 scenarios that could result in offsite doses over 50 mrem and that have annual probabilities greater than 10{sup {minus}9}/yr. The largest offsite dose is calculated to be 220 mrem, which is less than the 500 mrem value used to define items important to safety in 10 CFR 60. The study does not address an estimate of uncertainties, therefore conclusions or decisions made as a result of this report should be made with caution.

Ma, C.W.; Sit, R.C.; Zavoshy, S.J.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Laub, T.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Examining Repository Loading Options to Expand Yucca Mountain Repository Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siting a high level nuclear waste repository entails high economic, social, and political costs. Given the difficulty in siting the Yucca Mountain repository and the already identified need for additional capacity, the concept of expanding the capacity of the Yucca Mountain repository is of significant interest to the nuclear industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). As the capacity of the repository is limited by the decay heat inventory of the spent nuclear fuel in relation to the thermal design limits, expanding the capacity requires appropriate schemes for decay heat and spent fuel loading management. The current Yucca Mountain repository is based on a single level, fixed drift spacing design for a fixed area or footprint. Studies performed to date investigating the capacity of Yucca Mountain often assume that the loading of spent fuel is uniform throughout the repository and use the concept of a linear loading or areal power density (APD). However, use of linear loading or APD can be problematic with the various cooling times involved. The temperature within the repository at any point in time is controlled by the integral of the heat deposited in the repository. The integral of the decay heat varies as a function of pre-loading cooling periods even for a fixed linear loading. A meaningful repository capacity analysis requires the use of a computer model that describes the time-dependent temperature distributions of the rock from the dissipation of the heat through the repository system. If variations from the current Yucca Mountain repository design were to be considered, expanding the capacity of the repository would be pursued in several ways including: (1) increase the footprint size; (2) implement multiple-levels in the repository for the given footprint; (3) allow the drift distance to vary within thermal limits; and, (4) allow non-uniform loading of wastes into the drifts within thermal limits. Options (1) and (2) have been investigated by other researchers. This paper investigates options (3) and (4) for possible expansion of the Yucca Mountain repository capacity. To support the work, a thermal analysis model was needed to describe the temperature changes in the rock around the waste packages against the thermal design limits as a function of spent fuel characteristics and composition. Under the high temperature operating mode (HTOM), the relevant thermal design limits are: (1) the rock temperature midway between adjacent drifts must remain below the local boiling point (96 deg. C); and (2) the rock temperature at drift walls must remain below 200 deg. C. As the work involves a large number of calculations, examining the compliance within thermal design limits, the capability to perform efficient mountain-scale heat-transfer analyses was necessary. A related topic of importance in this investigation was also the effect of uncertainty. As the modeling exercise relies on the use of computational models, uncertainties are unavoidable and understanding the uncertainty in the interpretation of the results is important. The concept of variable drift spacing and variable drift thermal loading was investigated with respect to possible capacity expansion of the Yucca Mountain repository. Also, a computer model was developed for efficient repository heat transfer calculations and sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed to identify key parameters and to estimate the uncertainty in the results and understand how the repository capacity estimation would be affected by the uncertainty. (authors)

Li, Jun; Nicholson, Mark; Proctor, W. Cyrus; Yim, Man-Sung; McNelis, David [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Identification of structures, systems, and components important to safety at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study recommends which structures, systems, and components of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain are important to safety. The assessment was completed in April 1990 and uses the reference repository configuration in the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report and follows the methodology required at that time by DOE Procedure AP6.10-Q. Failures of repository items during the preclosure period are evaluated to determine the potential offsite radiation doses and associated probabilities. Items are important to safety if, in the event they fail to perform their intended function, an accident could result which causes a dose commitment greater than 0.5 rem to the whole body or any organ of an individual in an unrestricted area. This study recommends that these repository items include the structures that house spent fuel and high-level waste, the associated filtered ventilation exhaust systems, certain waste- handling equipment, the waste containers, the waste treatment building structure, the underground waste transporters, and other items listed in this report. This work was completed April 1990. 27 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

Hartman, D.J.; Miller, D.D. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Klamerus, L.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT RECOMMENDATION BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY REGARDING THE SUITABILITY OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE FOR A REPOSITORY UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than half a century, since nuclear science helped us win World War II and ring in the Atomic Age, scientists have known that !he Nation would need a secure, permanent facility in which to dispose of radioactive wastes. Twenty years ago, when Congress adopted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA or ''the Act''), it recognized the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that the best option for such a facility would be a deep underground repository. Fifteen years ago, Congress directed the Secretary of Energy to investigate and recommend to the President whether such a repository could be located safely at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since then, our country has spent billions of dollars and millions of hours of research endeavoring to answer this question. I have carefully reviewed the product of this study. In my judgment, it constitutes sound science and shows that a safe repository can be sited there. I also believe that compelling national interests counsel in favor of proceeding with this project. Accordingly, consistent with my responsibilities under the NWPA, today I am recommending that Yucca Mountain be developed as the site for an underground repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. The first consideration in my decision was whether the Yucca Mountain site will safeguard the health and safety of the people, in Nevada and across the country, and will be effective in containing at minimum risk the material it is designed to hold. Substantial evidence shows that it will. Yucca Mountain is far and away the most thoroughly researched site of its kind in the world. It is a geologically stable site, in a closed groundwater basin, isolated on thousands of acres of Federal land, and farther from any metropolitan area than the great majority of less secure, temporary nuclear waste storage sites that exist in the country today. This point bears emphasis. We are not confronting a hypothetical problem. We have a staggering amount of radioactive waste in this country--nearly 100,000,000 gallons of high-level nuclear waste and more than 40,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel with more created every day. Our choice is not between, on the one hand, a disposal site with costs and risks held to a minimum, and, on the other, a magic disposal system with no costs or risks at all. Instead, the real choice is between a single secure site, deep under the ground at Yucca Mountain, or making do with what we have now or some variant of it--131 aging surface sites, scattered across 39 states. Every one of those sites was built on the assumption that it would be temporary. As time goes by. every one is closer to the limit of its safe life span. And every one is at least a potential security risk--safe for today, but a question mark in decades to come.

NA

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain is being characterized for the development of a high-level nuclear waste repository. The repository is planned to be located in the unsaturated zone in fractured, welded tuff. Sealing of the repository is one element of the Yucca Mountain Project. This paper presents a description of the current sealing design options, design requirements, and the design constraints. Design options for the shafts include anchor-to-bedrock seals, shaft fill, and settlement plugs; in the underground facility, they include drift seals, drainage channels, sumps, and bulkheads. Design requirements are those quantitative requirements imposed on the sealing design options to achieve a desired level of performance. For example, a design requirement could be a restriction on the hydraulic conductivity of a design option. Constraints are restrictions placed on the repository design by the sealing design. An example of a constraint could be establishing the drainage pattern to direct flow from emplacement drifts to nonemplacement drifts. As (1) additional hydrogeologic data are obtained through site characterization, (2) approaches to allocating performance to various subsystems within the Yucca Mountain Project are refined, and (3) the exploratory shafts and the associated testing results are developed, the design requirements and constraints may be modified and used in developing the License Application Design.

Fernandez, J.A.; Hinkebein, T.E

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Factors limiting microbial growth and activity at a proposed high-level nuclear repository, yucca mountain, nevada.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...High-Level Nuclear Repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada TL Kieft WP Kovacik Jr...part of the characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nev., as a potential repository...from nine sites along a tunnel in Yucca Mountain. Microbial abundance was generally...

T L Kieft; W P Kovacik; D B Ringelberg; D C White; D L Haldeman; P S Amy; L E Hersman

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Exploratory shaft facility: It`s role in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site for a potential nuclear repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is characterizing Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to assess its suitability as a potential site for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and defense related activities. The assessment activities include surface investigations, drill holes from the surface, and an underground facility for in situ characterization tests. This underground exploratory shaft facility is being designed to meet the criteria for characterizing the mountain as described in the Site Characterization Plan. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Kalia, H.N.; Merson, T.J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Prepared in cooperation with the Inyo County, California, Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prepared in cooperation with the Inyo County, California, Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment County, California, Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office #12;U.S. Department of the Interior KEN Office Geologic Map of the southern Funeral Mountains including nearby Groundwater Discharge Sites

Fleskes, Joe

15

Information Request Yucca Mountain Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, 2008 , 2008 TO: Sue Tierney, Phil Niedzielski-Eichner, Skila Harris FROM: Chris Kouts SUBJECT: Information Request As requested, enclosed is the additional information you requested last week regarding use of engineered barriers. Please let me know if you need additional information or have any questions. A,4- -/0 7 The Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site and the Issue of Natural Barriers as the Principal Barriers for Demonstrating Safety This paper addresses two issues that are frequently raised concerning the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for development as a repository. The first issue is that the Yucca Mountain site is technically unsound and that an engineered barrier system is required because the site is not capable of protecting public health and safety. The second issue is

16

New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective untitled More...

17

Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 A Simulation Code for Yucca Mountain Transport Processes:List of Figures Yucca Mountain location, southwest1 Introduction 1.1 Yucca Mountain Repository . . . . 1.1.1

Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain Summary The Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain describes the nuclear waste problem and explains why the United States and other nations are considering deep geologic disposal as the solution. The overview describes why the Unites States is considering Yucca Mountain and how a monitored geologic repository would work in the mountain. It presents a repository design, an assessment of its expected performance, and an evaluation of the possible effects on people living near Yucca Mountain. Also presented is the work remaining to be completed prior to a license application, along with the estimated cost of building and operating a

19

Licensing A Geologic Repository At Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After completing more than twenty years of intensive scientific and engineering investigations at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the site is suitable for development of a geologic repository for disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Following this determination, the site was recommended to the President for repository development. The President approved the recommendation and forwarded it to the U.S. Congress for site designation. The Governor of Nevada vetoed the recommendation with a notice of disapproval to the U.S. Congress. Congress subsequently over-rode the Governor's veto with a joint resolution which the President signed into law. With site designation in effect, DOE is now focusing its work on the development of a license application for repository construction. This paper will summarize the work that had been done to support site recommendation, work that is currently being done for license application, and the necessary next steps that may be required to allow repository operations to begin in 2010.

Dyer, R. J.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

20

Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the… (more)

Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Preliminary results of trench mapping at the site of prospective surface facilities for the potential Yucca Mountain repository, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mapping and trenching studies are yielding data needed to evaluate the surface faulting potential within Midway Valley, a half graben bounded by west-dipping normal faults on the northeast margin of Yucca Mountain. These studies document the presence of two north-trending zones of fractures within Quaternary deposits along the west-central part of the Midway Valley half-graben block. The westernmost zone of fractures, located along the eastern base of Exile Hill, overlies a complex zone of bedrock faulting and may be related to an apparent down-on-the-east step in the contact between bedrock and colluvium. Fractures striking [approximately]N15E extend upwards from this apparent bedrock step through early ( ) to middle ( ) Pleistocene colluvium. The fractures do not extend into the overlying late Pleistocene colluvium. No vertical or lateral separation of the probably middle to late Pleistocene colluvium across fractures can be detected with a resolution of 5 cm or less in most cases. The Quaternary deposits are much thicker along the eastern zone of fractures and bedrock was not exposed. The presence of continuous thin layers within the alluvial strata demonstrate the absence of any detectable vertical or lateral separation of the middle ( ) Pleistocene deposits across the fractures within the eastern zone with a high degree of confidence. The results of the authors studies indicate that faults within the west-central part of the Midway Valley structural block have had little or no displacement since at least the mid Quaternary. Therefore, potential for surface fault rupture in this area is extremely low.

Wesling, J.R.; Swan, F.H.; Thomas, A.P.; Angell, M.M. (Geomatrix Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) and establish an approved YMP baseline against which overall YMP progress and management effectiveness shall be measured. For the sake of brevity, this document will be referred to as the Project Plan throughout this document. This Project Plan only addresses activities up to the submittal of the repository license application (LA) to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A new Project Plan will be submitted to establish the technical, cost, and schedule baselines for the final design and construction phase of development extending through the start of repository operations, assuming that the site is determined to be suitable.

Gertz, C.P.; Bartlett, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Review and critique of the US Department of Energy environmental program plan for site characterization for a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a review and critique of the US Department of Energy (DOE) environmental program plan for site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain which principally addresses compliance with federal and state environmental regulation and to a lesser extent monitoring and mitigation of significant adverse impacts and reclamation of disturbed areas. There are 15 documents which comprise the plan and focus on complying with the environmental requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, (NWPA) and with single-media environmental statutes and their regulations. All elements of the plan follow from the 1986 statutory environmental assessment (EA) required by NWPA which concluded that no significant adverse impacts would result from characterization of the Yucca Mountain site. The lack of appropriate environmental planning and review for site characterization at Yucca Mountain points to the need for an oversight function by the State of Nevada. It cannot be assumed that on its own DOE will properly comply with environmental requirements, especially the substantive requirements that comprise the intent of NEPA. Thus, procedures must be established to assure that the environmental interests of the State are addressed in the course of the Yucca Mountain Project. Accordingly, steps will be taken by the State of Nevada to review the soundness and efficacy of the DOE field surveys, monitoring and mitigation activities, reclamation actions, and ecological impact studies that follow from the DOE environmental program plans addressed by this review.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Evaluating the Long-Term Safety of a Repository at Yucca Mountain   

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regulations require that the repository be evaluated for its health and safety effects for 10,000 years for the Site Recommendation process. Regulations also require potential impacts to be evaluated for up to a million years in an Environmental Impact Statement. The Yucca Mountain Project is in the midst of the Site Recommendation process. The Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) that supports the Site Recommendation evaluated safety for these required periods of time. Results showed it likely that a repository at this site could meet the licensing requirements promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The TSPA is the tool that integrates the results of many years of scientific investigations with design information to allow evaluations of potential far-future impacts of building a Yucca Mountain repository. Knowledge created in several branches of physics is part of the scientific basis of the TSPA that supports the Site Recommendation process.

Abe Van Luik

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

The National Repository at Yucca Mountain, Russ Dyer  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repository at Repository at Yucca Mountain Presented to: EM High Level Waste Corporate Board Presented by: Russ Dyer Chief Scientist Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management July 24, 2008 Idaho National Laboratory 2 SBBB-GeneralBriefing_070808Rev1.ppt Solving a national problem now * On June 3, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy submitted an application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a license to construct a repository at Yucca Mountain 3 SBBB-GeneralBriefing_070808Rev1.ppt Repository license application * The LA seeks authorization to construct the nation's first geologic repository * It is a culmination of more than 25 years of scientific research and engineering * The LA describes DOE's plan to safely isolate spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive

26

Bibliography of publications related to Nevada-sponsored research of the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository site through 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1985, the State of Nevada has sponsored academic/private sector research into various health, safety, and environmental issues identified with the Yucca Mountain site. This research has been documented in scientific peer-reviewed literature, conferences, and workshops, as well as numerous state-sponsored University thesis and dissertation programs. This document is a bibliography of the scientific articles, manuscripts, theses, dissertations, conference symposium abstracts, and meeting presentations produced as a result of state-sponsored research.

Johnson, M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective.

J.H. Payer

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

Repository surface design site layout analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to establish the arrangement of the Yucca Mountain Repository surface facilities and features near the North Portal. The analysis updates and expands the North Portal area site layout concept presented in the ACD, including changes to reflect the resizing of the Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), Carrier Preparation Building (CPB), and site parking areas; the addition of the Carrier Washdown Buildings (CWBs); the elimination of the Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF); and the development of a concept for site grading and flood control. The analysis also establishes the layout of the surface features (e.g., roads and utilities) that connect all the repository surface areas (North Portal Operations Area, South Portal Development Operations Area, Emplacement Shaft Surface Operations Area, and Development Shaft Surface Operations Area) and locates an area for a potential lag storage facility. Details of South Portal and shaft layouts will be covered in separate design analyses. The objective of this analysis is to provide a suitable level of design for the Viability Assessment (VA). The analysis was revised to incorporate additional material developed since the issuance of Revision 01. This material includes safeguards and security input, utility system input (size and location of fire water tanks and pump houses, potable water and sanitary sewage rates, size of wastewater evaporation pond, size and location of the utility building, size of the bulk fuel storage tank, and size and location of other exterior process equipment), main electrical substation information, redundancy of water supply and storage for the fire support system, and additional information on the storm water retention pond.

Montalvo, H.R.

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

29

Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF ({approx}260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit ({approx}570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

Kessler, John H. [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kemeny, John [University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); King, Fraser [Integrity Corrosion Consulting, Ltd., 6732 Silverview Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ross, Alan M. [Alan M. Ross and Associates, 1061 Gray Fox Circle Pleasanton, CA 94566 (Canada); Ross, Benjamen [Disposal Safety, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Modeling thermal-hydrological response of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to thermal load at a potential repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Repository at Yucca Mountain. In Materials Research Societystudies using the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone model.Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water Resources

Haukwa, C.B.; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A description and status of the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain is being characterized to determine its suitability as a site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. The repository would be located in the unsaturated zone in fractured, welded tuff. Sealing of the repository is one element of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). This paper presents a description of the repository sealing program including the sealing design options, design requirements, design constraints, and the identification of the proposed sealing materials and field tests. Design options for the shafts include anchor-to-bedrock seals, shaft fill, and settlement plugs; in the underground facility options include drift seals, drainage channels, sumps, and bulkheads. Design requirements are those quantitative requirements imposed on the sealing design options to achieve a desired level of performance. Constraints are restrictions placed on the repository design by the sealing design. As (1) additional hydrogeologic data are obtained through site characterization, (2) approaches to allocating performance to various subsystems within the YMP are refined, and (3) the exploratory shafts and the associated testing results are developed, the design requirements and constraints may be modified and used in developing the License Application Design. 1 ref., 1 fig.

Fernandez, J.A.; Hinkebein, T.E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Advanced fuel cycles and impacts On The Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals identified for advanced fuel cycles, such as that proposed by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, is to reduce the volume of wastes that would ultimately have to be disposed in a geologic repository. Besides reducing volume, techniques that recycle the vast majority of actinides along with the removal of key fission products also reduce the inventory of radionuclides that must ultimately be disposed and the thermal output of the wastes. Advanced recycling techniques may also generate waste forms having different characteristics than those that have been considered for disposal in a repository at Yucca Mountain to-date. These all have a potential impact on several aspects of a repository, such as the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, including surface and subsurface facility design, pre-closure and post-closure safety analyses, and ultimately licensing. These changes would all have to be performed in accordance with the requirements at 10 CFR 63 and approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a license amendment prior to the disposal of any wastes from an advanced fuel cycle. (authors)

Nutt, W.M.; Peters, M.T. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model Supporting the Licence Application for the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MultiScale ThermoHydrologic Model (MSTHM) predicts thermal-hydrologic (TH) conditions within emplacement tunnels (drifts) and in the adjoining host rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is the proposed site for a radioactive waste repository in the US. Because these predictions are used in the performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain repository, they must address the influence of variability and uncertainty of the engineered- and natural-system parameters that significantly influence those predictions. Parameter-sensitivity studies show that the MSTHM predictions adequately propagate the influence of parametric variability and uncertainty. Model-validation studies show that the influence of conceptual-model uncertainty on the MSTHM predictions is insignificant compared to that of parametric uncertainty, which is propagated through the MSTHM.

T.A> Buscheck; Y. Sun; Y. Hao

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

34

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 9, Index  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules.

NONE

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Repository Safety Strategy: Strategy for Protecting Public Health and Safety after Closure of a Yucca Mountain Repository, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The updated Strategy to Protect Public Health and Safety explains the roles that the natural and engineered systems are expected to play in achieving the objectives of a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain. These objectives are to contain the radionuclides within the waste packages for thousands of years, and to ensure that annual doses to a person living near the site will be acceptably low. This strategy maintains the key assumption of the Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) strategy that the potential repository level (horizon) will remain unsaturated. Thus, the strategy continues to rely on the natural attributes of the unsaturated zone for primary protection by providing a setting where waste packages assisted by other engineered barriers are expected to contain wastes for thousands of years. As in the Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) strategy, the natural system from the walls of the underground openings (drifts) to the human environment is expected to provide additional defense by reducing the concentrations of any radionuclides released from the waste packages. The updated Strategy to Protect Public Health and Safety is the framework for the integration of site information, repository design and assessment of postclosure performance to develop a safety case for the viability assessment and a subsequent license application. Current site information and a reference design are used to develop a quantitative assessment of performance to be compared with a performance measure. Four key attributes of an unsaturated repository system that are critical to meeting the objectives: (1) Limited water contacting the waste packages; (2) Long waste package lifetime; (3) Slow rate of release of radionuclides from the waste form; and (4) Concentration reduction during transport through engineered and natural barriers.

DOE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Strategic Basis for License Application Planning for a Potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If Yucca Mountain, Nevada is designated as the site for development of a geologic repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) must obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval first for repository construction, then for an operating license, and, eventually, for repository closure and decommissioning. The licensing criteria defined in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 63 (10 CFR Part 63) establish the basis for these NRC decisions. Submittal of a license application (LA) to the NRC for authorization to construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain site is, at this point, only a potential future action by the DOE. The policy process defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), as amended, for recommendation and designation of Yucca Mountain as a repository site makes it difficult to predict whether or when the site might be designated. The DOE may only submit a LA to the NRC if the site designation takes effect. In spite of this uncertainty, the DOE must take prudent and appropriate action now, and over the next several years, to prepare for development and timely submittal of a LA. This is particularly true given the need for the DOE to develop, load, and certify the operation of its electronic information system to provide access to its relevant records as part of the licensing support network (LSN) in compliance with NRC requirements six months prior to LA submittal. The DOE must also develop a LA, which is a substantially different document from those developed to support a Site Recommendation (SR) decision. The LA must satisfy NRC licensing criteria and content requirements, and address the acceptance criteria defined by the NRC in its forthcoming Yucca Mountain Review Plan (YMRP). The content of the LA must be adequate to facilitate NRC acceptance and docketing for review, and the LA and its supporting documents must provide the documented basis for the NR C findings required for a construction authorization. The LA must also support a licensing proceeding before an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board panel prior to NRC action on any decision to authorize construction. The DOE has established a strategic basis for planning that is intended to provide the framework for development of an integrated plan for activities leading to preparation and submittal of a LA.

Newberry, C. M.; Brocoum, S. J.; Gamble, R. P.; Murray, R. C.; Cline, M.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

THE DECISION TO RECOMMEND YUCCA MOUNTAIN AND THE NEXT STEPS TOWARD LICENSED REPOSITORY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After more than 20 years of carefully planned and reviewed scientific field work by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey, and numerous other organizations, Secretary of Energy Abraham concluded in January that the Yucca Mountain site is suitable, within the meaning of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, for development as a permanent nuclear waste and spent fuel repository. In February, the Secretary recommended to the President that the site be developed for licensed disposal of these wastes, and the President transmitted this recommendation to Congress. This paper summarizes key technical and national interest considerations that provided the basis for the recommendation. It also discusses the program's near-term plans for repository development if Congress designates the site.

Barrett, L. H.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

Technical Data Catalog: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Quarterly supplement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents reference information contained in the Yucca Mountain Project Automated Technical Data Tracking System. The Department of Energy is seeking to design and maintain a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. However, before this repository can be built, the DOE must first do a comprehensive site evaluation. This evaluation is subject to many regulations. This report fulfills the reporting requirements of the Site-Specific Procedural Agreement for Geologic Repository to develop and maintain a catalog of data which will be updated and provided to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on a quarterly basis. This catalog contains: description of data; time, place, and method of acquisition; and where data may be examined.

NONE

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

EIS-0250-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Proposed Action defined in the Yucca Mountain FEIS is to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain to dispose of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The Proposed Action includes transportation of these materials from commercial and DOE sites to the repository.

40

Benchmark problems for repository siting models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes benchmark problems to test computer codes used in siting nuclear waste repositories. Analytical solutions, field problems, and hypothetical problems are included. Problems are included for the following types of codes: ground-water flow in saturated porous media, heat transport in saturated media, ground-water flow in saturated fractured media, heat and solute transport in saturated porous media, solute transport in saturated porous media, solute transport in saturated fractured media, and solute transport in unsaturated porous media.

Ross, B.; Mercer, J.W.; Thomas, S.D.; Lester, B.H.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Illuminating the Decision Path: The Yucca Mountain Site Recommendation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On February 14, 2002, U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham provided to the President the ''Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982.'' This Recommendation, along with supporting materials, complied with statutory requirements for communicating a site recommendation to the President, and it did more: in 49 pages, the Recommendation also spoke directly to the Nation, illuminating the methodology and considerations that led toward the decision to recommend the site. Addressing technical suitability, national interests, and public concerns, the Recommendation helped the public understand the potential risks and benefits of repository development and placed those risks and benefits in a meaningful national context.

Knox, E.; Slothouber, L.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

Supplemental Performance Analyses for the Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the potential development of a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (1), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. Based on internal reviews of the S&ER and its key supporting references, the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) (2) and the Analysis Model Reports and Process Model Reports cited therein, the DOE has recently identified and performed several types of analyses to supplement the treatment of uncertainty in support of the consideration of a possible site recommendation. The results of these new analyses are summarized in the two-volume report entitled FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis (SSPA) (3,4). The information in this report is intended to supplement, not supplant, the information contained in the S&ER. The DOE recognizes that important uncertainties will always remain in any assessment of the performance of a potential repository over thousands of years (1). One part of the DOE approach to recognizing and managing these uncertainties is a commitment to continued testing and analysis and to the continued evaluation of the technical basis supporting the possible recommendation of the site, such as the analysis contained in the SSPA. The goals of the work described here are to provide insights into the implications of newly quantified uncertainties, updated science, and evaluations of lower operating temperatures on the performance of a potential Yucca Mountain repository and to increase confidence in the results of the TSPA described in the S&ER (1). The primary tool used to evaluate the implications of the three types of supplemental information described in the SSPA (3,4) is the Yucca Mountain integrated TSPA model.

Sevougian, S. D.; McNeish, J. A.; Coppersmith, K.; Jenni, K. E.; Rickertsen, L. D.; Swift, P. N.; Wilson, M. L.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Summary of Properties Used to Evaluate INEEL Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

Dahl, C.A.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

Draft reclamation program plan for site characterization; Yucca Mountain project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its obligations under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an environmental program that is to be implemented during site characterization at the Yucca Mountain site. This site is proposed for the location of the nation`s first high-level radioactive waste repository. A program for the reclamation of areas disturbed by site characterization is part of the overall environmental program for that site. This Reclamation Program Plan (RPP) describes the reclamation policy of the DOE for the Yucca Mountain site and presents an overview of the reclamation program. The RPP also provides an overview of the reclamation needs relative to site characterization; a review of legislation and requirements pertinent to reclamation; and a review of previous commitments made by the DOE to certain types of reclamation activities. The objective of the DOE reclamation program at Yucca Mountain is to return land disturbed by site-characterization activities to a stable ecological state with a form and productivity similar to the predisturbance state. The DOE will take all reasonable and necessary steps to achieve this objective. 19 refs., 2 tabs.

NONE

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 1, Part A: Chapters 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 750 refs., 123 figs., 42 tabs.

NONE

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Site Characterization Plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 3, Part A: Chapters 6 and 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 218 figs., 50 tabs.

NONE

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

NONE

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

NONE

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A critique of the Department of Energy's environmental programme for the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Legislative standards, regulatory provisions, and US Department of Energy (DOE) policies have defined the environmental programme to study the planned high-level nuclear waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The DOE has limited environmental data collection for purposes of monitoring and mitigating impacts of proposed characterisation activities and repository development. Most of the plans are procedural and do not provide for the gathering of baseline data prior to site characterisation activities. The absence of baseline data prior to site characterisation activities reduces the chances of developing a comprehensive and integrated environmental programme to detect and remedy disturbed areas critical to the performance of the repository as well as to assess repository performance properly. The lack of long-term ecological studies means also that interactions between the geohydrologic setting of the repository and the biosphere will not be understood fully.

J. Lemons; D. J. Schaeffer; E. Saboski

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Scenarios constructed for nominal flow in the presence of a repository at Yucca Mountain and vicinity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scenario development for the system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project defines a scenario as a well-posed problem connecting an initiating event with radionuclide release to the accessible environment by a logical and physically possible combination or sequence of features, events, and processes. Drawing on the advice and assistance of the Project`s principal investigators (PIs), a collection of release scenarios initiated by the nominal ground-water flow occurring in the vicinity of the potential Yucca Mountain high-level-waste repository is developed and described in pictorial form. This collection of scenarios is intended to provide a framework to assist PIs in recognizing essential field and calculational analyses, to assist performance assessment in providing guidance to site characterization, and to continue the effort to exhaustively identify all features, events, and processes important to releases. It represents a step in the iterative process of identifying what details of the potential site are important for safe disposal. 67 refs.

Barr, G.E.; Hunter, R.L.; Dunn, E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, A. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Site characterization plan overview: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Consultation Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The consultation draft of the site characterization plan is a lengthy document that describes in considerable detail the program that will be conducted to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and other conditions relevant to the suitability of the site for a repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consultation draft of the site-characterization plan; it is not a substitute for the site-characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with brief descriptions of the disposal system -- the site, the repository, and the waste package -- preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Yucca Mountain site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE`s repository program -- staff who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization. 22 figs., 1 tab.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funding, Congress amended the NWPA to direct DOE to focus research of waste disposal only on Yucca Mountain.

Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Site characterization progress report, April 1, 1994--September 30, 1994: Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Volume 11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Civil Radioactive Waste Management Program was restructured to provide a new approach to the evaluation of the site for development as a repository and to its licensing. Funding was increased for FY 95, with most of the increase going to the Yucca Mountain site characterization project. During this period, significant progress was made in surface-based testing, advanced conceptual design, performance assessment, planning, licensing support system development activities, and construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: introduction, programmatic activities, site programs, repository design, waste package, performance assessment, and exploratory studies facility design/construction.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Precipitation-Front Modeling: Issues Relating to Nucleation and Metastable Precipitation in the Planned Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineralogic Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Rev. 1. Reportfor fracture sealing at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Journal ofWaste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada J.A. Apps and

Apps, J.A.; Sonnenthal, E.L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NRC staff site characterization analysis of the Department of Energy`s Site Characterization Plan, Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Site Characterization Analysis (SCA) documents the NRC staff`s concerns resulting from its review of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada, which is the candidate site selected for characterization as the nation`s first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. DOE`s SCP explains how DOE plans to obtain the information necessary to determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for a repository. NRC`s specific objections related to the SCP, and major comments and recommendations on the various parts of DOE`s program, are presented in SCA Section 2, Director`s Comments and Recommendations. Section 3 contains summaries of the NRC staff`s concerns for each specific program, and Section 4 contains NRC staff point papers which set forth in greater detail particular staff concerns regarding DOE`s program. Appendix A presents NRC staff evaluations of those NRC staff Consultation Draft SCP concerns that NRC considers resolved on the basis of the SCP. This SCA fulfills NRC`s responsibilities with respect to DOE`s SCP as specified by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18. 192 refs., 2 tabs.

NONE

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Audit of management of the site characterization program at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (Department) is responsible for establishing an underground repository to store high-level nuclear waste. In accordance with the amended Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Department began characterization of the Yucca Mountain site to assess the feasibility of safely storing spent fuel and high-level waste for 10,000 years. Site characterization was originally scheduled to be completed in 1995. Subsequently, your predecessor, Admiral Watkins, changed the plan completion date to 2001. The purpose of our audit was to determine if the Department is making adequate progress in characterizing the Yucca Mountain project.

Layton, J.C.

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Underground facility area requirements for a radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, managed by the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. Preliminary waste descriptions and preliminary areal power density calculations have been completed, and the Topopah Spring Member has been recommended as the emplacement unit. Using these data, an effort has begun to determine the area needed for the underground facility. This report describes work performed to determine the area needed to emplace waste equivalent to 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) initially loaded in commercial power reactors. The area needed for support functions is also described. The total area of the underground facility depends on the types of waste received, the amount of each type of waste received, the areal power density assumed, and the emplacement configuration chosen (horizontal or vertical emplacement). The areas range from about 1240 acres to about 1520 acres. For vertical emplacement of the reference inventory of spent fuel, 1520 acres are required. A significant finding of this report is the importance of low-heat-producing wastes (defense high-level waste, West Valley high-level waste, cladding hulls, transuranic waste, and spent fuel hardware) when calculating the area required for the underground facility. If other wastes are included and the spent fuel capacity is reduced consistent with a total capacity of 70,000 MTU, the area required will be smaller.

Mansure, A.J.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993, No. 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and 10 CFR 60.18(g), the U.S. Department of Energy has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period April 1, 1993, through September 30, 1993. This report is the ninth in a series issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Also included in this report are activities such as public outreach and international programs that are not formally part of the site characterization process. Information on these activities is provided to report on all aspects of the Yucca Mountain studies.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Summary of INEEL Calcine Properties Used to Evaluate Direct Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

C. A. Dahl

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Parameters and variables appearing in repository-siting models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Included in this report is a summary of data characterizing the parameters and variables appearing in repository siting models. These data cover the processes of saturates flow, unsaturated flow, surface water flow, geochemistry, heat transport, solute transport, and geomechanical response. Definitions and ranges of values are provided for equation parameters, source terms, dependent variables, boundary conditions, and initial conditions for the equations that are solved in the repository siting models. The data were compiled to help guide the selection of values of parameters and variables to be used in benchmark problems.

Mercer, J.W.; Thomas, S.D.; Ross, B.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 2, Part A: Chapters 3, 4, and 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1--5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 575 refs., 84 figs., 68 tabs.

NONE

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project technical data catalog quarterly supplement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE)/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Site-Specific Procedural Agreement for Geologic Repository Site Investigation and Characterization Program requires the DOE to develop and maintain a catalog of data which will be updated and provided to the NRC at least quarterly. This catalog is to include a description of the data; the time (date), place, and method of acquisition; and where the data may be examined. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Technical Data Catalog is published and distributed in accordance with t requirements of the Site-Specific Agreement. The YMP Technical Data Catalog is a report based on reference information contained in the YMP Automated Technical Data Tracking System (ATDT). The reference information is provided by Participants for data acquired or developed in support of the YMP. The Technical Data Catalog is updated quarterly and distributed in the month following the end of each quarter. A complete revision to the catalog is published at the end of each fiscal year. Supplements to the end-of-year edition are published each quarter. These supplements provide information related to new data items not included in previous quarterly updates and data items affected by changes to@ previously published reference information. The Technical Data Catalog, dated September 30, 1994, should be retained as the baseline document for the supplements until the end-of-year revision is published and distributed in October 1995.

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project technical data catalog: Quarterly supplement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE)/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Site-Specific Procedural Agreement for Geologic Repository Site Investigation and Characterization Program requires the DOE to develop and maintain a catalog of data which will be updated and provided to the NRC at least quarterly. This catalog is to include a description of the data; the time (date), place, and method of acquisition; and where the data may be examined. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Technical Data Catalog is published and distributed-in accordance with the requirements of the Site-Specific Agreement. The YMP Technical Data Catalog is a report based on reference information contained in the YMP Automated Technical Data Tracking System (ATDT). The reference information is provided by Participants for data acquired or developed in support of the YMP. The Technical Data Catalog is updated quarterly and distributed in the month following the end of each quarter. A complete revision to the catalog is published at the end of each fiscal year. Supplements to the end-of-year edition are published each quarter. These supplements provide information related to new data items not included in previous quarterly updates and data items affected by changes to previously published reference information. The Technical Data Catalog, dated September 30, 1994, should be retained as the baseline document for the supplements until the end-of-year revision is published and distributed in October 1995.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project: Technical Data Catalog quarterly supplement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The March 21, 1993, Department of Energy (DOE)/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Site-Specific Procedural Agreement for Geologic Repository Site Investigation and Characterization Program requires the DOE to develop and maintain a catalog of data which will be updated and provided to the NRC at least quarterly. This catalog is to include a description of the data; the time (date), place, and method of acquisition; and where it may be examined. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Technical Data Catalog is published and distributed in accordance with the requirements of the Site-Specific Agreement. The YMP Technical Data Catalog is a report based on reference information contained in the YMP Automated Technical Data Tracking System (ATDT). The reference information is provided by Participants for data acquired or developed in support of the YMP. The Technical Data Catalog is updated quarterly and published in the month following the end of each quarter. A complete revision to the Catalog is published at the end of each fiscal year. Supplements to the end-of-year edition are published each quarter. These supplements provide information related to new data items not included in previous quarterly updates and data items affected by changes to previously published reference information. The Technical Data Catalog, dated September 30, 1993, should be retained as the baseline document for the supplements until the end-of-year revision is published and distributed in October 1994.

NONE

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EXPERIENCE IN CREATING AND COMMUNICATING THE CASE FOR THE SAFETY OF A POTENTIAL YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience gained by the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) in making the recommendation for the development of the Yucca Mountain site as the nation's first high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel repository is useful for creating documents to support the next phase in the repository program, the licensing phase. The experience that supported the successful site-recommendation process involved a three-tiered approach. First, was making a highly technical case for regulatory compliance. Second, was making a broader case for safety in an Environmental Impact Statement. And third, producing plain language brochures, made available to the public in hard copy and on the Internet, to explain the Department's action and its legal and scientific bases. This paper reviews lessons learned from this process, and makes suggestions for the next stage of the repository program: licensing.

W.J. Boyle; A.E. Van Luik

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Siting America's geologic repository for high-level Nuclear Waste: Implications for environmental Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Siting a geologic repository for isolating highlevel nuclear waste up to 10,000 years is ... before attempted in the United States. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 exempted repository siting from ... require...

John Lemons; Charles Malone

71

Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey`s continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C. (eds.)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada. October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is the sixteenth in a series issued approximately every six months to report progress and results of site characterization activities being conducted to evaluate Yucca Mountain as a possible geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This report highlights work started, in progress, and completed during the reporting period. In addition, this report documents and discusses changes to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Site Characterization Program (Program) resulting from the ongoing collection and evaluation of site information, systems analyses, development of repository and waste package designs, and results of performance assessment activities. Details on the activities summarized can be found in the numerous technical reports cited throughout the progress report. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (Project) activities this period focused on implementing the near-term objectives of the revised Program Plan issued last period. Near-term objectives of the revised Program Plan include updating the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) repository siting guidelines to be consistent with a more focused performance-driven program; supporting an assessment in 1998 of the viability of continuing with actions leading to the licensing of a repository; and if the site is suitable, submittal of a Secretarial site recommendation to the President in 2001 and license application the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2002. During this reporting period, the Project developed and baselined its long-range plan in December 1996. That revision reflected the detailed fiscal year (FY) 1997 work scope and funding plan previously baselined at the end of FY 1996. Site characterization activities have been focused to answer the major open technical issues and to support the viability assessment.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Characterization, Propagation and Analysis of Aleatory and Epistemic Uncertainty in the 2008 Performance Assessment for the Proposed Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, illustrates the conceptual...

Clifford W. Hansen; Jon C. Helton; Cédric J. Sallaberry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Number 15, April 1--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the second half of fiscal year 1996, activities at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (Project) supported the objectives of the revised Program Plan released this period by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy (Department). Outlined in the revised plan is a focused, integrated program of site characterization, design, engineering, environmental, and performance assessment activities that will achieve key Program and statutory objectives. The plan will result in the development of a license application for repository construction at Yucca Mountain, if the site is found suitable. Activities this period focused on two of the three near-term objectives of the revised plan: updating in 1997 the regulatory framework for determining the suitability of the site for the proposed repository concept and providing information for a 1998 viability assessment of continuing toward the licensing of a repository. The Project has also developed a new design approach that uses the advanced conceptual design published during the last reporting period as a base for developing a design that will support the viability assessment. The initial construction phase of the Thermal Testing Facility was completed and the first phase of the in situ heater tests began on schedule. In addition, phase-one construction was completed for the first of two alcoves that will provide access to the Ghost Dance fault.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Making the Postclosure Safety Case for the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in its advisory standard for geological repositories promulgated jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, explicitly distinguishes between the concepts of a safety case and a safety assessment. As defined in the advisory standard, the safety case is a broader set of arguments that provide confidence and substantiate the formal analyses of system safety made through the process of safety assessment. Although the IAEAYs definitions include both preclosure (i.e., operational) safety and post-closure performance in the overall safety assessment and safety case, the emphasis in here is on long-term performance after waste has been emplaced and the repository has been closed. This distinction between pre- and postclosure aspects of the repository is consistent with the U.S. regulatory framework defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Chapter 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 197, or 40 CFR 197) [2] and implemented by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Chapter 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63, or 10 CFR 63) [3]. The separation of the pre- and postclosure safety cases is also consistent with the way in which the U.S. Department of Energy has assigned responsibilities for developing the safety case. Bechtel SAIC Company is the Management and Operating contractor responsible for the design and operation of the Yucca Mountain facility and is therefore responsible for the preparation of the preclosure aspects of the safety case. Sandia National Laboratories has lead responsibility for scientific work evaluating post-closure performance, and therefore is responsible for developing the post-closure aspects of the safety case. In the context of the IAEA definitions, both preclosure and postclosure safety, including safety assessment and the safety case, will be documented in the license application being prepared for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository, and in the documents that support that license application.

P. Swift; A.V. Luik

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

Preliminary evaluation of the subsurface area available for a potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project, managed by the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. The Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff has been recommended as the target geologic formation. One purpose of this study was to determine whether adequate area for the underground facility exists within the portion of the devitrified, densely welded Topopah Spring Member that contains less than 15 to 20% lithophysae. Areas were considered where the underground facility would be above the water table and at least 200 m below the surface. The thickness required for the repository zone was assumed to be 45 m. An area significantly larger than the area estimated to be required to accommodate the underground facility appears to be potentially useable from this study. However, because the primary area of exploration has been the central portion of north Yucca Mountain, adjacent areas are less well characterized. Portions of the areas identified in this study may not meet all of the above criteria. Additional exploration is required to determine tha acreage of the useable area. Another purpose of this study was to identify a preliminary location within the primary area of exploration, where conditions are favorable for the proposed underground facility. Using available information, this study has identified a slab that meets the above criteria. The slab dips 5{sup 0}6`NE from a strike direction of N11{sup 0}18`W. The area of the slab is about 1850 acres (7.49 km{sup 2}).

Mansure, A.J.; Ortiz, T.S.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A FRAMEWORK FOR THE ANALYSIS OF LOCALIZED CORROSION AT THE PROPOSED YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository: (1) the most likely degradation process; (2) controls the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package; and (3) determines when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. In this presentation a framework for the analysis of localized corrosion is presented and demonstrated for a scenario: (1) water chemistry of mixed salt solutions (sodium chloride-potassium nitrate); and (2) time-temperature-relative humidity profiles for a hot, mid and cool temperature waste package.

Dr. J.H. Payer

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Audit of Management of the Site Characterization Program at Yucca Mountain, IG-0366  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 1995 5, 1995 IG-1 INFORMATION: "Audit of Management of the Site Characterization Program at Yucca Mountain" The Secretary BACKGROUND: The Department of Energy (Department) is responsible for establishing an underground repository to store high-level nuclear waste. In accordance with the amended Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Department began characterization of the Yucca Mountain site to assess the feasibility of safely storing spent fuel and high-level waste for 10,000 years. Site characterization was originally scheduled to be completed in 1995. Subsequently, the Secretary of Energy changed the plan completion date to 2001. The purpose of our audit was to determine if the Department is making adequate progress in

79

Building of multilevel stakeholder consensus in radioactive waste repository siting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report considers the problem of multilevel consensus building for siting and construction of shared multinational/regional repositories for radioactive waste (RW) deep disposal. In the siting of a multinational repository there appears an essential innovative component of stakeholder consensus building, namely: to reach consent - political, social, economic, ecological - among international partners, in addition to solving the whole set of intra-national consensus building items. An entire partnering country is considered as a higher-level stakeholder - the national stakeholder, represented by the national government, being faced to simultaneous seeking an upward (international) and a downward (intra-national) consensus in a psychologically stressed environment, possibly being characterized by diverse political, economic and social interests. The following theses as a possible interdisciplinary approach towards building of shared understanding and stakeholder consensus on the international scale of RW disposal are forwarded and developed: a) building of international stakeholder consensus would be promoted by activating and diversifying on the international scale multilateral interactions between intra- and international stakeholders, including web-based networks of the RW disposal site investigations and decision-making, as well as networks for international cooperation among government authorities in nuclear safety, b) gradual progress in intergovernmental consensus and reaching multilateral agreements on shared deep repositories will be the result of democratic dialogue, via observing the whole set of various interests and common resolving of emerged controversies by using advanced synergetic approaches of conflict resolution, c) cross-cultural thinking and world perception, mental flexibility, creativity and knowledge are considered as basic prerogatives for gaining a higher level of mutual understanding and consensus for seeking further consensus, for advancing the preparedness to act together, and ultimately - for achieving desired shared goals. It is proposed that self-organized social learning will make it possible to promote adequate perception of risk and prevent, by diminishing uncertainties and unknown factors, social amplification of an imagined risk, as well as to increase the trust level and facilitate more adequate equity perception. The proposed approach to the multilevel stakeholder consensus building on international scale is extrapolated to the present-day activities of siting of such near-surface RW disposal facilities which supposedly could have non-negligible trans-boundary impact. A multilevel stakeholder interaction process is considered for the case of resolving of emerged problems in site selection for the planned near-surface RW repository in vicinity of the Lithuanian-Latvian border foreseen for disposal of short lived low- and intermediate level waste arising from the decommissioning of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. (authors)

Dreimanis, A. [Radiation Safety Centre, Riga LV (Latvia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The relationship of the Yucca Mountain repository block to the regional ground-water system: A geochemical model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being studied by the Department of Energy and the State of Nevada as the site of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Geochemical and isotopic modeling were used in this study to define the relationship of the volcanic tuff aquifers and aquitards to the underlying regional carbonate ground-water system. The chemical evolution of a ground water as it passes through a hypothetical tuffaceous aquifer was developed using computer models PHREEQE, WATEQDR and BALANCE. The tuffaceous system was divided into five parts, with specific mineralogies, reaction steps and temperatures. The initial solution was an analysis of a soil water from Rainier Mesa. The ending solution in each part became the initial solution in the next part. Minerals consisted of zeolites, smectites, authigenic feldspars and quartz polymorphs from described diagentic mineral zones. Reaction steps were ion exchange with zeolites. The solution from the final zone, Part V, was chosen as most representative, in terms of pH, element molalities and mineral solubilities, of tuffaceous water. This hypothetical volcanic water from Part V was mixed with water from the regional carbonate aquifer, and the results compared to analyses of Yucca Mountain wells. Mixing and modeling attempts were conducted on wells in which studies indicated upward flow.

Matuska, N.A.; Hess, J.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyze repository capacity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

features of Yucca Moun- tain led to its selection as a potential repository site: Yucca Mountain now Source: U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Collection: Fission...

83

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of this development, a detailed performance assessment (PA) for the YM repository was completed in 2008 and supported a license application by the DOE to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of the YM repository. The following aspects of the 2008 YM PA are described in this presentation: (i) conceptual structure and computational organization, (ii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques in use, (iii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for physical processes, and (iv) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified the NRC’s regulations for the YM repository.

Jon C. Helton; Clifford W. Hansen; Cédric J. Sallaberry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Technical data base quarterly report, April--June 1992; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acquisition and development of technical data are activities that provide the information base from which the Yucca mountain Site will be characterized and may P-ventually be licensed as a high-level waste repository. The Project Technical Data Base (TDB) is the repository for the regional and site-specific technical data required in intermediate and license application analyses and models. The TDB Quarterly Report provides the mechanism for identifying technical data currently available from the Project TDB. Due to the variety of scientific information generated by YMP activities, the Project TDB consists of three components, each designed to store specific types of data. The Site and Engineering Properties Data Base (SEPDB) maintains technical data best stored in a tabular format. The Geographic Nodal Information Study and Evaluation System (GENISES), which is the Geographic Information System (GIS) component of the Project TDB, maintains spatial or map-like data. The Geologic and Engineering Materials Bibliography of Chemical Species (GEMBOCHS) data base maintains thermodynamic/geochemical data needed to support geochemical reaction models involving the waste package and repository geochemical environment. Each of these data bases are addressed independently within the TDB Quarterly Report.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Engineered materials characterization report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 1, Introduction, history, and current candidates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is to evaluate Yucca Mountain for its suitability as a potential site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been occupied for a number of years with developing and evaluating the performance of waste packages for the potential repository. In recent years this work has been carried out under the guidance of and in collaboration with the Management and Operating contractor for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., which in turn reports to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes the history of the selection and characterization of materials to be used in the engineered barrier system for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, describes the current candidate materials, presents a compilation of their properties, and summarizes available corrosion data and modeling. The term ``engineered materials`` is intended to distinguish those materials that are used as part of the engineered barrier system from the natural, geologic materials of the site.

Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Roy, A.K.; Jones, D.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada DOE/EIS-0250 Errata Sheet Since release of the Final EIS for Yucca Mountain on February 14, 2002 as part of the Site Recommendation documentation required under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, the Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a variety of errors in the document. These errors were found to include: editing errors - errors in editorial style, rounding, and unit conversions data entry errors, errors in typing a number transcription errors - errors in transcribing information from one part of the document to another, failures to update the text from the most current analyses at the time of the

87

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground Motions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

88

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 8, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.5 through 8.3.5.20  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 68 figs., 102 tabs.

NONE

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 8, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.4 through 8.7; Glossary and Acronyms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Section 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 88 figs., 42 tabs.

NONE

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

THE INFLUENCE OF REPOSITORY THERMAL LOAD ON MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE OF YUCCA MOUNTAIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the impact of proposed repository thermal-loading on mountain-scale flow and heat transfer in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this context, a model has been developed to study the coupled thermal-hydrological (TH) processes at the scale of the entire Yucca Mountain. This mountain-scale TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the latest rock thermal and hydrological properties. The TH model consists of a two-dimensional north-south vertical cross section across the entire unsaturated zone model domain and uses refined meshes near and around the proposed repository block, based on the current repository design, drift layout, thermal loading scenario, and estimated current and future climatic conditions. The model simulations provide insights into thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and elevated water and rock temperature, which in turn allow modelers to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts.

Yu-Shu Wu, Sumit Mukhopadhyay, Keni Zhang, and G. S. Bodvarsson

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

An example postclosure risk assessment using the potential Yucca Mountain Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risk analysis described in this document was performed for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) over a 2-year time period ending in June 1988. The objective of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) task was to demonstrate an integrated, though preliminary, modeling approach for estimating the postclosure risk associated with a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The modeling study used published characterization data for the proposed candidate site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, along with existing models and computer codes available at that time. Some of the site data and conceptual models reported in the Site Characterization Plan published in December 1988, however, were not yet available at the time that PNL conducted the modeling studies.

Doctor, P.G.; Eslinger, P.W.; Elwood, D.M.; Engel, D.W.; Freshley, M.D.; Liebetrau, A.M.; Reimus, P.W.; Strenge, D.L.; Tanner, J.E.; Van Luik, A.E.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Preliminary mapping of surficial geology of Midway Valley Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tectonics program for the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada must evaluate the potential for surface faulting beneath the prospective surface facilities. To help meet this goal, Quaternary surficial mapping studies and photolineament analyses were conducted to provide data for evaluating the location, recency, and style of faulting with Midway Valley at the eastern base of Yucca Mountain, the preferred location of these surface facilities. This interim report presents the preliminary results of this work.

Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Swan, F.H.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1992--September 30, 1992, Number 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), the Department has prepared the seventh in a series of reports on the progress of site characterization at the Yucca Mountain candidate site. The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program made significant progress during the reporting period at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Several important advances were made in the surface-based testing program including: initiation of borehole drilling utilizing the new, state-of-the-art LM-300 drill rig which employs dry drilling and coring techniques; neutron access borehole drilling to evaluate infiltration processes; excavations to aid geologic mapping; and trenching in Midway Valley to study Quaternary faulting. A Floodplain Assessment and Statement of Findings was published in the Federal Register which concluded there would be no significant impact nor cumulative impacts on floodplains resulting from Exploratory Studies Facility activities. The National Academy of Sciences` National Research Council released its report entitled ``Ground Water at Yucca Mountain: How High Can It Rise?`` which concluded that none of the evidence cited as proof of groundwater upwelling in and around Yucca Mountain could be reasonably attributed to that process and that significant water table excursions to the repository design level are not shown by the geologic record. The June 29, 1992, earthquake near Yucca Mountain provided scientists with a wealth of information relevant to understanding the neotectonics of the area and the geometry of faults at depth. Early findings suggest that accelerations recorded were well within proposed design limits for the surface waste handling facilities.

NONE

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid; Some prototype studies conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid conducted in the G Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) at the Nevada Test Site. This work is part of the prototype investigations of hydrogeology for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work is being conducted to develop methods and procedures that will be used at the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Site, a candidate site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository, during the site characterization phase of the investigations.

French, C.A. [Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Las Vegas, NV (US)

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Characterization, propagation and analysis of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, illustrates the conceptual structure of risk assessments for complex systems. The 2008 YM PA is based on the following three ...

Clifford W. Hansen; Jon C. Helton; Cédric J. Sallaberry

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Repository seals requirement study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

Finite - difference modeling of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada Area: a study of the regional water table gradients based on hydraulic conductivity contrasts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Nevada Yucca Mountain site is being investigated to determine if it is a suitable site for the construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository.… (more)

Davidson, Timothy Ross

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

Inyo County

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

99

Investigations to site a radioactive waste repository in Cumbria: Evidence against proceeding to MRWS Stage 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigations to site a radioactive waste repository in Cumbria: Evidence against proceeding to MRWS Stage 4 Radioactive waste repository in Cumbria: Evidence against proceeding to MRWS Stage 4 s the UK radioactive waste legacy comprises difficult material which is complex, of mixed origin

100

1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Yucca Mountain Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Yucca Mountain Project The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada has been designated as United States choice for nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in a remote dry area, on federal has been made to characterize the nature of the discontinuities of the Yucca Mountain proposed nuclear

Maerz, Norbert H.

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101

Step-Wise Repository Licensing-Implementing the Scientific and Legislative Vision for the Next Phase of the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International scientific consensus backing geologic disposal as the preferred method of long term management of used nuclear fuel and defense high level radioactive waste has existed since the 1950s. Furthermore, many believe that geologic disposal programs should be implemented in a staged or 'step-wise' approach. These principles have also been at the root of US waste management policy for which a regulatory framework for site selection, and the licensing of a site once selected, is set forth in a series of legislation. The US program has now matured to the point where these regulatory components are now in place. Sufficient data has also been gathered and evaluated to support a site recommendation decision. This decision--on whether or not to proceed with a repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada - is about to be put before the US President and Congress. If made in the affirmative, the decision would initiate the next phase in the US disposal process as originally envisioned by Congress--a three-step repository licensing process (Construction, Operation, & Closure). This paper explores the many facets of the licensing process that may lie ahead. Approaches that could be deployed to effectively implement this process are discussed and opportunities to optimize the process, by capitalizing on its evolutionary nature to assure that the best available science is always applied to the protection of public health and safety, are identified. Focus is also placed on a key prerequisite to the accomplishment of this goal--the definition of the level to which post closure repository performance must be addressed at each stage of the licensing process.

McCullum, R.; Kessler, J. H.; Eyre, M. L.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Site characterization of the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes the investigations conducted to characterize the geologic barrier of the Yucca Mountain disposal system. Site characterization progressed through (1) non-intrusive evaluation and borehole completions to determine stratigraphy for site identification; (2) exploration from the surface through well testing to evaluate the repository feasibility; (3) underground exploration to study coupled processes to evaluate repository suitability; and (4) reporting of experimental conclusions to support the repository compliance phase. Some of the scientific and technical challenges encountered included the evolution from a small preconstruction characterization program with much knowledge to be acquired during construction of the repository to a large characterization program with knowledge acquired prior to submission of the license application for construction authorization in June 2008 (i.e., the evolution from a preconstruction characterization program costing <$0.04×109 as estimated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1982 to a thorough characterization, design, and analysis program costing $11×109—latter in 2010 constant dollars). Scientific understanding of unsaturated flow in fractures and seepage into an open drift in a thermally perturbed environment was initially lacking, so much site characterization expense was required to develop this knowledge.

Rob P. Rechard; Hui-Hai Liu; Yvonne W. Tsang; Stefan Finsterle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The importance of zeolites in the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zeolitic rocks play an important role in retarding the migration of radionuclides that occur in solution as simple cations (Cs, Sr, Ba). However, the interaction of zeolites with complex transuranic species in solution provides little if any advantage over other common silicate minerals. The most important consequences of zeolite occurrences near a high-level radioactive waste repository environment are likely to be their response to thermal loading and their impact on site hydrology. Partial zeolite dehydration during the early thermal pulse from the repository and rehydration as the repository slowly cools can have an important impact on the water budget of a repository in unsaturated rocks, provided that the long-term heating does not result in zeolite destabilization.

Vaniman, D.T.; Bish, D.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests at the C-Hole complex. Yucca Mountain site characterization project report milestone 4077  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests that are to be conducted at the C-Hole complex at the Nevada Test Site on behalf of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The predictions are used to make specific recommendations about the manner in which the tracer test should be conducted to best satisfy the needs of the Project. The objective of he tracer tests is to study flow and species transport under saturated conditions in the fractured tuffs near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The potential repository will be located in the unsaturated zone within Yucca Mountain. The saturated zone beneath and around the mountain represents the final barrier to transport to the accessible environment that radionuclides will encounter if they breach the engineered barriers within the repository and the barriers to flow and transport provided by the unsaturated zone. Background information on the C-Holes is provided in Section 1.1, and the planned tracer testing program is discussed in Section 1.2.

Reimus, P.W.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process Final Report December 2001 This document is not an official copy and is for informational purposes only. CONTENTS Summary Objectives International perspective Recommendations for future assessments 1 Introduction 1.1 Background to the Yucca Mountain Project 1.2 Terms of reference, objectives and scope of the review 1.3 Conduct of the review 1.4 Organisation of this report 2 General Considerations 2.1 Regulatory perspective 2.2 Performance assessment rationale 2.3 General approach to performance assessment 2.4 Documentation 3 Sub-system methodology 3.1 Repository design

108

Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Site environmental report for calendar year 1996: Yucca Mountain site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental program established by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office (YMSCO) has been designed and implemented to protect, maintain, and restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to the environment and the public, and comply with environmental policies and US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE, 1990a), to be superseded by DOE Order 231.1 (under review), the status of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) environmental program has been summarized in this annual Site Environmental Report (SER) to characterize performance, document compliance with environmental requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts during calendar year 1996.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

DOE/EIS-0250D; Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada CONTACT: For more information on this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), write or call: Wendy R. Dixon, EIS Project Manager Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 30307, Mail Stop 010 North Las Vegas, Nevada 89036-0307 Telephone: (800) 967-3477 The EIS is also available on the Internet at the Yucca Mountain Project website at http://www.ymp.gov and on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) website at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/. For general information on the DOE NEPA process, write or call:

111

The Yucca Mountain Project prototype air-coring test, U12g tunnel, Nevada test site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Prototype Air-Coring Test was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) G-Tunnel facility to evaluate standard coring techniques, modified slightly for air circulation, for use in testing at a prospective nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Air-coring technology allows sampling of subsurface lithology with minimal perturbation to ambient characteristic such as that required for exploratory holes near aquifers, environmental applications, and site characterization work. Two horizontal holes were cored, one 50 ft long and the other 150 ft long, in densely welded fractured tuff to simulate the difficult drilling conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain. Drilling data from seven holes on three other prototype tests in nonwelded tuff were also collected for comparison. The test was used to establish preliminary standards of performance for drilling and dust collection equipment and to assess procedural efficiencies. The Longyear-38 drill achieved 97% recovery for HQ-size core (-2.5 in.), and the Atlas Copco dust collector (DCT-90) captured 1500 lb of fugitive dust in a mine environment with only minor modifications. Average hole production rates were 6-8 ft per 6-h shift in welded tuff and almost 20 ft per shift on deeper holes in nonwelded tuff. Lexan liners were successfully used to encapsulate core samples during the coring process and protect core properties effectively. The Prototype Air-Coring Test demonstrated that horizontal air coring in fractured welded tuff (to at least 150 ft) can be safely accomplished by proper selection, integration, and minor modification of standard drilling equipment, using appropriate procedures and engineering controls. The test also indicated that rig logistics, equipment, and methods need improvement before attempting a large-scale dry drilling program at Yucca Mountain.

Ray, J.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Newsom, J.C. [Newsom Industries, Citrus Heights, CA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Secondary plant succession on disturbed sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of secondary plant succession on disturbed sites created during initial site investigations in the late 1970s and early 1980s at Yucca Mountain, NV. Specific study objectives were to determine the rate and success of secondary plant succession, identify plant species found in disturbances that may be suitable for site-specific reclamation, and to identify environmental variables that influence succession on disturbed sites. During 1991 and 1992, fifty seven disturbed sites were located. Vegetation parameters, disturbance characteristics and environmental variables were measured at each site. Disturbed site vegetation parameters were compared to that of undisturbed sites to determine the status of disturbed site plant succession. Vegetation on disturbed sites, after an average of ten years, was different from undisturbed areas. Ambrosia dumosa, Chrysothamnus teretifolius, Hymenoclea salsola, Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex canescens, and Stephanomeria pauciflora were the most dominant species across all disturbed sites. With the exception of A. dumosa, these species were generally minor components of the undisturbed vegetation. Elevation, soil compaction, soil potassium, and amounts of sand and gravel in the soil were found to be significant environmental variables influencing the species composition and abundance of perennial plants on disturbed sites. The recovery rate for disturbed site secondary succession was estimated. Using a linear function (which would represent optimal conditions), the recovery rate for perennial plant cover, regardless of which species comprised the cover, was estimated to be 20 years. However, when a logarithmic function (which would represent probable conditions) was used, the recovery rate was estimated to be 845 years. Recommendations for future studies and site-specific reclamation of disturbances are presented.

Angerer, J.P.; Ostler, W.K.; Gabbert, W.D.; Schultz, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

MISTY ECHO Tunnel Dynamics Experiment--Data report: Volume 1; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Performance Assessment Modeling for Savannah River Glass HLW Disposal in a Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance assessment (PA) simulates the long-term performance of a conceptual geological repository for nuclear waste or the performance of a subsystem such as the engineered barrier system (drifts, waste pa...

W. J. O’Connell; W. L. Bourcier; J. Gansemer…

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Two-stage repository development at Yucca Mountain: an engineering feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires that the first repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste be ready to receive waste by January 31, 1998. The preliminary designs of candidates for the first repository include a single waste-handling building constructed in one stage. After considering possible approaches to repository construction, the Department of Energy has proposed in its draft Mission Plan to construct the first repository in two steps to increase confidence in meeting the 1998 deadline. Therefore, the Department of Energy has requested the preparation of this engineering study to verify the validity of the two-stage approach to repository construction. This approach involves concurrent construction of two waste-handling buildings. The first would be completed in time to accept the equivalent of 400 MTU/y of waste by January 31, 1998. It would operate for 5 y, during which time construction of a full-capacity, 3000-MTU/y waste-handling building would be completed. The design includes six accesses to the underground facility: four vertical shafts and two ramps. The principal conclusion derived from this study is that two-stage repository construction can allow receipt and disposal of the 400 MTU/y of waste by January 31, 1998. Four alternate concepts have been explored to determine whether savings in costs could be accomplished. All four alternate concepts appear technically feasible and are potentially more cost effective than the reference approach.

MacDougall, H.R. (comp.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The EIS evaluates not only impacts from constructing, operating, monitoring, and closing a repository, but also from transporting the materials from 72 commercial and 4 DOE sites to the Yucca Mountain repository site in Nye County, Nevada. Public Comment Opportunities

117

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

1980-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Geothermal areas as analogues to chemical processes in the near-field and altered zone of the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to bound system performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository for thousands of years after emplacement of high-level nuclear waste requires the use of computer codes. The use of such codes to produce reliable bounds over such long time periods must be tested using long-lived natural and historical systems as analogues. The geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) in New Zealand were selected as the site most amenable to study. The rocks of the TVZ are silicic volcanics that are similar in composition to Yucca Mountain. The area has been subjected to temperatures of 25 to 300 C which have produced a variety of secondary minerals similar to those anticipated at Yucca Mountain. The availability of rocks, fluids and fabricated materials for sampling is excellent because of widespread exploitation of the systems for geothermal power. Current work has focused on testing the ability of the EQ3/6 code and thermodynamic data base to describe mineral-fluid relations at elevated temperatures. Welfare starting long-term dissolution/corrosion tests of rocks, minerals and manufactured materials in natural thermal features in order to compare laboratory rates with field-derived rates. Available field data on rates of silica precipitation from heated fluids have been analyzed and compared to laboratory rates. New sets of precipitation experiments are being planned. The microbially influenced degradation of concrete in the Broadlands-Ohaaki geothermal field is being characterized. The authors will continue to work on these projects in FY 1996 and expand to include the study of naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides, as a prelude to studying radionuclide migration in heated silicic volcanic rocks. 32 refs.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Meike, A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spend Nuclear Fuel and High-Leval Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D October 2007 Table of Contents Summary Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D October 2007 Printed on recycled paper with soy ink. COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal

122

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spend Nuclear Fuel and High-Leval Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Volume I Impact Analyses Chapters 1 through 13 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D October 2007 Printed on recycled paper with soy ink. COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D) (Repository SEIS). CONTACTS: For more information about this document, For general information on the DOE NEPA process, write

123

Acceptance of waste for disposal in the potential United States repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the process for the acceptance of waste into the waste management system (WMS) with a focus on the detailed requirements identified from the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document. Also described is the recent dialogue between OCRWM and the Office of Environmental Management to resolve issues, including the appropriate interpretation and application of regulatory and system requirements to DOE-owned spent fuel. Some information is provided on the design of the repository system to aid the reader in understanding how waste that is accepted into the WMS is received and emplaced in the repository.

Stahl, D. [Framatome Cogema Fuels, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Svinicki, K. [USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Modeling Alloy 22 general corrosion in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the general corrosion model used by the Yucca Mountain Project to account for general corrosion degradation of the Alloy 22 waste package outer barrier. The general corrosion rates were det...

Kevin G. Mon; Brvan E. Bullard; Fred Hua; Gopal C. De

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Evaluating Flake Assemblage and Stone Tool Distributions at a Large Western Stemmed Tradition Site Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigations at Yucca Mountain for the U. S. Department ofTRADITION SITE NEAR YUCCA MOUNTAIN lo: Special PublicationsLithic Quarry Near Yucca Mountain, Nye Coimty, Nevada. Las

Haynes, Gregory M

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid: Some prototype studies conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid has been conducted in the G Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) at the Nevada Test Site. This work is part of the prototype investigations of hydrogeology for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work is being conducted to develop methods and procedures that will be used at the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Site, a candidate site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository, during the site characterization phase of the investigations. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting this prototype testing under the guidance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and in conjunction with Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Company (REECo), the drilling contractor. 7 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Chornack, M.P. [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (USA); French, C.A. [Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, NV (USA)

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Progress report number 17, April 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), created with the enactment of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), is tasked to accept and dispose of the nation`s high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository (high-level radioactive waste program). The report summarizes significant site characterization activities during the period from April 1, 1997 through September 30, 1997, in the evaluation of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. The progress report also cites technical reports and research products that provide the detailed information on these activities. Chapter 2 outlines technical and regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Project and planned work toward achieving future objectives concerning the viability assessment, the environmental impact statement, the site recommendation, and the license application. Chapter 3 describes technical progress in preclosure radiological safety analysis, postclosure performance assessment, and performance confirmation activities. Chapter 4 describes various aspects of repository and waste package design and construction. It also discusses the Exploration Studies Facility cross drift. Chapter 5 describes site characterization activities, and Chapter 6 contains a complete list of references.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow processes at a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two complementary numerical models for analyzing high-level nuclear waste emplacement at Yucca Mountain have been developed. A vertical cross-sectional (X-Z) model permits a realistic representation of hydrogeologic features, such as alternating tilting layers of welded and non-welded tuffs. fault zones, and surface topography. An alternative radially symmetric (R-Z) model is more limited in its ability to describe the hydrogeology of the site, but is better suited to model heat transfer in the host rock. Our models include a comprehensive description of multiphase fluid and heat flow processes, including strong enhancements of vapor diffusion from pore-level phase change effects. The neighborhood of the repository is found to partially dry out from the waste heat. A condensation halo of large liquid saturation forms around the drying zone, from which liquid flows downward at large rates. System response to infiltration from the surface and to ventilation of mined openings is evaluated. The impact of the various flow processes on the waste isolation capabilities of the site is discussed.

Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Regulatory Review of the Safety Case for Siting Licensing of Saligny Low and Intermediate Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper contains the regulatory review comments produced following submission of siting license application of Saligny repository. The regulatory review was conducted in order to verify the compliance with Romanian regulatory criteria and requirements. After assessment of completeness of safety case and availability of supporting documents the review the main technical areas started. The review process was focused on the site characteristics, waste characteristics, safety considerations as scenarios development, mathematical models, identification and treatment of uncertainties, availability of parameters. (authors)

Dogaru, D.M. [National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control, 5 Bucharest (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Yucca Mountain Project public interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to keeping the citizens of Nevada informed about activities that relate to the high-level nuclear waste repository program. This paper presents an overview of the Yucca Mountain Project`s public interaction philosophy, objectives, activities and experiences during the two years since Congress directed the DOE to conduct site characterization activities only for the Yucca Mountain site.

Reilly, B.E.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was successful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Bradley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was sUGcessful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Raymond,, J. R.; Brandley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat,, J. K.; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

MODELING FLOW AND TRANSPORT PATHWAYS TO THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic ratios of {sup 36}Cl/Cl are used in conjunction with geologic interpretation and numerical modeling to evaluate flow and transport pathways, processes, and model parameters in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. By synthesizing geochemical and geologic data, the numerical model results provide insight into the validity of alternative hydrologic parameter sets, flow and transport processes in and away from fault zones, and the applicability of {sup 36}Cl/Cl. ratios for evaluating alternative conceptual models.

A.V. WOLFSBERG, G.J.C. ROEMER, J.T. FABRYKA-MARTIN, B.A. ROBINSON

1998-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

Site environmental report for calendar year 1997, Yucca Mountain Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the seventh annual Site Environmental Report (SER) submitted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office (YMSCO) to describe the environmental program implemented by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain. As prescribed by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA, 1982), this program ensures that site characterization activities are conducted in a manner that minimizes any significant adverse impacts to the environment and complies with all applicable laws and regulations. The most recent guidelines for the preparation of the SER place major emphasis on liquid and gaseous emissions of radionuclides, pollutants or hazardous substances; human exposure to radionuclides; and trends observed by comparing data collected over a period of years. To date, the YMP has not been the source of any radioactive emissions or been responsible for any human exposure to radionuclides. Minuscule amounts of radioactivity detected at the site are derived from natural sources or from dust previously contaminated by nuclear tests conducted in the past at the NTS. Because data for only a few years exist for the site, identification of long-term trends is not yet possible. Despite the lack of the aforementioned categories of information requested for the SER, the YMP has collected considerable material relevant to this report. An extensive environmental monitoring and mitigation program is currently in place and is described herein. Also, as requested by the SER guidelines, an account of YMP compliance with appropriate environmental legislation is provided.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

February 14, 2002: Yucca Mountain | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2002: Yucca Mountain 14, 2002: Yucca Mountain February 14, 2002: Yucca Mountain February 14, 2002: Yucca Mountain February 14, 2002 Secretary Abraham formally recommends to President Bush that the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada be developed as the nation's first long-term geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. "I have considered whether sound science supports the determination that the Yucca Mountain site is scientifically and technically suitable for the development of a repository," the Secretary informs the President. "I am convinced that it does. The results of this extensive investigation and the external technical reviews of this body of scientific work give me confidence for the conclusion, based on sound scientific principles, that a repository at

137

Design of a high-level waste repository system for the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report presents a conceptual design for a High Level Waste disposal system for fuel discharged by U.S. commercial power reactors, using the Yucca Mountain repository site recently designated by federal legislation. ...

Driscoll, Michael J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of this development, an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the YM repository was completed in 2008 [1] and supported a license application by the DOE to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of the YM repository [2]. This presentation provides an overview of the conceptual and computational structure of the indicated PA (hereafter referred to as the 2008 YM PA) and the roles that uncertainty analysis and sensitivity analysis play in this structure.

Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Hansen, Clifford W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Progress report on the scientific investigation program for the Nevada Yucca Mountain site, September 15, 1988--September 30, 1989; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113), Number 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. This report is the first of a series of reports that will hereafter be issued at intervals of approximately 6-months during site characterization. The DOE`s plans for site characterization are described in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site. The SCP has been reviewed and commented on by the NRC, the State of Nevada, the affected units of local government, other interested parties, and the public. More detailed information on plans for site characterization is being presented in study plans for the various site characterization activities. This progress report presents short summaries of the status of site characterization activities and cites technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for discussing major changes, if any, to the DOE`s site characterization program resulting from ongoing collection and evaluation of site information; the development of repository and waste-package designs; receipt of performance-assessment results; and changes, if any, that occur in response to external comments on the site characterization programs. 80 refs.

NONE

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Summary discussion of the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste was proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This paper summarizes the historical development of the 2008 YM performance assessment (PA), and explains how the methods and results of the 2008 PA address regulatory requirements specified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Topics covered include (i) screening of features, events and processes, (ii) development of scenario classes, (iii) descriptions of barrier capability, and (iv) compliance with applicable quantitative standards for individual protection, individual protection following human intrusion, and ground water protection. This article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA and provides a brief summary of information presented in detail in multiple articles in this issue and interprets the results in the context of applicable EPA and NRC regulations.

Peter N. Swift; Clifford W. Hansen; Jon C. Helton; Robert L. Howard; M. Kathryn Knowles; Robert J. MacKinnon; Jerry A. McNeish; S. David Sevougian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Site environmental report for calendar year 1994, Yucca Mountain Site, Nye County, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization office has established an environmental program to ensure that facilities are operated in order to protect, maintain, and restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to the environment and the public, and comply with environmental policies and US DOE orders. The status of the environmental program has been summarized in this annual report to characterize performance, confirm compliance with environmental requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts during CY 1994. Monitoring, archaeology, groundwater, ecosystems, tortoise conservation, waste minimization, etc., are covered.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Scenarios constructed for the effects of tectonic processes on the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive collection of scenarios is presented that connect initiating tectonic events with radionuclide releases by logical and physically possible combinations or sequences of features, events and processes. The initiating tectonic events include both discrete faulting and distributed rock deformation developed through the repository and adjacent to it, as well as earthquake-induced ground motion and changes in tectonic stress at the site. The effects of these tectonic events include impacts on the engineered-barrier system, such as container rupture and failure of repository tunnels. These effects also include a wide range of hydrologic effects such as changes in pathways and flow rates in the unsaturated and saturated zones, changes in the water-table configuration, and in the development of perched-water systems. These scenarios are intended go guide performance-assessment analyses and to assist principal investigators in how essential field, laboratory, and calculational studies are used. This suite of scenarios will help ensure that all important aspects of the system disturbance related to a tectonic scenario are captured in numerical analyses. It also provides a record of all options considered by project analysts to provide documentation required for licensing agreement. The final portion of this report discusses issues remaining to be addressed with respect to tectonic activity. 105 refs.

Barr, G.E.; Borns, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fridrich, C. [Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Animist Intersubjectivity as Argumentation: Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute Arguments Against a Nuclear Waste Site at Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

My focus in this essay is Shoshone and Paiute arguments against the Yucca Mountain site that claim that because Yucca Mountain is a culturally significant sacred place it ... set of arguments for the cultural val...

Danielle Endres

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report describes the results of scientific and engineering studies of the Yucca Mountain site, the waste forms to be disposed, the repository and waste package designs, and the results of the most recent assessments of the long-term performance of the potential repository. The scientific investigations include site characterization studies of the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical environment, and evaluation of how conditions might evolve over time. These analyses considered a range of processes that would operate in and around the potential repository. Since projections of performance for 10,000 years are inherently uncertain, the uncertainties associated with analyses and

145

Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report describes the results of scientific and engineering studies of the Yucca Mountain site, the waste forms to be disposed, the repository and waste package designs, and the results of the most recent assessments of the long-term performance of the potential repository. The scientific investigations include site characterization studies of the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical environment, and evaluation of how conditions might evolve over time. These analyses considered a range of processes that would operate in and around the potential repository. Since projections of performance for 10,000 years are inherently uncertain, the uncertainties associated with analyses and

146

Potential for the localized corrosion of alloy 22 Waste Packages in Multiple-Salt Deliquescent Brines in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been postulated that the deliquescence of multiple-salt systems in dust deposits and the consequent localized corrosion in high-temperature brines could lead to premature failure of the Alloy 22 waste packages in the Yucca Mountain repository. EPRI has developed a decision tree approach to determine if the various stages leading to waste package failure are possible and whether the safety of the repository system could be compromised as a result. Through a series of arguments, EPRI has shown that it is highly unlikely that the multiple-salt deliquescent brines will form in the first place and, even if they did, that they would not be thermodynamically stable, that the postulated brines are not corrosive and would not lead to the initiation of localized corrosion of Alloy 22, that even if localized corrosion did initiate that the propagation would stifle and cease long before penetration of the waste package outer barrier, and that even if premature waste package failures did occur from this cause that the safety of the overall system would not be compromised. EPRI concludes, therefore, that the postulated localized corrosion of the waste packages due to high-temperature deliquescent brines is neither a technical nor a safety issue of concern for the Yucca Mountain repository. (authors)

King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting, Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Arthur, R.; Apted, M. [Monitor Scientific LLC, Denver, CO (United States); Kessler, J.H. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Impacts of Stable Element Intake on C and I Dose Estimates - Implications for Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the intake of stable isotopes of carbon and iodine on the committed doses due to the ingestion of {sup 14}C and {sup 129}I. This was accomplished through the application of two different computational approaches. The first was based on the assumption that ground (drinking) water was the only source of intake of both {sup 14}C and {sup 129}I and stable carbon and stable iodine. For purposes of the second approach, the intake of {sup 14}C and {sup 129}I was still assumed to be only that in the ground (drinking) water, but the intake of stable carbon and stable iodine was assumed to be that in the drinking water plus other components of the diet. The doses were estimated using either a conversion formula or the applicable dose coefficients in Federal Guidance Reports No. 11 and No. 13. Serving as input for the analyses was the estimated maximum concentration of {sup 14}C or {sup 129}I that would be present in the ground water due to potential releases from the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository during the first 10,000 years after closure. The estimated concentrations of stable carbon and iodine were based on analyses of ground water samples collected in the Amargosa Valley, NV. Based on the accompanying analyses, three conclusions were reached. First, no dose estimate, using a conversion formula in which the ratios of the stable to radioactive isotopes of an element serve as input, should ever be made without including the stable element intake contributions from all components of the diet. Second, the study suggests that the dose coefficients for {sup 129}I in Federal Guidance Reports No. 11 and No. 12 which, in turn, are based on publications of the ICRP, may not be appropriate for application in developed nations of the world, especially those in which relatively large amounts of seafood are consumed and the use of iodized salt is common. The estimated average daily intake of stable iodine by the adult U.S. population, for example, is 400 pg. This is twice the value listed by the ICRP for Reference Man. This leads to a dose estimate that is too high by a factor of two. Although the ICRP accounts for stable isotope contributions through the selection of a corresponding biological half-time for iodine, the selection in this case may need reevaluation especially with respect to assessments of potential {sup 129}I releases from the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository. The third conclusion, which confirms earlier studies, is that an increase in the intake of either {sup 14}C or {sup 129}I will not lead to an increase in the dose if there is a corresponding increase in the intake of stable carbon or iodine such that the ratio of {sup 14}C or {sup 129}I to stable carbon or iodine does not change.

D.W. Moeller; M.T. Ryan; Lin-Shen C. Sun; R.N. Cherry Jr.

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

149

Repository Applications: Potential Benefits of Using Depleted Uranium (DU)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Repository Applications Repository Applications Repository Applications: Potential Benefits of Using Depleted Uranium (DU) in a Geological Repository The United States is investigating the Yucca Mountain (YM) site in Nevada for the disposal of radioactive spent nuclear fuel (SNF)—the primary waste from nuclear power plants. The SNF would be packaged and then emplaced 200 to 300 m underground in parallel disposal tunnels. The repository isolates the SNF from the biosphere until the radionuclides decay to safe levels. DU may improve the performance of geological repositories for disposal of SNF via three mechanisms: Radiation shielding for waste packages to protect workers Lowering the potential for long-term nuclear criticality in the repository Reducing the potential for releases of radionuclides from the SNF

150

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1991--September 30, 1991, Number 5; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Site Characterization Progress Report of Yucca Mountain (PR) presents brief summaries of the status of site characterization activities and cites the technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for the discussion of changes to the DOE`s site characterization program resulting from ongoing collection and evaluation of site information; the development of repository and waste-package designs; the results of performance assessments; and any changes that occur in response to external comments. Information covered includes geochemistry, hydrology, geology, climate, and radiation dose estimate calculations.

NONE

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Assessment of compliance with ground water protection standards in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the assessment of compliance with ground water protection standards in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) regulatory background, (ii) analysis structure including characterization of uncertainty, and (iii) analysis results for each of the ground water protection standards. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; M. Wasiolek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Yucca Mountain  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yucca Mountain We are applying our unique scientific and engineering capabilities to ensure the safety of the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository. 8 08 FACT SHEET...

153

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of… (more)

Lee, Si-Yong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Final Systems Development Report for the Clark County Socioeconomic Impact Assessment of the Proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Systems Development Report represents the third major step in the Clark County Socioeconomic Impact Assessment of the Proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mound Nevada. The first of these steps was to forge a Research Design that would serve as a guide for the overall research process. The second step was the construction of the Base Case, the purpose of which was to describe existing conditions in Clark County in the specified analytic areas of Economic-Demographic/Fiscal, Emergency Planning and Management, Transportation and Sociocultural analysis. The base case description will serve as a basis for assessing changes in these topic areas that might result from the Yucca Mountain project. These changes will be assessed by analyzing conditions with and without repository development in the county. Prior to performing such assessments, however, the snapshot type of data found in the base case must be operationalized or systematized to allow for more dynamic data utilization. In other words, a data system that can be used to analyze the consequences of the introduction of different variables (or variable values) in the Clark County context must be constructed. Such a system must be capable of being updated through subsequent data collection and monitoring efforts to both provide a rolling base case and supply information necessary to construct trend analyses. For example, during the Impact Assessment phase of the study process, the without repository analysis is accomplished by analyzing growth for the county given existing conditions and likely trends. These data are then compared to the with Yucca Mountain project conditions anticipated for the county. Similarly, once the emergency planning management and response needs associated with the repository are described, these needs will be juxtaposed against existing (and various future) capacity(ies) in order to determine the nature and magnitude of impacts in this analytic area. Analogous tasks will be performed for the other analytic areas detailed in the Base Case and outlined below.

NONE

1992-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Characterization, propagation and analysis of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, illustrates the conceptual structure of risk assessments for complex systems. The 2008 YM PA is based on the following three conceptual entities: a probability space that characterizes aleatory uncertainty; a function that predicts consequences for individual elements of the sample space for aleatory uncertainty; and a probability space that characterizes epistemic uncertainty. These entities and their use in the characterization, propagation and analysis of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty are described and illustrated with results from the 2008 YM PA.

Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Hansen, Clifford W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Recent characterization activities of Midway Valley as a potential repository surface facility site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, has been identified as a possible location for the surface facilities of a potential high-level nuclear-waste repository. This structural and topographic valley is bounded by two north- trending, down-to-the-west normal faults: the Paintbrush Canyon fault on the east and the Bow Ridge fault on the west. Surface and near-surface geological data have been acquired from Midway Valley during the past three years with particular emphasis on evaluating the existence of Quaternary faults. A detailed (1:6000) surficial geological map has been prepared based on interpretation of new and existing aerial photographs, field mapping, soil pits, and trenches. No evidence was found that would indicate displacement of these surficial deposits along previously unrecognized faults. However, given the low rates of Quaternary faulting and the extensive areas that are covered by late Pleistocene to Holocene deposits south of Sever Wash, Quaternary faulting between known faults cannot be precluded based on surface evidence alone. Middle to late Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits (Unit Q3) exist at or near the surface throughout Midway Valley. Confidence is increased that the potential for surface fault rupture in Midway Valley can be assessed by excavations that expose the deposits and soils associated with Unit Q3 or older units (middle Pleistocene or earlier).

Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wesling, J.R.; Swan, F.H.; Bullard, T.F. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down Gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, U. S. Department of Energy Grant DE-RW0000233 2010 Project Report, prepared by The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC for Inyo County Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inyo County completed the first year of the U.S. Department of Energy Grant Agreement No. DE-RW0000233. This report presents the results of research conducted within this Grant agreement in the context of Inyo County's Yucca Mountain oversight program goals and objectives. The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC prepared this report for Inyo County Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office. The overall goal of Inyo County's Yucca Mountain research program is the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, of radionuclide into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Data collected within the Grant is included in interpretive illustrations and discussions of the results of our analysis. The centeral elements of this Grant prgoram was the drilling of exploratory wells, geophysical surveys, geological mapping of the Southern Funeral Mountain Range. The cullimination of this research was 1) a numerical ground water model of the Southern Funeral Mountain Range demonstrating the potential of a hydraulic connection between the LCA and the major springs in the Furnace Creek area of Death Valley, and 2) a numerical ground water model of the Amargosa Valley to evaluate the potential for radionuclide transport from Yucca Mountain to Inyo County, California. The report provides a description of research and activities performed by The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC on behalf of Inyo County, and copies of key work products in attachments to this report.

King, Michael J; Bredehoeft, John D., Dr.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

158

Conceptual structure and computational organization of the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This presentation describes the overall conceptual structure and computational organization of the 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository carried out by the DOE in support of a licensing application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The following topics are addressed: (i) regulatory background, (ii) the three basic entities underlying a PA, (iii) determination of expected, mean and median dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository, (iv) the relationship between probability, sets and scenario classes, (v) scenario classes and the characterization of aleatory uncertainty, (vi) scenario classes and the determination of expected dose to the RMEI, (vii) analysis decomposition, (viii) disjoint and nondisjoint scenario classes, (ix) scenario classes and the NRC’s YM review plan, (x) characterization of epistemic uncertainty, and (xi) adequacy of Latin hypercube sample size used in the propagation of epistemic uncertainty. This article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA and is intended as an introduction to following articles in the issue that provide additional analysis details and specific analysis results.

J.C. Helton; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the seismic scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the seismic ground motion scenario class and the seismic fault displacement scenario class obtained in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed for the seismic ground motion scenario class: (i) engineered barrier system conditions; (ii) release results for the engineered barrier system, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone; (iii) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository; and (iv) expected dose to the RMEI. In addition, expected dose to the RMEI for the seismic fault displacement scenario class is also considered. The present article is the part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; A. Bier; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; P. Vo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Expected dose for the early failure scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the early waste package (WP) failure scenario class and the early drip shield (DS) failure scenario class in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) properties of the early failure scenario classes and the determination of dose and expected dose the RMEI, (ii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the early WP failure scenario class, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the early DS failure scenario class, (iv) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the combined early WP and early DS failure scenario class with and without the inclusion of failures resulting from nominal processes, and (v) uncertainty in the occurrence of early failure scenario classes. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

J.C. Helton; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the igneous scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the igneous intrusive scenario class and the igneous eruptive scenario class obtained in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed for the igneous intrusive scenario class: (i) engineered barrier system conditions, (ii) release results for the engineered barrier system, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone, (iii) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository, and (iv) expected dose to the RMEI. In addition, expected dose to the RMEI for the igneous eruptive scenario class is also considered. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.J. Sallaberry; G.A. Behie; A. Bier; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; C.W. Hansen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; S.D. Sevougian; P. Vo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Expected dose for the nominal scenario class in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected (mean) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the nominal scenario class (i.e., under nominal or undisturbed conditions) in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) properties of the nominal scenario class and the determination of dose and expected (mean) dose to the RMEI, (ii) uncertainty in dose and resultant expected (mean) dose to the RMEI, (iii) expected (mean) dose to the RMEI from individual radionuclides, and (iv) numerical stability of the sampling-based procedure used to estimate the expected (mean) dose to the RMEI. The present paper is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional papers in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

J.C. Helton; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Expected dose for the igneous scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the igneous intrusive scenario class and the igneous eruptive scenario class in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) properties of the igneous scenario classes and the determination of dose and expected dose to the RMEI, (ii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the igneous intrusive scenario class, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the igneous eruptive scenario class, (iv) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the combined igneous intrusive and igneous eruptive scenario class, and (v) uncertainty in the occurrence of igneous scenario classes. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.J. Sallaberry; C.W. Hansen; J.C. Helton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the nominal scenario class in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the nominal scenario class (i.e., for undisturbed conditions) obtained in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis procedures, (ii) drip shield and waste package failure, (iii) engineered barrier system conditions, (iv) radionuclide release results for the engineered barrier system, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone, and (v) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; A. Bier; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; P. Vo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the early failure scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the early waste package failure scenario class and the early drip shield failure scenario class obtained in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) engineered barrier system conditions, (ii) release results for the engineered barrier system, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone, (iii) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository, and (iv) expected dose to the RMEI. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; A. Bier; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; P. Vo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical Study of Pre-Closure Off-Normal Thermal Scenarios at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada currently includes a minimum of 50 years forced ventilation inside of emplacement drifts prior to repository closure. To regulate the heat generated from emplaced waste packages, the ventilation during the pre-closure period should be continuous. Off-normal thermal scenarios that consider temporary shutdown of the pre-closure ventilation are investigated to determine the impacts of ventilation shutdown on the thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behaviors of the emplacement drifts. In-drift heat transfer processes including radiation, convection, and conduction are studied. The analysis provides a ventilation heat removal ratio that varies on the drift location and the ventilation duration. The heat removal ratio is transferred and utilized in the NUFT thermal-hydrology software. The NUFT software is used to investigate the thermal-hydrologic impacts on the repository rock mass for the off-normal thermal scenarios with various shutdown durations at various pre-closure times. The predicted rock mass temperature evaluated from the thermal-hydrologic analysis is applied for the thermal-mechanical analysis of the off-normal thermal scenarios. The results show that degradation and rockfall of the emplacement drifts due to the off-normal thermal scenarios will be minimal, and it is concluded that the impacts of off-normal thermal scenarios on the stability of the emplacement drifts will be insignificant.

J. Leem; M. Lin; Y. Sun; D. Kicker

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project bibliography, January--June 1995. Supplement 4, Add.3: An update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following a reorganization of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in 1990, the Yucca Mountain Project was renamed Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The title of this bibliography was also changed to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography. Prior to August 5, 1988, this project was called the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This bibliography contains information on this ongoing project that was added to the Department of Energy`s Energy Science and Technology Database from January 1, 1995, through June 30, 1995. The bibliography is categorized by principal project participating organization. Participant-sponsored subcontractor reports, papers, and articles are included in the sponsoring organization`s list. Another section contains information about publications on the Energy Science and Technology Database that were not sponsored by the project but have some relevance to it.

Stephan, P.M. [ed.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1995 quality program status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project`s (YMP`s) quality assurance program for January 1 to September 30, 1995. The report includes major sections on program activities and trend analysis.

Bolivar, S.L.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Distance learning and its application to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the concept of distance learning, which is used to exchange information via electronic media with real time interaction. Issues concerning policy, funding, legislation, accessibility, and programming are outlined. Possible applications for education, business, and federal projects, with a focus on the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, are also discussed.

Brandt, J.; Sizemore, J. [SAIC, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995, Number 12. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first half of fiscal year 1995, most activities at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project were directed at implementing the Program Plan developed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Plan is designed to enable the Office to make measurable and significant progress toward key objectives over the next five years within the financial resources that can be realistically expected. Activities this period focused on the immediate goal of determining by 1998 whether Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is technically suitable as a possible site for a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Work on the Project advanced in several critical areas, including programmatic activities such as issuing the Program Plan, completing the first technical basis report to support the assessment of three 10 CFR 960 guidelines, developing the Notice of Intent for the Environmental Impact Statement, submitting the License Application Annotated Outline, and beginning a rebaselining effort to conform with the goals of the Program Plan. Scientific investigation and analysis of the site and design and construction activities to support the evaluation of the technical suitability of the site also advanced. Specific details relating to all Project activities and reports generated are presented in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Site characterization progress report, Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Number 19, April 1, 1998--September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nineteenth semiannual report of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) summarizes activities during the period from April 1, 1998, through September 30, 1998. Project activities are aimed at evaluating Yucca Mountain as a potential location for permanent geologic disposal of nuclear materials, as directed by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA). The progress report documents activities this period that contribute to completing the Project`s near-term programmatic and statutory objectives. These objectives include completing the Viability Assessment, the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), a possible US Department of Energy (DOE) Secretarial Site Recommendation to the President, and, if the site is suitable, submittal of a license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Project work this period continued to be concentrated in three integrated activities: site characterization, engineering design and construction, and performance assessment. Accomplishments this period and their relation to near-term objectives are briefly summarized.

Not Available

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

YUCCA MOUNTAIN WASTE PACKAGE CLOSURE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The method selected for dealing with spent nuclear fuel in the US is to seal the fuel in waste packages and then to place them in an underground repository at the Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. This article describes the Waste Package Closure System (WPCS) currently being designed for sealing the waste packages.

G. Housley; C. Shelton-davis; K. Skinner

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

173

Coupling fuel cycles with repositories: how repository institutional choices may impact fuel cycle design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The historical repository siting strategy in the United States has been a top-down approach driven by federal government decision making but it has been a failure. This policy has led to dispatching fuel cycle facilities in different states. The U.S. government is now considering an alternative repository siting strategy based on voluntary agreements with state governments. If that occurs, state governments become key decision makers. They have different priorities. Those priorities may change the characteristics of the repository and the fuel cycle. State government priorities, when considering hosting a repository, are safety, financial incentives and jobs. It follows that states will demand that a repository be the center of the back end of the fuel cycle as a condition of hosting it. For example, states will push for collocation of transportation services, safeguards training, and navy/private SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) inspection at the repository site. Such activities would more than double local employment relative to what was planned for the Yucca Mountain-type repository. States may demand (1) the right to take future title of the SNF so if recycle became economic the reprocessing plant would be built at the repository site and (2) the right of a certain fraction of the repository capacity for foreign SNF. That would open the future option of leasing of fuel to foreign utilities with disposal of the SNF in the repository but with the state-government condition that the front-end fuel-cycle enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities be located in that state.

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 24-207A Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Miller, W.F. [Texas A.M. University System, MS 3133 College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hydrogen Diffusion and Trapping Effects in Low and Medium Carbon Steels for Subsurface Reinforcement in the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electrochemical hydrogen permeation method was used to investigate hydrogen transport, trapping characteristics of low (0.08 pct C) and medium carbon (0.44 pct C) steels proposed for the Yucca Mountain (YM) r...

Joshua Lamb; Venugopal Arjunan…

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydrocarbon concentrations at the Alpine mountain sites Jungfraujoch and Arosa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile hydrocarbons have been measured for 1 yr at Arosa (2010 m asl) to determine the contribution of European emissions to the trace gas concentrations at this remote site. Results are compared to concurrent hydrocarbon concentrations at the high Alpine background site Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl). Hydrocarbon concentrations at Arosa are generally much higher than at Jungfraujoch. The influence of the Alpine boundary layer air was studied based on the diurnal variation of hydrocarbon concentrations, i.e. rising pollutant concentrations in the morning at Arosa and in the afternoon at Jungfraujoch. Different hydrocarbon emission sources of the uplifting air were found at the two sites. At Jungfraujoch, several transatlantic events were detected from October 2001 to January 2002 based on analysis of hydrocarbon ratios and air parcel trajectories. The OH concentration during the transatlantic transport was estimated to be around 5×105 cm?3, derived from simultaneous hydrocarbon oxidation and dilution in the free troposphere. These transatlantic transport events were tracked back to warm conveyor belts, characterized by uniform dynamics and relatively uniform surface sources. In addition, ozone production in the free tropospheric transport was also documented in these events.

Yingshi Li; Mike Campana; Stefan Reimann; Daniel Schaub; Konrad Stemmler; Johannes Staehelin; Thomas Peter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mountain  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biodiesel (B100) Production by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD)" Biodiesel (B100) Production by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD)" "(million gallons)" "Period","PADD",,,,,,,,,,"U.S." ,"East Coast (PADD 1)",,"Midwest (PADD 2)",,"Gulf Coast (PADD 3)",,"Rocky Mountain (PADD 4)",,"West Coast (PADD 5)" 2011 "January",3,,30,,1,,0,,1,,35.355469 "February",3,,32,,4,,0,,1,,40.342355 "March",3,,47,,6,,0,,2,,59.59017 "April",3,,54,,10,,0,,3,,71.0517 "May",4,,58,,11,,0,,4,,77.196652 "June",4,,56,,14,,0,,7,,81.39104 "July",5,,65,,17,,0,,5,,91.679738 "August",5,,66,,20,,0,,5,,95.484891 "September",6,,65,,20,,0,,6,,95.880151 "October",7,,73,,22,,0,,4,,105.342474

177

Overview of total system model used for the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A summary is presented for the total system model used to represent physical processes associated with the seven scenario classes (i.e., nominal conditions, early waste package (WP) failure, early drip shield (DS) failure, igneous intrusive events, igneous eruptive events, seismic ground motion events and seismic fault displacement events) considered in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The total system model estimates dose to an exposed individual resulting from radionuclide movement through the repository system and biosphere. Components of the total system model described in this presentation include models for (i) climate analysis, (ii) land surface infiltration and associated unsaturated zone flow, (iii) multi-scale thermal hydrology and engineered barrier system (EBS) thermal–hydrologic environment, (iv) EBS physical and chemical environment, (v) WP and DS degradation, (vi) drift seepage and drift wall condensation, (vii) waste form degradation and mobilization, (viii) water and radionuclide movement in the EBS and underlying unsaturated and saturated zones, (ix) radionuclide movement in the biosphere and resultant human exposure, and (x) processes specific to early WP and DS failures, intrusive and eruptive igneous events, and seismic ground motion and fault displacement events.

C.W. Hansen; J.T. Birkholzer; J. Blink; C.R. Bryan; Y. Chen; M.B. Gross; E. Hardin; J. Houseworth; R. Howard; R. Jarek; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P. Mariner; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; F.V. Perry; B. Robinson; D. Sassani; S.D. Sevougian; J.S. Stein; M. Wasiolek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Expected dose for the seismic scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the seismic ground motion scenario class and the seismic fault displacement scenario class in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) definition of the seismic scenario classes and the determination of dose and expected dose to the RMEI, (ii) properties of the seismic ground motion scenario class, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI for the seismic ground motion scenario class from 0 to 20,000 yr, (iv) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI for the seismic ground motion scenario class from 0 to 106 yr, (v) properties of the seismic fault displacement scenario class including expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from 0 to 20,000 yr and 0 to 106 yr, (vi) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI for the combined ground motion and seismic fault displacement scenario class, and (vii) probabilities associated with seismic scenario classes. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

J.C. Helton; M.G. Gross; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Several TOUGH2 Modules Developed for Site Characterization Studies of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lawrencestudies of Yucca Mountain. The model formulations arebeing used in the Yucca Mountain project. Pruess, K . ,

Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Bomb-Pulse Chlorine-36 at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository Horizon: An Investigation of Previous Conflicting Results and Collection of New Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) found elevated ratios of chlorine-36 to total chloride (36Cl/Cl) in samples of rock collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain (YM). The data were interpreted as an indication that fluids containing “bomb-pulse” 36Cl reached the repository horizon in the ~50 years since the peak period of above-ground nuclear testing. Due to the significance of 36Cl data to conceptual models of unsaturated zone flow, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) implemented a study to validate the LANL findings. The USGS drilled new boreholes at select locations across zones where bomb-pulse ratios had previously been identified. The drill cores were analyzed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Because consensus was not reached between the USGS/LLNL and LANL on several fundamental points including the presence or absence of bomb-pulse 36Cl, an evaluation by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), was initiated. The overall objectives of the UNLV study were to investigate the source of the validation study’s conflicting results, and to obtain additional data on bomb-pulse isotopes at the repository horizon. UNLV engaged in discussions with previous investigators, reviewed reports, and analyzed archived samples. UNLV also collected new samples of rock from the ESF, soil profiles from the surface of YM, and samples of seep water from inside the ESF. Samples were analyzed for 36Cl/Cl ratios, and 99Tc and 129I in select samples. A column experiment was conducted mimicking the passage of bomb-pulse 36Cl through YM tuff. The work faced several obstacles including an extended shutdown of the tunnel. Only one sample yielded a background corrected 36Cl/Cl ratio that was higher than the accepted bomb-pulse threshold (1250 x 10-15). Specimen 01034214 obtained from the Drill Hole Wash fault (19+33) had a ratio of 1590 ± 80 (1?) x10-15, whereas the other separate sample from this fault zone yielded 1160 ± 50 (1?) x 10-15. Three samples collected from Alcove 6 averaged 490 ± 100 (1?) x10-15; a sample from Sundance Fault resulted in a ratio of 920 ± 60 (1?) x10-15, and a sample from the Bow Ridge Fault produced 530 ± 20 (1?) x10-15. The results are significant because: 1) they tend to be lower than LANL data for comparable samples, albeit in agreement with the range of data produced in the area, and 2) they show that a bomb-pulse 36Cl/Cl ratio was measured in rock collected at the repository horizon level by a second and independent group of investigators (UNLV). Because of time UNLV was not able to replicate the results, and these few data points are insufficient to draw major and definitive conclusions. Leachates of soil samples collected from the surface above the ESF yielded several ratios with bomb-pulse 36Cl, particularly for samples encompassing the wetting front. Soil samples collected above the south ramp, where there was limited soil coverage due to a large amount of rock outcrop, had relatively large ratios ranging from 2170 ± 110 (1?) x10-15 to 5670 ± 350 (1?) x10-15. Soil samples from profiles from above the north ramp ranged from 820 ± 70 (1?) x10-15 to 2390 ± 160 (1?) x10-15, which compare favorably with previous measurements near the site. Water seepage into the ESF south ramp and 36Cl standards made from NIST material were also analyzed. The standards were produced to have nominal 36Cl/Cl ratios (10-15) of 500, 2,500 and 10,000 and the results showed good agreement with the calculated ratios. The seepage samples ranged between 680 ± 40 (1?) x10-15 to 1110 ± 40 (1?) x10-15, consistent with that found for modern meteoric water, with a small bomb-pulse component. Bomb-pulse 36Cl may not have been incorporated in this fast-path water because the surface above the infiltration zone consists mostly of outcrop and the flow pathways have probably mostly been leached. 99Tc was measured in five of nine leaches of ESF rock but poor analytical recoveries and lack of data overlap with 36Cl limit interpretations of these data

Cizdziel, James

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bomb-Pulse Chlorine-36 At The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository Horizon: An Investigation Of Previous Conflicting Results And Collection Of New Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) found elevated ratios of chlorine-36 to total chloride ({sup 36}Cl/Cl) in samples of rock collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) at Yucca Mountain as the tunnels were excavated. The data were interpreted as an indication that fluids containing 'bomb-pulse' {sup 36}Cl reached the repository horizon in the {approx}50 years since the peak period of above-ground nuclear testing. Moreover, the data support the concept that so-called fast pathways for infiltration not only exist but are active, possibly through a combination of porous media, faults and/or other geologic features. Due to the significance of {sup 36}Cl data to conceptual models of unsaturated zone flow and transport, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and implement a study to validate the LANL findings. The USGS chose to drill new boreholes at select locations across zones where bomb-pulse ratios had previously been identified. The drill cores were analyzed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for {sup 36}Cl/Cl using both active and passive leaches, with the USGS/LLNL concluding that the active leach extracted too much rock-Cl and the passive leach did not show bomb-pulse ratios. Because consensus was not reached between the USGS/LLNL and LANL on several fundamental points, including the conceptual strategy for sampling, interpretation and use of tritium ({sup 3}H) data, and the importance and interpretation of blanks, in addition to the presence or absence of bomb-pulse {sup 36}Cl, an evaluation by an independent entity, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), using new samples was initiated. This report is the result of that study. The overall objectives of the UNLV study were to investigate the source or sources of the conflicting results from the previous validation study, and to obtain additional data to determine whether or not there are bomb-pulse isotopes at the repository horizon. To that en4 we have engaged in discussions with previous investigators, reviewed reports, and analyzed archived samples. We have also collected new samples of rock from the ESF, soil profiles from the surface of Yucca Mountain, and opportunistic samples of seep water from inside the south ramp of the ESF.

J. Cizdziel

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as well as non-radioactive traffic fatalities. The Yucca Mountain EIS Transportation Database was developed using Microsoft Access 97{trademark} software and the Microsoft Windows NT{trademark} operating system. The database consists of tables for storing data, forms for selecting data for querying, and queries for retrieving the data in a predefined format. Database queries retrieve records based on input parameters and are used to calculate incident-free and accident doses using unit risk factors obtained from RADTRAN results. The next section briefly provides some background that led to the development of the database approach used in preparing the Yucca Mountain DEIS. Subsequent sections provide additional details on the database structure and types of impacts calculated using the database.

Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

183

Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1994 quality program status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This status report is for calendar year 1994. It summarizes the annual activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP or Project) quality assurance program. By identifying the accomplishments of the quality program, a baseline is established that will assist in decision making, improve administrative controls and predictability, and allow us to annually identify adverse trends and to evaluate improvements. This is the fourth annual status report.

Bolivar, S.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes and their effect on fractured rock permeability around nuclear waste repositories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emplacement drift at Yucca Mountain. Journal of Contaminantniches in tuff units at Yucca Mountain. Proceedings of thetunnels, similar to the Yucca Mountain repository concept in

Rutqvist, Jonny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratorys South Table Mountain Complex  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

# 1440 # 1440 FINAL Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex July 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of FINAL National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS.................................................................................................................vii S. SUMMARY .................................................................................................................... S-1 S.1 INTRODUCTION ...........................................................................................................

186

REPOSITORY ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM DESIGN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Viability Assessment (VA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is being completed for delivery in September of 1998. A major element of the VA is the design of a high level waste repository on the Nevada Test Site. The repository is made up of surface and subsurface facilities. The engineered barrier includes the man-made elements of the system that act to retard the migration of radionuclides from a geologic repository. They act in conjunction with the geologic barriers present at Yucca Mountain. The engineered barrier system (EBS) consists of the Waste Package and the underground facility. The focus of this paper is the status of the design of the underground facility portion of the EBS. In addition to a robust waste package, the EBS components in the reference design include a number of features that impede naturally occurring infiltration from reaching and corroding the waste packages. In addition, and as a defense-in-depth strategy, a number of other optional features are being considered. They include drip shields above the waste packages to intercept dripping water and granular backfill around the waste packages to form a diffusion barrier. Plans are being made to test a number of the EBS materials and structures. The Viability Assessment document will discuss the various EBS options and alternative designs and lay out a plan for determining those to be included in the License Application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) scheduled for completion in 2002.

DANIEL G. MCKENZIE III PE, DR. KALYAN K. BHATTACHARYYA AND PAUL G. HARRINGTON

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project bibliography, 1992--1994. Supplement 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following a reorganization of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in 1990, the Yucca Mountain Project was renamed Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The title of this bibliography was also changed to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography. Prior to August 5, 1988, this project was called the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This bibliography contains information on this ongoing project that was added to the Department of Energy`s Energy Science and Technology Database from January 1, 1992, through December 31, 1993. The bibliography is categorized by principal project participating organization. Participant-sponsored subcontractor reports, papers, and articles are included in the sponsoring organization`s list. Another section contains information about publications on the Energy Science and Technology Database that were not sponsored by the project but have some relevance to it. Earlier information on this project can be found in the first bibliography DOE/TIC-3406, which covers 1977--1985, and its three supplements DOE/OSTI-3406(Suppl.1), DOE/OSTI-3406(Suppl.2), and DOE/OSTI-3406(Suppl.3), which cover information obtained during 1986--1987, 1988--1989, and 1990--1991, respectively. All entries in the bibliographies are searchable online on the NNW database file. This file can be accessed through the Integrated Technical Information System (ITIS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

NONE

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Experimental and numerical simulation of dissolution and precipitation: Implications for fracture sealing at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRACTURE SEALING AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Patrick F. Dobsonpotential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, would reducewas flowed through crushed Yucca Mountain tuff at 94°C. The

Dobson, Patrick F.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas; Apps, John A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Multiple-point statistical prediction on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain Xiaoyan Liu 1 ,systems, such as at Yucca Mountain, water flow rate andflow field behavior at the Yucca Mountain waste repository

Liu, X.Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Analysis on the use of engineered barriers for geologic isolation of spent fuel in a reference salt site repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A perspective on the potential durability and effectiveness requirements for the waste form, container and other engineered barriers for geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel has been developed. This perspective is based on calculated potential doses to individuals who may be exposed to radioactivity released from a repository via a groundwater transport pathway. These potential dose commitments were calculated with an integrated geosphere transport and bioshpere transport model. A sensitivity analysis was accomplished by varying four important system parameters, namely the waste radionuclide release rate from the repository, the delay prior to groundwater contact with the waste (leach initiation), aquifer flow velocity and flow path length. The nuclide retarding capacity of the geologic media, a major determinant of the isolation effectiveness, was not varied as a parameter but was held constant for a particular reference site. This analysis is limited to looking only at engineered barriers whose net effect is either to delay groundwater contact with the waste form or to limit the rate of release of radionuclides into the groundwater once contact has occurred. The analysis considers only leach incident scenarios, including a water well intrusion into the groundwater near a repository, but does not consider other human intrusion events or catastrophic events. The analysis has so far been applied to a reference salt site repository system and conclusions are presented.Basically, in nearly all cases, the regional geology is the most effective barrier to release of radionuclides to the biosphere; however, for long-lived isotopes of carbon, technetium and iodine, which were poorly sorbed on the geologic media, the geology is not very effective once a leach incident is initiated.

Cloninger, M.O.; Cole, C.R.; Washburn, J.F.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

ADVANCES IN YUCCA MOUNTAIN DESIGN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since site designation of the Yucca Mountain Project by the President, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the transition from the site characterization phase of the project to preparation of the license application. As part of this transition, an increased focus has been applied to the repository design. Several evolution studies were performed to evaluate the repository design and to determine if improvements in the design were possible considering advances in the technology for handling and packaging nuclear materials. The studies' main focus was to reduce and/or eliminate uncertainties in both the pre-closure and post-closure performance of the repository and to optimize operations. The scope and recommendations from these studies are the subjects of this paper and include the following topics: (1) a more phased approach for the surface facility that utilize handling and packaging of the commercial spent nuclear fuel in a dry environment rather than in pools as was presented in the site recommendation; (2) slight adjustment of the repository footprint and a phased approach for construction and emplacement of the repository subsurface; and (3) simplification of the construction, fabrication and installation of the waste package and drip shield.

Harrington, P.G.; Gardiner, J.T.; Russell, P.R.Z.; Lachman, K.D.; McDaniel, P.W.; Boutin, R.J.; Brown, N.R.; Trautner, L.J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

EIS-0250-S2: Supplemental EIS for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This SEIS is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a railroad for shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from an existing rail line in Nevada to a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of the evaluation is to assist the Department in deciding whether to construct and operate a railroad in Nevada, and if so, in which corridor and along which specific alignment within the selected corridor.

193

Yucca Mountain biological resources monitoring program; Annual report FY92  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a potential site for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities (SCA) do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, an environmental program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) during fiscal year 1992 (FY92) for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the YMP environmental program. The six program areas are Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises, Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

NONE

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Annual report, FY91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize Yucca Mountain as a possible site for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a repository. To ensure that site characterization activities (SCA) do not adversely affect the Yucca Mountain area, an environmental program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and to ensure that activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during fiscal year 1991 (FY91) for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the YMP environmental program. The six program areas are Site Characterization Activities Effects, Desert Tortoises, Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Development of an Integrated Natural Barrier Database System for Site Evaluation of a Deep Geologic Repository in Korea - 13527  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corporation (KRMC) established in 2009 has started a new project to collect information on long-term stability of deep geological environments on the Korean Peninsula. The information has been built up in the integrated natural barrier database system available on web (www.deepgeodisposal.kr). The database system also includes socially and economically important information, such as land use, mining area, natural conservation area, population density, and industrial complex, because some of this information is used as exclusionary criteria during the site selection process for a deep geological repository for safe and secure containment and isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other long-lived radioactive waste in Korea. Although the official site selection process has not been started yet in Korea, current integrated natural barrier database system and socio-economic database is believed that the database system will be effectively utilized to narrow down the number of sites where future investigation is most promising in the site selection process for a deep geological repository and to enhance public acceptance by providing readily-available relevant scientific information on deep geological environments in Korea. (authors)

Jung, Haeryong; Lee, Eunyong; Jeong, YiYeong; Lee, Jeong-Hwan [Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corportation - KRMC, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corportation - KRMC, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A site scale model for modeling unsaturated zone processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for theZone Trocesses at yucca Mountain, N G. S. Bodvarsson, Y. S.unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a permanent

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evolution of repository and waste package designs for Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes the evolution of the engineered barrier design for the proposed Yucca Mountain disposal system. Initially, the underground facility used a fairly standard panel and drift layout excavated mostly by drilling and blasting. By 1993, the layout of the underground facility was changed to accommodate construction by a tunnel boring machine. Placement of the repository in unsaturated zone permitted an extended period without backfilling; placement of the waste package in an open drift permitted use of much larger, and thus hotter packages. Hence in 1994, the underground facility design switched from floor emplacement of waste in small, single walled stainless steel or nickel alloy containers to in-drift emplacement of waste in large, double-walled containers. By 2000, the outer layer was a high nickel alloy for corrosion resistance and the inner layer was stainless steel for structural strength. Use of large packages facilitated receipt and disposal of high volumes of spent nuclear fuel. In addition, in-drift package placement saved excavation costs. Options considered for in-drift emplacement included different heat loads and use of backfill. To avoid dripping on the package during the thermal period and the possibility of localized corrosion, titanium drip shields were added for the disposal drifts by 2000. In addition, a handling canister, sealed at the reactor to eliminate further handling of bare fuel assemblies, was evaluated and eventually adopted in 2006. Finally, staged development of the underground layout was adopted to more readily adjust to changes in waste forms and Congressional funding.

Rob P. Rechard; Michael D. Voegele

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository...

199

Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plan for site: Draft characterization of the Yucca Mountain site:Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the EMMP is to document compliance with the NWPA. To do so, a summary description of site characterization activites is provided, based on the consultation draft of the SCP. Subsequent chpaters identify those technical areas having the potential to be impacted by site characterization activities and the monitoring plans proposed to identify whether those impacts acutally occur. Should monitoring confirm the potential for significant adverse impact, mitigative measures will be developed. In the context of site characterization, mitigation is defined as those changes in site characterization activities that serve to avoid or minimize, to the maximum extent practicle, any significant adverse environmental impacts. Although site characterization activies involve both surface and subsurface activities, it is the surface-based aspect of site characterization that is addressed in detailed by the EMMP. The schedule and duration of these activities is given in the consultation draft of the SCP. A breif summary of all proposed activities is given in the EMMP. 10 refs., 8 figs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Uncertainties in coupled thermal-hydrological processes associated with the drift scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada S. Mukhopadhyay * , Y.waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Drift Scalerock; Radioactive waste; Yucca Mountain, Nevada Introduction

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING): A Model for Estimating Microbial Communities in Repository Drifts at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical and microbiological modeling was performed to evaluate the potential quantities and impact of microorganisms on the geochemistry of the area adjacent to and within nuclear waste packages in the proposed repository drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The microbial growth results from the introduction of water, ground support, and waste package materials into the deep unsaturated rock. The simulations, which spanned one million years, were accomplished using a newly developed computer code, Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING). MING uses environmental thresholds for limiting microbial growth to temperatures below 120 C and above relative humidities of 90 percent in repository drifts. Once these thresholds are met, MING expands upon a mass balance and thermodynamic approach proposed by McKinley and others (1997), by using kinetic rates to supply constituents from design materials and constituent fluxes including solubilized rock components into the drift, to perform two separate mass-balance calculations as a function of time. The first (nutrient limit) assesses the available nutrients (C, N, P and S) and calculates how many microorganisms can be produced based on a microorganism stoichiometry of C{sub 160}(H{sub 280}O{sub 80})N{sub 30}P{sub 2}S. The second (energy limit) calculates the energy available from optimally combined redox couples for the temperature, and pH at that time. This optimization maximizes those reactions that produce > 15kJ/mol (limit on useable energy) using an iterative linear optimization technique. The final available energy value is converted to microbial mass at a rate of 1 kg of biomass (dry weight) for every 64 MJ of energy. These two values (nutrient limit and energy limit) are then compared and the smaller value represents the number of microorganisms that can be produced over a specified time. MING can also be adapted to investigate other problems of interest as the model can be used in saturated and unsaturated environments and in laboratory situations to establish microbial growth limitations. Other projected uses include investigations of contaminated locations where monitored natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation could be employed.

D.M. Jolley; T.F. Ehrhorn; J. Horn

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Ten Step Protocol and Plan for CCS Site Characterization, Based on an Analysis of the Rocky Mountain Region, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report expresses a Ten-Step Protocol for CO2 Storage Site Characterization, the final outcome of an extensive Site Characterization analysis of the Rocky Mountain region, USA. These ten steps include: (1) regional assessment and data gathering; (2) identification and analysis of appropriate local sites for characterization; (3) public engagement; (4) geologic and geophysical analysis of local site(s); (5) stratigraphic well drilling and coring; (6) core analysis and interpretation with other data; (7) database assembly and static model development; (8) storage capacity assessment; (9) simulation and uncertainty assessment; (10) risk assessment. While the results detailed here are primarily germane to the Rocky Mountain region, the intent of this protocol is to be portable or generally applicable for CO2 storage site characterization.

McPherson, Brian; Matthews, Vince

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Preparing to Submit a License Application for Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1982, the U.S. Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, a Federal law that established U.S. policy for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Congress amended the Act in 1987, directing the Department of Energy to study only Yucca Mountain, Nevada as the site for a permanent geologic repository. As the law mandated, the Department evaluated Yucca Mountain to determine its suitability as the site for a permanent geologic repository. Decades of scientific studies demonstrated that Yucca Mountain would protect workers, the public, and the environment during the time that a repository would be operating and for tens of thousands of years after closure of the repository. A repository at this remote site would also: preserve the quality of the environment; allow the environmental cleanup of Cold War weapons facilities; provide the nation with additional protection from acts of terrorism; and support a sound energy policy. Throughout the scientific evaluation of Yucca Mountain, there has been no evidence to disqualify Yucca Mountain as a suitable site for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Upon completion of site characterization, the Secretary of Energy considered the results and concluded that a repository at Yucca Mountain would perform in a manner that protects public health and safety. The Secretary recommended the site to the President in February 2002; the President agreed and recommended to Congress that the site be approved. The Governor of Nevada submitted a notice of disapproval, and both houses of Congress acted to override the disapproval. In July 2002, the President's approval allowed the Department to begin the process of submittal of a license application for Yucca Mountain as the site for the nation's first repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Yucca Mountain is located on federal land in Nye County in southern Nevada, an arid region of the United States, approximately 100 miles (160 kilometers) northwest of Las Vegas (Figure 1). The location is remote from population centers, and there are no permanent residents within approximately 14 miles (23 km) of the site. Overall, Nye County has a population density of about two persons per square mile (two persons per 2.5 square km); in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, it is significantly less. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-south-trending ridges extending approximately 25 miles (40 km), and consists of successive layers of fine-grained volcanic tuffs, millions of years old, underlain by older carbonate rocks. The alternating layers of welded and nonwelded volcanic tuffs have differing hydrologic properties that significantly impact the manner in which water moves through the mountain. The repository horizon will be in welded tuff located in the unsaturated zone, more than 1,000 feet (300 meters) above the water table in the present-day climate, and is expected to remain well above the water table during wetter future climate conditions. Future meteorology and climatology at Yucca Mountain are important elements in understanding the amount of water available to potentially interact with the waste.

W.J. Arthur; M.D. Voegele

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

DOE`s Yucca Mountain studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States. It is for readers who have a general rather than a technical background. It discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of safely underground. It also describes why Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being studied as a potential repository site and provides basic information about those studies.

NONE

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1993 Quality Program status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This status report is for calendar year 1993. It summarizes the annual activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP or Project) quality assurance program. By identifying the accomplishments of the quality program, we establish a baseline that will assist in decision making, improve administrative controls and predictability, and allow us to annually identify long term trends and to evaluate improvements. This is the third annual status report (Bolivar, 1992; Bolivar, 1994). This report is divided into two primary sections: Program Activities and Trend Analysis. Under Program Activities, programmatic issues occurring in 1993 are discussed. The goals for 1993 are also listed, followed by a discussion of their status. Lastly, goals for 1994 are identified. The Trend Analysis section is a summary of 1993 quarterly trend reports and provides a good overview of the quality assurance issues of the Los Alamos YMP.

Bolivar, S.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Expected dose and associated uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the human intrusion scenario in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected (mean) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository resulting from an inadvertent drilling intrusion into the repository. The following topics are addressed: (i) assumed properties of an inadvertent drilling intrusion and the determination of the associated dose and expected (mean) dose to the RMEI, (ii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for expected dose to the RMEI, and (iii) the numerical stability of the sampling-based procedure used to estimate expected (mean) dose to the RMEI. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 7. Repository Design, Performance, and Affected Environment .......................................................CR7-1 7.1 Repository Design ...........................................................................................................CR7-18 7.1.1 Draft EIS Repository Design ....................................................................................CR7-39 7.1.2 Supplement to the Draft EIS Flexible Design...........................................................CR7-62 7.1.2.1 Higher- and Lower-Temperature Operating Modes .................................................CR7-73 7.1.2.2 Ventilation.......................................................................................................CR7-74

208

Restoration of areas disturbed by site studies for a mined commercial radioactive waste repository: The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) was undertaken to environmentally characterize a portion of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State as a potential host for the nation's first mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Studies were terminated by Congress in 1987. Between 1976 and 1987, 72 areas located across the Hanford Site were disturbed by the BWIP. These areas include borehole pads, a large Exploratory Shaft Facility, and the Near Surface Test Facility. Most boreholes were cleared of vegetation, leveled, and stabilized with a thick layer of compacted pit-run gravel and sand. The Near Surface Test Facility consists of three mined adits, a rock-spoils bench, and numerous support facilities. Restoration began in 1988 with the objective of returning sites to pre-existing conditions using native species. The Hanford Site retains some of the last remnants of the shrub-steppe ecosystem in Washington. The primary constraints to restoring native vegetation at Hanford are low precipitation and the presence of cheatgrass, an extremely capable alien competitor. 5 figs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Biehert, R.W.; Newell, R.L.; Page, T.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Supplement to the Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV (DOE/EIS-0250F) (10/13/06)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

90 Federal Register 90 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 198 / Friday, October 13, 2006 / Notices 1 Coincident with this Notice of Intent, DOE is publishing an Amended Notice of Intent to prepare a Supplemental Yucca Mountain Rail Corridor and Rail Alignment EIS (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and DOE/ EIS-0369). That EIS will review the rail corridor analyses of the Yucca Mountain Final EIS, and update, as appropriate, and will analyze the proposed Mina corridor; it also will include detailed analyses of alternative alignments for the construction and operation of a rail line within the Mina corridor, as well as the Caliente corridor. 2 Section 114(f)(4) of the NWPA provides that any environmental impact statement ''prepared in connection with a repository * * * shall, to the extent practicable, be adopted by the Commission

210

Evaluating the Moisture Conditions in the Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain: The Impact of Natural Convection Processes in Heated Emplacement Drifts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE FRACTURED ROCK AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN: THE IMPACT OF NATURALgeologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will stronglyWaste Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Nuclear

Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Halecky, N.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cost estimate of high-level radioactive waste containers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the bottoms-up cost estimates for fabrication of high-level radioactive waste disposal containers based on the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design (SCP-CD). These estimates were acquired by Babcock and Wilcox (B&S) under sub-contract to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The estimates were obtained for two leading container candidate materials (Alloy 825 and CDA 715), and from other three vendors who were selected from a list of twenty solicited. Three types of container designs were analyzed that represent containers for spent fuel, and for vitrified high-level waste (HLW). The container internal structures were assumed to be AISI-304 stainless steel in all cases, with an annual production rate of 750 containers. Subjective techniques were used for estimating QA/QC costs based on vendor experience and the specifications derived for the LLNL-YMP Quality Assurance program. In addition, an independent QA/QC analysis is reported which was prepared by Kasier Engineering. Based on the cost estimates developed, LLNL recommends that values of $825K and $62K be used for the 1991 TSLCC for the spent fuel and HLW containers, respectively. These numbers represent the most conservative among the three vendors, and are for the high-nickel anstenitic steel (Alloy 825). 6 refs., 7 figs.

Russell, E.W.; Clarke, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Domian, H.A. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)] [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Madson, A.A. [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Finite - difference modeling of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada Area: a study of the regional water table gradients based on hydraulic conductivity contrasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Nevada Yucca Mountain site is being investigated to determine if it is a suitable site for the construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository. A feature of concern north of the selected site is an abrupt rise in the water table. This high...

Davidson, Timothy Ross

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Data Packages in Hanford Site's Administrative Record (AR) and Public Information Repository (PIR)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In 1989, the Department of Energy joined with the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in signing the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order more commonly known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). The TPA outlines legally enforceable milestones for Hanford cleanup over the next several decades. The AR is the body of documents and information that is considered or relied upon to arrive at a final decision for remedial action or hazardous waste management. An AR is established for each operable unit (OU); treatment, storage, or disposal unit (TSD); or Expedited Response Action (ERA) group and will contain all documents having information considered in arriving at a Record of Decision or permit. Documents become part of the AR after they have been designated as an AR by the TPA or after EPA, DOE, or other official parties have identified a document or set of documents for inclusion. Furthermore, AR documents are to be kept in a Public Information Repository (PIR).Thousands of data packages that support the AR documents are available to the public in the Hanford PIR.

214

Yucca Mountain project prototype testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE is responsible for characterizing the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada to determine its suitability for development as a geologic repository to isolate high-level nuclear waste for at least 10,000 years. This unprecedented task relies in part on measurements made with relatively new methods or applications, such as dry coring and overcoring for studies to be conducted from the land surface and in an underground facility. The Yucca Mountain Project has, since 1988, implemented a program of equipment development and methods development for a broad spectrum of hydrologic, geologic, rock mechanics, and thermomechanical tests planned for use in an Exploratory Shaft during site characterization at the Yucca Mountain site. A second major program was fielded beginning in April 1989 to develop and test methods and equipment for surface drilling to obtain core samples from depth using only air as a circulating medium. The third major area of prototype testing has been during the ongoing development of the Instrumentation/ Data Acquisition System (IDAS), designed to collect and monitor data from down-hole instrumentation in the unsaturated zone, and store and transmit the data to a central archiving computer. Future prototype work is planned for several programs including the application of vertical seismic profiling methods and flume design to characterizing the geology at Yucca Mountain. The major objectives of this prototype testing are to assure that planned Site Characterization testing can be carried out effectively at Yucca Mountain, both in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF), and from the surface, and to avoid potential major failures or delays that could result from the need to re-design testing concepts or equipment. This paper will describe the scope of the Yucca Mountain Project prototype testing programs and summarize results to date. 3 figs.

Hughes, W.T.; Girdley, W.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

An Exercise on Bayesian Combination of Expert Judgment for Climatic Predictions at the Yucca Mountain Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge uncertainty is of major concern when a Performance Assessment of any High Level Nuclear Waste Repository is under development. Its nature and the scarcity of data or the impossibility to obtain them ...

R. Bolado; A. Lantarón; J. A. Moya

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes (TH/THC/THM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Model Report is to document the development of the Mountain-Scale Thermal-Hydrological (TH), Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical (THC), and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) Models and evaluate the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This Model Report was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.12.7), and was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. In this Model Report, any reference to ''repository'' means the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, and any reference to ''drifts'' means the emplacement drifts at the repository horizon. This Model Report provides the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses for analyzing mountain-scale hydrological/chemical/mechanical changes and predict flow behavior in response to heat release by radioactive decay from the nuclear waste repository at the Yucca Mountain site. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH Model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH Model captures mountain-scale three dimensional (3-D) flow effects, including lateral diversion at the PTn/TSw interface and mountain-scale flow patterns. The Mountain-Scale THC Model evaluates TH effects on water and gas chemistry, mineral dissolution/precipitation, and the resulting impact to UZ hydrological properties, flow and transport. The THM Model addresses changes in permeability due to mechanical and thermal disturbances in stratigraphic units above and below the repository host rock. The Mountain-Scale THM Model focuses on evaluating the changes in 3-D UZ flow fields arising out of thermal stress and rock deformation during and after the thermal periods.

P. Dixon

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

218

Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transort in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into drifts at Yucca Mountain. ” J. Contam. Hydrol. , 38(1–investigations at Yucca Mountain - the potential repositorygroup exposed at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. USGS Open-File

Moridis, G.J.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y.-S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT - A BRIEFING --  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has the following articles: Nuclear waste--a long-term national problem; Spent nuclear fuel; High-level radioactive waste; Radioactivity and the environment; Current storage methods; Disposal options; U.S. policy on nuclear waste; The focus on Yucca Mountain; The purpose and scope of the Yucca Mountain Project; The approach for permanently disposing of waste; The scientific studies at Yucca Mountain; The proposed design for a repository at Yucca Mountain; Natural and engineered barriers would work together to isolate waste; Meticulous science and technology to protect people and the environment; Licensing a repository; Transporting waste to a permanent repository; The Environmental Impact Statement for a repository; Current status of the Yucca Mountain Project; and Further information available on the Internet.

NA

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evaluation of the geologic relations and seismotectonic stability of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI); Final report: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes activities for the year ending 30 June 1988 by staff members of the Seismological Laboratory in support of the Yucca Mountain site assessment program. Participants include James N. Brune, Director, John Anderson, William Peppin, Keith Priestley, Martha Savage, and Ute Vetter. Activities during the year centered largely around acquisition of equipment to be used for site characterization plan for Yucca Mountain. Due to modifications in the scheduling and level of funding, this work has not progressed as originally anticipated. The report describes progress in seven areas, listed in approximate order of significance to the Yucca Mountain project. These are: (1) equipment acquisition, (2) review of the draft site characterization plan, (3) studies of earthquake sequence related to the tectonic problems at Yucca Mountain, (4) a review of the work of Szymanski in relation to Task 4 concerns, (5) coordination meetings with USGS, DOE and NRC personnel, (6) studies related to Yucca Mountain and (7) other studies.

NONE

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Expected dose and associated uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for all scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. The conceptual structure and organization of the 2008 YM PA is based on decomposing the analysis into the following scenario classes: nominal, early waste package failure, early drip shield failure, igneous intrusive, igneous eruptive, seismic ground motion, and seismic fault displacement. This presentation describes how results obtained for the individual scenario classes are brought together in the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified by the NRC in the regulatory requirements for the YM repository and presents associated uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results. The following topics are addressed: (i) determination of expected dose to the RMEI from all scenario classes, (ii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI for 0 to 20,000 yr, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from for 0 to 106 yr, (iv) justification for the decomposition procedure used to estimate expected dose to the RMEI from all scenario classes, and (v) effectiveness of individual barrier systems in reducing releases from the repository and thus dose to the RMEI. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

J.C. Helton; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

An analysis of repository waste-handling operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to document the operational analysis of waste-handling facilities at a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. The site currently under investigation for the geologic repository is located at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The repository waste-handling operations have been identified and analyzed for the year 2011, a steady-state year during which the repository receives spent nuclear fuel containing the equivalent of 3000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and defense high-level waste containing the equivalent of 400 MTU. As a result of this analysis, it has been determined that the waste-handling facilities are adequate to receive, prepare, store, and emplace the projected quantity of waste on an annual basis. In addition, several areas have been identified where additional work is required. The recommendations for future work have been divided into three categories: items that affect the total waste management system, operations within the repository boundary, and the methodology used to perform operational analyses for repository designs. 7 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

Dennis, A.W.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Multiple-point statistical prediction on fracture networks at Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many underground nuclear waste repository systems, such as Yucca Mountain project, water flow rate and amount of ... fracture data to study flow field behavior at Yucca Mountain waste repository system. First,...

Xiaoyan Liu; Chengyuan Zhang; Quansheng Liu; Jens Birkholzer

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Reference Design Description for a Geologic Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the current major national environmental problems is the safe disposal of large quantities of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials, which are rapidly accumulating throughout the country. These radioactive byproducts are generated as the result of national defense activities and from the generation of electricity by commercial nuclear power plants. At present, spent nuclear fuel is accumulating at over 70 power plant sites distributed throughout 33 states. The safe disposal of these high-level radioactive materials at a central disposal facility is a high national priority. This Reference Design Description explains the current design for a potential geologic repository that may be located at Yucca Mountain in Nevada for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials. This document describes a possible design for the three fundamental parts of a repository: a surface facility, subsurface repository, and waste packaging. It also presents the current conceptual design of the key engineering systems for the final four phases of repository processes: operations, monitoring, closure, and postclosure. In accordance with current law, this design does not include an interim storage option. In addition, this Reference Design Description reviews the expected long-term performance of the potential repository. It describes the natural barrier system which, together with the engineered systems, achieves the repository objectives. This design will protect the public and the environment by allowing the safe disposal of radioactive waste received from government-owned custodial spent fuel sites, high-level radioactive waste sites, and commercial power reactor sites. All design elements meet or exceed applicable regulations governing the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The design will provide safe disposal of waste materials for at least a 10,000 year period. During this time interval, natural radioactive decay of the waste materials will result in fission products that pose a minimal radiological hazard to the public afterward. For example, after 100 years, the relative hazard from the waste fission products will have diminished approximately 90 percent. After 1,000 years, the hazard will have diminished 99 percent, and after 10,000 years it will have diminished 99.9 percent. The resulting radiological hazard after 10,000 years is minimal, being of the same order of magnitude as that posed by 0.2 percent uranium ore, which is equivalent to that which was used to originally produce the nuclear fuel. Because developing such a repository is extremely complex, the design will move forward in three stages: Site Recommendation, License Application, and Construction. This document presents the design as it will be submitted in the Site Recommendation Consideration Report; the design will be updated as the design process moves forward. As more cost-effective solutions, technical advancements, or changes to requirements occur, the design may evolve. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is developing a system that includes this potential repository. This waste management system integrates acceptance, transportation, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Acceptance and transportation will be handled by regional servicing contractors under contract to the DOE. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission will conduct an in-depth and thorough licensing review to determine the acceptability of the proposed waste management system. Eight sections of this document follow. Section 2 discusses the design requirements for the proposed repository. Section 3 describes the physical layout of the proposed repository. Section 4 describes the evolutionary phases of the development of the proposed repository. Section 5 describes the receipt of waste. Section 6 details the various systems that will package the waste and move it below ground, as well as safety monitoring and closure. Section 7 describes the syst

NA

2000-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1992 quality program status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project`s quality assurance program for calendar year 1992. The report includes major sections on Program Activities and Trend Analysis. Program Activities are discussed periodically at quality meetings. The most significant issue addressed in 1992 has been the timely revision of quality administrative procedures. The procedure revision process was streamlined from 55 steps to 7. The number of forms in procedures was reduced by 38%, and the text reduced by 29%. This allowed revision in 1992 of almost half of all implementing procedures. The time necessary to complete the revision process (for a procedure) was reduced from 11 months to 3 months. Other accomplishments include the relaxation of unnecessarily strict training requirements, requiring quality assurance reviews only from affected organizations, and in general simplifying work processes. All members of the YMP received training to the new Orientation class Eleven other training classed were held. Investigators submitted 971 records to the Project and only 37 were rejected. The software program has 115 programs approved for quality-affecting work. The Project Office conducted 3 audits and 1 survey of Los Alamos activities. We conducted 14 audits and 4 surveys. Eight corrective action reports were closed, leaving only one open. Internally, 22 deficiencies were recognized. This is a decrease from 65 in 1991. Since each deficiency requires about 2 man weeks to resolve, the savings are significant. Problems with writing acceptable deficiency reports have essentially disappeared. Trend reports for 1992 were examined and are summarized herein. Three adverse trends have been closed; one remaining adverse trend will be closed when the affected procedures are revised. The number of deficiencies issued to Los Alamos compared to other participants is minimal.

Bolivar, S.L.; Burningham, A.; Chavez, P. [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table...

Lee, Si-Yong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment of Three Site Development Projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THREE SITE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS AT THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY SOUTH TABLE MOUNTAIN SITE July 2007 U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y G o l d e n F i e l d O f f i c e N a t i o n a l R e n e w a b l e E n e r g y L a b o r a t o r y 1 6 1 7 C o l e B o u l e v a r d G o l d e n , C o l o r a d o 8 0 4 0 1 DOE/EA-1573 Final Environmental Assessment of Three Site Development Projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site i TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ....................................................................................................iv EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..........................................................................................................................

228

Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Overview of Ontario Power Generation's Proposed Deep Geologic Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Waste at the Bruce Site, Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for the long-term management of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste is being proposed by Ontario Power Generation at the Bruce site near Kincardine, Ontario. The DGR would be located at a depth of approximately 680 m within a 200 m thick layer of low-permeability Ordovician argillaceous limestone, which is below a 200 m layer of low permeability Ordovician shale. The repository would have the capacity for approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} of as-disposed waste, sufficient for the current fleet of 20 OPG-owned nuclear reactors. The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the project. In summary: Site-specific studies to confirm the suitability of the site to host the DGR were initiated in 2006. These studies include site characterization, environmental assessment, facility engineering and safety assessment. The preliminary results of this work, which is ongoing, continue to confirm our expectations that the site is suitable. (authors)

Gierszewski, P. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Sorption of 237Np by UO2 under Repository Conditions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

237 Np by UO 2 under Repository Conditions M. Jonathan Haire E. V. Zakharova T. V. Kazakovskaya Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institute of Physical Chemistry Institute of Experimental Physics Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6166 Moscow, Russia, 117915 Sarov, Russia, 607190 Phone: (865) 574-7141 Phone: 7 095 335 1742 Phone: 7 42796 73369 e-mail: hairemj@ornl.gov e-mail: zakharova@ipc.rssi.ru e-mail: kaz@astra.vniief.ru Abstract - The primary radioisotope contributor to the calculated long-term radiation dose to the public at the Yucca Mountain spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository site boundary is neptunium-237 ( 237 Np). Russian experiments have shown that Np(V) and Np(IV) are sorbed onto UO 2 . If Np were sorbed by UO 2 in spent fuel rather than being transported to the site

231

Report to Congress on the potential use of lead in the waste packages for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Report of the Senate Committee on Appropriations accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act for 1989, the Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the use of lead in the waste packages to be used in geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The evaluation that was performed in response to this directive is presented in this report. This evaluation was based largely on a review of the technical literature on the behavior of lead, reports of work conducted in other countries, and work performed for the waste-management program being conducted by the DOE. The initial evaluation was limited to the potential use of lead in the packages to be used in the repository. Also, the focus of this report is post closure performance and not on retrievability and handling aspects of the waste package. 100 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

NONE

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Rock mass modification around a nuclear waste repository in welded tuff  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of numerical analyses to estimate the extent of rock mass modification resulting from the presence of a High Level Waste (HLW) repository. Changes in rock mass considered are stresses and joint deformations resulting from disposal room excavation and thermal efffects induced by the heat generated by nuclear waste. rock properties and site conditions are taken from the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analyses were conducted using boundary element and distinct element methods. Room-scale models and repository-scale models were investigated for up to 500 years after waste emplacement. Results of room-scale analyses based on the thermoelastic boundary element model indicate that a zone of modified rock develops around the disposal rooms for both vertical and horizontal waste emplacement. This zone is estimated to extend a distance of roughly two room diameters from the room surface. Results from the repository-scale model, which are based on the thermoelastic boundary element model and the distinct element model, indicate a zone with modified rock mass properties starting approximately 100 m above and below the repository, with a thickness of approximately 200 m above and 150 m below the repository. Slip-prone subhorizontal features are shown to have a substantial effect on rock mass response. The estimates of rock mass modification reflect uncertainties and simplifying assumptions in the models. 32 refs., 57 figs., 1 tab.

Mack, M.G.; Brandshaug, T.; Brady, B.H.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Options to Elements of the Proposed Action Options to Elements of the Proposed Action TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page A. Options to Elements of the Proposed Action .....................................................................................A-1 A.1 Wastewater Treatment at the Repository Option.........................................................................A-1 A.1.1 Potential Benefits of the Premanufactured Wastewater Treatment Facility..........................A-2 A.1.2 Potential Environmental Impacts of the Premanufactured Wastewater Treatment Facility .................................................................................................................A-2 A.2 Reduced Transportation, Aging, and Disposal Canister Use Option...........................................A-2

234

Yucca Mountain project canister material corrosion studies as applied to the electrometallurgical treatment metallic waste form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository. As part of the repository assessment activities, candidate materials are being tested for possible use as construction materials for waste package containers. A large portion of this testing effort is focused on determining the long range corrosion properties, in a Yucca Mountain environment, for those materials being considered. Along similar lines, Argonne National Laboratory is testing a metallic alloy waste form that also is scheduled for disposal in a geologic repository, like Yucca Mountain. Due to the fact that Argonne`s waste form will require performance testing for an environment similar to what Yucca Mountain canister materials will require, this report was constructed to focus on the types of tests that have been conducted on candidate Yucca Mountain canister materials along with some of the results from these tests. Additionally, this report will discuss testing of Argonne`s metal waste form in light of the Yucca Mountain activities.

Keiser, D.D.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone site-scale model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizationzone site- scale model, Yucca Mountain Project Milestonelateral diversion at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Numerical analysis of thermal-hydrological conditions in the single heater test at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single Heater Test at Yucca Mountain, LBNL-39789, E.O. Law­Single Heater Test at Yucca Mountain Jens T. Birkholzer andwaste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heating phase of the

Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Yvonne W.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Repository performance confirmation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part of the Yucca Mountain license application identified a broad suite of monitoring activities. A revision of the plan was expected to winnow the number of activities down to a manageable size. As a result, an objective process for the next stage of performance confirmation planning was developed as an integral part of an overarching long-term testing and monitoring strategy. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance monitoring program at once reflects its importance to stakeholders while demonstrating adequate understanding of relevant monitoring parameters. The compliance criteria were stated by regulation and are currently monitored as part of the regulatory rule for disposal. At the outset, the screening practice and parameter selection were not predicated on a direct or indirect correlation to system performance metrics, as was the case for Yucca Mountain. Later on, correlation to performance was established, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant continues to monitor ten parameters originally identified in the compliance certification documentation. The monitoring program has proven to be effective for the technical intentions and societal or public assurance. The experience with performance confirmation in the license application process for Yucca Mountain helped identify an objective, quantitative methodology for this purpose. Revision of the existing plan would be based on findings of the total system performance assessment. Identification and prioritization of confirmation activities would then derive from performance metrics associated with performance assessment. Given the understanding of repository performance confirmation, as reviewed in this paper, it is evident that the performance confirmation program for the Yucca Mountain project could be readily re-engaged if licensing activities resumed.

Hansen, Francis D.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Faulting in the Yucca Mountain region: Critical review and analyses of tectonic data from the central Basin and Range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has been proposed as the potential site for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. The tectonic setting of Yucca Mountain presents several potential hazards for a proposed repository, such as potential for earthquake seismicity, fault disruption, basaltic volcanism, magma channeling along pre-existing faults, and faults and fractures that may serve as barriers or conduits for groundwater flow. Characterization of geologic structures and tectonic processes will be necessary to assess compliance with regulatory requirements for the proposed high level waste repository. In this report, we specifically investigate fault slip, seismicity, contemporary stain, and fault-slip potential in the Yucca Mountain region with regard to Key Technical Uncertainties outlined in the License Application Review Plan (Sections 3.2.1.5 through 3.2.1.9 and 3.2.2.8). These investigations center on (i) alternative methods of determining the slip history of the Bare Mountain Fault, (ii) cluster analysis of historic earthquakes, (iii) crustal strain determinations from Global Positioning System measurements, and (iv) three-dimensional slip-tendency analysis. The goal of this work is to assess uncertainties associated with neotectonic data sets critical to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses` ability to provide prelicensing guidance and perform license application review with respect to the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain.

Ferrill, D.A.; Stirewalt, G.L.; Henderson, D.B.; Stamatakos, J.; Morris, A.P.; Spivey, K.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Wernicke, B.P. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Project publications (1979--1994)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This over-300 title publication list reflects the accomplishments of Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project researchers, who, since 1979, have been conducting multidisciplinary research to help determine if Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for a high-level waste repository. The titles can be accessed in two ways: by year, beginning with 1994 and working back to 1979, and by subject area: mineralogy/petrology/geology, volcanism, radionuclide solubility/groundwater chemistry; radionuclide sorption and transport; modeling/validation/field studies; summary/status reports, and quality assurance.

Bowker, L.M.; Espinosa, M.L.; Klein, S.H. [comps.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Project Publications (1979-1996)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This over-350 title publication list reflects the accomplishments of Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project researchers, who, since 1979, have been conducting multidisciplinary research to help determine if Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for a high-level waste repository. The titles can be accessed in two ways: by year, beginning with 1996 and working back to 1979, and by subject area: mineralogy/petrology/geology, volcanism, radionuclide solubility/ground-water chemistry; radionuclide sorption and transport; modeling/validation/field studies; summary/status reports, and quality assurance.

Ruhala, E.R.; Klein, S.H. [comps.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A model of the large hydraulic gradient at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, based on hydraulic conductivity contrasts between Cenozoic and Paleozoic rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MODEL OF THE LARGE HYDRAULIC GRADIENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA TEST SITE, BASED ON HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY CONTRASTS BETWEEN CENOZOIC AND PALEOZOIC ROCKS A Thesis ERIC WILLIAM STROM Submitted to the Offic of Graduate Studies of Texas A.... 4m W&~~ &&go~'~o~~i gp ??g Y, ) 4r y. odtli' ~ 6. A MODEL OF THE LARGE HYDRAULIC GRADIENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA TEST SITE, BASED ON HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY CONTRASTS BETWEEN CENOZOIC AND PALEOZOIC ROCKS A Thesis ERIC WILLIAM STROM...

Strom, Eric William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

Bullard, K.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sorption of radionuclides on Yucca Mountain tuffs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A substantial database of sorption coefficients for important radionuclides on Yucca Mountain tuffs has been obtained by Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past ten years. Current sorption studies are focussed on validation questions and augmentation of the existing database. Validation questions concern the effects of the use of crushed instead of solid rock samples in the batch experiments, the use of oversaturated stock solutions, and variations in water/rock ratios. Sorption mechanisms are also being investigated. Database augmentation activities include determination of sorption coefficients for elements with low sorption potential, sorption on psuedocolloids, sorption on fracture lining minerals, and sorption kinetics. Sorption can provide an important barrier to the potential migration of radionuclides from the proposed repository within Yucca Mountain to the accessible environment. In order to quantify this barrier, sorption coefficients appropriate for the Yucca Mountain groundwater system must be obtained for each of the important radionuclides in nuclear waste. Los Alamos National Laboratories has conducted numerous batch (crushed-rock) sorption experiments over the past ten years to develop a sorption coefficient database for the Yucca Mountain site. In the present site characterization phase, the main goals of the sorption test program will be to validate critical sorption coefficients and to augment the existing database where important data are lacking. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Meijer, A.; Triay, I.; Knight, S.; Cisneros, M.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Anticipated Degradation Modes of Metallic Engineered Barriers for High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unsaturated repositories: They are located above the water table (such as the initially designed Yucca Mountain, United States). The EBS does not...5

Martín A. Rodríguez

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Multiphysics processes in partially saturated fracture rock: Experiments and models from Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Test at Yucca Mountain. ACC: MOL.19980507.0359,Unit Evaluation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site: SummaryEstimations for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization

Rutqvist, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

EA-1956: Site-Wide Environmental Assessment for the Divestiture of Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, Wyoming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Draft Site-Wide EA: Public Comment Period Ends 04/14/2014DOE is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed discontinuation of DOE operations at, and the proposed divestiture of, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR-3).

248

DOE/EA-1583: Final Site-wide Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center/Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (October 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER / ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER / NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVE NO. 3 FINAL Site-wide Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact October 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 N. Poplar Street, Suite 150 Casper WY 82601 DOE/EA-1583 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center / Naval Petroleum Reserve No.3 Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS.................................................................................................vii SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................ix 1.0 INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................................................1

249

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata and ROTC 1, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.

John McCord; Marutzky, Sam

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Yucca Mountain socioeconomic project report on the 1987 risk perception telephone surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of the risk-related impacts from the siting of a high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository represents a new and important addition to conventional socioeconomic impact studies. In particular, the driving forces behind these impacts are the risks people perceive to be associated with the repository. Measuring the risk impacts requires a complementary set of approaches, of which, risk surveys are the cornerstone.a The purpose of these surveys is to provide scientifically defensible measures of the risk-related impacts. The risk surveys follow directly from a conceptual framework of how the HLNW repository affects peoples` perceptions and, ultimately, their behaviors. These surveys describe and measure: Characteristics of individuals, Risks people perceive from the HLNW repository, Views, or mind sets, they form about the HLNW repository, Changes in behaviors--e.g., changes in retirement decisions or industrial relocations--induced by the location of the repository, and Changes in well-being of Nevada citizens, if the repository were located at Yucca Mountain.

Kunreuther, H. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Wharton School of Finance and Commerce; Slovic, P. [Decision Research, Eugene, OR (United States); Nigg, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Desvousges, W.H. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Progress report on the scientific investigation program for the Nevada Yucca Mountain Site, October 1, 1991--March 31, 1992, Number 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18(g), the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period October 1, 1991, through March 31, 1992. This report is the sixth in a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization. Also included in this report are activities such as public outreach and international programs that are not officially part of site characterization. Information on these activities is provided in order to fully integrate all aspects of the Yucca Mountain studies.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

{sup 36}Cl measurements of the unsaturated zone flux at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determining the unsaturated zone percolation rate, or flux, is an extremely important site characterization issue for the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. A new technique that measures the {sup 36}Cl content of tuff from the Exploratory Shaft will be used to calculate flux through the unsaturated zone over longer times than could be measured by the more conventional {sup 14}C method. Measurements of the {sup 36}Cl "bomb pulse" in soil samples from Yucca Mountain have been used to confirm that infiltration is not an important recharge mechanism. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Norris, A.E.; Wolfsberg, K.; Gifford, S.K.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Moving Beyond the Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Moving Beyond the Yucca Mountain Viability Assessment U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the sole location to be studied for possi- ble development of the Yucca Mountain site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently published Viability As- sessment

254

Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program. Progress report, January 1994--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geological repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) from January 1994 through December 1994 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1990, Number 3; Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, the US Department of Energy has prepared this report on the progress of site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the period April 1 through September 30, 1990. This report is the third of a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during site characterization. The report covers a number of new initiatives to improve the effectiveness of the site characterization program and covers continued efforts related to preparatory activities, study plans, and performance assessment. 85 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

NONE

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 2. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains appendices for the following: (1) remote sensing and surface mapping techniques; (2) subsurface mapping methods for site characterization; (3) gravity technique; (4) audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique; (5) seismic refraction technique; (6) direct-current electrical resistivity method; (7) magnetic technique; (8) seismic reflection technique; (9) seismic crosshole method; (10) mechanical downhole seismic velocity survey method; (11) borehole geophysical logging techniques; (12) drilling and coring methods for precharacterization studies; (13) subsurface drilling methods for site characterization; (14) geomechanical/thermomechanical techniques for precharacterization studies; (15)geomechanical/thermal techniques for site characterization studies; (16) exploratory geochemical techniques for precharacterization studies; (17) geochemical techniques for site characterization; (18) hydrologic techniques for precharacterization studies; (19) hydrologic techniques for site characterization; and (20) seismological techniques.

NONE

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Dynamic and cyclic properties in shear of tuff specimens from Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Yucca Mountain was designated as the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository by the U.S. Government in 1987. The proposed repository design requires high safety for… (more)

Jeon, Seong Yeol, 1972-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 1. Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of the geologic isolation of radioactive materials from the biosphere requires an intimate knowledge of site geologic conditions, which is gained through precharacterization and site characterization studies. This report presents the results of an intensive literature review, analysis and compilation to delineate the information needs, applicable techniques and evaluation criteria for programs to adequately characterize a site in six geologic media. These media, in order of presentation, are: granite, shale, basalt, tuff, bedded salt and dome salt. Guidelines are presented to assess the efficacy (application, effectiveness, and resolution) of currently used exploratory and testing techniques for precharacterization or characterization of a site. These guidelines include the reliability, accuracy and resolution of techniques deemed acceptable, as well as cost estimates of various field and laboratory techniques used to obtain the necessary information. Guidelines presented do not assess the relative suitability of media. 351 refs., 10 figs., 31 tabs.

NONE

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Mineralogy, petrology and whole-rock chemistry of selected mechanical test samples of Yucca Mountain tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petrologic, bulk chemical and mineralogic data are presented for 19 samples of tuffaceous rocks from core holes UE-25a{number_sign}1, USW G-1, USW GU-3, and USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The suite of samples contains a wide variety of petrologic types, including zeolitized, glassy, and devitrified tuffs. Data include hand sample and thin section descriptions (with modal analyses for which uncertainties are estimated), and major element analyses with uncertainty estimates. No uncertainties were estimated for qualitative mineral identifications by X-ray diffraction. 5 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Connolly, J.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Calculations supporting evaluation of potential environmental standards for Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992, Section 801 (US Congress, 1992) provides for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to contract the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to conduct a study and provide findings and recommendations on reasonable standards for the disposal of high-level wastes at the Yucca Mountain site. The NAS study is to provide findings and recommendations which include, among other things, whether a health-based standard based on dose to individual members of the public from releases to the accessible environment will provide a reasonable standard for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The EPA, based upon and consistent with the findings and recommendations of the NAS, is required to promulgate standards for protection of the public from releases from radioactive materials stored or disposed of in a repository at the Yucca Mountain site. This document presents a number of different ``simple`` analyses of undisturbed repository performance that are intended to provide input to those responsible for setting appropriate environmental standards for a potential repository at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Each of the processes included in the analyses has been simplified to capture the primary significance of that process in containing or isolating the waste from the biosphere. In these simplified analyses, the complex waste package interactions were approximated by a simple waste package ``failure`` distribution which is defined by the initiation and rate of waste package ``failures``. Similarly, releases from the waste package and the engineered barrier system are controlled by the very near field environment and the presence and rate of advective and diffusive release processes. Release was approximated by either a simple alteration-controlled release for the high solubility radionuclides and either a diffusive or advective-controlled release for the solubility-limited radionuclides.

Duguid, J.O.; Andrews, R.W.; Brandstetter, E.; Dale, T.F.; Reeves, M. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NEPA Yucca Mountain Downloads | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEPA Yucca Mountain Downloads NEPA Yucca Mountain Downloads NEPA Yucca Mountain Downloads October 24, 2008 EIS-0250: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplement to the Environmental Impact Statement Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada October 10, 2008 EIS-0369: Floodplain Statement of Finding Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada October 10, 2008 EIS-0369: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings Nevada Rail Alignment for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada June 2, 2008 EIS-0250-S2: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

262

Hazards and scenarios examined for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes various hazards identified between 1978 when Yucca Mountain, located in arid southern Nevada, was first proposed as a potential site and 2008 when the license application to construct a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste was submitted. Although advantages of an arid site are many, hazard identification and scenario development have generally recognized fractures in the tuff as important features; climate change, water infiltration and percolation, and an oxidizing environment as important processes; and igneous activity, seismicity, human intrusion, and criticality as important disruptive events to consider at Yucca Mountain. Some of the scientific and technical challenges encountered included a change in the repository design from in-floor emplacement with small packages to in-drift emplacement with large packages without backfill. This change, in turn, increased the importance of igneous and seismic hazards.

Rob P. Rechard; Geoff A. Freeze; Frank V. Perry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Eugene Smith 1 The determination of volcanic risk to the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain requires, then volcanism in the future may not be a significant threat to Yucca Mountain. On the other hand, if melting

Conrad, Clint

264

Climate Change at Yucca Mountain: Lessons from Earth History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Climate Change at Yucca Mountain: Lessons from Earth History MaryLynn Musgrove and Daniel P. Schrag Yucca Mountain's suitability as a nuclear waste repository stems largely from its very dry climate the climate and hydrologic conditions at Yucca Mountain will be stable enough beyond the next ten millennia so

Schrag, Daniel

265

Information Repository  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Information Repository Documents 3 Information Repository Documents WIPP Annual Waste Minimization Report Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report, dated November 14, 2013 Class 1 Permit Modifications and NMED Responses Class 1 Modification, August 29, 2013 WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit EPA I.D. Number NM4890139088. (1. revise a course outline; 2. revise table and panel figures to include Panel 7; 3. update description related to Type B Packages; and 4. update TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT figures) JE Kieling, NMED dated October 13, 2013 Fee Assessment Class 1 Permit Modification WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit EPA I.D. Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Revise a Course Outline; Revise Table and Panel Figures to Include Panel 7; Update Descriptions Related to Type B Packages; and Update TRUPACT-ll and HalfPACT Figures) JM Kieling, NMED dated September 23, 2013

266

Effect of small-scale fractures on flow and transport processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Yu-Shu Wu, H.matrix interaction in Yucca Mountain site characterizationthe Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal of

Wu, Yu-Shu; Liu, H.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Uranium and Neptunium Desorption from Yucca Mountain Alluvium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and neptunium were used as reactive tracers in long-term laboratory desorption studies using saturated alluvium collected from south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of these long-term experiments is to make detailed observations of the desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium to provide Yucca Mountain with technical bases for a more realistic and potentially less conservative approach to predicting the transport of adsorbing radionuclides in the saturated alluvium. This paper describes several long-term desorption experiments using a flow-through experimental method and groundwater and alluvium obtained from boreholes along a potential groundwater flow path from the proposed repository site. In the long term desorption experiments, the percentages of uranium and neptunium sorbed as a function of time after different durations of sorption was determined. In addition, the desorbed activity as a function of time was fit using a multi-site, multi-rate model to demonstrate that different desorption rate constants ranging over several orders of magnitude exist for the desorption of uranium from Yucca Mountain saturated alluvium. This information will be used to support the development of a conceptual model that ultimately results in effective K{sub d} values much larger than those currently in use for predicting radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain.

C.D. Scism; P.W. Reimus; M. Ding; S.J. Chipera

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Flow calculations for Yucca Mountain groundwater travel time (GWTT-95)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1983, high-level radioactive waste repository performance requirements related to groundwater travel time were defined by NRC subsystem regulation 10 CFR 60.113. Although DOE is not presently attempting to demonstrate compliance with that regulation, understanding of the prevalence of fast paths in the groundwater flow system remains a critical element of any safety analyses for a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Therefore, this analysis was performed to allow comparison of fast-path flow against the criteria set forth in the regulation. Models developed to describe the conditions for initiation, propagation, and sustainability of rapid groundwater movement in both the unsaturated and saturated zones will form part of the technical basis for total- system analyses to assess site viability and site licensability. One of the most significant findings is that the fastest travel times in both unsaturated and saturated zones are in the southern portion of the potential repository, so it is recommended that site characterization studies concentrate on this area. Results support the assumptions regarding the importance of an appropriate conceptual model of groundwater flow and the incorporation of heterogeneous material properties into the analyses. Groundwater travel times are sensitive to variation/uncertainty in hydrologic parameters and in infiltration flux at upper boundary of the problem domain. Simulated travel times are also sensitive to poorly constrained parameters of the interaction between flow in fractures and in the matrix.

Altman, S.J.; Arnold, B.W.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Ho, C.K.; McKenna, S.A.; Eaton, R.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Effects of a potential drop of a shipping cask, a waste container, and a bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the effects of potential drops of a typical shipping cask, waste container, and bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations at the prospective Yucca Mountain Repository. The waste-handling process (one stage, no consolidation configuration) is examined to estimate the maximum loads imposed on typical casks and containers as they are handled by various pieces of equipment during waste-handling operations. Maximum potential drop heights for casks and containers are also evaluated for different operations. A nonlinear finite-element model is employed to represent a hybrid spent fuel container subject to drop heights of up to 30 ft onto a reinforced concrete floor. The impact stress, strain, and deformation are calculated, and compared to the failure criteria to estimate the limiting (maximum permissible) drop height for the waste container. A typical Westinghouse 17 {times} 17 PWR fuel assembly is analyzed by a simplified model to estimate the energy absorption by various parts of the fuel assembly during a 30 ft drop, and to determine the amount of kinetic energy in a fuel pin at impact. A nonlinear finite-element analysis of an individual fuel pin is also performed to estimate the amount of fuel pellet fracture due to impact. This work was completed on May 1990.

Wu, C.L.; Lee, J.; Lu, D.L.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Yucca Mountain Press Conference | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yucca Mountain Press Conference Yucca Mountain Press Conference Yucca Mountain Press Conference June 3, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery for Secretary Bodman Thank you all for being here. I'm pleased to announce that this morning the Department of Energy submitted a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission seeking authorization to build America's first national repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We are confident that the NRC's rigorous review process will validate that the Yucca Mountain repository will provide for the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a way that protects human health and our environment. This application represents the culmination of over 20 years of work by

272

Negative pH, efflorescent mineralogy, and consequences for environmental restoration at the Iron Mountain Superfund site, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as white, blue-green, yellow to orange...soluble efflorescent minerals can make certain remediation...tailings removal, and lime neutralization of the...by 80–90% The mineral deposits are primarily...routing them to a lime neutralization plant...metals Iron Mountain mineral composition neutralization...

D. Kirk Nordstrom; Charles N. Alpers

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

A preliminary investigation of the structure of southern Yucca Flat, Massachusetts Mountain, and CP basin, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, based on geophysical modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New gravity and magnetic data collected in the vicinity of Massachusetts Mountain and CP basin (Nevada Test Site, NV) provides a more complex view of the structural relationships present in the vicinity of CP basin than previous geologic models, helps define the position and extent of structures in southern Yucca Flat and CP basin, and better constrains the configuration of the basement structure separating CP basin and Frenchman Flat. The density and gravity modeling indicates that CP basin is a shallow, oval-shaped basin which trends north-northeast and contains ~800 m of basin-filling rocks and sediment at its deepest point in the northeast. CP basin is separated from the deeper Frenchman Flat basin by a subsurface ridge that may represent a Tertiary erosion surface at the top of the Paleozoic strata. The magnetic modeling indicates that the Cane Spring fault appears to merge with faults in northwest Massachusetts Mountain, rather than cut through to Yucca Flat basin and that the basin is downed-dropped relative to Massachusetts Mountain. The magnetic modeling indicates volcanic units within Yucca Flat basin are down-dropped on the west and supports the interpretations of Phelps and KcKee (1999). The magnetic data indicate that the only faults that appear to be through-going from Yucca Flat into either Frenchman Flat or CP basin are the faults that bound the CP hogback. In general, the north-trending faults present along the length of Yucca Flat bend, merge, and disappear before reaching CP hogback and Massachusetts Mountain or French Peak.

Geoffrey A. Phelps; Leigh Justet; Barry C. Moring, and Carter W. Roberts

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

275

Adapting Dry Cask Storage for Aging at a Geologic Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Aging System is a crucial part of operations at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository in the United States. Incoming commercial SNF that does not meet thermal limits for emplacement will be aged on outdoor pads. U.S. Department of Energy SNF will also be managed using the Aging System. Proposed site-specific designs for the Aging System are closely based upon designs for existing dry cask storage (DCS) systems. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing DCS systems for use in the SNF Aging System at Yucca Mountain. The most important difference between existing DCS facilities and the Yucca Mountain facility is the required capacity. Existing DCS facilities typically have less than 50 casks. The current design for the aging pad at Yucca Mountain calls for a capacity of over 2,000 casks (20,000 MTHM) [1]. This unprecedented number of casks poses some unique problems. The response of DCS systems to off-normal and accident conditions needs to be re-evaluated for multiple storage casks. Dose calculations become more complicated, since doses from multiple or very long arrays of casks can dramatically increase the total boundary dose. For occupational doses, the geometry of the cask arrays and the order of loading casks must be carefully considered in order to meet ALARA goals during cask retrieval. Due to the large area of the aging pad, skyshine must also be included when calculating public and worker doses. The expected length of aging will also necessitate some design adjustments. Under 10 CFR 72.236, DCS systems are initially certified for a period of 20 years [2]. Although the Yucca Mountain facility is not intended to be a storage facility under 10 CFR 72, the operational life of the SNF Aging System is 50 years [1]. Any cask system selected for use in aging will have to be qualified to this design lifetime. These considerations are examined, and a summary is provided of the adaptations that must be made in order to use DCS technologies successfully at a geologic repository.

C. Sanders; D. Kimball

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

Site characterization plan: Conceptual design report: Volume 6, Drawing portfolio: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a description of a prospective geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste to support the development of the Site Characterization Plan for the Yucca Mountain site. The site for the prospective repository is located at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, and the waste emplacement area will be constructed in the underlying volcanic tuffs. The target horizon for waste emplacement is a sloping bed of densely welded tuff more than 650 ft below the surface and typically more than 600 ft above the water table. The conceptual design described in this report is unique among repository designs in that it uses ramps in addition to shafts to gain access to the underground facility, the emplacement horizon is located above the water table, and it is possible that 300- to 400-ft-long horizontal waste emplacement boreholes will be used. This report summarizes the design bases, design and performance criteria, and the design analyses performed. The current status of meeting the preclosure performance objectives for licensing and of resolving the repository design and preclosure issues is presented. The repository design presented in this report will be expanded and refined during the advanced conceptual design, the license application design, and the final procurement and construction design phases. Volume 6 contains drawings. 114 figs.

MacDougall, H.R.; Scully, L.W.; Tillerson, J.R. (comps.)

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Data Qualification Report: Compostion of J-13 Well Water for Use on the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data evaluated in this qualification report have been cited in analysis and model reports (AMRs) in support of the Site Recommendation in determining the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a repository for high level nuclear waste. The AMRs use these hydrochemical data as a basis for modeling the chemical interactions between groundwater and engineered materials, including waste forms, packages and materials in the engineered barrier system J-13 water is also used as a reactant in experiments performed to collect data on corrosion of waste packages and repository materials, on solubility of radionuclides, on waste form leach rates, and in simulations of the mobility of radionuclides in groundwater, among other applications. J-13 water serves effectively as a reference or surrogate water composition across the program. Establishing a qualified data set describing the composition of J-13 will help ensure commonality among the various studies.

T.L. Steinborn

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

278

Sensitivity Analysis Of Hydrological Parameters In Modeling Flow And Transport In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain Keni Zhang, Yu-Shu Wu,volcanic deposits at Yucca Mountain have been intensivelyhydraulic properties, Yucca Mountain Introduction Site

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Houseworth, James E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Geohydrological models and earthquake effects at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Yucca Mountain, the proposed site for the high-level ... feature that extends for over 100?km. Yucca Mountain and its vicinity are underlain by faulted ... , and surrounding the core of the Timber Mountain Calde...

J. B. Davies; Charles B. Archambeau

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Application of natural analogues in the Yucca Mountain project - overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contractor) 2000. Yucca Mountain Site Description. TDR-CRW-in silicic tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Clays and ClayHazard Analysis for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. BA0000000-01717-

Simmons, Ardyth M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir This part of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2) (Nevada Rail Corridor SEIS)

282

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Nevada Rail - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env The Summary of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County,

283

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document.

V. Trebules

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

284

Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

A Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A three-dimensional unsaturated-zone numerical model has been developed to simulate flow and distribution of moisture, gas and heat at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential repository site for high-level radioactive waste. The model takes into account the simultaneous flow dynamics of liquid water, vapor, air and heat in the highly heterogeneous, fractured porous rock in the unsaturated zone (UZ). This model is intended for use in the prediction of the current and future conditions in the UZ so

286

US nuclear waste site "unsuitable"  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... about the suitability of Yucca Mountain as the site for the nation's first highlevel nuclear ...

Mary Manning

1988-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Nuclear Waste Repository Plan Approved by Senate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bill calls for selection of permanent repository site by 1989, building of a retrievable waste facility, cash payments states with storage sites ... After considerable debate, the Senate has approved a plan aimed at getting the federal government's effort to find a long-term storage site for spent nuclear fuel and highlevel nuclear wastes off dead center and out of the political crossfire. ...

JANICE LONG

1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

288

Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.

S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Environmental Impacts of Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

~~"'"""""""""'l.. _ _ 4 Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operation and Monitoring, and Closure 4-iii Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 4. Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure ..............4-1 4.1 Preclosure Environmental Impacts of Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure of a Repository ...............................................................................................................................4-3 4.1.1 Impacts to Land Use and Ownership .......................................................................................4-4

290

DOE/EA-1440-S-1: Final Supplement to the Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex (May 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SUPPLEMENT TO FINAL SITE-WIDE ENVIRONMENTAL SUPPLEMENT TO FINAL SITE-WIDE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY'S SOUTH TABLE MOUNTAIN COMPLEX Proposed Construction and Operation of: - Research Support Facilities, - Infrastructure Improvements (Phase I), - Upgrades to the Thermochemical User Facility and Addition of the Thermochemical Biorefinery Pilot Plant May 2008 U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y G o l d e n F i e l d O f f i c e N a t i o n a l R e n e w a b l e E n e r g y L a b o r a t o r y 1 6 1 7 C o l e B o u l e v a r d G o l d e n , C o l o r a d o 8 0 4 0 1 DOE/EA-1440-S-1 Department of Energy Golden Field Office 161 7 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 -3305 May 14,2008 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for SUPPLEMENT TO FINAL SITE-WIDE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY'S

291

Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Thermal-Response Evaluation of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Thermal-Response Evaluation of Yucca Mountain During the Preclosure and Postclosure Phases July 2008 #12;Thermal Response Evaluation of Yucca Mountain July 2008 Page of the thermal response of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository for various thermal loadings. The U. S. Nuclear

292

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Roland Gritto, Valeri A in the proposed nuclear waste repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A 5-km-long source line and a 3-km-long receiver line were located on top of Yucca Mountain ridge and inside the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF

Korneev, Valeri A.

293

Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test: Fiscal Year 1998 Status Report Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program Deliverable SPU85M4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) and documents the progress of construction activities and site and laboratory characterization activities undertaken in fiscal year 1998. Also presented are predictive flow-and-transport simulations for Test Phases 1 and 2 of testing and the preliminary results and status of these test phases. Future anticipated results obtained from unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport testing in the Calico Hills Formation at Busted Butte are also discussed in view of their importance to performance assessment (PA) needs to build confidence in and reduce the uncertainty of site-scale flow-and-transport models and their abstractions for performance for license application. The principal objectives of the test are to address uncertainties associated with flow and transport in the UZ site-process models for Yucca Mountain, as identified by the PA working group in February 1997. These include but are not restricted to: (1) The effect of heterogeneities on flow and transport in unsaturated and partially saturated conditions in the Calico Hills Formation. In particular, the test aims to address issues relevant to fracture-matrix interactions and permeability contrast boundaries; (2) The migration behavior of colloids in fractured and unfractured Calico Hills rocks; (3) The validation through field testing of laboratory sorption experiments in unsaturated Calico Hills rocks; (4) The evaluation of the 3-D site-scale flow-and-transport process model (i.e., equivalent-continuum/dual-permeability/discrete-fracture-fault representations of flow and transport) used in the PA abstractions for license application; and (5) The effect of scaling from lab scale to field scale and site scale.

Bussod, G.Y.; Turin, H.J.; Lowry, W.E.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Modeling Unsaturated Flow and Transport Processes in Fractured Tuffs of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone site-scale model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizationsite-scale model, Yucca Mountain Project Milestone 3GLM105M,unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Total System Performance Assessment Code (TOSPAC); Volume 2, User`s guide: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TOSPAC is a computer program that calculates partially saturated groundwater flow with the transport of water-soluble contaminants. TOSPAC Version 1 is restricted to calculations involving one-dimensional, vertical columns of one or more media. TOSPAC was developed to help answer questions surrounding the burial of toxic wastes in arid regions. Burial of wastes in arid regions is attractive because of generally low population densities and little groundwater flow, in the unsaturated zone, to disturb the waste. TOSPAC helps to quantify groundwater flow and the spread of contamination, offering an idea of what could happen in the distant future. Figure 1.1 illustrates the problem TOSPAC was designed to investigate. For groundwater flow, TOSPAC can provide saturations, velocities, and and travel tunes for water in the rock matrix or the fractures in the unsaturated zone. TOSPAC can determine how hydrologic conditions vary when the rate of infiltration changes. For contaminant transport, TOSPAC can compute how much of a contaminant is dissolved in the water and how it is distributed. TOSPAC can determine how fast the solute is moving and the shape of the concentration front. And TOSPAC can be used to investigate how much of the contaminant remains in the inventory of a repository, how much is adsorbed onto the soil or rock matrix, and how much reaches the water table. Effective use of TOSPAC requires knowledge in a number of diverse disciplines, including real groundwater flow and transport, the mathematical models of groundwater flow and transport, real-world data required for the models, and the numerical solution of differential equations. Equally important is a realization of the limitations intrinsic to a computer model of complex physical phenomena. This User`s Guide not only describes the mechanics of executing TOSPAC on a computer, but also examines these other topics.

Gauthier, J.H.; Dudley, A.L; Skinner, L.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, M.L.; Peters, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Flooding of an underground facility at Yucca Mountain: A summary of NRC review plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are developing review plans for a potential high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This early preparation of NRC`s review program will ensure that important technical issues related to compliance with 10 CFR Part 60 will be identified before receipt of a license application. Under the siting criteria of NRC`s Part 60, one of the potentially adverse conditions is the potential for flooding of the underground facility by surface waters. The Department of Energy (DOE) should evaluate this and other conditions in a license application. This paper summarizes the NRC staff`s plans to review DOE`s demonstration of compliance with Part 60 regarding potential flooding of an underground facility. We present these plans recognizing that the Congress is currently considering changes in how a HLW repository would be licensed.

Coleman, N.M.; Wescott, R.G.; Johnson, T.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Dialogs on the Yucca Mountain controversy. Special report No. 10  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to resolve the controversial issue of tectonic and hydrologic stability of the Yucca Mountain region, the National Academy of Sciences established a Panel on Coupled Hydrologic/Tectonic/HydrothermaI Systems. The Panel has recently released it`s findings in a report entitled Ground Water at Yucca Mountain: How High Can It Rise? The representation of data and the scientific validity of this report was the subject of comprehensive evaluations and reviews which has led to correspondence between Dr. Charles Archarnbeau and Dr. Frank Press, the President of the National Academy of Sciences. All such correspondence prior to April 9, 1993 is covered by TRAC Special Report No. 5, {open_quotes}Dialogs on the Yucca Mountain Controversy.{close_quotes} The present report represents a continuation of the dialog between Dr. Archambeau and Dr. Press; specifically the letter from Dr. Press to Dr. Archambeau dated April 9, 1993 and Archambeau`s response to Press, dated August 19, 1993. In addition to the correspondence between Press and Archambeau, a series of recent reports by other investigators, referred to in the correspondence from Archambeau, are included in this report and document new data and inferences of importance for resolution of the question of suitability of the Yucca Mountain site as a high level nuclear waste repository. These reports also demonstrate that other scientists, not previously associated with the government`s program at Yucca Mountain or the National Academy review of an aspect of that program, have arrived at conclusions that are different than those stated by the Academy review and DOE program scientists.

Schluter, C.M.; Szymanski, J.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Response to "Analysis of the Treatment, by the U.S. Department of Energy, of the FEP Hydrothermal Activity in the Yucca Mountain Performance Assessment" by Yuri Dublyansky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineral Formation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. ” Geochimica etand Heat Flow Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Some Tectonic andNuclear Waste Site, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA: Pedogenic,

Houseworth, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current posture of the used nuclear fuel management program in the U.S. following termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, is to pursue research and development (R&D) of generic (i.e., non-site specific) technologies for storage, transportation and disposal. Disposal R&D is directed toward understanding and demonstrating the performance of reference geologic disposal concepts selected to represent the current state-of-the-art in geologic disposal. One of the principal constraints on waste packaging and emplacement in a geologic repository is management of the waste-generated heat. This paper describes the selection of reference disposal concepts, and thermal management strategies for waste from advanced fuel cycles. A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. We performed thermal analysis of these concepts using waste inventory cases representing a range of advanced fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress and previous experience in the U.S. repository program. All of the disposal concepts selected for this study use enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The encapsulating materials (typically clay-based or rock salt) have low intrinsic permeability and plastic rheology that closes voids so that low permeability is maintained. Uniformly low permeability also contributes to chemically reducing conditions common in soft clay, shale, and salt formations. Enclosed modes are associated with temperature constraints that limit changes to the encapsulating materials, and they generally have less capacity to dissipate heat from the waste package and its immediate surroundings than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Open emplacement modes can be ventilated for many years prior to permanent closure of the repository, limiting peak temperatures both before and after closure, and combining storage and disposal functions in the same facility. Open emplacement modes may be practically limited to unsaturated host formations, unless emplacement tunnels are effectively sealed everywhere prior to repository closure. Thermal analysis of disposal concepts and waste inventory cases has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature constraints. For example, the choice of salt as the host medium expedites the schedule for geologic disposal by approximately 50 yr (other factors held constant) thereby reducing future reliance on surface decay storage. Rock salt has greater thermal conductivity and stability at higher temperatures than other media considered. Alternatively, the choice of salt permits the use of significantly larger waste packages for SNF. The following sections describe the selection of reference waste inventories, geologic settings, and concepts of operation, and summarize the results from the thermal analysis.

Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Massimiliano, Fratoni [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Greenberg, Harris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Howard, Rob L [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Physical processes and effects of magmatism in the Yucca Mountain region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes initial studies related to the effects of volcanism on performance of the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository, and to the general processes of magmatism in the Yucca Mountain region. Volcanism or igneous activity can affect the repository performance by ejection of waste onto the earth`s surface (eruptive effects), or by subsurface effects of hydrothermal processes and altered hydrology if an intrusion occurs within the repository block. Initial, conservative calculations of the volume of waste that might be erupted during a small-volume basaltic eruption (such as those which occurred in the Yucca Mountain region) indicate that regulatory limits might be exceeded. Current efforts to refine these calculations, based upon field studies at analog sites, are described. Studies of subsurface effects are just beginning, and are currently focused on field studies of intrusion properties and contact metamorphism at deeply eroded analog sites. General processes of magmatism are important for providing a physical basis for predictions of future volcanic activity. Initial studies have focused on modeling basaltic magma chambers in conjunction with petrographic and geochemical studies. An example of the thermal-fluid dynamic evolution of a small basaltic sill is described, based on numerical simulation. Quantification of eruption conditions can provide valuable information on the overall magmatic system. We are developing quantitative methods for mapping pyroclastic facies of small basaltic centers and, in combination with two-phase hydrodynamic simulation, using this information to estimate eruption conditions. Examples of such hydrodynamic simulations are presented, along with comparison to an historical eruption in Hawaii.

Valentine, G.A.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perry, F.V. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, New Mexico (USA). Dept. of Geology

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

9 M.y. record of southern Nevada climate from Yucca Mountain secondary minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is presently the object of intense study as a potential permanent repository for the Nation`s high-level radioactive wastes. The mountain consists of a thick sequence of volcanic tuffs within which the depth to water table ranges from 500 to 700 meters below the land surface. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ), which would host the projected repository, coupled with the present day arid to semi-arid climate, is considered a favorable attribute of the site. Evaluation of the site includes defining the relation between climate variability, as the input function or driver of site- and regional-scale ground-water flow, and the possible future transport and release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. Secondary calcite and opal have been deposited in the UZ by meteoric waters that infiltrated through overlying soils and percolated through the tuffs. The oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O values) of these minerals reflect contemporaneous meteoric waters and the {delta}{sup 13}C values reflect soil organic matter, and hence the resident plant community, at the time of infiltration. Recent U/Pb age determinations of opal in these occurrences, coupled with the {delta}{sup 13}C values of associated calcite, allow broadbrush reconstructions of climate patterns during the past 9 M.y.

Whelan, J.F.; Moscati, R.J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analysis of the Variability of Classified and Unclassified Radiological Source term Inventories in the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Area, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been proposed that unclassified source terms used in RM/SM reactive transport modeling investigations should be based on yield-weighted source terms calculated using the RM/SM average source term from Bowen et al. (2001) and the unclassified announced yields reported in DOE/NV-209. This unclassified inventory is likely to be used in unclassified contaminant boundary calculations and is, thus, relevant to compare to the classified inventory. They have examined the classified radionuclide inventory produced by 73 underground nuclear tests conducted in the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RM/SM) area of the Nevada Test Site. The goals were to (1) evaluate the variability in classified radiological source terms among the 73 tests and (2) and compare that variability and inventory uncertainties to an average unclassified inventory (e.g. Bowen 2001). To evaluate source term variability among the 73 tests, radiological inventories were compared on two relative scales: geometric mean and yield-weighted geometric mean. Furthermore, radiological inventories were either decay corrected to a common date (9/23/1992) or the time zero (t{sub 0}) of each test. Thus, a total of four data sets were produced. The date of 9/23/1992 was chosen based on the date of the last underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site.

Zhao, P; Zavarin, M

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

303

Constructing the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is constructing an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), approximately 160 km (100 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This facility is being used to obtain geological, hydrological, geomechanical, thermomechanical and geochemical information to characterize, Yucca Mountain as a potential site to isolate High-Level Radioactive Waste from the accessible environment. The ESF, when completed, will consist of two ramps from surface (North and South ramp) to the potential repository horizon formations, a drift connecting the two ramps, test alcoves, and above and below ground operational support facilities. The ramps and connecting drift are being mined by a 7.62 m (25 ft) diameter, fully shielded, Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). This paper describes the current status of the construction of the ESF and test alcoves. At the time of this writing, the following has been accomplished: North Ramp excavation is complete; four test alcoves have been excavated and are in use for scientific experiments; the excavation has reached the potential repository horizon; the drift connecting the two ramps is being excavated, and the excavation of a test alcove for thermal testing is in progress. The mining operations are ahead of schedule, and to date March 26, 1996, the TBM has excavated over 4623 m(15,160 ft.) without any major breakdowns or accidents. The average advance for a three shift (two mining shifts) production day has been 33.46 m (110 ft.). Maximum advance for a week was 218.3 m (716 ft.). An Alpine Miner (AM 75) roadheader is being used to excavate test alcoves. The major ground support system consists of Supper Swellex rock bolts, steel sets as required, Williams rock bolts and channels, and welded wire fabric. Various sections of the tunnel have been instrumented, and the entire excavation has been geologically mapped. To date, the site conditions have been those predicted.

Kalia, H.N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Replogle, J.M. [USDOE Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Sites at McGee Mountain, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of two innovative technologies in early-stage geothermal exploration:a) shallow (2m) survey; b) hydroprobe; and Identify a geothermal resource at the project site.

305

Impact of Pyrophoric Events on Long-Term Repository Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of a feature, event, and process (FEP) screening argument developed for the issue of pyrophoricity as it pertains to the post-closure interment of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) at the Yucca Mountain Repository.

Richard Gregg

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Site plan safety submission for sampling, monitoring, decontamination of GB agent - north plant Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this site plan safety submission (SPSS), includes: sampling plan to determine if GB is a contaminant in equipment and piping used in the production and demil processes; monitoring plan for personnel involved in the sampling effort; decon plan for personnel, equipment, and piping should contamination be identified. Additional sections and appendices include: historical use of bldg 1501, 1503, 1504, 1506, 1601, 1602, 1603, 1606; chemical information on GB; safety requirements; medical requirements and first aid procedures; piping drawings; rma sop's for sampling, monitoring, and decon.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

DOE Announces Yucca Mountain License Application Schedule | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yucca Mountain License Application Schedule Yucca Mountain License Application Schedule DOE Announces Yucca Mountain License Application Schedule July 19, 2006 - 3:13pm Addthis New Director Ward Sproat Testifies on Revised Timeline WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, no later than June 30, 2008. The Department also announced that if requested legislative changes are enacted, the repository will be able to accept spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste starting in early 2017. Announcing a schedule for submitting a license application is another step in the Department's mission to provide stability, clarity and predictability in moving the Yucca Mountain Project forward as quickly as

309

Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License Application March 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today filed a motion with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to withdraw the license application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain with prejudice. "President Obama is fully committed to ensuring that the Nation meets our long-term storage obligations for nuclear waste," said Department of Energy General Counsel Scott Blake Harris. "In light of the decision not to proceed with the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the President directed Secretary Chu to establish the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's

310

List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents March 10, 2004 EIS-0250-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada March 1, 2004 Nuclear Waste Policy Act Document on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 An Act to provide for the development of repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, to establish a program of research, development, and demonstration regarding the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, and for other purposes. April 1, 2003 Final Report of theIgneous Consequences Peer Review Panel A report for the DOE on the Yucca Mountain Project.

311

DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application May 27, 2010 - 2:22pm Addthis Today, the United States Department of Energy filed with the NRC's Atomic Safety and Licensing Board a reply brief making clear that its motion to withdraw the pending application to license the Yucca Mountain geologic repository is authorized by the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and consistent with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). As today's filing details, the AEA vests the Department with broad authority over the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The NWPA does not strip the Department of that authority or otherwise compel the Department to go forward with the construction of the Yucca Mountain repository. Rather, the

312

List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents List of Yucca Mountain Archival Documents March 3, 2010 Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application DOE's withdraws it's pending license application for a permanent geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. December 30, 2008 Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management-Quality Assurance Requirements and Description A report detailling the requirements and description of the Quality Assurance program. December 9, 2008 The Report To The President And The Congress By The Secretary Of Energy On The Need For A Second Repository This report is prepared pursuant to Section 161 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, which requires the Secretary of Energy to report to the President and to the Congress on or after January 1, 2007, but not later

313

DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application DOE Defends Its Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain Application May 27, 2010 - 2:22pm Addthis Today, the United States Department of Energy filed with the NRC's Atomic Safety and Licensing Board a reply brief making clear that its motion to withdraw the pending application to license the Yucca Mountain geologic repository is authorized by the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and consistent with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). As today's filing details, the AEA vests the Department with broad authority over the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The NWPA does not strip the Department of that authority or otherwise compel the Department to go forward with the construction of the Yucca Mountain repository. Rather, the

314

Selection of candidate canister materials for high-level nuclear waste containment in a tuff repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A repository located at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site is a potential site for permanent geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The repository can be located in a horizon in welded tuff, a volcanic rock, which is above the static water level at this site. The environmental conditions in this unsaturated zone are expected to be air and water vapor dominated for much of the containment period. Type 304L stainless steel is the reference material for fabricating canisters to contain the solid high-level wastes. Alternative stainless alloys are considered because of possible susceptibility of 304L to localized and stress forms of corrosion. For the reprocessed glass wastes, the canisters serve as the recipient for pouring the glass with the result that a sensitized microstructure may develop because of the times at elevated temperatures. Corrosion testing of the reference and alternative materials has begun in tuff-conditioned water and steam environments. 21 references, 8 figures, 8 tables.

McCright, R.D.; Weiss, H.; Juhas, M.C.; Logan, R.W.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Sorption/Desorption Behavior of Uranium in Transport Studies Using Yucca Mountain Alluvium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, Nevada is the proposed site of a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. In the event repository engineered barriers fail, the saturated alluvium located south of Yucca Mountain is expected to serve as a natural barrier to the migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. The purpose of this study is to improve the characterization of uranium retardation in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain to support refinement of an assessment model. The distribution of uranium desorption rates from alluvium obtained from Nye County bore holes EWDP-19IM1, EWDP-10SA, EWDP-22SA were studied to address inconsistencies between results from batch sorption and column transport experiments. The alluvium and groundwater were characterized to better understand the underlying mechanisms of the observed behavior. Desorption rate constants were obtained using an activity based mass balance equation and column desorption experiments were analyzed using a mathematical model utilizing multiple sorption sites with different first-order forward and reverse reaction rates. The uranium desorption rate constants decreased over time, suggesting that the alluvium has multiple types of active sorption sites with different affinities for uranium. While a significant fraction of the initially sorbed uranium desorbed from the alluvium quite rapidly, a roughly equivalent amount remained sorbed after several months of testing. The information obtained through this research suggests that uranium may experience greater effective retardation in the alluvium than simple batch sorption experiments would suggest. Electron Probe Microanalysis shows that uranium is associated with both clay minerals and iron oxides after sorption to alluvial material. These results provide further evidence that the alluvium contains multiple sorption sites for uranium.

C. D. Scism

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Independent management and financial review, Yucca Mountain Project, Nevada. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project is one part of the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program (the Program) which was established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, and as amended in 1987. The Program`s goal is to site the nation`s first geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste, in the form of spent fuel rod assemblies, generated by the nuclear power industry and a smaller quantity of Government radioactive waste. The Program, which also encompasses the transportation system and the multipurpose canister system was not the subject of this Report. The subject of this Review was only the Yucca Mountain Project in Nevada. While the Review was directed toward the Yucca Mountain Project rather than the Program as a whole, there are certain elements of the Project which cannot be addressed except through discussion of some Program issues. An example is the Total System Life Cycle Cost addressed in Section 7 of this report. Where Program issues are discussed in this Report, the reader is reminded of the scope limitations of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) contract to review only the Yucca Mountain Project. The primary scope of the Review was to respond to the specific criteria contained in the NARUC scope of work. In responding to these criteria, the Review Team understood that some interested parties have expressed concern over the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act relative to the Yucca Mountain Project and the nature of activities currently being carried out by the Department of Energy at the Yucca Mountain Project site. The Review Team has attempted to analyze relevant portions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act as Amended, but has not conducted a thorough analysis of this legislation that could lead to any specific legal conclusions about all aspects of it.

NONE

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Unsaturated flow modeling in performance assessments for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes the progression of modeling efforts of infiltration, percolation, and seepage conducted between 1984 and 2008 to evaluate feasibility, viability, and assess compliance of a repository in the unsaturated zone for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Scientific understanding of infiltration in a desert environment, unsaturated percolation flux in fractures and matrix of the volcanic tuff, and seepage into an open drift in a thermally perturbed environment was initially lacking in 1984. As understanding of the Yucca Mountain disposal system increased through site characterization and in situ testing, modeling of infiltration, percolation, and seepage evolved from simple assumptions in a single model in 1984 to three modeling modules each based on several detailed process models in 2008. Uncertainty in percolation flux through Yucca Mountain was usually important in explaining the observed uncertainty in performance measures:cumulative release in assessments prior to 1995 and individual dose, thereafter.

Rob P. Rechard; Jens T. Birkholzer; Yu-Shu Wu; Joshua S. Stein; James E. Houseworth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Site characterization plan: Conceptual design report, Volume 3: Appendices A-E: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a description of a prospective geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste to support the development of the Site Characterization Plan for the Yucca Mountain site. The site for the prospective repository is located at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, and the waste emplacement area will be constructed in the underlying volcanic tuffs. The target horizon for waste emplacement is a sloping bed of densely welded tuff more than 650 ft below the surface and typically more than 600 ft above the water table. The conceptual design described in this report is unique among repository designs in that it uses ramps in addition to shafts to gain access to the underground facility, the emplacement horizon is located above the water table, and it is possible that 300- to 400-ft-long horizontal waste emplacement boreholes will be used. This report summarizes the design bases, design and performance criteria, and the design analyses performed. The current status of meeting the preclosure performance objectives for licensing and of resolving the repository design and preclosure issues is presented. Volume 3 contains Appendices A through E.

MacDougall, H.R.; Scully, L.W.; Tillerson, J.R. (comps.)

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Salt repository project closeout status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE`s) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

NONE

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Going Beyond 10,000 Years at Yucca Mountain P.F. Peterson, W.E. Kastenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Going Beyond 10,000 Years at Yucca Mountain P.F. Peterson, W.E. Kastenberg University of California the federal government's Yucca Mountain (YM) nuclear waste repository project. The successful challenge at Yucca Mountain Currently, the best available understanding of potential long-term performance at YM

322

DOE/EA-1440-S-1: Finding of No Significant Impact for Final Supplement to the Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex (5/15/08)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Cole Boulevard 7 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 -3305 May 14,2008 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for SUPPLEMENT TO FINAL SITE-WIDE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY'S SOUTH TABLE MOUNTAIN COMPLEX AGENCY: Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: 111 accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations, DOE evaluated the potential environniental impacts that would result from three actions at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) site: Proposed Construction and Operation o f Research Suppol-t Facilities (RSF), Infrastructure Improvements (Phase I), Upgrades to tlie Thermochemical User Facility (TCUF) and addition of the

323

Mountain Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Wind Mountain Wind Jump to: navigation, search Mountain Wind is a wind farm located in Uinta County, Wyoming. It consists of 67 turbines and has a total capacity of 140.7 MW. It is owned by Edison Mission Group.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Fort Bridger, its approximate coordinates are 41.318716°, -110.386418°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.res-americas.com/wind-farms/operational-/mountain-wind-i-wind-farm.aspx Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mountain_Wind&oldid=132229" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

324

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MONTICELLO NPL SITES MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 - December 31, 2007 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no problems that have not been addressed. (inspection checklists attached). * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no unacceptable conditions. * Pond 4 leachate detection and removal systems continue to operate at normal levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Repository leachate collection and removal system (LCRS) and leachate collection system (LDS) continue to operate at normal and acceptable levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Portions of repository cover were planted with rabbitbrush seedlings to repair areas

325

Regional groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain are presented. Both a regional (200 {times} 200 km) and subregional (50 {times} 50 km) model were used in the analyses. Simulations were conducted to determine the impact of various disruptive that might take place over the life span of a proposed Yucca Mountain geologic conditions repository on the groundwater flow field, as well as changes in the water-table elevations. These conditions included increases in precipitation and groundwater recharge within the regional model, changes in permeability of existing hydrogeologic barriers, a:nd the vertical intrusion of volcanic dikes at various orientations through the saturated zone. Based on the regional analysis, the rise in the water-table under Yucca Mountain due to various postulated conditions ranged from only a few meters to 275 meters. Results of the subregional model analysis, which was used to simulate intrusive dikes approximately 4 kilometers in length in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, showed water-table rises ranging from a few meters to as much as 103 meters. Dikes oriented approximately north-south beneath Yucca Mountain produced the highest water-table rises. The conclusions drawn from this analysis are likely to change as more site-specific data become available and as the assumptions in the model are improved.

Ahola, M.; Sagar, B. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Repository sealing plan for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, fiscal years 1984 through 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a plan to develop acceptable sealing methods for a prospective nuclear waste repository in unsaturated tuff in Yucca Mountain, which is on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. Sealing is the permanent closure of the underground facility, shafts, ramps, and boreholes. Questiona associated with the performance of the sealing system form the basis for this plan. Tasks that contribute to the resolution of these questions and support the documentation required for the construction authorization application are proposed. The approach to answering the performance-related questions is divided into six steps: (1) assess the need for sealing, (2) define the design requirements, (3) measure the material properties, (4) assess the performance of sealing designs, (5) perform laboratory analyses and field testing, and (6) reassess the performance of sealing designs. Organization of the tasks supporting each step is illustrated by detailed work-flow diagrams.

Fernandez, J.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude and reduced {sup 13}C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a Contract to USA Repository a Contract to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project October 30, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a $2.5 billion management and operating (M&O) contract to USA Repository Services (USA-RS), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the URS Corporation. USA-RS will be supported by principal subcontractors: Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc., and AREVA Federal Services, Inc. "If we are to meet growing energy demand and slow the growth of greenhouse gas emissions, nuclear power must be a larger part of our energy mix; it is

329

U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project October 30, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a $2.5 billion management and operating (M&O) contract to USA Repository Services (USA-RS), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the URS Corporation. USA-RS will be supported by principal subcontractors: Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc., and AREVA Federal Services, Inc. "If we are to meet growing energy demand and slow the growth of greenhouse gas emissions, nuclear power must be a larger part of our energy mix; it is

330

Reactive transport model for the ambient unsaturated hydrogeochemical system at Yucca mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assist a technical review of a potential application for a geologic repository, a reactive transport model is presented for the ambient hydrogeochemical system at Yucca Mountain (YM). The model simulates two-phase, nonisothermal, advective and diffusive ... Keywords: Yucca mountain, geochemistry, groundwater chemistry, groundwater flow and transport, hydrology, reactive transport model, unsaturated zone

Lauren Browning; William M. Murphy; Chandrika Manepally; Randall Fedors

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nevada Rail Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final En Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final En Proposed Action: To determine a rail alignment within a rail corridor in which to construct and operate a railroad to transport spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and other materials from an existing railroad in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The Proposed Action includes the construction of railroad construction and operations support facilities. This Rail Alignment EIS analyzes two alternatives that would implement the Proposed Action: the Caliente rail

332

Two Approaches to the Geologic Disposal of Long-Lived Nuclear Waste: Yucca Mountain, Nevada and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key component of the US energy program is to provide for the safe and permanent isolation of spent nuclear fuel and long-lived radioactive waste produced through programs related to national defense and the generation of electric power by nuclear utilities. To meet this challenge, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a multi-faceted approach to the geologic disposal of long-lived nuclear wastes. Two sites are being developed or studied as current or potential deep geologic repositories for long lived radioactive wastes, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico and Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Levich, R. A.; Patterson, R. L.; Linden, R. M.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

Independent management and financial review, Yucca Mountain Project, Nevada. Final report, Appendix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425), as amended by Public Law 100-203, December 22, 1987, established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the Department of Energy (DOE), and directed the Office to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine if this site is suitable for the construction of a repository for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. Work on site characterization has been under way for several years. Thus far, about $1.47 billion have been spent on Yucca Mountain programs. This work has been funded by Congressional appropriations from a Nuclear Waste Fund to which contributions have been made by electric utility ratepayers through electric utilities generating power from nuclear power stations. The Secretary of Energy and the Governor of the State of Nevada have appointed one person each to a panel to oversee an objective, independent financial and management evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project. The Requirements for the work will include an analysis of (1) the Yucca Mountain financial and, contract management techniques and controls; (2) Project schedules and credibility of the proposed milestones; (3) Project organizational effectiveness and internal planning processes, and (4) adequacy of funding levels and funding priorities, including the cost of infrastructure and scientific studies. The recipient will provide monthly progress report and the following reports/documents will be presented as deliverables under the contract: (1) Financial and Contract Management Preliminary Report; (2) Project Scheduling Preliminary Report; (3)Project Organizational Effectiveness Preliminary Report; (4) Project Funding Levels and Funding Priorities Preliminary Report; and (5) Final Report.

NONE

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Method development and strategy for the characterization of complexly faulted and fractured rhyolitic tuffs, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The planned high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, would exist in unsaturated, fractured welded tuff. One possible contaminant pathway to the accessible environment is transport by groundwater infiltrating to the water table and flowing through the saturated zone. Therefore, an effort to characterize the hydrology of the saturated zone is being undertaken in parallel with that of the unsaturated zone. As a part of the saturated zone investigation, there wells-UE-25c{number_sign}1, UE-25c{number_sign}2, and UE-25c{number_sign}3 (hereafter called the c-holes)-were drilled to study hydraulic and transport properties of rock formations underlying the planned waste repository. The location of the c-holes is such that the formations penetrated in the unsaturated zone occur at similar depths and with similar thicknesses as at the planned repository site. In characterizing a highly heterogeneous flow system, several issues emerge. (1) The characterization strategy should allow for the virtual impossibility to enumerate and characterize all heterogeneities. (2) The methodology to characterize the heterogeneous flow system at the scale of the well tests needs to be established. (3) Tools need to be developed for scaling up the information obtained at the well-test scale to the larger scale of the site. In the present paper, the characterization strategy and the methods under development are discussed with the focus on the design and analysis of the field experiments at the c-holes.

Karasaki, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Galloway, D. [Geological Survey, Sacramento, CA (United States)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Open OntologyOpen Ontology Repository:Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonfunctional requirements Use case descriptionsUse case descriptions Wiki page:Wiki page: http://ontolog.cim3.net/cgihttp://ontolog.cim11 Open OntologyOpen Ontology Repository:Repository: Architecture andArchitecture and Interfaces3.net/cgi-- bin/wiki.pl?OpenOntologyRepository_Requirementbin/wiki.pl?OpenOntology

Baclawski, Kenneth B.

337

Use of Integrated Decay Heat Limits to Facilitate Spent Nuclear Fuel Loading to Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an alternative to the use of the linear loading or areal power density (APD) concept, using integrated decay heat limits based on the use of mountain-scale heat transfer analysis is considered to represent the thermal impact from the deposited spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to the Yucca Mountain repository. Two different integrated decay heat limits were derived to represent both the short-term (up to 50 years from the time of repository closure) and the long-term decay heat effect (up to 1500 years from the time of repository closure). The derived limits were found to appropriately represent the drift wall temperature limit (200 deg. C) and the midway between adjacent drifts temperature limit (96 deg. C) as long as used fuel is uniformly loaded into the mountain. These limits can be a useful practical guide to facilitate the loading of used fuel into Yucca Mountain. (authors)

Li, Jun; Yim, Man-Sung; McNelis, David [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University (United States); Piet, Steven [Idaho National Laboratory (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Area recommendation report for the crystalline repository project: An evaluation. [Crystalline Repository Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation is given of DOE's recommendation of the Elk River complex in North Carolina for siting the second repository. Twelve recommendations are made including a strong suggestion that the Cherokee Tribe appeal both through political and legal avenues for inclusion as an affected area primarily due to projected impacts upon economy and public health as a consequence of the potential for reduced tourism.

Beck, J E; Lowe, H; Yurkovich, S P

1986-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Multiphysics processes in partially saturated fracture rock: Experiments and models from Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the G-Tunnel underground facility. in Proceedings of theYucca Mountain showing underground facilities for the siteYucca Mountain showing underground facilities for the site

Rutqvist, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Response to West Cumbria MRWS consultation: Why a deep nuclear waste repository should not be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to West Cumbria MRWS consultation: Why a deep nuclear waste repository should not be sited geological nuclear waste repository. There a suspicion of predetermination because the only district that has. National and international guidance on how best to select potential sites for deep geological nuclear waste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Distribution of potentially hazardous phases in the subsurface at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drilling, trenching, excavation of the Exploratory Studies Facility, and other surface and underground-distributing activities have the potential to release minerals into the environment from tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Some of these minerals may be potential respiratory health hazards. Therefore, an understanding of the distribution of the minerals that may potentially be liberated during site-characterization and operation of the potential repository is crucial to ensuring worker and public safety. Analysis of previously reported mineralogy of Yucca Mountain tuffs using data and criteria from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) suggests that the following minerals are of potential concern: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite, opal-CT, erionite, mordenite, and palygorskite. The authors have re-evaluated the three-dimensional mineral distribution at Yucca Mountain above the static water level both in bulk-rock samples and in fractures, using quantitative X-ray powder diffraction analysis. Erionite, mordenite, and palygorskite occur primarily in fractures; the crystalline-silica minerals, quartz, cristobalite, and tridymite are major bulk-rock phases. Erionite occurs in the altered zone just above the lower Topopah Spring Member vitrophyre, and an occurrence below the vitrophyre but above the Calico Hills has recently been identified. In this latter occurrence, erionite is present in the matrix at levels up to 35 wt%. Mordenite and palygorskite occur throughout the vadose zone nearly to the surface. Opal-CT is limited to zeolitic horizons.

Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J.; Raymond, R. Jr.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

DOE Marks Milestone in Submitting Yucca Mountain License Application |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Marks Milestone in Submitting Yucca Mountain License Marks Milestone in Submitting Yucca Mountain License Application DOE Marks Milestone in Submitting Yucca Mountain License Application June 3, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced submittal of a license application (LA) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) seeking authorization to construct America's first repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 8,600 page application describes DOE's plan to safely isolate spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in tunnels deep underground at Yucca Mountain, a remote ridge on federally controlled land in the Mojave Desert 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Currently, the waste is stored at 121 temporary locations in 39 states

343

Material corrosion issues for nuclear waste disposition in Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For more than two decades, an extensive scientific effort has been underway to determine whether Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for...

Raul B. Rebak

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Rocky Mountain's Home page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mountain Region service area The Rocky Mountain Region is one of four regions of the Western Area Power Administration. RM sells power in Colorado, most of Wyoming, Nebraska...

345

Site characterization plan: Conceptual design report, Volume 1: Chapters 1-3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site for the prospective repository is located at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, and the waste emplacement area will be constructed in the underlying volcanic tuffs. The target horizon for waste emplacement is a sloping bed of densely welded tuff more than 650 ft below the surface and typically more than 600 ft above the water table. The conceptual design described in this report is unique among repository designs in that it uses ramps in addition to shafts to gain access to the underground facility, the emplacement horizon is located above the water table, and it is possible that 300- to 400-ft-long horizontal waste emplacement boreholes will be used. This report summarizes the design bases (site and properties of the waste package), design and performance criteria, and the design analyses performed. The current status of meeting the preclosure performance objectives for licensing and of resolving the repository design and preclosure issues is presented. The repository design presented in this report will be expanded and refined during the advanced conceptual design, the license application design, and the final procurement and construction design phases.

MacDougall, H.R.; Scully, L.W.; Tillerson, J.R. (comps.)

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste to Yucca Mountain: The Next Step in Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada,'' the Department states that certain broad transportation-related decisions can be made. These include the choice of a mode of transportation nationally (mostly legal-weight truck or mostly rail) and in Nevada (mostly rail, mostly legal-weight truck, or mostly heavy-haul truck with use of an associated intermodal transfer station), as well as the choice among alternative rail corridors or heavy-haul truck routes with use of an associated intermodal transfer station in Nevada. Although a rail line does not service the Yucca Mountain site, the Department has identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. If mostly rail is selected for Nevada, the Department would then identify a preference for one of the rail corridors in consultation with affected stakeholders, particularly the State of Nevada. DOE would then select the rail corridor and initiate a process to select a specific rail alignment within the corridor for the construction of a rail line. Five proposed rail corridors were analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement. The assessment considered the impacts of constructing a branch rail line in the five 400-meter (0.25mile) wide corridors. Each corridor connects the Yucca Mountain site with an existing mainline railroad in Nevada.

Sweeney, Robin L,; Lechel, David J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Development and Application of Reactive Transport Modeling Techniques to Study Radionuclide Migration at Yucca Mountain, NV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been chosen as a possible site for the first high level radioactive waste repository in the United States. As part of the site investigation studies, we need to make scientifically rigorous estimations of radionuclide migration in the event of a repository breach. Performance assessment models used to make these estimations are computationally intensive. We have developed two reactive transport modeling techniques to simulate radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain: (1) the selective coupling approach applied to the convection-dispersion-reaction (CDR) model and (2) a reactive stream tube approach (RST). These models were designed to capture the important processes that influence radionuclide migration while being computationally efficient. The conventional method of modeling reactive transport models is to solve a coupled set of multi-dimensional partial differential equations for the relevant chemical components in the system. We have developed an iterative solution technique, denoted the selective coupling method, that represents a versatile alternative to traditional uncoupled iterative techniques and the filly coupled global implicit method. We show that selective coupling results in computational and memory savings relative to these approaches. We develop RST as an alternative to the CDR method for solving large two- or three-dimensional reactive transport simulations for cases in which one is interested in predicting the flux across a specific control plane. In the RST method, the multidimensional problem is reduced to a series of one-dimensional transport simulations along streamlines. The key assumption with RST is that mixing at the control plane approximates the transverse dispersion between streamlines. We compare the CDR and RST approaches for several scenarios that are relevant to the Yucca Mountain Project. For example, we apply the CDR and RST approaches to model an ongoing field experiment called the Unsaturated Zone Transport Test.

Viswanathan, Hari Selvi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Yucca Mountain Project drift scale test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project is currently evaluating the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical (TMHC) response of the potential repository host rock through an in situ thermal testing program. A drift scale test (DST) was constructed during 1997 and heaters were turned on in December 1997. The DST includes nine canister-sized containers with thirty operating heaters each located within the heated drift (HD) and fifty wing heaters located in boreholes in both ribs with a total power output of nominally 210kW. A total of 147 boreholes (combined length of 3.3 km) houses most of the over 3700 TMHC sensors connected with 201 km of cabling to a central data acquisition system. The DST is located in the Exploratory Studies Facility in a 5-m diameter drift approximately 50 m in length. Heating will last up to four years and cooling will last another four years. The rock mass surrounding the DST will experience a harsh thermal environment with rock surface temperatures expected to reach a maximum of about 200 C. This paper describes the process of designing the DST. The first 38 m of the 50-m long Heated Drift (HD) is dedicated to collection of data that will lead to a better understanding of the complex coupled TMHC processes in the host rock of the proposed repository. The final 12 m is dedicated to evaluating the interactions between the heated rock mass and cast-in-place (CIP) concrete ground support systems at elevated temperatures. In addition to a description of the DST design, data from site characterization, and a general description of the analyses and analysis approach used to design the test and make pretest predictions are presented. Test-scoping and pretest numerical predictions of one way thermal-hydrologic, thermal-mechanical, and thermal-chemical behaviors have been completed (TRW, 1997a). These analyses suggest that a dry-out zone will be created around the DST and a 10,000 m{sup 3} volume of rock will experience temperatures above 100 C. The HD will experience large stress increases, particularly in the crown of the drift. Thermoelastic displacements of up to about 16 mm are predicted for some thermomechanical gages. Additional analyses using more complex models will be performed during the conduct of the DST and the results compared with measured data.

Finley, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Blair, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Labs., CA (United States); Boyle, W.J. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Site characterization plan: Conceptual design report, Volume 2: Chapters 4-9: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a description of a prospective geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste to support the development of the Site Characterization Plan for the Yucca Mountain site. The target horizon for waste emplacement is a sloping bed of densely welded tuff more than 650 ft below the surface and typically more than 600 ft above the water table. The conceptual design described in this report is unique among repository designs in that it uses ramps in addition to shafts to gain access to the underground facility, the emplacement horizon is located above the water table, and it is possible that 300- to 400-ft-long horizontal waste emplacement boreholes will be used. This report summarizes the design bases (site and properties of the waste package), design and performance criteria, and the design analyses performed. The current status of meeting the preclosure performance objectives for licensing and of resolving the repository design and preclosure issues is presented. The repository design presented in this report will be expanded and refined during the advanced conceptual design, the license application design, and the final procurement and construction design phases. 147 refs., 145 figs., 83 tabs.

MacDougall, H.R.; Scully, L.W.; Tillerson, J.R. (comps.)

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R&D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of the disposal system. Clay/shale, salt, and crystalline rock media are selected as the basis for reference mined geologic disposal concepts in this study, consistent with advanced international repository programs, and previous investigations in the U.S. The U.S. pursued deep geologic disposal programs in crystalline rock, shale, salt, and volcanic rock in the years leading up to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, or NWPA (Rechard et al. 2011). The 1987 NWPA amendment act focused the U.S. program on unsaturated, volcanic rock at the Yucca Mountain site, culminating in the 2008 license application. Additional work on unsaturated, crystalline rock settings (e.g., volcanic tuff) is not required to support this generic study. Reference disposal concepts are selected for the media listed above and for deep borehole disposal, drawing from recent work in the U.S. and internationally. The main features of the repository concepts are discussed in Section 4.5 and summarized in Table ES-1. Temperature histories at the waste package surface and a specified distance into the host rock are calculated for combinations of waste types and reference disposal concepts, specifying waste package emplacement modes. Target maximum waste package surface temperatures are identified, enabling a sensitivity study to inform the tradeoff between the quantity of waste per disposal package, and decay storage duration, with respect to peak temperature at the waste package surface. For surface storage duration on the order of 100 years or less, waste package sizes for direct disposal of SNF are effectively limited to 4-PWR configurations (or equivalent size and output). Thermal results are summarized, along with recommendations for follow-on work including adding additional reference concepts, verification and uncertainty analysis for thermal calculations, developing descriptions of surface facilities and other system details, and cost estimation to support system-level evaluations.

Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Dupont, Mark (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Blink, James A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Fratoni, Massimiliano (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Greenberg, Harris (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Carter, Joe (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Unsaturated zone waters from the Nopal I natural analog, Chihuahua, Mexico -- Implications for radionuclide mobility at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical and U-Th isotopic data on unsaturated zone waters from the Nopal I natural analog reveal effects of water-rock interaction and help constrain models of radionuclide release and transport at the site and, by analogy, at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Geochemical reaction-path modeling indicates that, under oxidizing conditions, dissolution of uraninite (spent fuel analog) by these waters will lead to eventual schoepite precipitation regardless of initial silica concentration provided that groundwater is not continuously replenished. Thus, less soluble uranyl silicates may not dominate the initial alteration assemblage and keep dissolved U concentrations low. Uranium-series activity ratios are consistent with models of U transport at the site and display varying degrees of leaching versus recoil mobilization. Thorium concentrations may reflect the importance of colloidal transport of low-solubility radionuclides in the unsaturated zone.

Pickett, D.A.; Murphy, W.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Engineering – Nuclear Engineering in the GRADUATEDoctor of Philosophy in Nuclear Engineering Departmentof Nuclear Engineering University of California, Berkeley

Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transport in the unsaturated zone at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Yucca Mountain, Nevada G.J. Moridis *, Q. Hu, Y.-S. Wu, G.S. Bodvarsson Earth Sciences Division in a repository to be situated in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. In this study we of the spatial distribution of hydraulic and transport properties in the Yucca Mountain subsurface are considered

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

354

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rocky Mountain Research Laboratories -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rocky Mountain Research Rocky Mountain Research Laboratories - CO 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROCKY MOUNTAIN RESEARCH LABORATORIES (CO.06 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1020 Yuma Street , Denver , Colorado CO.06-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 CO.06-3 Site Operations: Processed beryllium on a pilot scale. CO.06-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication of radioactive materials handled at the site CO.06-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP CO.06-2 Also see Documents Related to ROCKY MOUNTAIN RESEARCH LABORATORIES CO.06-1 - Rocky Mountain Research Letter; Burton to Smith; Subject:

355

The following changes to the EIA in the Yucca Mountain Rule Docket (A-95-12, V-B-2) were made in this document to correct typographical and other minor errors in the text.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The following changes to the EIA in the Yucca Mountain Rule Docket (A-95-12, V-B-2) were made Radiation Protection Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada" Pg. ii Item 4.1 changed to read, "Performance Standards with Expected Values of TSPA-SR Calculations for a Repository at Yucca Mountain for Nominal

356

Interaction of Plutonium with Bacteria in the Repository Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microorganisms in the nuclear waste repository environment may interact with plutonium through (1) sorption, (2) intracellular accumulation, and (3) transformation speciation. These interactions may retard or enhance the mobility of Pu by precipitation reactions, biocolloid formation, or production of more soluble species. Current and planned radioactive waste repository environments, such as deep subsurface halite and granite formations, are considered extreme relative to life processes in the near-surface terrestrial environment. There is a paucity of information on the biotransformation of radionuclides by microorganisms present in such extreme environments. In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction of plutonium with microorganisms present in the waste repository sites we investigated a pure culture (Halomonas sp.) and a mixed culture of bacteria (Haloarcula sinaiiensis, Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Altermonas sp., and a {gamma}-proteobacterium) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and an Acetobacterium sp. from alkaline groundwater at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland.

Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.; Lucero, D. A.; Papenguth, H. W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Modeling Approach/Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1, with ROTC-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes an approach for preliminary (Phase I) flow and transport modeling for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This modeling will take place before the planned Phase II round of data collection to better identify the remaining data gaps before the fieldwork begins. Because of the geologic complexity, limited number of borings, and large vertical gradients, there is considerable uncertainty in the conceptual model for flow; thus different conceptual models will be evaluated, in addition to different framework and recharge models. The transport simulations will not be used to formally calculate the Contaminant Boundary at this time. The modeling (Phase II) will occur only after the available data are considered sufficient in scope and quality.

Greg Ruskauff

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies continue on the use of organic acids as tracers in hydrology studies of Yucca Mountain. Work performed during this time period has been concentrated in three main areas: the familiarization with, and optimization of, the LC-MS hardware and data system; the initial development of soil column test procedures, which are used for evaluation of both the columns themselves and the tracer compounds; and continuation of the batch sorption and degradation studies for the potential tracers. All three of these tasks will continue, as the addition of new tracer compounds, analytical information, and equipment will necessitate further evaluation of existing methods and procedures. Also included in this report is the final report on an information system.

Stetzenbach, K.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Pore-water extraction from unsaturated tuff by triaxial and one-dimensional compression methods, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrologic system in the unsaturated tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated for the US Department of Energy by the Yucca Mountain Project Branch of the US Geological Survey as a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository. Part of this investigation includes a hydrochemical study that is being made to assess characteristics of the hydrologic system such as: traveltime, direction of flow, recharge and source relations, and types and magnitudes of chemical reactions in the unsaturated tuff. In addition, this hydrochemical information will be used in the study of the dispersive and corrosive effects of unsaturated-zone water on the radioactive-waste storage canisters. This report describes the design and validation of laboratory experimental procedures for extracting representative samples of uncontaminated pore water from welded and nonwelded, unsaturated tuffs from the Nevada Test Site.

Mower, T.E. [PRC Environmental Management, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Higgins, J.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Yang, In C.; Peters, C.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on Track Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on Track December 13, 2007 - 4:44pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) today released two independent assessments addressing areas critical to the overall success of the Yucca Mountain repository program. These assessments, which include an independent review of the OCRWM Quality Assurance (QA) Program and an independent review of its engineering processes and procedures, have concluded that the Yucca Mountain Project's current QA and engineering processes and procedures are consistent with standard nuclear industry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on Track Two Independent Assessments Find the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project is on Track December 13, 2007 - 4:44pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) today released two independent assessments addressing areas critical to the overall success of the Yucca Mountain repository program. These assessments, which include an independent review of the OCRWM Quality Assurance (QA) Program and an independent review of its engineering processes and procedures, have concluded that the Yucca Mountain Project's current QA and engineering processes and procedures are consistent with standard nuclear industry

362

EA-1968: Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) Campus, Golden, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is preparing a Site-Wide Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of possible site operations and improvements over the next five to ten years at DOE’s STM campus of NREL and nearby leased support facilities in Golden, Colorado. This proposed action would support DOE’s mission to research, develop, and deploy energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies and would consist of: • Research, routine laboratory, and site operation enhancements • New building construction and modifications of existing buildings • Infrastructure and utilities upgrades and enhancements

363

Geology of the USW SD-12 drill hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drill hole USW SD-12 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the {open_quotes}Systematic Drilling Program,{close_quotes} as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-12 drill hole is located in the central part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility and slightly south of midway between the North Ramp and planned South Ramp declines. Drill hole USW SD-12 is 2166.3 ft (660.26 m) deep, and the core recovered essentially complete sections of ash-flow tuffs belonging to the lower half of the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, and the Topopah Spring Tuff, all of which are part of the Miocene Paintbrush Group. A virtually complete section of the Calico Hills Formation was also recovered, as was core from the entire Prow Pass Tuff formation of the Crater Flat Group.

Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engstrom, D.A. [Spectra Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.. ' \ MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 -December 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Dayvault JR 7CJ7 This report summarizes current project status and activities implemented during October tiU'ough December 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities for the Monticello MIII Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection repmis, site meteorological data, and monitoring summary for tlw ex situ ground water treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 · * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities (see attached repmis). .

365

Progress report No. 2 on the Scientific Investigation Program for the Nevada Yucca Mountain Site, October 1, 1989--March 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of Section 113(b)(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Pub. L. No. 97-425), as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report on the progress of scientific investigation activities at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada for October 1, 1989, through March 31, 1990. This report is the second of a series of reports that are issued at intervals of approximately six months during the period of scientific investigation. The progress report presents short summaries of the status of scientific investigation activities and cites technical reports and research products that provide more detailed information on the activities. The report provides highlights of work started during the reporting period, work in progress, and work completed and documented during the reporting period. In addition, the report is the vehicle for discussing major changes, if any, to the DOE`s scientific investigation program. The progress report conveys information in a convenient summary form to be used for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be the mechanism for controlling and documenting technical or policy positions regarding changes in schedules or the technical program. Such changes are controlled through rigorous DOE change-control procedures. The progress report only describes such approval changes. 49 refs., 3 tabs.

NONE

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, June 1--December 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground water tracers are solutes dissolved in or carried by ground water to delineate flow pathways. Tracers provide information on direction and speed of water movement and that of contaminants that might be conveyed by the water. Tracers can also be used to measure effective porosity, hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and solute distribution coefficients. For most applications tracers should be conservative, that is, move at the same rate as the water and not sorb to aquifer materials. Tracers must have a number of properties to be functional. Regardless of the desired properties, the chemical and physical behavior of a tracer in ground water and the porous medium under study must be understood. Good estimates of tracer behavior can be obtained from laboratory studies. Studies in this proposal will address tracer properties with analytical method development, static sorption and degradation studies and column transport studies, Mutagenicity tests will be performed on promising candidates. The tracers that will be used for these experiments are fluorinated organic acids and other organic compounds that have the chemical and biological stability necessary to be effective in the Yucca Mountain environment. Special emphasis will be placed on compounds that fluoresce or have very large ultraviolet absorption coefficients for very high analytical sensitivity.

Stetzenbach, K.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Data Qualification Report: Precipitation Chloride Data for Use on the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data covered by this qualification report have been cited in analysis/model reports (AMRs) to support the Site Recommendation in determining the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a repository for high level nuclear waste. Those analyses cited both qualified and unqualified hydrochemical data. This report evaluates unqualified precipitation chloride data based on the pedigree of the data and within the context of supporting analyses on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The following AMRs use the unqualified chloride data considered in this report: (1) AMR S0040, ''Geochemical and Isotopic Constraints on Groundwater Flow Directions, Mixing and Recharge at Yucca Mountain'' (ANL-NBS-HS-000021) (Kwicklis 2000)--an analysis of groundwater recharge rates, flow directions and velocities, and mixing proportions of water from different source areas based on groundwater geochemical and isotopic data. (2) AMR U0085, ''Analysis of Geochemical Data for the Unsaturated Zone'' (ANL-NBS-HS-000017) (Fabryka-Martin 2000)--identifies fluid geochemical parameters for the unsaturated zone, local precipitation, and surface water; discusses the occurrence and origins of fracture minerals; and presents a thermal history of the unsaturated zone. These data are being evaluated for inclusion in technical products to include AMRs and Process Modeling Reports (PMRs) that support the Site Recommendation and that may also be used to support the License Application. A finding that the precipitation chloride data are qualified means that the data are adequate for generalized use and can be appropriately used in a wide variety of applications, so long as consideration is given to limitations on the accuracy, precision and representativeness of the data for an intended use in a technical product.

C. Wilson

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 The Department or Energy's Office of Civilian Radioaztivc Waste Management (OCRWM) is preparing to obtain a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In December 2005, OCRWM identified design process inadequacies and suspended the appro\lal of new7 documents 'important to waste isolation' or safety analysis that were subject to quality assurance procedures. Waste isolation refers to limiting radioactive exposure to the public after the waste is placed in the repository; while safety refers to limiting exposure prior to

369

Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 Yucca Mountain Project Document Suspension, OAS-M-08-07 The Department or Energy's Office of Civilian Radioaztivc Waste Management (OCRWM) is preparing to obtain a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In December 2005, OCRWM identified design process inadequacies and suspended the appro\lal of new7 documents 'important to waste isolation' or safety analysis that were subject to quality assurance procedures. Waste isolation refers to limiting radioactive exposure to the public after the waste is placed in the repository; while safety refers to limiting exposure prior to

370

LOOKING PAST YUCCA MOUNTAIN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LOOKING PAST YUCCA MOUNTAIN ... NUCLEAR WASTE: Blue-ribbon panel calls for interim storage of spent fuel ...

GLENN HESS

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

371

Middlesex Sampling Plant environmental report for calendar year 1992, 239 Mountain Avenue, Middlesex, New Jersey. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) and provides the results for 1992. The site, in the Borough of Middlesex, New Jersey, is a fenced area and includes four buildings and two storage piles that contain 50,800 m{sup 3} of radioactive and mixed hazardous waste. More than 70 percent of the MSP site is paved with asphalt. The MSP facility was established in 1943 by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) to sample, store, and/or ship uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores. In 1955 the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), successor to MED, terminated the operation and later used the site for storage and limited sampling of thorium residues. In 1967 AEC activities ceased, onsite structures were decontaminated, and the site was certified for unrestricted use under criteria applicable at that time. In 1980 the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a multiphase remedial action project to clean up several vicinity properties onto which contamination from the plant had migrated. Material from these properties was consolidated into the storage piles onsite. Environmental surveillance of MSP began in 1980 when Congress added the site to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The environmental surveillance program at MSP includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-230, thorium-232, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, chemical analyses are performed to detect metals and organic compounds in surface water and groundwater and metals in sediments. This program assists in fulfilling th DOE policy of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

TBM tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is a scientific endeavor to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain for the first long term, high level nuclear waste repository in the United States. Status of this long-term project form the construction perspective is described. A key element is construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), which is being excavated with a 7. 6 m(25 ft) diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM). Development of the ESF may include the excavation of over 15 km (9.3 mi) of tunnel varying in size from 3 to 7.6 m(10 to 25 ft). Prior to construction, extensive constructibility reviews were an interactive part of the final design. Intent was to establish a constructible design that met the long-term stability requirements for radiological safety of a future repository while maintaining flexibility for the scientific investigations and acceptable tunneling productivity.

Williamson, G.E.; Gowring, I.M. [ed.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Blowup at Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...States waste disposal Yucca Mountain GeoRef, Copyright...attracted enough funding for a proof-of-concept...ATMI id zero? Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Uk...pluto-nium disposal (Science...mate-rial-i.e., Yucca Mountain. He says he...

Gary Taubes

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 91, 6, pp. 15951606, December 2001 The 1992 Little Skull Mountain Earthquake Sequence,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(NTS) approximately 20 km from Yucca Mountain, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste Little Skull Mountain Earthquake Sequence, Southern Nevada Test Site by Kenneth D. Smith, James N. Brune Skull Mountain, Nevada, 29 June 1992 earth- quake occurred in the southwest portion of Nevada Test Site

Sheehan, Anne F.

375

MECHANICAL DEGRADATION OF EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN - A CASE STUDY IN ROCK MECHANICS, PART 1: NONLITHOPHYSAL ROCK, PART 2: LITHOPHYSAL ROCK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for a US high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation throughout the regulatory period for repository performance.

M. Lin, D. Kicker, B. Damjanac, M. Board, and M. Karakouzian

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

376

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and Reversal of the Board's Ruling on the Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and Reversal of the Board's Ruling on the Motion to Withdraw Proceeding before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on DOE's application for a license to construct a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; DOE brief arguing that the NRC should review and reverse the order of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board denying DOE's motion to withdraw its application. Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and Reversal of the Board's Ruling on the Motion to Withdraw More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Reply to the Responses to the

377

Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A comparative application of the Repository Integration Program (RIP) to Total System Performance Assessment, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 and FY 1992, Sandia National Laboratory and Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory were assigned the responsibility to generate initial Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) of the Yucca Mountain site. The analyses performed by these organizations (called TSPA-1991) are reported in Barnard et al(1992) and Eslinger et al. (1993). During this same time period, Golder Associates Inc. was assigned the task of generating a model capable of analyzing the total system performance of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The developed model, called Repository Integration Program (RIP), is documented in Kossik and Hachey (1993), Miller et al. (1993), and Golder Associates Inc. (1993). In FY 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of TSPA-2. Prior to initiating the next TSPA iteration, it was decided that it would be valuable to evaluate the applicability of RIP for use in this iteration. Therefore, analyses were conducted to compare the results generated by RIP to those reported in TSPA-1991. In particular, the aim was to generate a RIP input data set as equivalent as possible to that documented in Barnard et al. (1992) and to analyze the total system performance (as well as the performance of the individual subsystem components of the waste package/Engineered Barrier System (EBS), unsaturated gaseous flow and transport, unsaturated aqueous flow and transport, saturated flow and transport, and disruptive processes/events). The performance measure for comparison with the results of TSPA-1991 is the cumulative release of radionuclides to the accessible environment over a 10,000-year period following closure normalized to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits specified in 40 CFR 191.

NONE

1993-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

Modeling studies of gas movement and moisture migration at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling studies on moisture redistribution processes that are mediated by gas phase flow and diffusion have been carried out. The problem addressed is the effect of a lowered humidity of the soil gas at the land surface on moisture removal from Yucca Mountain, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. At the land surface, humid formation gas contacts much drier atmospheric air. Near this contact, the humidity of the soil gas may be considerably lower than at greater depth, where the authors expect equilibrium with the liquid phase and close to 100% humidity. The lower relative humidity of the soil gas may be modeled by imposing, at the land surface, an additional negative capillary suction corresponding to vapor pressure lowering according to Kelvin`s Equation, thus providing a driving force for the upward movement of moisture in both the vapor and liquid phases. Sensitivity studies show that moisture removal from Yucca Mountain arising from the lowered-relative-humidity boundary condition is controlled by vapor diffusion. There is much experimental evidence in the soil literature that diffusion of vapor is enhanced due to pore-level phase change effects by a few orders of magnitude. Modeling results presented here will account for this enhancement in vapor diffusion.

Tsang, Y.W.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Mechanical defradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain- A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation.

M. Lin; D. Kicker; B. Damjanac; M. Board; M. Karakouzian

2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

April 1 - June 30, 2008 April 1 - June 30, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during April through June 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities. * Shrub seedlings planted last fall had a poor survival rate. * New damage to shrubs and vole infestation is not evident. * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no abnormalities.

382

TBM tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is a scientific endeavor to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain for the first long-term, high-level nuclear waste repository in the United States. The current status of this long-term project from the construction perspective is described. A key element is construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Tunnel, which is being excavated with a 7.6 m (25 ft) diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM). Development of the ESF may include the excavation of over 15 km (9.3 mi) of tunnel varying in size from 3.0 to 7.6 m (10 to 25 ft). Prior to construction, extensive constructability reviews were an interactive part of the final design. The intent was to establish a constructable design that met the long-term stability requirements for radiological safety of a future repository, while maintaining flexibility for the scientific investigations and acceptable tunneling productivity.

Morris, J.P.; Hansmire, W.H. [Kiewit Construction Co., Las Vegas, NV (United States)]|[Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Site characterization plan: Conceptual design report: Volume 4, Appendices F-O: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site for the prospective repository is located at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, and the waste emplacement area will be constructed in the underlying volcanic tuffs. The target horizon for waste emplacement is a sloping bed of densely welded tuff more than 650 ft below the surface and typically more than 600 ft above the water table. The conceptual design described in this report is unique among repository designs in that it uses ramps in addition to shafts to gain access to the underground facility, the emplacement horizon is located above the water table, and it is possible that 300- to 400-ft-long horizontal waste emplacement boreholes will be used. This report summarizes the design bases, design and performance criteria, and the design analyses performed. The current status of meeting the preclosure performance objectives for licensing and of resolving the repository design and preclosure issues is presented. The repository design presented in this report will be expanded and refined during the advanced conceptual design, the license application design, and the final procurement and construction design phases. Volume 4 contains Appendices F to O.

MacDougall, H R; Scully, L W; Tillerson, J R [comps.] [comps.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

EA-1968: Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) Campus Site-Wide Environmental Assessment, Golden, Colorado

386

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

387

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

388

Eocene and Oligocene Floras and Vegetation of the Rocky Mountains Scott L. Wing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. The JSTOR Archive is a trusted digital repository providing of the state of Wy- oming (106,000 kmz), and their total outcrop The Rocky Mountain region is geologicallydi

Lyons, S. Kathleen

389

About Rocky Mountain Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rates About the Rocky Mountain Region RM Office The Platte River Power Authority in Colorado, Nebraska Public Power District, Kansas Electric Power Cooperative and Wyoming...

390

Yucca Mountain Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yucca Mountain Engineering Based on the success of the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, INL secured a lead role to provide engineering design and operations support for the...

391

Board Oversight of the DOE's Scientific and Technical Activities at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Board Oversight of the DOE's Scientific and Technical Activities at Yucca Mountain The DOE is characterizing Yucca Mountain in Nevada to evaluate the suitability of the site for con. In addi- tion, individual Board members attended DOE workshops and traveled to Yucca Mountain. I

392

Location and mechanism of the Little Skull Mountain earthquake as constrained by satellite radar interferometry and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designed to measure the strain rate across the region around Yucca Mountain. The LSM earthquake complicates parameters; 7260 Seismology: Theory and modeling; KEYWORDS: InSAR, joint inversion, seismic, Yucca Mountain 1. Introduction [2] Yucca Mountain, a proposed long-term (103 ­105 years) disposal site for high-level radioactive

393

A Radionuclide Transport Model for the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain Bruce A. Robinson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Radionuclide Transport Model for the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain Bruce A. Robinson Zhiming model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. The model developed by the Yucca Mountain Project based on calibrations to site data. The particle-tracking technique

Lu, Zhiming

394

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic rupture through a branched fault2 configuration at Yucca Mountain and resulting3 ground analyses. This is motivated by the normal faults in the vicinity10 of Yucca Mountain, NV, a potential site fault12 located approximately 1 km west of the crest of Yucca Mountain, is the13 most active

Dmowska, Renata

395

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (CRWMS M&O 2000b) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) engineering design basis in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The engineering design basis documented in the PDD is to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the engineering design basis from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the engineering design basis captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 2-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1),the Engineering Design Bases (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (YMP 2000a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. M. Curry

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Yucca Mountain - The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its Archiving  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its Archiving Plan Yucca Mountain - The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its Archiving Plan Proceeding before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on DOE's application for a license to construct a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; DOE provides answers to the questions of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board regarding its plans to archive its document collection on the Licensing Support Network. Yucca Mountain - The Department of Energy's Status Report on Its Archiving Plan More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy's Response to Petitions to Intervene Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Reply to the Responses to the Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Brief in Support of Review and

398

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification Brief filed before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the proceeding on DOE's applciation to construct a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; DOE opposes the motion of Washington, South Carolina, Aiken County, and White Pine County to disqualify Commissioners Magwood and Ostendorff from voting on the appeal of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board's denial of DOE's motion to withdraw its application. Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal/Disqualification More Documents & Publications 3116 Public Meeting Summaries - November 2006

399

Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating FluidFlow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multidimensional, mountain-scale, thermal-hydrologic (TH) numerical model is presented for investigating unsaturated flow behavior in response to decay heat from the radioactive waste repository in the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone (UZ), Nevada. The model, consisting of both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) representations of the UZ repository system, is based on the current repository design, drift layout, thermal loading scenario, and estimated current and future climate conditions. This mountain-scale TH model evaluates the coupled TH processes related to mountain-scale UZ flow. It also simulates the impact of radioactive waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including heat-driven processes occurring near and far away from the emplacement tunnels or drifts. The model simulations predict thermally perturbed liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature elevations, as well as the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes and drainage between drifts. These simulations provide mountain-scale thermally perturbed flow fields for assessing the repository performance under thermal loading conditions.

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain repository site" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Progression of performance assessment modeling for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes the evolution of consequence modeling for a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. The discussion includes four early performance assessments (PAs) conducted between 1982 and 1995 to support selection and to evaluate feasibility and three major \\{PAs\\} conducted between 1998 and 2008 to evaluate viability, recommend the site, and assess compliance. Modeling efforts in 1982 estimated dose to individuals 18 km from the site caused by volcanic eruption through the repository. Modeling in 1984 estimated releases via the groundwater pathway because of container corrosion. In combination, this early analysis supported the first environmental assessment. Analysts in 1991 evaluated cumulative release, as specified in the 1985 US radiation protection standards, via the groundwater pathway over 104 yr at a 5-km boundary by modeling waste degradation and flow/transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones. By 1992, however, the US Congress mandated a change to a dose measure. Thus, the 1993 and 1995 performance assessments improved modeling of waste container degradation to provide better estimates of radionuclide release rates out to 106 yr. The 1998 viability assessment was a major step in modeling complexity. Dose at a 20-km boundary from the repository was evaluated through 106 yr for undisturbed conditions using more elaborate modeling of flow and the addition of modules for modeling infiltration, drift seepage, the chemical environment, and biosphere transport. The 2000 assessment for the site recommendation refined the analysis. Seepage modeling was greatly improved and waste form degradation modeling included more chemical dependence. The 2008 compliance assessment for the license application incorporated the influence of the seismicity on waste package performance to evaluate dose at an ~18-km boundary.

Rob P. Rechard; Michael L. Wilson; S. David Sevougian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

King Mountain | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

King Mountain Facility King Mountain Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy...

403

Use of a United States mid-Pacific Island territory for a Pacific Island Repository System (PIRS): Extended summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of using a mid-ocean island for a geologic high-level waste repository was investigated. The technical advantages include geographical isolation and near-infinite ocean dilution as a backup to repository geological waste isolation. The institutional advantages are reduced siting problems and the potential of creating an international waste repository. Establishment of international waste repository would allow cost sharing, aid US nonproliferation goals, and assure proper disposal of spent fuel from developing countries. The major uncertainties in this concept are rock conditions at waste disposal depths and costs. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rocky Mountain Remediation Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 June 6, 1997 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Rocky Mountain Remediation Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-97-04) This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of noncompliances associated with the dispersal of radioactive material during the remediation of trenches. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, Kaiser-Hill Company - EA-97-03 Consent Order, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC - EA 98-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation , Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

405

A Multiattribute Utility Analysis of Sites Nominated For Characterizat...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Multiattribute Utility Analysis of Sites Nominated For Characterization For the First Radioactive Waste Repository - A Decision Aiding Methodology A Multiattribute Utility...

406

Mountainous | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mountainous Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mountainous Dictionary.png Mountainous: A geothermal areal located in terrain characterized by rugged and steep topography with high relief Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Topographic Features List of topographic features commonly encountered in geothermal resource areas: Mountainous Horst and Graben Shield Volcano Flat Lava Dome Stratovolcano Cinder Cone Caldera Depression Resurgent Dome Complex The interior of Iceland holds a vast expanse of mountainous geothermal areas, one of the more famous areas is landmannalaugar, Iceland. Photo by

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