Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Geothermal Area White Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: White Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Hampshire Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

2

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Socorro Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

3

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

4

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

5

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

6

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

7

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

8

Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Map: Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Coordinates: 33.352°, -115.353° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.352,"lon":-115.353,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Bald Mountain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.365833333333°, -120.2425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.365833333333,"lon":-120.2425,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Microsoft Word - BlueMountainGeotherm_FONSI_FinalDrft v3 Clean...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR NEVADA GEOTHERMAL POWER'S BLUE MOUNTAIN GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN HUMBOLDT AND PERSHING...

11

Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Shallow exploration drilling on the west flank of Blue Mountain discovered sub economic gold mineralization and a spatially associated active geothermal system. The gold mineralization is an unusual example of an acid sulfate type epithermal system developed in pre Tertiary sedimentary host rocks. The geothermal system is largely unexplored but is unusual in that surface manifestation s typically associated with active geothermal system are not present. Authors Andrew J. Parr and Timothy J. Percival

12

Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

13

Geothermal Energy Resource Investigations, Chocolate Mountains Aerial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations, Chocolate Mountains Aerial Investigations, Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range, Imperial Valley, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Energy Resource Investigations, Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range, Imperial Valley, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The US Navy's Geothermal Program Office (GPO), has conducted geothermal exploration in the Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range (CMAGR) since the mid-1970s. At this time, the focus of the GPO had been on the area to the east of the Hot Mineral Spa KGRA, Glamis and areas within the Chocolate Mountains themselves. Using potential field geophysics, mercury surveys and geologic mapping to identify potential anomalies related to recent hydrothermal activity. After a brief hiatus starting in

14

Drum Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.544722222222,"lon":-112.91611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8,"lon":-118.87,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6751,"lon":-117.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

17

Drum Mountain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Drum Mountain Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.544722222222°, -112.91611111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.544722222222,"lon":-112.91611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

White Mountain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: White Mountain Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 44.571666666667°, -114.47916666667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.571666666667,"lon":-114.47916666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

19

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Tungsten Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6751,"lon":-117.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mcgee Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mcgee Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8,"lon":-118.87,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Blue Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blue Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (15) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41,"lon":-118.13,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Cuttings Analysis At Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cuttings_Analysis_At_Jemez_Mountain_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=473910

23

Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine porosity of the reservoir Notes The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be

24

Blue Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (15) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41,"lon":-118.13,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

Glass Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7,"lon":-121.45,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Preliminary Structural Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract The Blue Mountain geothermal field is a blind geothermalprospect (i.e., no surface hot springs) along the west flank of BlueMountain in southern Humboldt County, Nevada. Developmentwells in the system have high flow rates and temperatures above190°C at depths of ~600 to 1,070 m. Blue Mountain is a small~8-km-long east-tilted fault block situated between the EugeneMountains and Slumbering Hills. The geothermal field occupiesthe intersection between a regional NNE- to ENE-striking,west-dipping

27

Cuttings Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (1976) Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cuttings_Analysis_At_Marysville_Mountain_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=473911"

28

Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (3) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Project: Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (3) Development Project: Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (3) Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 39.32.41" N, 112°55'1" W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 39.32.41" N, 112°55'1" W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

29

Geothermal Literature Review At White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location White Mountains Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_White_Mountains_Area_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=510828

30

Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI: Unavailable Core Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Blue Mountain Geothermal...

31

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

32

Mountain home known geothermal resource area: an environmental analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mountain Home KGRA encompasses an area of 3853 hectares (ha) at the foot of the Mount Bennett Hills in Elmore County, Idaho. The site is associated with an arid climate and high winds that generate an acute dust problem. The KGRA lies adjacent to the northwest-southeast trending fault zone that reflects the northern boundary of the western Snake River Plain graben. Data indicate that a careful analysis of the subsidence potential is needed prior to extensive geothermal development. Surface water resources are confined to several small creeks. Lands are utilized for irrigated farmlands and rangeland for livestock. There are no apparent soil limitations to geothermal development. Sage grouse and mule deer are the major species of concern. The potential of locating significant heritage resources other than the Oregon Trail or the bathhouse debris appears to be relatively slight.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Overview of Geothermal Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Energy Geothermal Energy Development Kermit Witherbee Geothermal Geologist/Analyst DOE Office of Indian Energy Webcast: Overview of Geothermal Energy Development Tuesday, January 10, 2012 Geothermal Geology and Resources Environmental Impacts Geothermal Technology - Energy Conversion Geothermal Leasing and Development 2 PRESENTATION OUTLINE GEOTHERMAL GEOLOGY AND RESOURCES 3 Geology - Plate Tectonics 4 Plate Tectonic Processes Schematic Cross-Section "Extensional" Systems- "Rifting" Basin and Range Rio Grand Rift Imperial Valley East Africa Rift Valley "Magmatic" Systems Cascade Range 6 Geothermal Resources(USGS Fact Sheet 2008-3062) 7 State Systems

34

Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (2) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project (2) Project (2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (2) Project Location Information Coordinates 39.544722222222°, -112.91611111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.544722222222,"lon":-112.91611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Geothermal development in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

San Kampaeng and Fang geothermal areas are considered areas of interest for exploitation of geothermal energy. The technologies of exploration and development have been studied by Thai scientists and engineers during the past four years. The first geothermal deep exploration well was drilled, in cooperation with Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), in the San Kampaeng geothermal area. In 1985, supplementary work is planned to define the deep structural setting in greater detail before starting to drill the next deep exploration well. In Fang geothermal area some shallow exploitation wells have been drilled to obtain fluid to feed a demonstration binary system of 120 kWe, with the technical cooperation of BRGM and GEOWATT, France.

Praserdvigai, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Electrical Resistivity and Self-Potential Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Nevada Abstract Self potential and electrical resistivity surveys have been completed at the Blue Mountain geothermal area to search for the source of thermal fluids discovered during drilling for mineral exploration, and to help characterize the geothermal resource. Two large SP anomalies are associated with the artesian thermal area and the area of highest temperature observed in drill holes. Two similar anomalies were mapped 1 to 3 km to the south

37

STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Author BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility Citation BRIAN D. FAIRBANK. 2012. STATEMENT OF BRIAN D. FAIRBANK Nevada Geothermal Power Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Facility. N/Ap. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=STATEMENT_OF_BRIAN_D._FAIRBANK_Nevada_Geothermal_Power_Inc.%27s_Blue_Mountain_Geothermal_Power_Facility&oldid=682760

38

Rocky Mountain White Tilapia Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tilapia Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Tilapia Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rocky Mountain White Tilapia Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Rocky Mountain White Tilapia Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Alamosa, Colorado Coordinates 37.4694491°, -105.8700214° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

39

Geothermal materials development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Assessment of geothermal development in Puna, Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

The following subjects are discussed: the district of Puna prior to geothermal development, socioeconomic conditions, alternative modes of geothermal development, social benefits and costs of geothermal development, and geothermal development policy and its direction. (MHR)

Kamins, R.M.; Tinning, K.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geothermal Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Drilling Success at Blue Mountain, Nevada Abstract Exploration in a blind prospect has led to the confirmation of a geothermal resource at Blue Mt.Nevada. The latest results include drilling of three production wells into Piedmont faults. These wells produce from a 185 to 190°C dilute benign brine reservoir. Short flow tests have shown prolific flow rates and indications of reservoir continuity.Well entries have shown that system permeability is fault-dominated. This is confirmed by the results of seismic reflection imaging. Young faulting in the area includes intersecting range front faults that strike NW, NS, and NE. Exposure of

42

Geothermal materials development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level 1 and 2 Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results transferred to industry. In FY 1990, the R D efforts were focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}- resistant lightweight cements, and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant protective liner systems have reached the final development stages, and cost-shared field tests are planned for the FY 1991--1992 time frame. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools are continuing under Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) sponsorship.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Human Resources in Geothermal Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some 80 countries are potentially interested in geothermal energy development, and about 50 have quantifiable geothermal utilization at present. Electricity is produced from geothermal in 21 countries (total 38 TWh/a) and direct application is recorded in 35 countries (34 TWh/a). Geothermal electricity production is equally common in industrialized and developing countries, but plays a more important role in the developing countries. Apart from China, direct use is mainly in the industrialized countries and Central and East Europe. There is a surplus of trained geothermal manpower in many industrialized countries. Most of the developing countries as well as Central and East Europe countries still lack trained manpower. The Philippines (PNOC) have demonstrated how a nation can build up a strong geothermal workforce in an exemplary way. Data from Iceland shows how the geothermal manpower needs of a country gradually change from the exploration and field development to monitoring and operations.

Fridleifsson, I.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Geothermal Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nation has embarked on an aggressive program to develop its indigenous resources of geothermal energy. For more than a decade, geothermal energy has been heralded as one of the more promising forms of energy alternate to oil and gas for electric power generation, but during the last fifteen years, the total capacity in the U.S. has reached 502 MWe, about half the size of a single modern nuclear power plant. And yet, the United States, especially its western and Gulf coast states, is believed to possess a vast resource base of geothermal heat at depths up to 3 to 10 km. Many estimates of these potential resources suitable for the production of electric power have been published and they range over a spectrum of more than a factor of 100. This variation suggests that the potential is essentially unknown. Table 1 gives a range of published forecasts for the year 1985 and the equivalent potential in number of 1000 Mwe power plants and in oil consumption in millions of barrels per day. In view of the estimated construction of about 200 to 250 nuclear power reactors by 1985-90, the pessimistic forecasts clearly show that the contribution of geothermal energy to the Nation's energy supply may indeed be small. The optimistic forecasts represent more than 15% of the total electric power requirements estimated for the year 1985. The Task Force for Geothermal Energy, in the Federal Energy Administration Project Independence Blueprint report of November 1974, established a national goal for 1985 of 20,000 to 30,000 MWe, the latter value representing an equivalent energy supply of one million barrels of oil per day. This goal was clearly a compromise between what is worth a national effort and what might be realistically achieved. The potential for adding or replacing the equivalent of some 25 nuclear power plants or for conserving one million barrels of oil per day should be an adequate incentive for the Nation to accelerate the development of a viable geothermal industry.

Kruger, Paul

1975-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

45

Geothermal development plan: Yuma county  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One hot spring and 33 wells drilled in the county discharge water at temperatures sufficient for direct-use geothermal applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Currently, one industry within the county has been identified which may be able to use geothermal energy for its process heat requirements. Also, a computer simulation model was used to predict geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development of the resource.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

New Hampshire/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < New Hampshire Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Hampshire Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Hampshire No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Hampshire No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in New Hampshire Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region White Mountains Geothermal Area Other GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for New Hampshire Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and

47

Overview of Geothermal Energy Development Webcast | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Overview of Geothermal Energy Development Webcast Overview of Geothermal Energy Development Webcast...

48

Geothermal development in Australia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 m{sup 2}, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

Burns, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creelman, R.A. [Creelman (R.A.) and Associates, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buckingham, N.W. [Glenelg Shire Council, Portland, VIC (Australia); Harrington, H.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)]|[Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Microsoft Word - BlueMountainGeotherm_FONSI_FinalDrft v3 Clean_4-26-10 Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BLUE MOUNTAIN BLUE MOUNTAIN GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT HUMBOLDT COUNTY, NEVADA PERSHING COUNTY, NEVADA DECEMBER 2007 EA NUMBER: NV-020-08-01 Lead Agency: BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT Winnemucca Field Office 5100 E. Winnemucca Blvd. Winnemucca, Nevada 89445 Project Applicant: NEVADA GEOTHERMAL POWER COMPANY 900-409 Granville Street Vancouver, BC V6C 1T2 It is the mission of the Bureau of Land Management to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. BLM·NV·WN·ES·OB·01·1310 NV·020-08-EA-Ol ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT BLUE MOUNTAIN GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT TABLE OF CONTENTS Page LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ IV

50

Geothermal energy in Nevada: development and utilization  

SciTech Connect

The nature of geothermal resources in Nevada and resource applications are discussed. The social and economic advantages of using geothermal energy are outlined. Federal and state programs established to foster the development of geothermal energy are discussed. (MHR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Phases of a Geothermal Development...

52

Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Development Phases Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field...

53

Energy Education and Workforce Development: Explore Geothermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Careers to someone by E-mail Share Energy Education and Workforce Development: Explore Geothermal Careers on Facebook Tweet about Energy Education and Workforce...

54

DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal Energy Resources DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal Energy Resources February 7, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Focusing on reducing the upfront costs of geothermal development as well as improve its effectiveness, the U.S. Department of Energy today announced plans to leverage oil and gas expertise to test the reliability and efficiency of geothermal power generation at oil and gas fields. DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy will combine efforts to have experts test and validate low temperature geothermal power generation technologies at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) near Casper, Wyoming.

55

Geothermal development plan: Pinal County  

SciTech Connect

The Pinal County Area Development Plan evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified three suspected geothermal resource areas with potential 70/sup 0/C (158/sup 0/F) temperatures. In addition, one geothermal test well near Coolidge encountered bottom hole temperatures of 120/sup 0/C (248/sup 0/F) at a depth of 2440 m (8005 ft) and produced 18.3 l/sec (290 gpm). Geothermal resources are found to occur near population centers where average growth rates of 1.5% to 2% per year are expected over the next 40 years. Mining, agriculture and manufacturing are all important sectors of the regional economy and provide opportunities for direct utilization of geothermal energy. A regional energy use analysis includes energy use projections and regional energy price information. Agriculture accounts for 95% of the annual water consumption and predicted decreases in water availability will result in less future agricultural activity. The analysis contains a detailed section matching geothermal resources to potential industrial users. Fourteen firms in 10 industrial classes were identified as having some potential for geothermal energy use. In addition, 25 agricultural firms were identified as having some potential for geothermal use, including the prepared feeds industry.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Geothermal development opportunities in developing countries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the Seminar on geothermal development opportunities in developing countries, sponsored by the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy and presented by the National Geothermal Association. The overall objectives of the seminar are: (1) Provide sufficient information to the attendees to encourage their interest in undertaking more geothermal projects within selected developing countries, and (2) Demonstrate the technological leadership of US technology and the depth of US industry experience and capabilities to best perform on these projects.

Kenkeremath, D.C.

1989-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

57

Geothermal development plan: Yuma County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yuma County Area Development Plan evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F), and in addition, two areas are inferred to contain geothermal resources with intermediate (90/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C, 194/sup 0/F to 300/sup 0/F) temperature potential. The resource areas are isolated, although one resource area is located near Yuma, Arizona. One resource site is inferred to contain a hot dry rock resource. Anticipated population growth in the county is expected to be 2 percent per year over the next 40 years. The primary employment sector is agriculture, though some light industry is located in the county. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support future growth without advese affect on agriculture. Six firms were found in Yuma County which may be able to utilize geothermal energy for process heat needs. In addition, several agricultural processors were found, concentrated in citrus processing and livestock raising. Geothermal energy utilization projections suggest that by the year 2000, geothermal energy may economically provide the energy equivalent of 53,000 barrels of oil per year to the industrial sector if developed privately. Geothermal utilization projections increase to 132,000 barrels of oil per year by 2000 if a municipal utility developed the resource.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Geothermal development plan: northern Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Much of the northern counties (Apache, Coconino, Gila, Mohave, Navajo and Yavapai) is located in the Colorado Plateau province, a region of low geothermal potential. Two areas that do show some potential are the Flagstaff - San Francisco Peaks area and the Springerville area. Flagstaff is rapidly becoming the manufacturing center of Arizona and will have many opportunities to use geothermal energy to satisfy part of its increasing need for energy. Using a computer simulation model, projections of geothermal energy on line as a function of time are made for both private and city-owned utility development of a resource.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Geothermal development plan: Pima County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pima County Area Development evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 100{sup 0}C (212{sup 0}F), and in addition, one area is identified as having a temperature of 147{sup 0}F (297{sup 0}F). Geothermal resources are found to occur in Tucson where average population growth rates of two to three percent per year are expected over the next 40 years. Rapid growth in the manufacturing sector and the existence of major copper mines provide opportunities for the direct utilization of geothermal energy. However, available water supplies are identified as a major constraint to projected growth. The study also includes a regional energy analysis, future predictions for energy consumption and energy prices. A major section of the report is aimed at identifying potential geothermal users in Pima County and providing projections of maximum economic geothermal utilization. The study identifies 115 firms in 32 industrial classes that have some potential for geothermal use. In addition, 26 agribusiness firms were found in the county.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Geothermal handbook. Geothermal project, 1976. [Ecological effects of geothermal resources development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal program of Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of Interior, aims to develop ecologically sound practices for the exploration, development, and management of geothermal resources and the identification of the biological consequences of such development so as to minimize adverse effects on fish and wildlife resources. This handbook provides information about the ecological effects of geothermal resource development. Chapters are included on US geothermal resources; geothermal land leasing; procedures for assessing the effects on fish and game; environmental impact of exploratory and field development operations; and wildlife habitat improvement methods for geothermal development.

Not Available

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

State policies for geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most prominent geothermal resources in the USA occur in fifteen Gulf and Western states including Alaska and Hawaii. In each state, authority and guidelines have been established for administration of geothermal leasing and for regulation of development. Important matters addressed by these policies include resource definition, leasing provisions, development regulations, water appropriation, and environmental standards. Some other policies that need attention include taxation, securities regulations, and utility regulations. It is concluded that conditions needed for the geothermal industry to pursue large-scale development are consumer (utility) confidence in the resource; equitable tax treatment; prompt exploration of extensive land areas; long and secure tenure for productive properties; prompt facility siting and development; and competitive access to various consumers. With these conditions, the industry should be competitive with other energy sectors and win its share of investment capital. This publication reviews for the states various technical, economic, and institutional aspects of geothermal development. The report summarizes research results from numerous specialists and outlines present state and Federal policies. The report concludes generally that if public policies are made favorable to their development, geothermal resources offer an important energy resource that could supply all new electric capacity for the fifteen states for the next two decades. This energy--100,000 MW--could be generated at prices competitive with electricity from fossil and nuclear power plants. An extensive bibliography is included. (MCW)

Sacarto, D.M.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Geothermal development plan: Maricopa County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Maricopa County Geothermal Development Plan evaluated the market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified six potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 100{sup 0}C (212{sup 0}F) and in addition, four suspected intermediate temperature areas (90{sup 0} to 150{sup 0}C, 194{sup 0} to 300{sup 0}F). Geothermal resources are found to occur in and near the Phoenix metropolitan area where average population growth rates of two to three percent per year are expected over the next 40 years. Rapid growth in the manufacturing, trade and service sectors of the regional economy provides opportunities for the direct utilization of geothermal energy. A regional energy use analysis is included containing energy use and price projections. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support this growth, though agricultural water use is expected to diminish. The study also contains a detailed section matching geothermal resources to potential users. Two comparative analyses providing economic details for space heating projects are incorporated.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hawaii's Geothermal Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 2, 1976, an event took place in the desolate area of Puna, on the island of Hawaii, which showed great promise of reducing Hawaii's dependence on fuel oil. This great event was the flashing of Hawaii's first geothermal well which was named HGP-A. The discovery of geothermal energy was a blessing to Hawaii since the electric utilities are dependent upon fuel oil for its own electric generating units. Over 50% of their revenues pay for imported fuel oil. Last year (1979) about $167.1 million left the state to pay for this precious oil. The HGP-A well was drilled to a depth of 6450 feet and the temperature at the bottom of the hole was measured at 676 F, making it one of the hottest wells in the world.

Uemura, Roy T.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

State geothermal commercialization programs in seven Rocky Mountain states. Semiannual progress report, January-July 1981  

SciTech Connect

The activities and findings of the seven state commercialization teams participating in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range commercialization program are described. For each state (Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North and South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming), prospect identification, area development plans, site specific development analyses, time-phased project plans, the aggregated prospective geothermal energy use, and institutional analyses are discussed. Public outreach activities are also covered, and findings and recommendations are given for each state. Some background information about the program is provided. (LEW)

Lunis, B.C.; Toth, W.J. (comps.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

State geothermal commercialization programs in seven Rocky Mountain states. Semiannual progress report, July-December 1981  

SciTech Connect

The activities and findings of the seven state commercialization teams participating in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range commercialization program are described. The period covered is July through December 1981. Background information is provided, program objectives and the technical approach used are discussed, and the benefits of the program are described. Prospect identification, area development plans, site specific development analyses, time-phased project plans, the aggregated prospective geothermal energy use, and institutional analyses are discussed. Public outreach activities are covered and findings and recommendations are summarized.

Lunis, B.C. (ed.)

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Development of a geothermal thesaurus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An attempt was made to develop a thesaurus of terminology associated with geothermal energy for use in the information storage and retrieval system of LBL's Geothermal Information Group. The development of the thesaurus is discussed, beginning with an outline of its subject scope, sources, and methods used in compiling the list of terms. The tendency was to include, rather than exclude, terms of unknown usefulness, and to provide paths through the thesaurus to make these terms accessible. The thesaurus structure and links to other vocabularies are described. The thesaurus processing software developed at LBL is briefly mentioned.

Herr, J.J.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Nevada and Its Relationship to a Crustal-Scale Fracture Associated with the Inception of the Yellowstone Hotspot Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geophysical Setting of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, North-Central Nevada and Its Relationship to a Crustal-Scale Fracture Associated with the Inception of the Yellowstone Hotspot Abstract The Blue Mountain geothermal field, located about 35 km northwest of Winnemucca, Nevada, is situated along a prominent crustal-scale fracture interpreted from total intensity aeromagnetic and gravity data. Aeromagnetic data indicate that this feature is related to the intrusion of mafic dikes, similar to the Northern Nevada Rift (Zoback et al.,1994), and

68

Geothermal development plan: Graham-Greenlee counties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal potential in Graham and Greenlee counties both of which contain significant quantities of geothermal energy that could be used for industrial, agricultural or residential use, is described. Projections are made of geothermal heat on line under both private and city-owned utility development. Potential users of geothermal energy, however, are limited since this area is sparsely populated and lacks an industrial base. Only a couple of industries were identified which could use geothermal energy for their process heat needs.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geothermal Energy Development Webcast Transcript  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indian Energy Overview of Geothermal Energy Indian Energy Overview of Geothermal Energy Development Webcast (text version) Below is the text version of the webcast titled "Overview of Geothermal Energy Development," originally presented on January 10, 2012. In addition to this text version of the audio, you can access the recorded webcast and a PDF of the slides at www.energy.gov/indianenergy/resources/education-and-training. Alex Dane: All right, folks. We're going to go ahead and get started right now. It's my pleasure to introduce to you the Deputy Director of the Office of Indian Energy, Pilar Thomas, who's going to have a couple minutes here to introduce some background of the office of what they do and Pilar, I've un-muted your line so feel free to jump on in. I think we can hear

70

Environmental implications for geothermal energy development  

SciTech Connect

The nature of geothermal resources and the constraints that site characteristics place on their development are discussed. (MHR)

Craig, R.B.; Suter, G.W. II

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geothermal technology development at Sandia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal technology development at Sandia consists of work in two major project areas - Hard Rock Penetration and Magma Energy Extraction. The Hard Rock Penetration Program is directed at reducing drilling costs for geothermal wells. Current activities are focused in three areas: borehole mechanics, rock penetration mechanics, and industry cost-shared research. The Magma Energy Extraction Program is investigating the engineering feasibility of utilizing crustal magma bodies as a source of energy. Work is divided into four major areas: geophysics, geochemistry/materials, drilling, and energy extraction.

Dunn, J.C.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Property:GeothermalDevelopmentPhases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeothermalDevelopmentPhases GeothermalDevelopmentPhases Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GeothermalDevelopmentPhases Property Type Page Pages using the property "GeothermalDevelopmentPhases" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + Geothermal/Power Plant + C CA-017-05-051 + Geothermal/Well Field + CA-170-02-15 + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-650-2005-086 + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-670-2010-CX + Geothermal/Exploration + CA-96062042 + Geothermal/Power Plant +, Geothermal/Well Field +, Geothermal/Transmission + D DOE-EA-1116 + Geothermal/Power Plant +, Geothermal/Well Field +, Geothermal/Transmission + DOE-EA-1621 + Geothermal/Power Plant + DOE-EA-1676 + Geothermal/Power Plant + DOE-EA-1733 + Geothermal/Well Field +

73

Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Geothermal Resource Assessment and Future Recommendations  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base in early 2011 near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this wellthe most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home Air Force Base. In conclusion, Recommendation for follow-up efforts include the following:

Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

VALUE DISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOPMENT IN LAKE COUNTY, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eleven: Lake County Geothermal Energy Resource. . . .by t h e Report of t h e State Geothermal Task Force WDISTRIBUTION ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL DEVELOP~NTIN LAKE

Churchman, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Geothermal development plan: northern Arizona counties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Northern Counties Area Development Plan evaluated the regional market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. This study identified five potential geothermal resource areas, four of which have low temperature (Arizona.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the geology, drilling operations, and down-hole measurements obtained during the drilling of Deep Blue No.1. This well was sited on the basis of proximity to numerous gold exploration holes that indicated thermal water, high temperature gradients recorded in the 12 shallow gradient holes, and low resistivity values associated with certain interpreted major faults. The well was targeted to intersect fracture zones associated with the West and

77

Imperial County geothermal development annual meeting: summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All phases of current geothermal development in Imperial County are discussed and future plans for development are reviewed. Topics covered include: Heber status update, Heber binary project, direct geothermal use for high-fructose corn sweetener production, update on county planning activities, Brawley and Salton Sea facility status, status of Imperial County projects, status of South Brawley Prospect 1983, Niland geothermal energy program, recent and pending changes in federal procedures/organizations, plant indicators of geothermal fluid on East Mesa, state lands activities in Imperial County, environmental interests in Imperial County, offshore exploration, strategic metals in geothermal fluids rebuilding of East Mesa Power Plant, direct use geothermal potential for Calipatria industrial Park, the Audubon Society case, status report of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, East Brawley Prospect, and precision gravity survey at Heber and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields. (MHR)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Mountain Home Geothermal Project: geothermal energy applications in an integrated livestock meat and feed production facility at Mountain Home, Idaho. [Contains glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mountain Home Geothermal Project is an engineering and economic study of a vertically integrated livestock meat and feed production facility utilizing direct geothermal energy from the KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) southeast of Mountain Home, Idaho. A system of feed production, swine raising, slaughter, potato processing and waste management was selected for study based upon market trends, regional practices, available technology, use of commercial hardware, resource characteristics, thermal cascade and mass flow considerations, and input from the Advisory Board. The complex covers 160 acres; utilizes 115 million Btu per hour (34 megawatts-thermal) of geothermal heat between 300/sup 0/F and 70/sup 0/F; has an installed capital of $35.5 million;produces 150,000 hogs per year, 28 million lbs. of processed potatoes per year, and on the order of 1000 continuous horsepower from methane. The total effluent is 200 gallons per minute (gpm) of irrigation water and 7300 tons per year of saleable high grade fertilizer. The entire facility utilizes 1000 gpm of 350/sup 0/F geothermal water. The economic analysis indicates that the complex should have a payout of owner-invested capital of just over three years. Total debt at 11% per year interest would be paid out in 12 (twelve) years.

Longyear, A.B.; Brink, W.R.; Fisher, L.A.; Matherson, R.H.; Neilson, J.A.; Sanyal, S.K.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Bald Mountain Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bald Mountain Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Bald Mountain Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bald Mountain Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Ketchum, Idaho Coordinates 43.6807402°, -114.3636619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

80

Deep Blue No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Deep Blue No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the geology, drilling operations, and down-hole measurements obtained during the drilling of Deep Blue No.1. This well was sited on the basis of proximity to numerous gold exploration holes that indicated thermal water, high temperature gradients recorded in the 12 shallow gradient holes, and low resistivity values associated with certain interpreted major faults. The well was targeted to intersect fracture zones associated with the West and Central Faults, two

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Prairie City, Oregon Coordinates 44.4632135°, -118.7099477° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

82

Mountain Spa Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain Spa Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Mountain Spa Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Midway, Utah Coordinates 40.5121772°, -111.4743545° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

83

Kamchatka geothermal resources development: Problems and perspectives  

SciTech Connect

There are four long-term exploited geothermal fields in Kamchatka: one steam-water field Pauzhetka (south of Kamchatka peninsula) and three hot water fields: Paratunka (near by town of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky) and Esso and Anavgay (center of peninsula). Pauzhetka and Paratunka fields are exploited during almost 28 years. Esso and Anavgay fields are exploited during 25 years. In Pauzhetka 11 MWe geothermal power plant work and on the other fields thermal energy of hot water is directly used. Kamchatka region satisfies energetic demands mainly by organic imported fuels. At the same time electricity produced by geothermal fluids constitutes less than 2 per cent of total region electricity production, and thermal energy produced by geothermal fluids constitutes less than 3 per cent of total region thermal energy production. The main reasons of small geothermal portion in the energy production balance of Kamchatka are briefly discussed. The geothermal development reserves and perspectives of geothermal energy use increase in Kamchatka are outlined.

Pashkevich, Roman I.

1966-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through...

85

Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number NA DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial...

86

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through...

87

Rural Cooperative Geothermal Development Electric and Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source of heat that is key to developing the Tilapia based aquaculture. The geothermal power plant will create up to 30 jobs during construction, and one permanent maintenance...

88

Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Abstract N/A Authors Whitescarver and Olin D. Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1984 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Citation Whitescarver, Olin D.. 1984. Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California. (!) : U.S. Department of Energy. Report No.: N/A. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_Operations_Hypersaline_Geothermal_Brine_Utilization_Imperial_County,_California&oldid=682648

89

Pollution Control Guidance for Geothermal Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the EPA regulatory approach toward geothermal energy development. The state of knowledge is described with respect to the constituents of geothermal effluents and emissions, including water, air, solid wastes, and noise. Pollutant effects are discussed. Pollution control technologies that may be applicable are described along with preliminary cost estimates for their application. Finally discharge and emission limitations are suggested that may serve as interim guidance for pollution control during early geothermal development.

Hartley, Robert P.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has been selected to manage this technology development program, and this paper presents an overview of the program. Program justification which relates well cost to busbar energy cost and to DGE power-on-line goals is presented. Technological deficiencies in current rotary drilling techniques for geothermal wells are discussed. A program for correcting these deficiencies is described.

Varnado, S.G.; Stoller, H.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Geothermal Power Development in the Phillippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The generation of electric power to meet the needs of industrial growth and dispersal in the Philippines is aimed at attaining self-reliance through availment of indigenous energy resources. The Philippines by virtue of her position in the high-heat flow region has in abundance a number of exploitable geothermal fields located all over the country. Results indicate that the geothermal areas of the Philippines presently in various stages of exploration and development are of such magnitude that they can be relied on to meet a significant portion of the country's power need. Large scale geothermal energy for electric power generation was put into operation last year with the inauguration of two 55-MW geothermal generating units at Tiwi, Albay in Southern Luzon. Another two 55-MW units were added to the Luzon Grid in the same year from Makiling-Banahaw field about 70 kilometers south of Manila. For 1979 alone, therefore, 220-MW of generating capacity was added to the power supply coming from geothermal energy. This year a total of 220-MW power is programmed for both areas. This will bring to 443-MW of installed generating capacity from geothermal energy with 3-MW contributed by the Tongonan Geothermal pilot plant in Tongonan, Leyte, Central Philippines in operation since July 1977. Financial consideration of Philippine experience showed that electric power derived from geothermal energy is competitive with other sources of energy and is a viable source of baseload electric power. Findings have proven the technical and economic acceptability of geothermal energy resources development. To realize the benefits that stem from the utilization of indigenous geothermal resources and in the light of the country's ever increasing electric power demand and in the absence of large commercial oil discovery in the Philippines, geothermal energy resource development has been accelerated anew. The program includes development of eight fields by 1989 by adding five more fields to the currently developed and producing geothermal areas.

Jovellanos, Jose U.; Alcaraz, Arturo; Datuin, Rogelio

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Geothermal resource development: laws and regulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of geothermal resources in California is becoming of increasing interest because of the large amounts of these resources in the state. In response to this interest in development, the legislature and regulatory bodies have taken actions to increase geothermal power production. The important federal and California laws on the subject are presented and discussed. Pertinent federal and state provisions are compared, and inconsistencies are discussed. An important concept that needs clarification is the manner of designating an area as a ''known geothermal resource area.'' The question of designating geothermal resource as a mineral is not completely resolved, although there is authority tending toward the finding that it is a mineral.

Wharton, J.C.

1977-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geothermal development issues: Recommendations to Deschutes County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses processes and issues related to geothermal development. It is intended to inform planners and interested individuals in Deschutes County about geothermal energy, and advise County officials as to steps that can be taken in anticipation of resource development. (ACR)

Gebhard, C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Session 19: Geothermal Materials Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the most pressing problems constraining the development of geothermal energy is the lack of satisfactory component and system reliability. This is due to the unavailability, on a commercial scale, of cost-effective materials that can function in a wide range of geothermal environments and to the unavailability of a comprehensive body of directly related test data or materials selection experience. In 1976, the GHTD started the Geothermal Materials Program to address materials-related problems, and since 1978 Brookhaven National Laboratory has provided technical and managerial assistance in the implementation of the effort. Major successes have been attained in the development of elastomers for high-temperature applications and in the use of polymer concrete liners for corrosion protection. Both technologies have been successfully transferred to industry. Current efforts in metallic and nonmetallic materials development and corrosion protection will be summarized. In the metals area, testing of a series of experimental stainless steels has led to compositions which show a very remarkable resistance to pitting corrosion in hot chloride electrolytes. Combinations of molybdenum and nitrogen are very beneficial. Alternate materials for line shaft pump bearings have been identified through tests in simulated hot brine. Cermets and carbides show promise of extending pump life. A series of drill bit steels has been examined for fatigue and hot fracture toughness. The work has indicated alloys with properties that exceed those of materials now in use. A major finding in the nonmetallic materials area has been the development of fluorinated elastomers for use in statis seals at temperatures greater than 300 C. Field testing has just commenced, but based upon laboratory results, the work is very promising. Commercialization of this material is underway. Technology transfer of a 240 C EPDM was completed earlier. Field testing of polymer concrete-lined pipe has been successful, and at least one commercial source of the material now exists. Programs started in FY 1983 include the development of high-thermal-conductivity composites for heat exchanger tubes and elastomers for dynamic seal applications. Cathodic protection measurements of carbon steel have been made, both in the laboratory and in the field, which showed the feasibility of such protection of some carbon steel components, e.g., the outer surface of well casing. More work is suggested to include heat exchanges. Studies of corrosion in binary systems is also reviewed.

van Rooyen, Daniel

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Coso Geothermal Area (1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 1985 Usefulness...

96

Geothermal development plan: Maricopa county  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Maricopa county is the area of Arizona receiving top priority since it contains over half of the state's population. The county is located entirely within the Basin and Range physiographic region in which geothermal resources are known to occur. Several approaches were taken to match potential users to geothermal resources. One approach involved matching some of the largest facilities in the county to nearby geothermal resources. Other approaches involved identifying industrial processes whose heat requirements are less than the average assessed geothermal reservoir temperature of 110/sup 0/C (230/sup 0/F). Since many of the industries are located on or near geothermal resources, geothermal energy potentially could be adapted to many industrial processes.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Geothermal Development Plan: Pima County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pima County is located entirely within the Basin and Range physiographic province in which geothermal resources are known to occur. Continued growth as indicated by such factors as population growth, employment and income will require large amounts of energy. It is believed that geothermal energy could provide some of the energy that will be needed. Potential users of geothermal energy within the county are identified.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Geothermal instrumentation development activities at Sandia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major element of Sandia's Geothermal Technology Development Program is the effort directed toward development of instrumentation. This effort has two aspects, the development of high temperature components and prototype tools and the investigation of new concepts and capabilities. The focus of these activities is the acquisition of information to make geothermal drilling and resource development more efficient. Several projects of varying nature and scope make up the instrumentation development element, and this element will expand as the program emphasis on development of an advanced geothermal drilling system and the need for improved information grow. 13 refs.

Carson, C.C.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Geothermal development plan: Pinal county  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wells drilled in the county provide evidence of geothermal energy sufficient for process heat and space heating and cooling applications. Annual energy consumption was estimated for industries whose process heat requirements are less than 105/sup 0/C (221/sup 0/F). This information was then used to model the introduction of geothermal energy into the process heat market. Also, agriculture and agribusiness industries were identified. Many of these are located on or near a geothermal resource and might be able to utilize geothermal energy in their operations.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA EA at Patua Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field, Patua Geothermal Project Phase II General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Gradient Resources Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Project Location Fernley, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques, Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 327 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geothermal development and the Salton Sea  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The relationship of the Salton Sea, a key element of the Imperial Valley water system, to potential geothermal development in that region is studied. The effects of direct discharge of brines into the Sea are discussed along with the use of Salton Sea water for cooling the geothermal power plants. Methods for controlling the salinity of the Salton Sea are described. (MOW)

Goldsmith, M.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Environmental overview of geothermal development: northern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regional environmental problems and issues associated with geothermal development in northern Nevada are studied to facilitate environmental assessment of potential geothermal resources. The various issues discussed are: environmental geology, seismicity of northern Nevada, hydrology and water quality, air quality, Nevada ecosystems, noise effects, socio-economic impacts, and cultural resources and archeological values. (MHR)

Slemmons, D.B.; Stroh, J.M.; Whitney, R.A. (eds.) [eds.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Geothermal resources development project: Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic and site specific issues and problems are identified that relate directly to geothermal development in California, including changes in the state permitting process, land use issues, coordination between state entities, and geothermal revenues from BLM leased lands. Also discussed are the formation of working groups, preparation of a newsletter, the economic incentives workshops, and recommendations for future actions. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heater Loan Program Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water Heater Loan Program Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Heating &...

105

Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

106

Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Low Cost Exploration,...

107

Alaska: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview is given of the geological characteristics of each region of the state as they relate to potential geothermal development. Those exploration methods which can lead to the siting of a deep exploration well are described. Requirements and techniques needed for drilling deeper higher temperature exploration and production wells are presented. Electrical generation, direct utilization, and indirect utilization are reviewed. Economic factors of direct use projects are presented. A general guide to the regulatory framework affecting geothermal energy development is provided. The general steps necessary to gain access to explore, develop, distribute, and use geothermal resources are outlined. (MHR)

Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Near-Term Developments in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling geothermal wells. Current projects include: R & D in lost circulation control, high temperature instrumentation, underground imaging with a borehole radar insulated drill pipe development for high temperature formations, and new technology for data transmission through drill pipe that can potentially greatly improve data rates for measurement while drilling systems. In addition to this work, projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization are managed. During 1988, GDO projects include developments in five areas: high temperature acoustic televiewer, pneumatic turbine, urethane foam for lost circulation control, geothermal drill pipe protectors, an improved rotary head seals.

Dunn, James C.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

111

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Development of Models to Simulate...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

112

Geothermal Energy Research Development and Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Federal program's goal, strategy, plans, and achievements are summarized. In addition, geothermal development by state and local governments and, where available, by the private sector is described. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Regulation of geothermal energy development in Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regulatory system is presented in a format to help guide geothermal energy development. State, local, and federal agencies, legislation, and regulations are presented. Information sources are listed. (MHR)

Coe, B.A.; Forman, N.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Geothermal policy development program: expediting the local geothermal permitting process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a number of years, concerns have been raised about the length of time and the complexity involved in obtaining required permits in order to develop the geothermal resource at the Geysers. Perhaps the most important factor is jurisdiction. At the Geysers, all three levels of government - local, state, and federal - exercise significant authority over various aspects of geothermal development. In addition, several agencies within each governmental level play an active role in the permitting process. The present study is concerned primarily with the local permitting process, and the ways in which this process could be expedited. This report begins by looking at the local role in the overall permitting process, and then reviews the findings and conclusions that have been reached in other studies of the problem. This is followed by a case study evaluation of recent permitting experience in the four Geysers-Calistoga KGRA counties, and the report concludes by outlining several approaches to expediting the local permitting process.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Geothermal project summaries. Geothermal energy research, development and demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries of all Division of Geothermal Energy supported projects for which contracts have been executed are compiled. Each summary includes pertinent statistical data for that project and an abstract summarizing the project plans and accomplishments. The projects summarized fall into six categories: engineering research and development, resource exploration and assessment, hydrothermal technology applications, advanced technology applications, utilization experiments, and environmental control and institutional studies. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase the accuracy and value of information presented in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report, the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) developed a reporting system, known as the Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions, in 2010. The Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve as a guideline to project developers in reporting geothermal project development information to the GEA. A basic understanding of the Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions will also aid the reader in fully understanding the information presented in this

117

Legal issues related to geopressured-geothermal resource development. Geopressured-geothermal technical paper No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The legal aspects of geopressured-geothermal development in Texas are discussed. Many of the legal issues associated with geopressured-geothermal development in Texas are unsettled and represent areas of developing policy and law. Lawsuits can be expected either before or shortly after the first commercial development of geopressured-geothermal resources.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of a geothermal acoustic borehole televiewer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most geothermal wells are drilled in hard rock formations where fluid flow is through systems of open fractures. Productivity of these wells is usually determined by the extent of intersection of the wellbore with the fracture system. A need exists for fracture mapping methods and tools which can operate in a geothermal environment. In less hostile environments, the acoustic borehole televiewer has been shown to be a useful tool for determining location, orientation, and characterization of fractures as they intersect the borehole and for general wellbore and casing inspection. The development conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to adapt an acoustic borehole televiewer for operation in a geothermal environment is described. The modified instrument has been successfully tested at temperatures as high as 280/sup 0/C and pressures up to 5000 psi, and used successfully to map fractures and casing damage in geothermal wells.

Heard, F.E.; Bauman, T.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Development Of Genetic Occurrence Models For Geothermal Prospecting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Exploration strategies based on an understanding of the geologic processes that transfer heat from the mantle to the upper crust, and foster the conditions for shallow hydrothermal circulation or enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) exploration, are required to search efficiently for 'blind' geothermal resources. We propose a genetically based screening protocol to assess potentially prospective geothermal resources, beginning at the plate boundary scale and progressively focusing in on the scale of a producing

120

Toward assessing the geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains volcanic complex: a telluric-magnetotelluric survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Telluric-magnetotelluric studies were performed in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico to characterize the total geothermal system of the Valles Caldera and to be integrated with an east-west regional survey supported by the United States Geological Survey. The data from the regional survey indicate that electrically the San Juan Basin to the west of the Jemez Mountains is rather homogeneous in contrast to the eastern side near Las Vegas where the presence of a broad heterogeneous structure is clearly sensed. The data from the Jemez Mountain area are strikingly similar to other Rio Grande rift data and suggest a conducting layer at a depth of approximately 15 km. The telluric data indicate that the hydrothermal system in the area is of a localized nature.

Hermance, J.F.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sino Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Sino-Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation Place China Sector Geothermal energy Product China-based geothermal development company. References Sino-Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sino-Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation is a company located in China . References ↑ "Sino-Icelandic Green Energy Geothermal Development Corporation" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sino_Icelandic_Green_Energy_Geothermal_Development_Corporation&oldid=351117"

122

Support research for development of improved geothermal drill bits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in background research needed to develop drill bits for the geothermal environment is reported. Construction of a full-scale geothermal wellbore simulator and geothermal seal testing machine was completed. Simulated tests were conducted on full-scale bits. Screening tests on elastometric seals under geothermal conditions are reported. (JGB)

Hendrickson, R.R.; Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Winzenried, R.W.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Geothermal Field Developments in Iceland  

SciTech Connect

The exploration and research carried out in conjunction with the exploitation of the various geothernal fields has vastly deepened our understanding of the hydrothermal systems in Inceland. They have proved to be more diverse with respect to physical state, chemical composition, hydrological properties, and geological control than previously thought. The purpose of the present paper is to review the present state of knowledge regarding the Icelandic geothermal systems, with emphasis on the production and reservoir engineering aspects.

Palmason, G.; Stefansson, V.; Thorhallsson, S.; Thorsteinsson, T.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geothermal project summaries. Geothermal energy research, development, and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

The Division of Geothermal Energy ''Geothermal Project Summaries'' provides pertinent information on each active ERDA Geothermal project, includes a listing of all contractors and a compilation of completed projects. New project summaries and necessary revisions to current project data will be prepared on a quarterly basis.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geothermal project summaries. Geothermal energy research, development, and demonstration program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Division of Geothermal Energy ''Geothermal Project Summaries'' provides pertinent information on each active ERDA Geothermal project, includes a listing of all contractors and a compilation of completed projects. New project summaries and necessary revisions to current project data will be prepared on a quarterly basis.

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Geothermal energy: tomorrow's alternative today. A handbook for geothermal-energy development in Delaware  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a general procedure guide to various technical, economic, and institutional aspects of geothermal development in Delaware. The following are covered: geothermal as an alternative, resource characteristics, geology, well mechanics and pumping systems, fluid disposal, direct heat utilization-feasibility, environmental and legal issues, permits and regulations, finance and taxation, and steps necessary for geothermal development. (MHR)

Mancus, J.; Perrone, E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Skamania County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Skamania County, Washington, near Mt. Adams, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Skamania County was chosen due to both identified geothermal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Skamania County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Basic research needed for the development of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Basic research needed to facilitate development of geothermal energy is identified. An attempt has been made to make the report representative of the ideas of productive workers in the field. The present state of knowledge of geothermal energy is presented and then specific recommendations for further research, with status and priorities, are listed. Discussion is limited to a small number of applicable concepts, namely: origin of geothermal flux; transport of geothermal energy; geothermal reservoirs; rock-water interactions, and geophysical and geochemical exploration.

Aamodt, R.L.; Riecker, R.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal Development Associates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Associates Associates Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Development Associates Place Reno, Nevada Zip 89502 Sector Geothermal energy, Services Product Geothermal power and direct use project development and consulting services Coordinates 32.944065°, -97.578279° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.944065,"lon":-97.578279,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

130

Tongonan geothermal field Leyte, Philippines. Report on exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal exploration and development in the Philippines are reviewed. The geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the Tongonan geothermal field are described. The well drilling, power development, and plans for a 112 MW power plant are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Geothermal development plan: Graham/Greenlee Counties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Graham/Greenlee County Area Development Plan evaluated the region-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified five potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 100{sup 0}C (212{sup 0}F). In addition, seven areas are inferred to contain higher temperature resources with the Clifton Hot Springs area having electrical potential. Geothermal resources are found to occur near Safford and Clifton, the two major population centers. Future population growth in the two counties is expected to average less than two percent per year over the next 40 years. Growth in the mining, trade and services economic sectors provide opportunities for the direct utilization of geothermal energy. A regional energy use analysis is included containing energy use and price projections. Water supplies are found to be adequate for urban needs, though agricultural and mineral water use may be limited in the future. The study also contains a preliminary economic analysis for two district heating systems as well as a section matching geothermal resources to potential users.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geothermal pipeline: Progress and development update from the geothermal progress monitor  

SciTech Connect

This article is a progress and development update of new prospects for the utilization of geothermal energy. The city of San Bernadino, California uses high-quality geothermal fluids for laundry processes without the need for water softening or heating. Four geothermal prospects in Oregon including exploration work by Amadarko, CE Exploration Company, Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, and Vulcan Power Company are also reviewed.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development of drilling foams for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of foam drilling fluids in geothermal applications is addressed. A description of foams - what they are, how they are used, their properties, equipment required to use them, the advantages and disadvantages of foams, etc. - is presented. Geothermal applications are discussed. Results of industry interviews presented indicate significant potential for foams, but also indicate significant technical problems to be solved to achieve this potential. Testing procedures and results of tests on representative foams provide a basis for work to develop high-temperature foams.

McDonald, W.J.; Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; Chenevert, M.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Borehole survey instrumentation development for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The creation and subsequent study of hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs requires sophisticated tools and instruments that can function for relatively long periods of time in the hostile downhole environment. Detection of fracture dimensions and orientation of the geothermal reservoir is critical for the successful completion of the hot dry rock energy extraction system. The development of downhole instrumentation capable of characterizing the hydraulic-fracture systems must emphasize reliability of measuring devices and electro-mechanical components to function properly at borehole temperature exceeding 275/sup 0/C and pressures of 69 MPa (10,000 psi).

Dennis, B.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume I. Review and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of geothermal exploration in Hawaii is reviewed briefly. The nature and occurrences of geothermal resources are presented island by island. An overview of geothermal markets is presented. Other topies covered are: potential markets of the identified geothermal areas, well drilling technology, hydrothermal fluid transport, overland and submarine electrical transmission, community aspects of geothermal development, legal and policy issues associated with mineral and land ownership, logistics and infrastructure, legislation and permitting, land use controls, Regulation 8, Public Utilities Commission, political climate and environment, state plans, county plans, geothermal development risks, and business planning guidelines.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Geothermal Energy Development in the Eastern United States. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document represents the final report from the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) of The Johns Hopkins University on its efforts on behalf of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Department of Energy (DOE). For the past four years, the Laboratory has been fostering development of geothermal energy in the Eastern United States. While the definition of ''Eastern'' has changed somewhat from time to time, basically it means the area of the continental United States east of the Rocky Mountains, plus Puerto Rico but excluding the geopressured regions of Texas and Louisiana. During these years, the Laboratory developed a background in geology, hydrology, and reservoir analysis to aid it in establishing the marketability of geothermal energy in the east. Contrary to the situation in the western states, the geothermal resource in the east was clearly understood to be inferior in accessible temperature. On the other hand, there were known to be copious quantities of water in various aquifers to carry the heat energy to the surface. More important still, the east possesses a relatively dense population and numerous commercial and industrial enterprises, so that thermal energy, almost wherever found, would have a market. Thus, very early on it was clear that the primary use for geothermal energy in the east would be for process heat and space conditioning--heating and cool electrical production was out of the question. The task then shifted to finding users colocated with resources. This task met with modest success on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. A great deal of economic and demographic analysis pinpointed the prospective beneficiaries, and an intensive ''outreach'' campaign was mounted to persuade the potential users to invest in geothermal energy. The major handicaps were: (1) The lack of demonstrated hydrothermal resources with known temperatures and expected longevity; and (2) The lack of a ''bellwether'' installation for entrepreneurs to see, touch, and emulate. It is only at the present time that these two issues appear to be on the way to resolution by DGE user-coupled programs in the east.

None

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program Plan (U)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program Plan outlines a nine-year, industry-based program to develop and apply high temperature instrumentation technology which is needed by the borehole logging industry to serve the rapidly expanding geothermal market. Specifically, this program will upgrade existing materials and sondes to improve their high-temperature reliability. To achieve this goal specialized equipment such as high temperature electronics, cables and devices for measuring formation temperature, flow rate, downhole pressure, and fractures will be developed. In order to satisfy critical existing needs, the near-term (FY80) goal is for operation at or above 275/sup 0/C in pressures up to 48.3 MPa (7,000 psi). The long-term (FY84) goal is for operation up to 350/sup 0/C and 138 MPa (20,000 psi). This program plan has been prepared for the Department of Energy's Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) and is a portion of the DGE long-range Geothermal Well Technology Program.

Veneruso, A.F.; Polito, J.; Heckman, R.C.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Imperial County, geothermal development. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal development activities have increased during the October to December period. Nine power plant projects are proceeding, this includes two constructed facilities, one facility under construction, three facilities scheduled to begin construction in 1982, and three facilities in the planning or permitting stage. Geothermal exploration activities are continuing with activities in East Brawley, Truckhaven, and near the Superstition Mountains. Interest in direct heat development seems to be increasing. The City of El Centro project is under construction and there are several direct heat projects in preliminary planning stages. Permitting, planning, and waste disposal activities are reviewed.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Financing geothermal resource development in the Pacific Region states  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State and federal tax treatment as an incentive to development and non-tax financial incentives such as: the federal geothermal loan guarantee program, the federal geothermal reservoir insurance, and state financial incentives are discussed. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

United Nations geothermal activities in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

The United Nations implements technical cooperation projects in developing countries through its Department of Technical Cooperation for Development (DTCD). The DTCD is mandated to explore for and develop natural resources (water, minerals, and relevant infrastructure) and energy - both conventional and new and renewable energy sources. To date, the United Nations has been involved in over 30 geothermal exploration projects (completed or underway) in 20 developing countries: 8 in Africa (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar); 8 in Asia (China, India, Jordan, Philippines, Thailand); 9 in Latin America (Bolivia, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama) and 6 in Europe (Greece, Romania, Turkey, Yugoslavia). Today, the DTCD has seven UNDP geothermal projects in 6 developing countries. Four of these (Bolivia, China, Honduras, and Kenya) are major exploration projects whose formulation and execution has been possible thanks to the generous contributions under cost-sharing arrangements from the government of Italy. These four projects are summarized.

Beredjick, N.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Site specific analysis of geothermal development. Volume 1. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

MITRE/Metrek has analyzed development scenarios for 37 hydrothermal and geopressured prospects in the United States to assist DOE's Division of Geothermal Energy in mission-oriented planning of geothermal resource development. A summary of the site-specific analyses is presented with particular emphasis on possible recommendations for the Federal Geothermal Program.

Leigh, J.; Cohen, A.; Jacobsen, W.; Trehan, R.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Imperial County geothermal development. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

The highlights of geothermal development in Imperial County during October, November, and December 1983 are discussed. Topics include the status of geothermal development projects in the County, geothermal staff activities and research projects, and other geothermal-related topics.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Imperial County geothermal development quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect

The highlights of geothermal development in Imperial County during July, August, and September 1983 are discussed. Topics include the status of geothermal development projects in the county, geothermal staff activities and research projects, and other geothermal-related topics.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) Jump to: navigation, search Name International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) Agency/Company /Organization International Centre for International Mountain Development (ICIMOD) Resource Type Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.icimod.org/ Country Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan UN Region Southern Asia, Western Asia References ICIMOD[1] International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) Screenshot "The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, ICIMOD, is a regional knowledge development and learning centre serving the eight regional member countries of the Hindu Kush-Himalayas - Afghanistan,

145

Geothermal development plan: northern Arizona counties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northern Counties Area Development Plan evaluated the regional market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. This study identified five potential geothermal resource areas, four of which have low temperature (<90{sup 0}C, 194{sup 0}F) potential and one possible igneous system. The average population growth rate in the Northern Counties is expected to be five percent per year over the next 40 years, with Mohave and Yavapai Counties growing the fastest. Rapid growth is anticipated in all major employment sectors, including trade, service, manufacturing, mining and utilities. A regional energy use analysis is included, containing information on current energy use patterns for all user classes. Water supplies are expected to be adequate for expected growth generally, though Yavapai and Gila Counties will experience water deficiencies. A preliminary district heating analysis is included for the towns of Alpine and Springerville. Both communities are believed located on geothermal resource sites. The study also contains a section identifying potential geothermal resource users in northern Arizona.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Whatcom County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Whatcom County, Washington, near Mt. Baker, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Whatcom County was chosen due to both identified geotherrnal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Whatcom County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Geothermal Developers' Checklist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developers' Checklist Developers' Checklist Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Geothermal Developers' Checklist Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: Geothermal Technologies Office Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal, People and Policy Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes Resource Type: Dataset, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

Geothermal energy, research, development and demonstration program. Third annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are covered: the geothermal resource potential in the U.S., national geothermal utilization estimates, the Federal geothermal development strategy and program, Federal progress and achievements FY 1978, regional progress FY 1978, and Federal program plans for FY 1979. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Environmental development plan: geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure that environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) considerations are addressed adequately in the technology decision making process, the Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies and evaluates EH and S concerns; defines EH and S research and related assessments to examine or resolve the concerns; provides a coordinated schedule with the technology program for required EH and S research and developement; and indicates the timing for Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Readiness Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports. This EDP for geothermal energy systems covers all current and planned activities of the DOE Geothermal Energy Systems. Hydrothermal convection systems, geopressured systems, and hot-dry-rock systems are covered. Environmental concerns and requirements for resolution of these concerns are discussed at length. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mineral and geothermal resource potential of Wild Cattle Mountain and Heart Lake roadless areas Plumas, Shasta, and Tehama Counties, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical surveys in Wild Cattle Mountain and Heart Lake Roadless Areas indicate no potential for metallic or non-metallic mineral resources in the areas and no potential for coal or petroleum energy resources. However, Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and part of Heart Lake Roadless Area lie in Lassen Known Geothermal Resources Area, and much of the rest of Heart Lake Roadless Area is subject to non-competitive geothermal lease applications. Both areas are adjacent to Lassen Volcanic National Park, which contains extensive areas of fumaroles, hot springs, and hydrothermally altered rock; voluminous silicic volcanism occurred here during late Pleistocene and Holocene time. Geochemical data and geological interpretation indicate that the thermal manifestations in the Park and at Morgan and Growler Hot Springs (immediately west of Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area) are part of the same large geothermal system. Consequently, substantial geothermal resources are likely to be discovered in Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and cannot be ruled out for Heart Lake Roadless Area.

Muffler, L.J.P.; Clynne, M.A.; Cook, A.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

152

Conceptual design of a geothermal site development forecasting system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A site development forecasting system has been designed in response to the need to monitor and forecast the development of specific geothermal resource sites for electrical power generation and direct heat applications. The system is comprised of customized software, a site development status data base, and a set of complex geothermal project development schedules. The system would use site-specific development status information obtained from the Geothermal Progress Monitor and other data derived from economic and market penetration studies to produce reports on the rates of geothermal energy development, federal agency manpower requirements to ensure these developments, and capital expenditures and technical/laborer manpower required to achieve these developments.

Neham, E.A.; Entingh, D.J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Category:Geothermal Development Phases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 6 total. G GeothermalExploration GeothermalLand Use GeothermalLeasing GeothermalPower Plant GeothermalTransmission GeothermalWell Field Retrieved from "http:...

154

Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R and D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O and M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R and D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with US geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

Kukacka, L.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Authors Ileana M. Tibuleac, Joe Iovenitti, David von Seggern, Jon Sainsbury, Glenn Biasi and John G. Anderson Conference Stanford Geothermal Conference; Stanford University; 2013 Published PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University;, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

156

Time frames for geothermal project development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal development can generally be broken down into distinct phases: Exploration and Leasing; Project Development And Feasibility Studies; Well Field Development; Project Finance, Construction and Start-up Operations; and Commercial Operations. Each phase represents different levels of cost and risk and different types of management teams that are needed to assess and manage the project and associated risk. Orderly transitions of management at each major phase are needed. Exploration programs are largely science based, the primary focus of the science based investigations should be to: secure the lease position, and develop sufficient information to identify and characterize an economical geothermal resource. Project development specialists build on the exploration data to: pull together a project design, develop a detailed cost estimate; prepare an environmental assessment; and collect all data needed for project financing. Construction specialist build from the development phase to: develop detailed engineering, procure equipment and materials, schedule and manage the facilities construction programs, and start and test the power plant. Operations specialists take over from construction during start-up and are responsible for sustainable and reliable operations of the resource and power generation equipment over the life of the project.

McClain, David W.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

Neilson, J.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Assessment of the Geothermal Development of Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mexico, with a 60 million population has an extension of almost 2 million square kilometers. A large number of volcanoes and hydrothermal manifestations are found in the area, particularly along the Pacific Coast. The electricity needs of this country require its installed capacity to be doubled every eight-and-a-half years. Although its main energy source is the hydrocarbons, new sources of energy are being investigated and developed. In 1973, at Cerro Prieto, a 75 MW plant was inaugurated utilizing geothermal steam, initiating in this way commercial exploitation of this energy. From there on an uninterrupted program of exploration and development has been followed, along and across the country. Probably the region with the highest potential of geothermal energy is the New-volcanic Belt, a zone 300 kilometers wide which crosses the country from the Pacific Coast to the Gulf of Mexico Coast. In this zone, the geothermal fields of Los Azufres, Los Negritos, Ixtlan de los Hervores, La Primavera and San Marcos are located. Sixteen wells have been drilled at Los Azufres, 14 good producers with an average temperature of 275 C. An area of 385 square kilometers is estimated can be exploited for steam production. By 1981, it is expected to have four wellhead turbogenerators rated 6 MW each. Two geothermal wells are now being drilled at La Primavera, with very good results. Temperatures of 275 C have been found at a depth of 800 m in the first well of the Rio Caliente module. The first two wells are now being drilled at Los Humeros geothermal zone. To date, 80 wells have been drilled at Cerro Prieto. In the last group of wells the producing stratum was found at a depth between 2000 and 3000 m. The temperature of this stratum is about 340 C, and each well has an average output of 200 tons per hour. Research is now being conducted to solve the problems encountered of casing corrosion, and for the development of better cementing materials and improved cementing techniques, since the results obtained have not been entirely satisfactory, being the life of the geothermal wells shortened, increasing the cost of power generation. Since its inauguration in 1973, Cerro Prieto has been generating electricity continuously, with increasing annual plant factors, better than 90 percent in the last three years. As of this date, the installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 150 MW. The installation of a fifth unit of 30 MW is now underway. This unit will utilize low pressure steam flashed from the separated water, now being discarded from units 1 to 4. A flashing plant is currently being installed for this purpose. This means a 20 percent increase without drilling more wells. Future plans are the construction of two more plants of 200 MW each, for a total of 620 MW for May 1983. These units will be operating at slightly higher pressures than the existing ones. It is estimated that a total capacity of 40,000 MW could be installed by the year 2000, using steam obtained from the known geothermal areas of Mexico.

Dominguez, B.; Bermejo, F.; Guiza, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Imperial County geothermal development. Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activities of the Geothermal Office are reported including: important geothermal events, geothermal waste disposal, grant applications to the California Energy Commission, the planned geothermal development meeting, and other geothermal planning activities. The activities of the Geothermal Planner include processing of applications for geothermal permits, processing of environmental impact reports, and other geothermal planning activities. The progress on the VTN Corporation direct heat study is discussed.

Not Available

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Program planner's guide to geothermal development in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The resource base, status of geothermal development activities, and the state's energy flow are summarized. The present and projected geothermal share of the energy market is discussed. The public and private sector initiatives supporting geothermal development in California are described. These include legislation to provide economic incentives, streamline regulation, and provide planning assistance to local communities. Private sector investment, research, and development activities are also described. The appendices provide a ready reference of financial incentives. (MHR)

Yen, W.W.S.; Chambers, D.M.; Elliott, J.F.; Whittier, J.P.; Schnoor, J.J.; Blachman, S.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Brawley- Resurrection Of A Previously Developed Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Brawley Geothermal Field was originally developed by Unocal. In addition to drilling geothermal wells, this development included building and operating a 10 MWe power plant. Corrosion and scaling issues resulted in Unocal abandoning the project in the 1980's. Ormat Nevada investigated the potential of the shallow sands in 2006. It was concluded that these matrixpermeable sands contained moderately saline water, high porosity, and could support a binary-type power plant. In 2007, Ormat Nevada drilled and tested five wells. These test results confirmed the

162

Hawaii's Rainforest Crunch: Land, People, and Geothermal Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii's Rainforest Crunch: Land, People, and Geothermal Development...

163

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal...

164

Experience with the Development of Advanced Materials for Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter contains the following sections: Introduction, Advanced Cements, Materials Research and Development in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), Advanced Coatings, and Conclusions.

Sugama, T.; Butcher, T.; Ecker, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type ...

166

Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Chena Hot Springs geothermal field was intensively explored, tested, and developed without a wireline unit between October 2005 and August 2006. Due to the remote location of the project and its small size of 0.4 MW, it was necessary to perform the work without the geothermal industry infrastructure typically utilized in the 48 contiguous states. This could largely be done because some of the wells were capable of artesian flow at below boiling temperatures. The geology, consisting of

167

Geothermal Energy Development annual report 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an exerpt from Earth Sciences Division Annual Report 1979 (LBL-10686). Progress in thirty-four research projects is reported including the following area: geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, and geothermal environmental research. Separate entries were prepared for each project. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Preliminary investigation of two areas in New York State in terms of possible potential for hot dry rock geothermal energy. [Adirondack Mountains and Catskill Mountains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two areas in New York State were studied in terms of possible long range potential for geothermal energy: the Adirondack Mountains which are undergoing contemporary doming, and an anomalous circular feature centered on Panther Mountain in the Catskill Mountains. The Adirondack Mountains constitute an anomalously large, domical uplift on the Appalachian foreland. The domical configuration of the area undergoing uplift, combined with subsidence at the northeastern perimeter of the dome, argues for a geothermal rather than glacioisostatic origin. A contemporary hot spot near the crust-mantle boundary is proposed as the mechanism of doming, based on analogy with uplifts of similar dimensions elsewhere in the world, some of which have associated Tertiary volcanics. The lack of thermal springs in the area, or high heat flow in drill holes up to 370 m deep, indicates that the front of the inferred thermal pulse must be at some depth greater than 1 km. From isopach maps by Rickard (1969, 1973), it is clear that the present Adirondack dome did not come into existence until sometime after Late Devonian time. Strata younger than this are not present to provide further time stratigraphic refinement of this lower limit. However, the consequent radial drainage pattern in the Adirondacks suggests that the dome is a relatively young tectonic feature. Using arguments based on fixed hot spots in central Africa, and the movement of North American plate, Kevin Burke (Appendix I) suggests that the uplift may be less than 4 m.y. old.The other area of interest, the Panther Mountain circular feature in the Catskill Mountains, was studied using photogeology, gravity and magnetic profiling, gravity modeling, conventional field methods, and local shallow seismic refraction profiling.

Isachsen, Y.W.

1978-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

EA-1893: Canby Cascaded Geothermal Development System, Canby, California |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Canby Cascaded Geothermal Development System, Canby, 93: Canby Cascaded Geothermal Development System, Canby, California EA-1893: Canby Cascaded Geothermal Development System, Canby, California Summary This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal by Modoc Contracting Company to use DOE grant funds to fulfill its plan to expand its reliance on geothermal resources by producing more hot water and using it to produce power as well as thermal energy. The goal of the project is to complete a cascaded geothermal system that generates green power for the local community, provides thermal energy to support greenhouse and aquaculture operation, provide sustainable thermal energy for residential units, and eliminate the existing geothermal discharge to a local river. NOTE: NOTE: This EA has been cancelled.

170

Geothermal institutional handbook for the State of Wyoming: a user's guide of agencies regulations, permits and aids for geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The agencies involved in geothermal development are listed and individually described. A summary of existing geothermal resource laws and their statute numbers are given followed by a discussion on the problems associated with them. The local agencies and their regulations of geothermal development are discussed. The local, state, and federal agencies directly involved in geothermal development and their permitting requirements are tabulated. Some step-by-step instructions for determining what permits are necessary for developing a specific geothermal resource are given. A list of selected references and a list of additional resources for geothermal information and referral are included. (MHR)

Aspinwall, C.; Caplan, J.; James, R.; Marcotte, K.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Geothermal evaluation and analysis of the Yucca Mountain Repository, Nevada; Final report, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report on the geothermal analysis and evaluation for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, for the period of July 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989. Heat flow values were derived by measuring the thermal conductivities of samples taken from selected exploratory wells. Temperature gradients are recorded from the same wells. By using computer generated contour maps of the area, another interpretation of the heat-flow can be derived. Results of the mapping do not coincide with the past observations of the data. Another method used to evaluate the heat-flow of Yucca Mountain was to compare the temperature-depth relationship of the area. (MB)

NONE

1989-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

Geopressured-geothermal energy development: government incentives and institutional structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are included: a geothermal resource overview, the evolution of the current Texas geopressured-geothermal institutional structure, project evaluation with uncertainty and the structure of incentives, the natural gas industry, the electric utility industry, potential governmental participants in resource development, industrial users of thermal energy, current government incentives bearing on geopressured-geothermal development, six profiles for utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resources in the mid-term, and probable impacts of new government incentives on mid-term resource utilization profiles. (MHR)

Frederick, D.O.; Prestwood, D.C.L.; Roberts, K.; Vanston, J.H. Jr.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Geothermal data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the Valles Caldera - southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field, chemical, and isotopic data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico are presented. This region includes all thermal and mineral waters associated with Valles Caldera and many of those located near the Nacimiento Uplift, near San Ysidro. Waters of the region can be categorized into five general types: (1) surface and near surface meteoric waters; (2) acid-sulfate waters (Valles Caldera); (3) thermal meteoric waters (Valles Caldera); (4) deep geothermal and derivative waters (Valles Caldera); and (5) mineralized waters near San Ysidro. Some waters display chemical and isotopic characteristics intermediate between the types listed. The object of the data is to help interpret geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains region and to provide background data for investigating problems in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry.

Goff, F.; McCormick, Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Grigsby, C.O.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Geothermal energy in Montana: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A short description of the state's geothermal characteristics, economy, and climate is presented. More specific information is included under the planning regions and site specific data summaries. A brief discussion of the geothermal characteristics and a listing of a majority of the known hot springs is included. The factors which influence geothermal development were researched and presented, including: economics, financing, state leasing, federal leasing, direct-use technology, water quality laws, water rights, and the Major Facility Siting Act. (MHR)

Brown, K.E.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geothermal energy in Montana: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A short description of the state's geothermal characteristics, economy, and climate is presented. A listing of the majority of the known hot springs is included. A discussion of present and projected demand is included. The results of the site specific studies are addressed within the state energy picture. Possible uses and process requirements of geothermal resources are discussed. The factors which influence geothermal development were researched and presented according to relative importance. (MHR)

Brown, K.E.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Geothermal energy in Alaska: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are presented: the history of geothermal energy in Alaska; a history of Alaska land ownership; legal and institutional barriers; and economics. Development, the socio-economic and physical data concerning geothermal energy are documented by regions. The six regions presented are those of the present Alaska State Planning Activities and those of the Federal Land Use Commission. Site data summaries of the one hundred and four separate geothermal spring locations are presented by these regions. (MHR)

Markle, D.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Overview of Proposed Geothermal Development in Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the four hours of the public meeting held by the State Department of Business and Economic Development (DBED) in Maui in November 1989, not one of the 200 persons present spoke in favor of geothermal development on the Big Island to supply power to Oahu. However, we were all sure after the meeting that the State would proceed on its course to develop the project in spite of any public concerns. This situation we find incredible considering there are many unanswered questions on a subject of paramount importance to the economic and environmental well being of all of us. Our concerns are well expressed in the editorial of The Maui News, December 10, 1989 . We wish to set the record straight with some facts from an economic, financial and utility planning viewpoint, recognizing also the potentially serious social, health and other environmental impacts.

None

1990-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Abstract N/A Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and

179

Utah/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Utah/Geothermal < Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Utah Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Utah Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Cove Fort Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC 50 MW50,000 kW 50,000,000 W 50,000,000,000 mW 0.05 GW 5.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Cove Fort Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Drum Mountain Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Delta, Utah 0 MW0 kW

180

Geothermal energy in Alaska: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various factors affecting geothermal resource development are summarized for Alaska including: resource data base, geological description, reservoir characteristics, environmental character, base and development status, institutional factors, economics, population and market, and development potential. (MHR)

Markle, D.R.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Geothermal energy in Idaho: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various factors affecting geothermal resource development are summarized for Idaho, including: resource data base, geological description, reservoir characteristics, environmental character, lease and development status, institutional factors, legal aspects, population and market, and development. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Shaanxi Geothermal Energy Development Co Ltd CGCO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shaanxi Geothermal Energy Development Co Ltd CGCO Shaanxi Geothermal Energy Development Co Ltd CGCO Jump to: navigation, search Name Shaanxi Geothermal Energy Development Co Ltd (CGCO) Place Xianyang, Shaanxi Province, China Zip 712000 Sector Geothermal energy Product A Chinese geothermal project developer Coordinates 34.33968°, 108.688713° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.33968,"lon":108.688713,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brawley Resurrection of a Previously Developed Geothermal Field Abstract The Brawley Geothermal Field was originally developed byUnocal. In addition to drilling geothermal wells, this developmentincluded building and operating a 10 MWe power plant.Corrosion and scaling issues resulted in Unocal abandoning theproject in the 1980's. Ormat Nevada investigated the potentialof the shallow sands in 2006. It was concluded that these matrixpermeablesands contained moderately saline water, high porosity,and could support a binary-type power plant. In 2007, OrmatNevada drilled and tested five wells. These test results confirmedthe earlier conclusions and

184

Sandia/DOE geothermal drilling and completion technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the development of geothermal energy resources. Technological deficiencies in rotary drilling techniques are evidenced when drilling geothermal wells. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program aimed at developing new drilling and completion techniques for geothermal wells. The goals of this program are to reduce well costs 25% by 1982 and 50% by 1986. Sandia Laboratories has managed this technology development program since October 1977, and this paper presents an overview of the program. A statement of program goals and structure is given. The content of the FY-79 program is presented and recent results of R and D projects are given. Plans for development of an advanced drilling and completion system are discussed.

Barnette, J.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Alaska: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alaska's geothermal potential, exploration, drilling, utilization, and legal and institutional setting are covered. Economic factors of direct use projects are discussed. (MHR)

Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). Awardees (Company Institution) AltaRock Energy, Inc. Awardee Website http:www.altarockenergy.com Partner 1 University of Nevada at...

187

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oregon's geothermal potential, exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting are covered. Economic factors of direct use projects are discussed. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)

Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Technology assessment of geothermal energy resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal state-of-the-art is described including geothermal resources, technology, and institutional, legal, and environmental considerations. The way geothermal energy may evolve in the United States is described; a series of plausible scenarios and the factors and policies which control the rate of growth of the resource are presented. The potential primary and higher order impacts of geothermal energy are explored, including effects on the economy and society, cities and dwellings, environmental, and on institutions affected by it. Numerical and methodological detail is included in appendices. (MHR)

Not Available

1975-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geothermal Developments at San Diego Gas & Electric  

SciTech Connect

In 1972, the first well flow tests were conducted by NARCO and Magma Power to determine reservoir characteristics such as mass flow, temperature, stability, and mineral content of geothermal brine from the exploration wells. The results of these tests were encouraging. Brine temperatures were relatively hot, and salinity was less than previously experienced. Results were sufficient to justify further testing of the process design to determine an appropriate energy conversion cycle for a power plant. Both the flash cycle and binary cycle were considered. In the binary cycle, geothermal heat is transferred from hot brine to a secondary working fluid by means of heat exchangers. The heated secondary fluid expands to drive a turbine-generator. The flash cycle was rejected because the high measured noncondensible gas content of the brines seriously reduced the cycle efficiency. The reduced salinity was expected to result in reduced scaling characteristics. For these reasons the binary cycle was selected for initial design and field testing. In 1973, a series of field tests was conducted to support the design of the binary conversion cycle. Unfortunately, a rapid decline in heat exchanger performance resulting from scaling demonstrated a need to reevaluate the cycle design. A flash/binary process was chosen as the basis for facility design modifications and additional field testing. Design modifications were to use as much of the original design as possible in order to minimize cost. In March of 1974, SDG&E resumed field testing at Niland using reduced size models of the new flash/binary design. The 1974 test program confirmed the decision to modify the design, construction, and operation of the GLEF in a four-stage, flash/binary cycle configuration. In May of 1975, the design was completed and construction of the GLEF began. Startup operations were initiated and in June 1976 the facility was dedicated. In the fall of 1976 while debugging and initial operation was being accomplished, a test program was developed to provide additional basic information necessary for the design of a commercial flash/binary geothermal plant. The primary objective of the program was to develop binary heat exchanger heat design data under a variety of conditions.

Anastas, George; Hoaglin, Gregory J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Project development plan for East Mesa Geothermal Test Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans for a test facility for geothermal energy systems and components designed for moderate temperature/low salinity geothermal fluids available at the East Mesa site in the Imperial Valley of California are discussed. Details of the following phases of development are given: technical plan; management plan; procurement and contracting plan; technology transfer and utilization plan; and resource requirements. (JGB)

Not Available

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Impact of Taxation on the Development of Geothermal Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contractor report reviews past and current tax mechanisms for the development and operation of geothermal power facilities. A 50 MW binary plant is featured as the case study. The report demonstrates that tax credits with windows of availability of greater than one year are essential to allow enough time for siting and design of geothermal power systems. (DJE 2005)

Gaffen, Michael; Baker, James

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the

194

Shaanxi Green Energy Geothermal Development Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Energy Geothermal Development Co Ltd Green Energy Geothermal Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Shaanxi Green Energy Geothermal Development Co Ltd Place Xianyang, Shaanxi Province, China Sector Geothermal energy Product Sino Icelandic joint venture for the exploitation and utilization of geothermal energy in China. Coordinates 34.33968°, 108.688713° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.33968,"lon":108.688713,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water Heater Loan Program Mountain Association for Community Economic Development - Solar Water Heater Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) State Kentucky Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount 100% of equipment and installation cost Provider Kentucky Solar Partnership The Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) and the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) partner to offer low interest loans for the installation of solar water heaters. Loans cover the full equipment and installation cost. Flexible rate loans and terms are available. They

196

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Development Program is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of HDR as a significant energy source and to provide a basis for its timely commercial development. Principal operational tasks are those activities required to enable a decision to be made by FY86 on the ultimate commercialization of HDR. These include development and analyis of a 20- to 50-MW Phase II HDR reservoir at Site 1 (Fenton Hill) with the potential construction of a pilot electric generating station, Phase III; selection of a second site with subsequent reservoir development and possible construction of a direct heat utilization pilot plant of at least 30 MW thermal thereon; the determination of the overall domestic HDR energy potential; and the evaluation of 10 or more target prospect areas for future HDR plant development by commercial developers. Phase I of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Fenton Hill project was completed. Phase I evaluated a small subterranean system comprised of two boreholes connected at a depth of 3 km by hydraulic fracturing. A closed-loop surface system has been constructed and tests involving round-the-clock operation have yielded promising data on heat extraction, geofluid chemistry, flow impedance, and loss of water through the underground reservoir between the two holes, leading to cautions optimism for the future prospects of private-sector HDR power plants. (MHR)

Franke, P.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

Goff, S.; Goff, F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV; 2002/09/22 Published Geothermal Resources Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Mark Leidig,Richard P. Smith,Stuart D. Johnson,Kenneth

199

Economic incentive of geothermal resource development for direct applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of a mission-oriented program for accelerating the commercialization of geothermal energy, research is sponsored which concerns the quantitative analysis of investment decisions by industries involved in the development of geothermal resources. The results of a quick-response study conducted during the course of this research are discussed. The report specifically compares the relative investment incentive offered by two categories of geothermal ventures: (a) geothermal electric power projects; and (b) geothermal direct application projects. The attributes of discounted cash flows for several typical projects within each of the two categories are compared and, by using statistically-strong industry decision models previously developed, the likelihood of a favorable investment decision is estimated for each project.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

LOCAL POPULATION IMPACTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE GEYSERS - CALISTOGA REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Socio-Economic Impacts of Geothermal Develop- ment. LawrenceMatlock, 1978. Summary of 1977 Geothermal Drilling - WesternUnited States, Geothermal Energy Magazine vo. 6, no. 5, pp.

Haven, Kendal F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Development of an Enhanced Two-Phase Production System at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method was developed to enhance geothermal steam production from two-phase wells at THE Geysers Geothermal Field. The beneficial result was increased geothermal production that was easily and economically delivered to the power plant.

Steven Enedy

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

Geothermal energy in Idaho: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed site specific data regarding the commercialization potential of the proven, potential, and inferred geothermal resource areas in Idaho are presented. To assess the potential for geothermal resource development in Idaho, several kinds of data were obtained. These include information regarding institutional procedures for geothermal development, logistical procedures for utilization, energy needs and forecasted demands, and resource data. Area reports, data sheets, and scenarios were prepared that described possible geothermal development at individual sites. In preparing development projections, the objective was to base them on actual market potential, forecasted growth, and known or inferred resource conditions. To the extent possible, power-on-line dates and energy utilization estimates are realistic projections of the first events. Commercialization projections were based on the assumption that an aggressive development program will prove sufficient known and inferred resources to accomplish the projected event. This report is an estimate of probable energy developable under an aggressive exploration program and is considered extremely conservative. (MHR)

McClain, D.W.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Geothermal Program Review VII: proceedings. DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an indepth review of its entire geothermal R and D program. The 2--3 day conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R and D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. This year's conference, Program Review 7, was held in San Francisco on March 21--23, 1989. As indicated by its title, ''DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace'', Program Review 7 emphasized developing technologies, concepts, and innovations having potential for commercial application in the foreseeable future. Program Review 7 was comprised of eight sessions including an opening session and a special presentation on the ''Role of Geothermal Energy in Minimizing Global Environmental Problems.'' The five technical sessions covered GTD-sponsored R and D in the areas of hydrothermal (two sessions), hot dry rock, geopressured, and magma. Presentations were made by the relevant field researchers, and sessions were chaired by the appropriate DOE Operations Office Geothermal Program Manager. The technical papers and commentary of invited speakers contained in these Proceedings have been compiled in the order in which they were presented at Program Review 7.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Geothermal Materials Development. Annual report FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level I and II Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, utility company sponsored ``full cost`` recovery programs based upon materials technology developed in this project were initiated on topics such as condensing heat exchangers, high temperature composites for utility vaults used in district heating systems, and corrosion resistant coatings for use in oil-fired electric generating processes. In FY 1991 the DOE/GD-sponsored R&D project was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities being performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}- resistant well cements, chemical systems for lost circulation control, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective linear systems, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems needed for use in high temperature well drilling and safety related applications.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Geothermal Materials Development, Annual Report FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level I and II Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, utility company sponsored full cost'' recovery programs based upon materials technology developed in this project were initiated on topics such as condensing heat exchangers, high temperature composites for utility vaults used in district heating systems, and corrosion resistant coatings for use in oil-fired electric generating processes. In FY 1991 the DOE/GD-sponsored R D project was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities being performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}- resistant well cements, chemical systems for lost circulation control, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective linear systems, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems needed for use in high temperature well drilling and safety related applications.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Imperial County geothermal development. Quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Geothermal Office during the quarter are discussed, including: important geothermal events, geothermal waste disposal, a grant award by the California Energy Commission, the geothermal development meeting, and the current status of geothermal development in Imperial County. Activities of the Geothermal Planner are addressed, including permits, processing of EIR's, and other planning activities. Progress on the direct heat study is reported.

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Geothermal energy in Idaho: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of known information about the nature of the resource, its potential for development, and the infrastructure of government which will guide future development is presented. Detailed site specific data regarding the commercialization potential of the proven, potential, and inferred geothermal resource areas in Idaho are included. Leasing and development status, institutional parameters, and a legal overview of geothermal resources in Idaho are given. (MHR)

McClain, D.V.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Environmental Development Plan (EDP). Geothermal energy systems, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Energy Systems Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the environmental, health, safety, social, and economic issues which are associated with the development, demonstration, and commercialization of geothermal resources and conversion technology. The EDP also describes the actions and implementation strategy required to resolve the issues identified. These actions may include the initiation of R and D activities, operations monitoring, baseline characterization studies, or activities leading to the development of standards and criteria in concert with other responsible agencies.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Public opinion concerning geothermal development in Lake County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A random sample of 2500 of the registered voters of Lake County, California, were polled about their opinions regarding the prospect of the development of geothermal energy in Lake County. The results of a secondary analysis of their responses are presented. The main conclusions are: (1) A large majority of the respondents are in favor of geothermal development provided that it is suitably regulated to minimize negative environmental impacts. (2) The main determinants of the respondents' approval or disapproval of geothermal development are their expectations concerning the environmental impacts of geothermal development and the economic benefits of development for the county. Essentially all respondents who do not perceive negative environmental impacts support development, and the expectation of increased job opportunities and/or tax revenues is a nearly absolute prerequisite for support of development. (auth) (3) Pro- and anti-geothermal bias have strong effects upon the formation of opinions about leasing and the perception of environmental impacts. (4) Purely demographic characteristics of the respondents, such as employment status and years of residence in the county, have only limited effects upon their attitudes toward geothermal development except in the southern portion of the county, where longer term residents and those who live in the county for reasons of employment are more in favor of development.

Vollintine, L.; Weres, O.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ace Development Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Bruneau, Idaho Coordinates 42.8804516°, -115.7973081° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

212

Development Overview of Geothermal Resources In Kilauea East Rift Zone |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Overview of Geothermal Resources In Kilauea East Rift Zone Development Overview of Geothermal Resources In Kilauea East Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Development Overview of Geothermal Resources In Kilauea East Rift Zone Abstract This study reviews the geothermal resources associatedwith the Kilauea East Rift Zone (KERZ) of Hawaii islandby focusing on a holistic development strategy for additionalgeothermal production. A review of existing literature inthe fields of geology, drilling, power production and policychallenges, highlights critical issues for geothermalenterprises. A geological assessment of the hydrology,geochemistry, and structural features that characterize theregion is discussed. Available data are interpreted includinggeology, geochemistry, well depth and temperature.

213

Geothermal Development in Imperial County | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Imperial County in Imperial County Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geothermal Development in Imperial County Abstract Imperial County is estimated to have a potential geothermal energy resource of 10,000 to 20,000 megawatts of electricity, of which 4,500 MW appears feasible for development with present technology in the next forty years. Imperial County, under NSF/ERDA Grant AER75-08793, contracted with UCR and Cal Tech for research covering the areas of: (a) resource assessment, (b) engineering, (c) geography, (d) social, (e) economic, and (f) political and legal implications of geothermal development. This summary reports the findings. Imperial County has been the site of active geothermal exploration and development by oil and utility companies for the past

214

Geothermal energy: Geology, exploration, and developments. Part I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geology, exploration, and initial developments of significant geothermal areas of the world are summarized in this report which is divided into two parts. Part 1 is a review of the geological and explorational aspects of geothermal energy development; areas of potential development in the Western United States are also discussed. The most favorable geological environment for exploration and development of geothermal steam is characterized by recent normal faulting, volcanism, and high heat flow. Successful exploration for steam consists of coordinated multidisciplinary application of geological, geophysical, and geochemical knowledge and techniques. These are reviewed. California leads in known geothermal reserves and is followed by Nevada, Oregon, and New Mexico. Specific prospective areas in these 11 Western States are described.

Grose, Dr. L.T.

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Further Developments on the Geothermal System Scoping Model: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses further developments and refinements for the uses of the Geothermal System Scoping Model in an effort to provide a means for performing a variety of trade-off analyses of surface and subsurface parameters, sensitivity analyses, and other systems engineering studies in order to better inform R&D direction and investment for the development of geothermal power into a major contributor to the U.S. energy supply.

Antkowiak, M.; Sargent, R.; Geiger, J. W.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Geothermal development plan: Cochise/Santa Cruz Counties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cochise/Santa Cruz Counties Area Development Plan evaluated the regional market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified three potential geothermal resource areas with potential for resource temperatures less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F). Geothermal resources are found to occur near the towns of Willcox, San Simon, and Bowier. Population growth rates are expected to average three percent per year over the next 30 years in Willcox; Bowie and San Simon are expected to grow much slower. Regional employment is based on agriculture and copper mining, though future growth in trade, services and international trade is expected. A regional energy-use analysis is also included. Urban use, copper mining and agriculture are the principal water users in the region and substantial reductions in water use are anticipated in the future. The development plan also contains a section identifying potential geothermal energy users in the region. Geothermal energy utilization projections suggest that by the year 2000, geothermal energy might economically provide the energy equivalent of 3,250,000 barrels of oil per year to the industrial sector. In addition, geothermal energy utilization might help stimulate an agricultural and livestock processing industry.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Recent developments in geothermal waste treatment biotechnology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuing studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have shown that cost-efficient biotechnology for the removal of toxic trace metals from geothermal sludge is feasible. Pilot-scale experiments have shown that fast rates (< 24-h) of metal removal at 55{degree}C--60{degree}C can be achieved with removal efficiencies of better than 80%, yielding a product well within the environmental regulatory limits. Recent studies have shown that radionuclides, such as radium present in low concentrations in some sludges, can also be removed by means of a secondary biotreatment. The process produces an aqueous phase which contains all of the regulatory metals in a soluble form. A follow-up technology for the treatment of the aqueous phase is concurrently being developed at BNL. Preliminary results indicate that a small volume concentrate of metals can be generated producing an aqueous phase which meets drinking water standards. In this paper the current state-of-the-biotechnology will be discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Jin, J.Z.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume II. Infrastructure and community-services requirements, Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The requirements of infrastructure and community services necessary to accommodate the development of geothermal energy on the Island of Hawaii for electricity production are identified. The following aspects are covered: Puna District-1981, labor resources, geothermal development scenarios, geothermal land use, the impact of geothermal development on Puna, labor resource requirments, and the requirements for government activity.

Chapman, G.A.; Buevens, W.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Geothermal energy in Washington: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an attempt to identify the factors which have affected and will continue to affect geothermal assessment and development in the state. The eight potential sites chosen for detailed analysis include: Indian Heaven KGRA, Mount St. Helens KGRA, Kennedy Hot Springs KGRA, Mount Adams PGRA (Potential Geothermal Resource Area), Mount Rainier PGRA, Mount Baker PGRA, Olympic-Sol Duc Hot Springs, and Yakima. The following information is included for each site: site data, site location and physical description, geological/geophysical description, reservoir characteristics, land ownership and leasing, geothermal development status, institutional characteristics, environmental factors, transportation and utilities, and population. A number of serious impediments to geothermal development were identified which can be solved only by legislative action at the state or federal level and/or changes in attitudes by regulatory agencies. (MHR)

Bloomquist, R.G.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Geothermal Loan Guaranty Program and its impact on geothermal exploration and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study showed that the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Program has had only a negligible effect on geothermal development and the response to the program was far less than expected. The streamlining of environmental regulations and leasing policies, and the granting of intangible drilling cost write-offs and depletion allowances to operators would have had a greater impact on geothermal energy development. The loan guaranty program did not promote the undertaking of any new projects that would not have been undertaken without it. The program only accelerated the pace for some development which might have commenced in the future. Included in the study are recommendations for improving the operation of the program thereby increasing its attractiveness to potential applicants.

Nasr, L.H.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Malheur County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Malheur County, shown in Figure 1. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Malheur County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued responding as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. Public service impacts include costs such as education, fire protection, roads, waste disposal, and water supply. The project assumption discussion notes experiences at other geothermal areas. The background section compares geothermal with conventional power plants. Power plant fuel distinguishes geothermal from other power sources. Other aspects of development are similar to small scale conventional thermal sources. The process of geothermal development is then explained. Development consists of well drilling, gathering system construction, power plant construction, plant operation and maintenance, and wellfield maintenance.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Site-Specific Analysis of Geothermal Development-Data Files of Prospective Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents site-specific data and sample development schedules for the first plant on line at 30 hydrothermal and 7 geopressured prospective sites (prospects) that are believed to be suited for supporting the geothermal generation of electricity. This report includes many prospects from an earlier METREK report on geothermal development scenarios. The list has been augmented with other sites chosen as development prospects by the division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The DGE additions include a general area called ''Cascade Range''. METREK has chosen the following specific Cascade Range Sites in place of that general area: Baker Hot Springs, Mount Hood, Lassen and Glass Mountain/ Diablo. All the prospects have been selected on the basis of current knowledge of hydrothermal and geopressured resources. The selection is intended for program planning purposes. Neither METREK nor the Federal government warrants that any of these sites will necessarily be developed, nor does their selection necessarily imply any commitment on the part of the Federal government to their development. [DJE-2005

Williams, F.; Cohen, A.; Pfundstein, R.; Pond, S.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Prospects and problems of development of geothermal resources of Russia  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses the pros and cons of geothermal energy source development in the Russian Federation. It estimates the geothermal reserves in each area of the Federation and presents the data in terms of tons of conventional fuels. Across the region, the average specific density exceeds 2,000,000 tons of conventional fuel per cubic kilometer. In the administrative regions of central Russia, the geothermal reserves are estimated to range from 160 years to 4200 years. The economic feasibility of developing these resources in the administrative regions is also explored, and it is concluded that the geothermal heat source is a source of hot water that is far superior to the conventional electric boiler-house source.

Boguslavskii, E.I.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Solicitation - Geothermal Drilling Development and Well Maintenance Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy (DOE)-industry research and development (R and D) organization, sponsors near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling and well maintenance costs. Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) administers DOE funds for GDO cost-shared projects and provides technical support. The GDO serves a very important function in fostering geothermal development. It encourages commercialization of emerging, cost-reducing drilling technologies, while fostering a spirit of cooperation among various segments of the geothermal industry. For Sandia, the GDO also serves as a means of identifying the geothermal industry's drilling fuel/or well maintenance problems, and provides an important forum for technology transfer. Successfully completed GDO projects include: the development of a high-temperature borehole televiewer, high-temperature rotating head rubbers, a retrievable whipstock, and a high-temperature/high-pressure valve-changing tool. Ongoing GDO projects include technology for stemming lost circulation; foam cement integrity log interpretation, insulated drill pipe, percussive mud hammers for geothermal drilling, a high-temperature/ high-pressure valve changing tool assembly (adding a milling capability), deformed casing remediation, high- temperature steering tools, diagnostic instrumentation for casing in geothermal wells, and elastomeric casing protectors.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Legal and institutional problems facing geothermal development in Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problems discussed confronting future geothermal development in Hawaii include: a seemingly insoluble mismatch of resource and market; the burgeoning land claims of the Native Hawaiian community; a potential legal challenge to the State's claim to hegemony over all of Hawaii's geothermal resources, regardless of surface ownership; resistance to any sudden, large scale influx of Mainland industry, and questionable economics for the largest potential industrial users. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Geothermal energy in Wyoming: site data base and development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of geothermal energy and its current and potential uses in Wyoming is presented. Chapters on each region are concluded with a summary of thermal springs in the region. The uniqueness of Yellowstone is discussed from both an institutional point of view and a natural one. The institutional situation at the federal and state level is discussed as it applies to geothermal development in Wyoming. (MHR)

James, R.W.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Population analysis relative to geothermal energy development, Imperial County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The historical and current population characteristics of Imperial County, California, are examined. These include vital rates, urbanization, town sizes, labor force composition, income, utility usage, and ethnic composition. Inferences are drawn on some of the important social and economic processes. Multivariate statistical analysis is used to study present relationships between variables. Population projections for the County were performed under historical, standard, and geothermal projection assumptions. The transferability of methods and results to other geothermal regions anticipating energy development is shown. (MHR)

Pick, J.B.; Jung, T.H.; Butler, E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Deschutes County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be Deschutes County. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Deschutes County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economical impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result for the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Harney County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Harney Count. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Harney County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1990 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To develop an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal source Notes An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra Nevada through the geothermal reservoir to the Panamint Mountains is presented. The cross section is constrained by new reflection and refraction seismic data, gravity and magnetic modeling, drilling data from the geothermal reservoir, and published regional geologic mapping. The

232

Colorado geothermal commercialization program: community development of geothermal energy in Pagosa Springs, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A district heating system for the Pagosa Springs central business district is in the planning stage. A detailed analysis of the project is presented. It comprises area and site specific studies and describes in detail the recent, current, anticipated, and postulated geothermal development activities. (MHR)

Coe, B.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Geothermal energy development in the Philippines: An overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Philippines is the third largest producer of geothermal electricity after the US and Mexico. Geothermal exploration was started in 1962, and the first large commercial power plants came on-line in 1979 in two fields. By 1984, four geothermal fields had a combined installed capacity of 890 MWe and in 1992 these plants supplied about 20% of the country`s electric needs. Geothermal energy development was stimulated in the mid-1970s by the oil crisis and rapidly growing power demand, government support, available foreign funding, and a combination of private and government investment and technical expertise. However, no new geothermal capacity has been added since 1984, despite the growing demand for energy and the continuing uncertainty in the supply of crude oil. The Philippines` geothermal capacity is expected to expand by 270--1,100 MWe by the end of 1999. Factors that will affect the rate growth in this decade include suitable legislation, environmental requirements, financing, degree of private involvement, politics, inter-island electric grid connections, and viability of the remaining prospects.

Sussman, D. [Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati (Philippines)] [Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati (Philippines); Javellana, S.P. [Philippine National Oil Co.--Energy Development Corp., Fort Bonifacio (Philippines)] [Philippine National Oil Co.--Energy Development Corp., Fort Bonifacio (Philippines); Benavidez, P.J. [National Power Corp., Biliman, Quezon City (Philippines)] [National Power Corp., Biliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Exploration and Development of Geothermal Power in California Abstract From 1955 to 1962, approximately 40 wells were drilled in 15 California thermal areas for the purpose of exploring and developing natural steam to utilize for electric power generation. Twenty-four of the wells were drilled in the three areas which at present seem to have the greatest potential for the production of natural steam: The Geysers, Sonoma County; Casa Diablo, Mono County; and the Salton Sea area, Imperial County.Since June 1960, steam from The Geysers thermal area, produced at a rate of approximately 250,000 Ib/hr, has been utilized to operate a 12,500 kw

235

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description Historically, areas where the Earth surface is covered by an exposed high-velocity rock layer have been locations where conventional, single-component, seismic P-waves have failed to provide usable geological information. The research will use new seismic sources that emphasize shear waves and new seismic data-acquisition technology based on cable-free data recording to acquire seismic research data across two sites covered with surface-exposed highvelocity rocks. Research tasks will involve acquiring, processing, and interpreting both conventional seismic data and multicomponent seismic data. Scientists at BEG will analyze well logs, cores, and reservoir test data to construct geological models of the targeted geology across each study site.

236

Geopressured-geothermal energy development: social and economic issues. Geopressured-geothermal technical paper No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented relevant to rule-making for geopressured-geothermal development on state-owned lands. The analysis is focused on those potential social and economic effects of resource development, if any, which may require special attention during the leasing and permitting process. The social and economic impacts likely to result from resource development depend upon characteristics specific to the site and surrounding social and economic systems.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

California/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California/Geothermal California/Geothermal < California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF California Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in California Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Alum Geothermal Project Ram Power Silver Peak, Nevada 64 MW64,000 kW 64,000,000 W 64,000,000,000 mW 0.064 GW 6.4e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Alum Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC Susanville, California 20 MW20,000 kW 20,000,000 W 20,000,000,000 mW 0.02 GW 2.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Black Rock I Geothermal Project CalEnergy Generation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development North Shore Mono Lake Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region

238

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Abstract Seismic reflection data were collected in two geothermalareas in Nevada to support geologic structural models andgeothermal well targeting. The data were integrated withsurface mapping, well results, and other geophysical data inconceptual geologic models in both areas. Faults wereinterpreted from reflection data based on reflector offsetsand apparent fault surface reflectors dipping away from therange front. Interpreted faults at Blue Mt., where severalwells have been drilled, correlated with well entries.Subsequent well targeting based on the conceptualstructural model

239

Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description A comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach is proposed using existing geophysical exploration technology coupled with new seismic techniques and subject matter experts to determine the combination of geoscience data that demonstrates the greatest potential for identifying EGS drilling targets using non-invasive techniques. This proposed exploration methodology is expected to increase spatial resolution and reduce the non-uniqueness that is inherent in geological data, thereby reducing the uncertainty in the primary selection criteria for identifying EGS drilling targets. These criteria are, in order of importance: (1) temperatures greater than 200-250°C at 1-5 km depth; (2) rock type at the depth of interest, and; (3) stress regime.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines current developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the R&D effort allowed to identify a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became a basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource and therefore differs, the emerging technology has to be also flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.

1997-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

242

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines: Current developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the r and D effort identified a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became the basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource, the emerging technology has to be flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Energy Science and Technology Div.; Bajsarowicz, V. [CET Environmental Services, Inc., Richmond, CA (United States); McCloud, M. [C.E. Holt/California Energy, Pasadena, CA (United States)

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Balancing energy and the environment: the case of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of part of a Rand study on the federal role in resolving environmental issues arising out of the implementation of energy projects are reported. The projects discussed are two geothermal programs in California: the steam resource development at The Geysers (Lake and Sonoma counties) in northern California, and the wet brine development in the Imperial Valley in southern California.

Ellickson, P.L.; Brewer, S.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

245

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Status of Environmental Controls for Geothermal Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the initial findings and recommendations of the Environmental Controls Panel to the Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council (IGCC). The Panel has been charged to assess the adequacy of existing environmental controls for geothermal energy systems, to review ongoing programs to develop environmental controls, and to identify controls-related research areas where redirection of federal efforts are appropriate to assure the availability of controls on a timely basis. In its deliberations, the Panel placed greatest emphasis on the use of geothermal resources for electricity generation, the application of geothermal energy receiving greatest attention today. The Panel discussed major known environmental concerns and their potential impact on the commercialization of geothermal resources, control options, regulatory considerations, and ongoing and planned research programs. The environmental concerns reviewed in this report include: air emissions, liquid discharges, solid wastes, noise, subsidence, seismicity, and hydrological alterations. For each of these concerns a brief description of the concern, associated legislation and regulations, control approaches, federal funding trend, and the Panel's recommendations and priorities are presented. In short, the Panel recommends that controls-related research efforts be rebalanced and enhanced, with the greatest emphasis placed on controls for hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and non-H{sub 2}S gaseous emissions, injection monitoring methods, systems to treat and use nongeothermal waters for environmental control purposes, solid waste characterization and management methods evaluation, and subsidence controls.

Caskey, John F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geothermal resource area 11, Clark County area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 11 includes all of the land in Clark County, Nevada. Within this area are nine geothermal anomalies: Moapa Area, Las Vegas Valley, Black Canyon, Virgin River Narrows, Roger's Springs, Indian Springs, White Rock Springs, Brown's Spring, and Ash Creek Spring. All of the geothermal resources in Clark County have relatively low temperatures. The highest recorded temperature is 145{sup 0}F at Black Canyon. The temperatures of the other resources range from 70 to 90{sup 0}F. Because of the low temperature of the resources and, for the most part, the distance of the resources from any population base, the potential for the development of the resources are considered to be somewhat limited.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Geothermal development plan: Cochise-Santa Cruz counties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A total of five hot springs and 25 thermal wells are located within the combined counties. The water discharged from these hot springs and wells may be suitable for applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Within Cochise county there are two large firms which are capable of using 70/sup 0/C (158/sup 0/F) geothermal water for their process heat requirements but the potential use of geothermal energy in Santa Cruz county is limited due to the absence of industry within the county. The amount of geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development is also predicted using a computer simulation model.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Imperial County geothermal development. Quarterly report, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three areas are reported: Geothermal Administration, Geothermal Planning; and other Geothermal Activities. Geothermal Administration addresses the status of the Imperial Valley Environmental Project (IVEP) transfer, update of the Geothermal Resource Center, and findings of Geothermal field inspections. Field inspections will cover the four new wells drilled by Magma at the Salton Sea in preparation for 28 MW power plant, the progress at Sperry at East Mesa, and the two on-line power plants in East Mesa and North Brawley. Evaluation of cooperative efforts will cover the Geothermal Subsidence Detection Network Resurvey, Master EIR for the Salton Sea and the Annual Imperial County Geothermal meeting. The status of Geothermal development throughout the County will cover existing proposed facilities. The summary of the Geothermal meeting (Appendix A) will also provide the status of several projects. Geothermal Planning addresses the EIR Notice of Exemption from CEQA, progress on the Master EIR for the Salton Sea, and the EIR for Phillips Petroleum for 6 exploratory wells in the Truckhaven area. Other Geothermal Activity addresses the Department of Energy Region IX meeting hosted by Imperial County, the Annual Imperial County Geothermal meeting, Class II-1 geothermal hazardous waste disposal siting study, and Imperial County Geothermal Direct Heat Study.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Environmental research needs for geothermal resources development. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed analysis was conducted to determine the adequacy of the total research efforts regarding the potential environmental impacts related to the exploration, drilling, production, and transmission stages of vapor-dominated, liquid-dominated, geopressured, and hot-dry-rock geothermal resources. The following environmental considerations were selected and analyzed in detail: air emissions (hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, mercury, boron, radon, etc.); liquid emissions (brine, and toxic chemicals); land subsidence; seismic activity; and noise. Following the definition of the problem and the assessment of the past and ongoing research efforts, environmental research needs were then recommended based on: (1) the severity of the environmental problems as perceived by literature and contacts with the research community; (2) probability of occurrence; (3) and the research dependency for a solution to that particular problem. The recommended research needs consisted of: (1) an evaluation of the past and ongoing research efforts to ascertain gaps in knowledge for a particular pollutant, process, or control technology; (2) baseline studies of air, soil, water, and ecology around the existing geothermal facilities and in the locations scheduled for future geothermal development; (3) need for the development of appropriate models for predicting concentration and dispersion of pollutants; (4) development of predictive models for potential health and environmental effects associated with geothermal operations; and (5) development of appropriate control technology to destroy, remove or reduce harmful emissions in order to prevent the occurrence of environmental and health hazards and to comply with existing standards and criteria.

Carstea, D.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Evaluation of the hot-dry-rock geothermal potential of an area near Mountain Home, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation of an area near Mountain Home, Idaho, was performed to assess the hot dry rock (HDR) potential of the prospect. The techniques reported include telluric and gravity profiling, passive seismic, hydrology and water chemistry surveys, and lineament analysis. Gravity and telluric surveys were unsuccessful in locating fractures buried beneath recent volcanics and sediments of the plain because density and conductivity contrasts were insufficient. Gravity modeling indicated areas where granite was not likely to be within drilling depth, and telluric profiling revealed an area in the northwest part of the prospect where higher conductivity suggested the presence of fractures or water or both, thereby making it unsuitable for HDR. Water geochemistry indicated that (hot water) reservoir temperatures do not exceed 100/sup 0/C. An area in the east central part of the prospect was delineated as most favorable for HDR development. Temperature is expected to be 200/sup 0/C at 3-km depth, and granitic rock of the Idaho Batholith should be intersected at 2- to 3-km depth.

Arney, B.H.; Goff, F.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Imperial County geothermal development. Summary report, 1979-1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress of geothermal development during the past three years, county activities in support of geothermal development, and current challenges and future needs of the geothermal industry and the county are summarized. Exploration activities have resulted in the identification and definition of three additional Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRAs) during the grant period: the Westmorland KGRA, the East Brawley KGRA, both in 1980, and the South Brawley KGRA in 1982. Exploration is continuing in other areas of the county as well. Three 10 megawatt power plants have begun operations during the grant period: the Magma East Mesa 10 Megawatt Binary Power Plant, the Union/Southern California Edison 10 Megawatt Flash Power Plant in Brawley, both beginning operations in 1980, and the Union/Southern California Edison 10 Megawatt Flash Power Plant at the Salton Sea, initiating operations in 1982. Three commercial power plants are scheduled to begin construction during late 1982 or early 1983. Groundbreaking for the Heber Binary Project is scheduled for November 1982. Site work has already begun for the Heber Flash Power Plant. The Magma 28 megawatt power plant at the Salton Sea is to begin construction in early 1983. Two commercial power plants are in planning stages. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Value distribution assessment of geothermal development in Lake County, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A value distribution assessment is defined as the determination of the distribution of benefits and costs of a proposed or actual development, with the intent of comparing such a development with alternative plans. Included are not only the social and economic effects, but also people's perceptions of their roles and how they are affected by the proposed or actual development. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: on morality and ethics; the vanishing community; case study of pre-development planning--Lake County; methodology for research; Lake County geothermal energy resource; decision making; Planning Commission hearing; communication examples; benefit tracing; response to issues raised by the report of the State Geothermal Task Force; and, conclusions and recommendations. (JGB)

Churchman, C.W.; Nelson, H.G.; Eacret, K.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Recent developments in the hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, most of the Hot Dry Rock Programs effort has been focused on the extraction technology development effort at the Fenton Hill test site. The pair of approximately 4000 m wells for the Phase II Engineering System of the Fenton Hill Project have been completed. During the past two years, hydraulic fracture operations have been carried out to develop the geothermal reservoir. Impressive advances have been made in fracture identification techniques and instrumentation. To develop a satisfactory interwellbore flow connection the next step is to redrill the lower section of one of the wells into the fractured region. Chemically reactive tracer techniques are being developed to determine the effective size of the reservoir area. A new estimate has been made of the US hot dry rock resource, based upon the latest geothermal gradiant data. 3 figs.

Franke, P.R.; Nunz, G.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the resulting constraints on potentially developable electrical power in each geothermal resource area. Analyses were completed for 11 major geothermal areas in California: four in the Imperial Valley, Coso, Mono-Long Valley, Geysers-Calistoga, Surprise Valley, Glass Mountain, Wendel Amedee, and Lassen. One area in Hawaii, the Puna district, was also included in the analysis. The water requirements for representative types of energy conversion processes were developed using a case study approach. Cooling water requirements for each type of energy conversion process were estimated based upon a specific existing or proposed type of geothermal power plant. The make-up water requirements for each type of conversion process at each resource location were then estimated as a basis for analyzing any constraints on the megawatts which potentially could be developed.

Sakaguchi, J.L.

1979-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

Geothermal exploration and development in Nevada through 1973  

SciTech Connect

A brief description is given of Nevada's geothermal resources, and exploration activity for geothermal power through 1973. The use, geology, exploration, and regulation of the State's geothermal energy resources are discussed.

Garside, L.J.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Status of Nevada Geothermal Resource Development - Spring 2011 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Development - Spring 2011 Resource Development - Spring 2011 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Status of Nevada Geothermal Resource Development - Spring 2011 Abstract Recent increases in geothermal exploration and power plant construction in Nevada are the first significant activities since the Steamboat II/III and Brady plants came on line in 1992.Exploration activity on existing projects grew between 2005 and 2010, culminating in the construction of several new power plants. The BLM's 2007 lease auction (first since the 2005 Energy Policy Act revisions) opened the door to exploration on green field properties. The number of wells permitted and drilled remained low from 1994 through 2003, but rose sharply to peak in 2009.However, over 760,000

259

Geothermal Energy Resources (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Louisiana developed policies regarding geothermal stating that the state should pursue the rapid and orderly development of geothermal resources.

260

A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are defined from the numerical solution of a complex hypersingular integral equation written for a given fracture configuration and loading. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures with existing discontinuities such as faults and joints. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two- and three-dimensional heat extraction solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate heat extraction and the variations of the reservoir stress with cooling. The numerical models have been developed in a user-friendly environment to create a tool for improving fracture design and investigating single or multiple fracture propagation in rock.

Ahmad Ghassemi

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Dixie Valley - Geothermal Development in the Basin and Range | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Geothermal Development in the Basin and Range - Geothermal Development in the Basin and Range Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Dixie Valley - Geothermal Development in the Basin and Range Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Dixie Valley - Geothermal Development in the Basin and Range Citation Dixie Valley - Geothermal Development in the Basin and Range [Internet]. [updated 2013/01/01;cited 2013/01/01]. Available from: http://www.geothermex.com/projects-dixie-valley.php Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Dixie_Valley_-_Geothermal_Development_in_the_Basin_and_Range&oldid=682561" Categories: References Geothermal References Uncited

262

Regional operations research program for commercialization of geothermal energy in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range. Final report, August 1, 1978-February 28, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work accomplished from August 1978 to February 1980 in the Regional Operations Research efforts for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Geothermal Commercialization Program are described. The work included continued data acquisition and extension of the data base, enhancement and refinement of the economic models for electric and direct use applications, site-specific and aggregated analyses in support of the state teams and special analyses in support of several federal agencies.

Marlin, J.M.; Cunniff, R.; McDevitt, P.; Nowotny, K.; O'Dea, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Case studies of geothermal leasing and development on federal lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to a widely expressed need to examine the impact of the federal regulatory system on the rate of geothermal power development, the Department of Energy-Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) has established a Streamlining Task Force in cooperation with appropriate federal agencies. The intent is to find a way of speeding development by modification of existing laws or regulations or by better understanding and mechanization of the existing ones. The initial focus was on the leasing and development of federal lands. How do the existing processes work? Would changes produce positive results in a variety of cases? These are questions which must be considered in a national streamlining process. This report presents case studies of federal leasing actions on seven diverse locations in the western region. Characteristics of existing high geothermal potential areas are quite diverse; geography, environment, industry interest and the attitudes and activities of the responsible federal land management agencies and the interested public vary widely. Included are descriptions of post and current activities in leasing exploration and development and discussions of the probable future direction of activities based on current plans. Implications of these plans are presented. The case studies were based on field interviews with the appropriate State and District BLM officer and with the regional forester's office and the particular forest office. Documentation was utilized to the extent possible and has been included in whole or in part in appendices as appropriate.

Trummel, Marc

1978-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

264

Montana Geothermal Handbook: a guide to agencies, regulations, permits and financial aids for geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The handbook is divided into three parts: a list of the permits required for various thermal projects, and an estimate of time needed to obtain them; a brief discussion of the statutes and regulations referred to; (This information was gathered in a survey of state and federal regulations, as well as in conversations with numerous state and federal officials); and a description of the state and federal grant and loan funding available to a prospective geothermal developer. The names and addresses of the relevant state and federal agencies and legal citations are listed in appendices.

Perlmutter, S.; Birkby, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Geothermal development in southwest Idaho: the socioeconomic data base  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report inventories, analyzes, and appraises the exiting socioeconomic data base for the ten counties in southwest Idaho that would be impacted by any significant geothermal development. The inventory describes key sociological demographic, and economic characteristics, and presents spatial boundaries, housing data, and projections of population and economic activity for the counties. The inventory identifies the significant gaps in the existing data base and makes recommendations for future research.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geothermal development in southwest Idaho: the socioeconomic data base  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report inventories, analyzes, and appraises the existing socioeconomic data base for the ten counties in southwest Idaho that would be impacted by any significant geothermal development. The inventory describes key sociological demographic, and economic characteristics, and presents spatial boundaries, housing data, and projections of population and economic activity for the counties. The inventory identifies the significant gaps in the existing data base and makes recommendations for future research.

Spencer,S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geothermal development of the Madison group aquifer: a case study  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal well has been drilled at the St. Mary's Hospital in Pierre, South Dakota. The well is 2176 feet deep and artesian flows 375 gpm at 106/sup 0/F. The well is producing fluids from the Mississippian Madison Group, a sequence of carbonate rocks deposited over several western states. The project was funded to demonstrate the goethermal potential of this widespread aquifer. This case study describes the development of the project through geology, drilling, stimulation, and testing.

Martinez, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Development of inverse modeling techniques for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed inverse modeling capabilities for the non-isothermal, multiphase, multicomponent numerical simulator TOUGH2 to facilitate automatic history matching and parameter estimation based on data obtained during testing and exploitation of geothermal fields. The TOUGH2 code allows one to estimate TOUGH2 input parameters based on any type of observation for which a corresponding simulation output can be calculated. In addition, a detailed residual and error analysis is performed, and the uncertainty of model predictions can be evaluated. One of the advantages of inverse modeling is that it overcomes the time and labor intensive tedium of trial- and error model calibration. Furthermore, the estimated parameters refer directly to the numerical model used for the subsequent predictions and optimization studies. This paper describes the methodology of inverse modeling and demonstrates an application of the method to data from a synthetic geothermal reservoir. We also illustrate its use for the optimization of fluid reinjection into a partly depleted reservoir.

Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Potential effects of environmental regulatory procedures on geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential effects of several types of applicable environmental regulatory procedures on geothermal development were assessed, and particular problem areas were identified. The possible impact of procedures adopted pursuant to the following Federal statutes were analyzed: Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Safe Drinking Water Act; and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. State regulations applicable, or potentially applicable, to geothermal facilities were also reviewed to determine: permit information requirements; pre-permit air or water quality monitoring requirements; effect of mandated time frames for permit approval; and potential for exemption of small facilities. The regulations of the following states were covered in the review: Alaska; Arizona; California; Colorado; Hawaii; Idaho; Montana; Nevada; New Mexico; Oregon; Utah; Washington; and Wyoming. (MHR)

Beeland, G.V.; Boies, D.B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Drilling Systems Project Description Potter Drilling has recently demonstrated hydrothermal spallation drilling in the laboratory. Hydrothermal spallation drilling creates boreholes using a focused jet of superheated water, separating individual grains ("spalls") from the rock surface without contact between the rock and the drill head. This process virtually eliminates the need for tripping. Previous tests of flame-jet spallation achieved ROP of 50 ft/hr and higher in hard rock with minimal wear on the drilling assembly, but operating this technology in an air-filled borehole created challenges related to cuttings transport and borehole stability. The Potter Drilling system uses a water based jet technology in a fluid-filled borehole and as a result has the potential to achieve similarly high ROP that is uncompromised by stability or cuttings transport issues.

271

Geothermal direct use developments in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct heat use of geothermal energy in the United States is recognized as one of the alternative energy resources that has proven itself technically and economically, and is commercially available. Developments include space conditioning of buildings, district heating, groundwater heat pumps, greenhouse heating, industrial processing, aquaculture, and swimming pool heating. Forty-four states have experienced significant geothermal direct use development in the last ten years. The total installed capacity is 5.7 billion Btu/hr (1700 MW/sub t/), with an annual energy use of nearly 17,000 billion Btu/yr (4.5 million barrels of oil energy equivalent). In this report we provide an overview of how and where geothermal energy is used, the extent of that use, the economics and growth trends. The data is based on an extensive site data gathering effort by the Geo-Heat Center in the spring of 1988, under contract to the US Department of Energy. 100 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal reservoir is being developed in Sierran-type crystalline bedrock of the Coso Mountains, a small desert mountain range just to the east of the Sierra Nevada and Rose Valley, which is the southern extension of the Owens Valley of eastern California Optimum development of this reservoir requires an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal sources. An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra

273

Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_Wells_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511310"

274

Development of geothermal-well-completion systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a three year study concerning the completion of geothermal wells, specifically cementing, are reported. The research involved some specific tasks: (1) determination of properties an adequate geothermal well cement must possess; (2) thorough evaluation of current high temperature oilwell cementing technology in a geothermal context; (3) basic research concerning the chemical and physical behavior of cements in a geothermal environment; (4) recommendation of specific cement systems suitable for use in a geothermal well.

Nelson, E.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

included in the analysis. The water requirements for representative types of energy conversion processes were developed using a case study approach. Cooling water requirements for...

276

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Mean br Capacity Mean br Reservoir br Temp Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics Mesozoic granite granodiorite MW K Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics triassic metasedimentary MW K Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone

277

Zuni Mountains, New Mexico as a potential dry hot rock geothermal energy Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many of the criteria for the successful exploitation of energy from dry hot rock are met in the Zuni Mountains, New Mexico. This area falls within a broad region of abnormally high heat flow on the Colorado Plateau. Within this region, a variety of evidence indicates that local ''hot spots'' may be present. These ''hot spots'' are prime targets for dry hot rock exploration. A site-evaluation program utilizing geological, geochemical-geochronological, and geophysical techniques is proposed to delineate the optimal sites for subsequent exploratory drilling.

Laughlin, A.W.; West, F.G.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Geothermal Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The first geothermal power generation in the world was started at Larderello, Italy in 1904. Then, New Zealand succeeded in the geothermal power generating country. These developments were then followed by the United States, Mexico, Japan and the Soviet Union, and at present, about 25 countries are utilizing geothermal power, or investigating geothermal resources.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Geopressured-geothermal development and coastal subsidence in Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Elevation changes at the Parcperdue geopressured-geothermal test site in southwestern Louisiana range from 0.8 to 0.16 in/y (+2 to -4 mm/y) and reflect natural base-line movements associated with salt dome growth and the compaction of thick, recent sediments. Natural variation is the primary cause of greater movement at the nearby Rockefeller Refuge geopressured-geothermal test site where base-line movement rates range from -0.43 to -0.55 in/y (-12 to -14 mm/y). Holocene sediments in the coastal marshlands at Rockefeller Refuge are more susceptible to compactional subsidence than upland Pleistocene formations at Parcperdue. Anomalous subsidence at both test sites coincided with site preparation and well drilling and may have been related to loading of surficial soils by the weight of drilling equipment. Elevation changes monitored after drilling and during formation testing were consistent with base-line subsidence rates, indicating that loading was temporary. Anomalous base-line subsidence rates coinciding with areas of historical fluid withdrawal indicate that these effects may outweigh the effects of present geopressured-geothermal development.

Trahan, D.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Federal hot dry rock geothermal energy development program: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The formulation and evolution of the Federal Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are traced. Program motivation is derived from the enormous potential of the resource. Accomplishments to date, including the establishment and evaluation of the 5-MW/sub t/ Phase 1 reservoir at Fenton Hill, NM and various instrument and equipment developments, are discussed. Future plans presented include (1) establishment of a 20- to 50-MW/sub t/ Phase 2 reservoir at Fenton Hill that will be used to demonstrate longevity and, eventually, electric power production and (2) the selection of a second site at which a direct thermal application will be demonstrated.

Nunz, G.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain: a scenario for geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A scenario for the development of potential geothermal resources in the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain states of Mississippi, Alabama and Florida is explained and discussed. A description of the resources and the nature of the potential applications and energy market in this region are given. A ranking of the resources as to their energy content, potential market, etc., is described, and the assumptions and strategy used to generate the scenario are discussed. A more complete report on the detailed aspects involved in the preparation of the development scenario will be issued in the near future.

Not Available

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Rock properties in support of geothermal resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal rock mechanics needs have been defined and subsequently a test system was designed and built for providing appropriate material properties. The development areas identified as requiring rock mechanics were stimulation, reservoir engineering, subsidence prediction, surface exploration and subsurface evaluation, and drilling. The resulting test system provides mechanical, electrical, thermal and physical properties on 2 and 4 inch diameter cores at confining pressures and pore fluid pressures to 200 MPa (30,000 psi) and temperatures to 535/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F). The test system development was continued and site specific rock mechanics requirements were identified. (MHR)

Butters, S.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Imperial County geothermal development semi-annual report, October 1, 1980-March 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current geothermal progress in Imperial County is reported. Three areas are reported: Geothermal Administration, Geothermal Planning, and other Geothermal Activities. Geothermal Administration addresses the status of the Imperial Valley Environmental Project (IVEP) transfer, update of the Geothermal Resource Center, and findings of Geothermal field inspections. In addition, the cooperative efforts between industry and the County; Master EIR for the Salton Sea KGRA and the resurveying of the subsidence detection network are covered. Geothermal Planning addresses a Board of Supervisor action on the Union Oil Geothermal Production Permit for 16 wells in the Salton Sea KGRA and a permit for Southern California Edison 10 megawatts power plant in the Salton Sea KGRA. Planning Commission action covers: Amendment of Magma Power's 49 megawatts Geothermal Production Permit to 28 megawatt power plant and relocation of the plant and wells within the Salton Sea KGRA; Exploration permit to Occidental Geothermal for four exploratory wells in East Brawley; Geothermal Production Permit to Southern California Edison to operate a 10 megawatt power plant in the Salton Sea KGRA; and Geothermal production permit to Union Oil for 16 production-injection wells in the Salton Sea KGRA. Lastly, EIR exemptions to CEQA were granted to Chevron for 70 shallow temperature observation holes and Union for fifteen. Other Geothermal Activity addresses the County Direct Heat Development study; the solicitation for district heating and cooling proposals; the new Geothermal Class II-1 disposal site; the DOE Region IX meeting in Tucson; and USGA designating a new KGRA, the East Brawley KGRA, the Westmorland KGRA, and revising the southern border of the Salton Sea KGRA.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Mountain  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biodiesel (B100) Production by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD)" Biodiesel (B100) Production by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD)" "(million gallons)" "Period","PADD",,,,,,,,,,"U.S." ,"East Coast (PADD 1)",,"Midwest (PADD 2)",,"Gulf Coast (PADD 3)",,"Rocky Mountain (PADD 4)",,"West Coast (PADD 5)" 2011 "January",3,,30,,1,,0,,1,,35.355469 "February",3,,32,,4,,0,,1,,40.342355 "March",3,,47,,6,,0,,2,,59.59017 "April",3,,54,,10,,0,,3,,71.0517 "May",4,,58,,11,,0,,4,,77.196652 "June",4,,56,,14,,0,,7,,81.39104 "July",5,,65,,17,,0,,5,,91.679738 "August",5,,66,,20,,0,,5,,95.484891 "September",6,,65,,20,,0,,6,,95.880151 "October",7,,73,,22,,0,,4,,105.342474

286

Development of geothermal logging systems in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Logging technologies developed for hydrocarbon resource evaluation have not migrated into geothermal applications even though data so obtained would strengthen reservoir characterization efforts. Two causative issues have impeded progress: (1) there is a general lack of vetted, high-temperature instrumentation, and (2) the interpretation of log data generated in a geothermal formation is in its infancy. Memory-logging tools provide a path around the first obstacle by providing quality data at a low cost. These tools feature on-board computers that process and store data, and newer systems may be programmed to make decisions. Since memory tools are completely self-contained, they are readily deployed using the slick line found on most drilling locations. They have proven to be rugged, and a minimum training program is required for operator personnel. Present tools measure properties such as temperature and pressure, and the development of noise, deviation, and fluid conductivity logs based on existing hardware is relatively easy. A more complex geochemical tool aimed at a quantitative analysis of (potassium, uranium and thorium) is in the calibration phase, and it is expandable into all nuclear measurements common in the hydrocarbon industry. A fluid sampling tool is in the design phase. All tools are designed for operation at conditions exceeding 400 C, and for deployment in the slim holes produced by mining-coring operations. Partnerships are being formed between the geothermal industry and scientific drilling programs to define and develop inversion algorithms relating raw tool data to more pertinent information. These cooperative efforts depend upon quality guidelines such as those under development within the international Ocean Drilling Program.

Lysne, P.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Noise-control needs in the developing...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Noise-control needs in the developing energy technologies Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

288

Area development plan of the geothermal potential in planning region 8, Roosevelt - Custer area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resource data, the Roosevelt-Custer Region development plan, and energy, economic, and institutional considerations are presented. Environmental considerations and water availability are discussed. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, October 1980-December 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Geothermal resource area 3: Elko County. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 3 includes all of the land in Elko County, Nevada. There are in excess of 50 known thermal anomalies in this area. Several of the more major resources have been selected for detailed description and evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The other resources are considered too small, too low in temperature, or too remote to be considered for development in the near future. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the studied resource sites in Elko County were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics; the land ownership and land use patterns; existing population and projected growth rates; transportation facilities and energy requirements. These factors were then compared with resource site specific data to determine the most likely uses of the resource. The uses considered in this evaluation were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories several subdivisions were considered separately. It was determined that several of the geothermal resources evaluated in the Area Development Plan could be commercially developed. The potential for development for the seven sites considered in this study is summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Toward The Development Of Occurrence Models For Geothermal Resources In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Toward The Development Of Occurrence Models For Geothermal Resources In The Toward The Development Of Occurrence Models For Geothermal Resources In The Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Toward The Development Of Occurrence Models For Geothermal Resources In The Western United States Details Activities (6) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Simplified geothermal occurrence models using attributes identified at Coso and elsewhere were developed and applied in preparing the recently completed Department of Defensefunded evaluation of geothermal potential on U.S. military bases. An interpretation of the spatial associations between selected characteristics was used to direct field investigations. Several potential targets were identified using this method, and field investigations at two bases provided evidence supporting

292

Geothermal energy, research, development and demonstration program. Second annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discussion is presented under the following section headings: executive summary; national geothermal utilization estimates; Federal Geothermal Energy Program objective; Federal Geothermal Energy strategy; Federal Program planning, implementation, and progress monitoring; organization of the report; national progress and achievements; regional progress and accomplishments; fiscal year 1978 activities; federal program activities in fiscal year 1979 and beyond; Appendix A--interagency coordination and program management Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council (IGCC); and appendix B--international activities.

Not Available

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cumulative biological impacts of The Geysers geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cumulative nature of current and potential future biological impacts from full geothermal development in the steam-dominated portion of The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA are identified by the California Energy Commission staff. Vegetation, wildlife, and aquatic resources information have been reviewed and evaluated. Impacts and their significance are discussed and staff recommendations presented. Development of 3000 MW of electrical energy will result in direct vegetation losses of 2790 acres, based on an estimate of 11.5% loss per lease-hold of 0.93 acres/MW. If unmitigated, losses will be greater. Indirect vegetation losses and damage occur from steam emissions which contain elements (particularly boron) toxic to vegetation. Other potential impacts include chronic low-level boron exposure, acid rain, local climate modification, and mechanical damage. A potential exists for significant reduction and changes in wildlife from direct habitat loss and development influences. Highly erosive soils create the potential for significant reduction of aquatic resources, particularly game fish. Toxic spills have caused some temporary losses of aquatic species. Staff recommends monitoring and implementation of mitigation measures at all geothermal development stages.

Brownell, J.A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The analysis of subsidence associated with geothermal development. Volume 1. Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study evaluates the state of knowledge of subsidence associated with geothermal development, and provides preliminary methods to assess the potential of land subsidence for any specific geothermal site. The results of this study are presented in three volumes. Volume 1 is designed to serve as a concise reference, a handbook, for the evaluation of the potential for land subsidence from the development of geothermal resources.

Atherton, R.W.; Finnemore, E.J.; Gillam, M.L.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Accelerated Geothermal Resource Development in the Great Basin Through Enhanced Public Awareness and Outreach to Shareholders.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy conducted work encompassing two main tasks. We (1) produced a web-based, stakeholder geothermal information system for Nevada geothermal data relevant to assessing and developing geothermal resources, and (2) we held informational stakeholder workshops (both as part of GeoPowering the West Initiative). The objective of this grant was to conduct workshops and fund database and web development activities. This grant funds salaries for web and database developers and part of the administrative assistant who helps to coordinate and organize workshops, and maintain selected databases.

Taranik, James V.; Oppliger, Gary; Sawatsky, Don

2002-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

Nevada Geothermal Operating Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Operating Company LLC Operating Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Nevada Geothermal Operating Company LLC Place Blue Mountain, NV Sector Geothermal energy Website http://www.nevadageothermal.co References Alternative Earth Resources Inc Website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Nevada Geothermal Operating Company LLC is a subsidiary of Alternative Earth Resources Inc based in Blue Mountain, NV. Alternative Earth Resources Inc. (formerly Nevada Geothermal Power) is an experienced renewable energy company, focused on developing and generating clean, sustainable electric power from geothermal resources. The Company has headquarters in Vancouver, BC and trades on the Toronto Venture Exchange under the symbol AER. Alternative Earth holds leasehold interests in four geothermal projects

297

Geothermal energy development in Washington State. A guide to the federal, state and local regulatory process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Washington State's geothermal potential is wide spread. Hot springs and five strato volcanoes existing throughout the Cascade Range, limited hot spring activity on the Olympic Peninsula, and broad reaching, low temperature geothermal resources found in the Columbia Basin comprise the extent of Washington's known geothermal resources. Determination of resource ownership is the first step in proceeding with geothermal exploration and development activities. The federal and state processes are examined from pre-lease activity through leasing and post-lease development concerns. Plans, permits, licenses, and other requirements are addressed for the federal, state, and local level. Lease, permit, and other forms for a number of geothermal exploration and development activities are included. A map of public lands and another displaying the measured geothermal resources throughout the state are provided.

Bloomquist, R.G.; Simpson, S.J.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Significant Problems in Geothermal Development in California, Final Report on Four Workshops, December 1978 - March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From November 1978 through March 1979 the California Geothermal Resources Board held four workshops on the following aspects of geothermal development in California: County Planning for Geothermal Development; Federal Leasing and Environmental Review Procedures; Transmission Corridor Planning; and Direct Heat Utilization. One of the objectives of the workshops was to increase the number of people aware of geothermal resources and their uses. This report is divided into two parts. Part 1 provides summaries of all the key information discussed in the workshops. For those people who were not able to attend, this part of the report provides you with a capsule version of the workshop sessions. Part 2 focuses on the key issues raised at the workshops which need to be acted upon to expedite geothermal resource development that is acceptable to local government and environmentally prudent. For the purpose of continuity, similar Geothermal Resources Task Force recommendations are identified.

None

1979-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program. Quarterly progress report, January 1981-March 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods as they apply to advanced drilling systems.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Analysis of ecological effects of geopressured-geothermal resource development. Geopressured-geothermal technical paper No. 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities involved in geopressured-geothermal resource production are identified and their ecological impacts are discussed. The analysis separates those activites that are unique to geopressured-geothermal development from those that also occur in oil and gas and other resource developments. Of the unique activities, those with the greatest potential for serious ecological effect are: (1) accidental brine discharge as a result of a blowout during well drilling; (2) subsidence; (3) fault activation and enhanced seismicity; and (4) subsurface contamination of water, hydrocarbon, and mineral reservoirs. Available methods to predict and control these effects are discussed.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geopressured-geothermal resource development on public free school lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study's findings and recommendations are based upon analysis of the following: financial and economic feasibility of geopressured-geothermal resource development; possible ecological, social, and economic impacts of resource development on PFSL; and legal issues associated with resource development. The results of the analysis are summarized and are discussed in detail in a series of four technical papers which accompany this volume. Existing rules of the General Land Office (GLO), the School Land Board (SLB), and the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) were reviewed in light of the above analysis and were discussed with the agencies. The study's recommendations resulted from this analytical and review process; they are discussed. The preliminary draft rules and regulations to govern resource development on PFSL are presented in Appendix A; the accompanying forms and model lease are found in Appendix B.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Geology and geothermal waters of Lightning Dock region, Animas Valley and Pyramid Mountains, Hidalgo County, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This circular covers the geology of the Pyramid Peak, Swallow Fork Peak, Table Top Mountain, and South Pyramid Peak 7-1/2-min quadrangles, which include the Lightning Dock KGRA. Hot wells (70 to 115.5/sup 0/C) seem to be structurally controlled by intersections of the ring-fracture zone of an Oligocene ash-flow tuff cauldron (Muir cauldron), a Miocene-to-Holocene north-trending basin-and-range fault (Animas Valley fault), and a northeast-trending lineament that appears to control anomalously heated underground waters and Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt cones in the San Bernardino, San Simon, and Animas Valleys. The Muir cauldron, approximately 20 km in diameter, collapsed in two stages, each associated with the eruption of a rhyolite ash-flow-tuff sheet and of ring-fracture domes. Most of the hydrothermal alteration of the Lightning Dock KGRA is related to the first stage of eruption and collapse, not to the modern geothermal system. Contrary to previous reports, no silicic volcanic rocks younger than basin-and-range faulting are known; unconformities beneath rhyolite ring-fracture domes are caused by Oligocene caldera collapse, not by basin-and-range faulting. The Animas Valley is the site of widespread post-20 My travertine deposits and near-surface veins of calcite, fluorite, and/or psilomelane, controlled by north- or northwest-trending basin-and-range faults. The fluoride-bearing waters of the Lightning Dock KGRA may be a late stage of this hydrothermal activity. Distribution of Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt suggests that deep-seated basalt near the solids may be the ultimate heat source.

Elston, W.E.; Deal, E.G.; Logsdon, M.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Geopressured geothermal drilling and completions technology development needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured geothermal formations found in the Texas and Louisiana gulf coast region and elsewhere have the potential to supply large quantities of energy in the form of natural gas and warm brine (200 to 300/sup 0/F). Advances are needed, however, in hardware technology, well design technology, and drilling and completion practices to enable production and testing of exploratory wells and to enable economic production of the resource should further development be warranted. This report identifies needed technology for drilling and completing geopressured geothermal source and reinjection wells to reduce the cost and to accelerate commercial recovery of this resource. A comprehensive prioritized list of tasks to develop necessary technology has been prepared. Tasks listed in this report address a wide range of technology needs including new diagnostic techniques, control technologies, hardware, instrumentation, operational procedure guidelines and further research to define failure modes and control techniques. Tasks are organized into the functional areas of well design, drilling, casing installation, cementing, completions, logging, brine reinjection and workovers.

Maish, A.B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Geothermal areas as analogues to chemical processes in the near-field and altered zone of the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository  

SciTech Connect

The need to bound system performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository for thousands of years after emplacement of high-level nuclear waste requires the use of computer codes. The use of such codes to produce reliable bounds over such long time periods must be tested using long-lived natural and historical systems as analogues. The geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) in New Zealand were selected as the site most amenable to study. The rocks of the TVZ are silicic volcanics that are similar in composition to Yucca Mountain. The area has been subjected to temperatures of 25 to 300 C which have produced a variety of secondary minerals similar to those anticipated at Yucca Mountain. The availability of rocks, fluids and fabricated materials for sampling is excellent because of widespread exploitation of the systems for geothermal power. Current work has focused on testing the ability of the EQ3/6 code and thermodynamic data base to describe mineral-fluid relations at elevated temperatures. Welfare starting long-term dissolution/corrosion tests of rocks, minerals and manufactured materials in natural thermal features in order to compare laboratory rates with field-derived rates. Available field data on rates of silica precipitation from heated fluids have been analyzed and compared to laboratory rates. New sets of precipitation experiments are being planned. The microbially influenced degradation of concrete in the Broadlands-Ohaaki geothermal field is being characterized. The authors will continue to work on these projects in FY 1996 and expand to include the study of naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides, as a prelude to studying radionuclide migration in heated silicic volcanic rocks. 32 refs.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Meike, A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Guidelines to the Preparation of Environmental Reports for Geothermal Development Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) through its Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) is the federal agency responsible for certain actions that pertain to the development of geothermal resources. Such resources include (1) all products of geothermal processes, embracing indigenous steam, geopressured fluids, hot water, and brines; (2) steam and other gases, hot water and hot brines resulting from water, and natural gas or other fluids introduced into geothermal formations; (3) any by-products derived from geothermal resources, such as minerals or gases. By-products must either have a value less than 75% of the value of the geothermal resources from which they are derived or must not be of sufficient value alone to warrant extraction and production. in order to encourage the development of geothermal resources, ERDA conducts a program to assess those resources and to establish the technical, economic, and environmental acceptability of geothermal technologies. This program includes some proposed actions that could affect the environment. As a means of obtaining information essential to satisfying the requirements of NEAP and its own regulations (10 CFR Part 711), ERDA requests that certain participants in the agency's programmatic activities submit an environmental report. The report describes the proposed programmatic activities and considers the potential impacts of those activities with respect to the existing environment. This guidelines document has been developed to provide assistance to participants in the preparation of environmental reports about geothermal activities.

None

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Support research for development of improved geothermal drill bits. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full-scale geothermal wellbore simulator and geothermal seal testing machine were constructed. The major emphasis in the Phase II program, in addition to constructing the above research simulators, includes: simulated tests on full-scale components, i.e., full-scale bits; screening tests on elastomeric seals under geothermal conditions; and initial considerations of research needs for development of sealed high-temperature bits. A detailed discussion of the work is presented. (MHR)

hendrickson, R.R.; Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Winzenried, R.W.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Regional Operations Research Program for Commercialization of Geothermal Energy in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range. Final Technical Report, January 1980--March 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work accomplished from January 1980 to March 1981 in the Regional Operations Research efforts for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Geothermal Commercialization Program. The scope of work is as described in New Mexico State University Proposal 80-20-207. The work included continued data acquisition and extension of the data base, enhancement and refinement of the economic models for electric and direct use applications, site-specific and aggregated analyses in support of the state teams, special analyses in support of several federal agencies, and marketing assistance to the state commercialization teams.

None

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Report to the Legislature on the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Development Grant Program for Local Governments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the California Energy Commission's administration of its Geothermal Development Grant Program for Local Governments. The Energy Commission established this program as a result of the passage of Assembly Bill 1905 (Bosco) in 1980. This legislation established the mechanism to distribute the state's share of revenues received from the leasing of federal mineral reserves for geothermal development. The federal government deposits these revenues in the Geothermal Resources Development Account (GRDA) created by AB 1905. The state allocates funds from the GRDA to the California Parklands and Renewable Resources Investment Fund, the counties of origin where the federal leases are located, and the Energy Commission. The legislation further directs the Energy Commission to disburse its share as grants to local governments to assist with the planning and development of geothermal resources. Activities which are eligible for funding under the Energy Commission's grant program include resource development projects, planning and feasibility studies, and activities to mitigate the impacts of existing geothermal development.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Constraints to leasing and development of federal resources: OCS oil and gas and geothermal. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chapter I identifies possible technological, economic, and environmental constraints to geothermal resource development. Chapter II discusses constraints relative to outer continental shelf and geothermal resources. General leasing information for each resource is detailed. Chapter III summarizes the major studies relating to development constraints. 37 refs. (PSB)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Technical analyses in geothermal development: Quarterly project status report, September-November 30, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) development of a decision-making model for geothermal sludge and solid waste disposal; (2) development of a framework for integrated economic analysis; (3) assessment of incremental royalty income; (4) technical and engineering analysis; ;and (5) impact of artificial intelligence/expert systems technology on geothermal well drilling costs. (ACR)

Not Available

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Research and Development of Information on Geothermal Direct Heat Application Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first annual report of ICF's geothermal R&D project for the Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office. The overall objective of this project is to compile, analyze, and report on data from geothermal direct heat application projects. Ultimately, this research should convey the information developed through DOE's and Program Opportunity Notice (PON) activities as well as through other pioneering geothermal direct heat application projects to audiences which can use the early results in new, independent initiatives. A key audience is potential geothermal investors.

Hederman, William F., Jr.; Cohen, Laura A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Development of seals for a geothermal downhole intensifier. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system using high-velocity fluid jets in conjunction with a rotary diamond bit is currently considered as the best candidate for reducing the cost of drilling geothermal wells. Technical, safety and cost considerations indicate that the required jet supply pressure can best be established by a downhole pressure intensifier. Key intensifier components are the check valve and plunger seals, which must prevent leakage of the high-pressure, high-temperature abrasive fluid (drilling mud). To achieve the required performance, novel ceramic seals are currently being developed. The check valve seal includes a tapered polymeric plug and ceramic stop acting against a ceramic seat. The ceramic plunger seal is a variant of the ''stepped-joint'' piston ring and is designed to minimize contact pressure and abrasive wear. Initial testing of these seals in the laboratory shows encouraging results; design refinement and further testing is in progress. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Captain, K.M.; Harvey, A.C.; Caskey, B.C.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Development history of the Tiwi geothermal field, Philippines  

SciTech Connect

Commercial production of electricity from the Tiwi geothermal system began in 1979. In 1982, Tiwi became the world`s first water-dominated system to produce more than 160 MWe. Today the field supplies about 11% of Luzon`s electricity. Initially, the reservoir was single-phase liquid with a small, shallow steam zone on the east side. Temperature reversals in the first wells showed the east to be an outflow zone. As production began, reservoir pressure declined, two-phase conditions developed, and groundwater entered the reservoir from the east. As many productions wells cooled, brine production increased and generation decreased from about 280 MWe in 1983 to about 190 MWe in 1986. Improvements to surface facilities and new wells drilled farther west raised generation to about 280 MWe by mid-1993. Separated brine was first injected into the reservoir, but this lowered steam production; injection is now outside the field.

Gambill, D.T.; Beraquit, D.B. [Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati (Philippines)] [Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati (Philippines)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

New Mexico/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico/Geothermal Mexico/Geothermal < New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF New Mexico Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in New Mexico Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Lightning Dock I Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, New Mexico Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Lightning Dock II Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Lordsburg, NV Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in New Mexico

316

Newberry Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search Davenport Newberry Holdings (previously named Northwest Geothermal Company) started to develop a 120MW geothermal project on its...

317

Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

Varnado, S.G.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, October 1978-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drill bits, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Geothermal development of the Salton Trough, California and Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A geological description is given of the Salton Trought followed by a chronological history of attempts to exploit the area's geothermal resources. In addition, detailed descriptions are given of all ongoing geothermal projects in the area and the organizations conducting them.

Palmer, T.D.; Howard, J.H.; Lande, D.P. (eds.)

1975-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Geothermal development of the Salton Trough, California and Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geological description is given of the Salton Trought followed by a chronological history of attempts to exploit the area's geothermal resources. In addition, detailed descriptions are given of all ongoing geothermal projects in the area and the organizations conducting them.

Palmer, T.D.; Howard, J.H.; Lande, D.P. (eds.)

1975-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Decision Analysis for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description The result of the proposed...

326

Development of the Geothermal Heat Pump Market in China; Renewable Energy in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case study is one in a series of Success Stories on developing renewable energy technologies in China for a business audience. It focuses on the development of the geothermal heat pump market in China.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Geothermal technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1981-September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Technology Development Program is described. The program emphasizes research in rock penetration mechanics, fluid technology, borehole mechanics, diagnostics technology, and permeability enhancement.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This audience is well aware that the major goal of all geothermal R&D is the successful application of advanced technology in the marketplace. In support of that goal, the Geothermal Technology Division has forged a close link between its research objectives and potentially competitive market applications. Our technical objectives are all expressed in quantified reductions in the cost of geothermal power; these cost reductions are the force that will drive the geothermal industry for the foreseeable future. I agree with the recent statement of Stephen Fye of Unocal that without a legislated incentive for geothermal or disincentive for competing fuels-such as mandated carbon dioxide reductions--any premium the public is willing to pay for the use of this premium fuel will be too small to greatly impact geothermal economics. His conclusion is that the geothermal industry must be fully competitive in the marketplace at current prices. His further conclusion--with which I fully concur--is that the avenue to competitiveness is through research, by both industry and government.

Mock, John E.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

330

GRR/Section 7-HI-a - Geothermal and Cable System Development Permit | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-HI-a - Geothermal and Cable System Development Permit GRR/Section 7-HI-a - Geothermal and Cable System Development Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-HI-a - Geothermal and Cable System Development Permit 07HIAGeothermalAndCableSystemDevelopmentPermitting.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Engineering Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statute 196D Hawaii Administrative Rules 13-185 Hawaii Revised Statute 205-3.1 Revised Statute 205-5. Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07HIAGeothermalAndCableSystemDevelopmentPermitting.pdf 07HIAGeothermalAndCableSystemDevelopmentPermitting.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

331

Geothermal resource areas database for monitoring the progress of development in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD) and associated data system provide broad coverage of information on the development of geothermal resources in the United States. The system is designed to serve the information requirements of the National Progress Monitoring System. GRAD covers development from the initial exploratory phase through plant construction and operation. Emphasis is on actual facts or events rather than projections and scenarios. The selection and organization of data are based on a model of geothermal development. Subjects in GRAD include: names and addresses, leases, area descriptions, geothermal wells, power plants, direct use facilities, and environmental and regulatory aspects of development. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publically available for retrieval and use. The background of the project, conceptual development, software development, and data collection are described here. Appendices describe the structure of the database in detail.

Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.; Leung, K.; Phillips, S.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development of a Software Design Tool for Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Heat Pump  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Software Design Tool for Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Heat Pump Software Design Tool for Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Heat Pump Systems in Heating- and Cooling-Dominated Buildings Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of a Software Design Tool for Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Heat Pump Systems in Heating- and Cooling-Dominated Buildings Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description In heating-dominated buildings, the proposed design approach takes advantage of glazed solar collectors to effectively balance the annual thermal loads on the ground with renewable solar energy. In cooling-dominated climates, the design approach takes advantage of relatively low-cost, unglazed solar collectors as the heat rejecting component.

333

Mountainous | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mountainous Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mountainous Dictionary.png Mountainous: A geothermal areal located in terrain characterized by rugged and steep topography with high relief Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Topographic Features List of topographic features commonly encountered in geothermal resource areas: Mountainous Horst and Graben Shield Volcano Flat Lava Dome Stratovolcano Cinder Cone Caldera Depression Resurgent Dome Complex The interior of Iceland holds a vast expanse of mountainous geothermal areas, one of the more famous areas is landmannalaugar, Iceland. Photo by

334

Development of polymer concrete liners and coatings for use in geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a research and field testing program conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy to develop polymer concrete (PC) liners and coatings for use in geothermal applications are presented. Whenever possible, carbon steel is used in geothermal facilities for components such as piping, well casings, and containment vessels. However carbon steel is subject to severe corrosion when exposed to some geothermal fluids and brines, leading to the use, in some cases, of very expensive high alloy steels. Results of laboratory tests done in simulated geothermal environments (pH 2 hydrochloric acid steam at 200{degree}C) have shown that PC materials can be used as liners and coatings to protect carbon steel surfaces from corrosion. In situ field testing of 8-in. (203-mm) inside diameter (ID) by 12-in. (305-mm) long spool sections and 12in. ID (305-mm) wellhead tee sections in operational geothermal facilities is currently being done to verify the laboratory test data. Economic studies have shown that the capital cost of the vessels and piping in a typical geothermal facility can be significantly reduced through the use of protective PC linings and coatings. As a result PC lined components are currently being used commercially at two geothermal sites.

Webster, R.P.; Reams, W.; Kukacka, L.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal electricity production capacity has grown over time because of multiple factors, including its renewable, baseload, and domestic attributes; volatile and high prices for competing technologies; and policy intervention. Overarching federal policies, namely the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), provided certainty to project investors in the 1980s, leading to a boom in geothermal development. In addition to market expansion through PURPA, research and development policies provided an investment of public dollars toward developing technologies and reducing costs over time to increase the market competitiveness of geothermal electricity. Together, these efforts are cited as the primary policy drivers for the currently installed capacity. Informing policy decisions depends on the combined impacts of policies at the federal and state level on geothermal development. Identifying high-impact suites of policies for different contexts, and the government levels best equipped to implement them, would provide a wealth of information to both policy makers and project developers.

Doris, E.; Kreycik, C.; Young, K.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

Matthews, K.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Geothermal Energy Research and Development Program; Project Summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program document. This document contains summaries of projects related to exploration technology, reservoir technology, drilling technology, conversion technology, materials, biochemical processes, and direct heat applications. [DJE-2005

None

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Investigation of two areas in New York State which may have potential for geothermal energy. Progress report, May 1, 1976--September 31, 1976. [Adirondack Mountains and Panther Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant results to date include the following: (1) the present Adirondack Mountains Dome is undergoing rapid contemporary vertical doming; the velocity at the center of the dome is 3.7mm/yr, compared to 1mm/yr for the Swiss Alps; (2) post-Pleistocene fault offsets measuring from one to eleven millimeters have been found in the Adirondacks, indicating vertical uplift during the past 10,000 years; (3) the Panther Mountain Circular drainage feature is structurally-controlled and shows a 10 to 20 milligal negative Simple Bouguer gravity anomaly such as might be produced by a buried felsic pluton.

Isachsen, Y.W.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Geothermal Energy Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following is complete draft.Geothermal Summary for AAPG Explorer J. L. Renner, Idaho National Laboratory Geothermal energy is used to produce electricity in 24 countries. The United States has the largest capacity (2,544 MWe) followed by Philippines (1,931 MWe), Mexico (953 MWe), Indonesia (797 MWe), and Italy (791 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). When Chevron Corporation purchased Unocal Corporation they became the leading producer of geothermal energy worldwide with projects in Indonesia and the Philippines. The U. S. geothermal industry is booming thanks to increasing energy prices, renewable portfolio standards, and a production tax credit. California (2,244 MWe) is the leading producer, followed by Nevada (243 MWe), Utah (26 MWe) and Hawaii (30 MWe) and Alaska (0.4 MWe) (Bertani, 2005). Alaska joined the producing states with two 0.4 KWe power plants placed on line at Chena Hot Springs during 2006. The plant uses 30 liters per second of 75C water from shallow wells. Power production is assisted by the availability of gravity fed, 7C cooling water (http://www.yourownpower.com/) A 13 MWe binary power plant is expected to begin production in the fall of 2007 at Raft River in southeastern Idaho. Idaho also is a leader in direct use of geothermal energy with the state capital building and several other state and Boise City buildings as well as commercial and residential space heated using fluids from several, interconnected geothermal systems. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 modified leasing provisions and royalty rates for both geothermal electrical production and direct use. Pursuant to the legislation the Bureau of Land management and Minerals Management Service published final regulations for continued geothermal leasing, operations and royalty collection in the Federal Register (Vol. 72, No. 84 Wednesday May 2, 2007, BLM p. 24358-24446, MMS p. 24448-24469). Existing U. S. plants focus on high-grade geothermal systems located in the west. However, interest in non-traditional geothermal development is increasing. A comprehensive new MIT-led study of the potential for geothermal energy within the United States predicts that mining the huge amounts of stored thermal energy in the Earths crust not associated with hydrothermal systems, could supply a substantial portion of U.S. electricity with minimal environmental impact (Tester, et al., 2006, available at http://geothermal.inl.gov). There is also renewed interest in geothermal production from other non-traditional sources such as the overpressured zones in the Gulf Coast and warm water co-produced with oil and gas. Ormat Technologies, Inc., a major geothermal company, recently acquired geothermal leases in the offshore overpressured zone of Texas. Ormat and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center recently announced plans to jointly produce geothermal power from co-produced water from the Teapot Dome oilfield (Casper Star-Tribune, March 2, 2007). RMOTC estimates that 300 KWe capacity is available from the 40,000 BWPD of 88C water associated with oil production from the Tensleep Sandstone (Milliken, 2007). The U. S. Department of Energy is seeking industry partners to develop electrical generation at other operating oil and gas fields (for more information see: https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/50D3734745055A73852572CA006665B1?OpenDocument). Several web sites offer periodically updated information related to the geothermal industry and th

J. L. Renner

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Environmental investigations associated with the LASL hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is currently evaluating the feasibility of extracting thermal energy from hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. An overview of the environmental studies that LASL has conducted relative to its HDR Geothermal Energy Development Project is presented. Because HDR geothermal technology is a new field of endeavor, environmental guidelines have not been established. It is anticipated that LASL's research will lead to the techniques necessary to mitigate undesirable environmental impacts in future HDR developments. To date, results of environmental investigations have been positive in that no undesirable environmental impacts have been found.

Rea, K.H.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Geothermal development in the U.S.A. and future directions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal industry presently has an operating generation capacity of about 2,300 megawatts and generates about 17 billion kilowatt-hours per year in the United States. Although the domestic market is stagnant due to restructuring of the electricity industry and to the very low competing price of natural gas, the industry is doing well by developing geothermal fields and power plants in the Philippines and Indonesia. The industry strongly supports the Department of Energy research program to develop new and improved technology and help lower the costs of geothermal power generation.

Wright, P.M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Energy and Geoscience Inst.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Environmental overview for the development of geothermal resources in the State of New Mexico. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief overview of the present day geothermal applications for hydrothermal electrical generation and direct heat use and their environmental implications is provided. Technologies and environmental impacts are considered at all points on the pathway of development resource exploration; well field, plant and transmission line construction; and plant operation. The technologies for electrical generation-direct, dry steam conversion; separated steam conversion; single-flash conversion, separated-steam/single-flash conversion and binary cycle conversion and the technologies for direct heat use - direct use of geothermal waters, surface heat exhanger, down-the hole heat exchanger and heat pump are described. A summary of the geothermal technologies planned or in operation within New Mexico geothermal areas is provided. A review of regulations that affect geothermal development and its related environmental impact in New Mexico is presented. The regulatory pathway, both state and federal, of geothermal exploration after the securing of appropriate leases, development, and construction and implementation of a geothermal facility are described. Six categories (Geophysical, Water, Air, Noise, Biota and Socioeconomics) were selected for environmental assessment. The data available is described.

Bryant, M.; Starkey, A.H.; Dick-Peddie, W.A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Mercury Vapor At Socorro Mountain Area (Kooten, 1987) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Socorro Mountain Area (Kooten, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Socorro Mountain Area...

346

Magnetotellurics At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE...

347

Hydroprobe At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroprobe At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hydroprobe At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP)...

348

Ground Gravity Survey At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Mcgee Mountain...

349

Environmental analysis for geothermal energy development in the Geysers Region: executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are summarized for the Geysers--Calistoga KGRA: geothermal resource development, highlights of the master environmental assessment, control technology for hydrogen sulfide emissions, meteorological/climatological data base for hydrogen sulfide predictions, and future research needs. (MHR)

Dorset, P.F.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cumulative impacts study of The Geysers KGRA: public-service impacts of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal development in The Geysers KGRA has affected local public services and fiscal resources in Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, and Napa counties. Each of these counties underwent rapid population growth between 1970 and 1980, some of which can be attributed to geothermal development. The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in The Geysers is identified. Using three different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in The Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdictions are examined and compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed, and a framework is presented for calculating mitigation costs per unit of public service.

Matthews, K.M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of requirements for accelerating the development of geothermal energy resources in California  

SciTech Connect

Various resource data are presented showing that geothermal energy has the potential of satisfying a significant part of California's increasing energy needs. General factors slowing the development of geothermal energy in California are discussed and required actions to accelerate its progress are presented. Finally, scenarios for developing the most promising prospect in the state directed at timely on-line power are given. Specific actions required to realize each of these individual scenarios are identified.

Fredrickson, C.D.

1977-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Environmental overview of geothermal development: the Mono-Long Valley KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major issues and concerns relating to geothermal development were identified and assessed in seven broad areas: (1) air quality, (2) archaeology and cultural resources, (3) geology, (4) natural ecosystems, (5) noise, (6) socioeconomics, and (7) water quality. Existing data for each of these areas was identified and evaluated to determine if the data can be used to help resolve major issues. Finally, specific areas where additional data are needed to ensure that geothermal development is environmentally acceptable were recommended.

Strojan, C.L.; Romney, E.M. (eds.) [eds.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Geothermal Technology Development Program. Annual progress report, October 1983-September 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the status of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Technology Development Program. The work reported is sponsored by the Department of Energy/Geothermal Hydropower Technology Division (DOE/GHTD), with program management provided by Sandia National Laboratories. The program emphasizes research in rock penetration mechanics, fluid technology, borehole mechanics, diagnostics technology, and permeability enhancement. 102 figs., 16 tabs.

Kelsey, J.R. (ed.)

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Analysis of requirements for accelerating the development of geothermal energy resources in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various resource data are presented showing that geothermal energy has the potential of satisfying a significant part of California's increasing energy needs. General factors slowing the development of geothermal energy in California are discussed and required actions to accelerate its progress are presented. Finally, scenarios for developing the most promising prospect in the state directed at timely on-line power are given. Specific actions required to realize each of these individual scenarios are identified.

Fredrickson, C.D.

1977-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

An assessment of leadership in geothermal energy technology research and development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is one of the more promising renewable energy technologies because it is environmentally benign and, unlike most renewable energy sources, can provide base power. This report provides an assessment of the research and development (R&D) work underway in geothermal energy in the following countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, and the United Kingdom. While the R&D work underway in the US exceeds the R&D efforts of the other countries, the lead is eroding. This erosion is due to reductions in federal government funding for geothermal energy R&D and the decline of the US petroleum industry. This erosion of R&D leadership is hindering commercialization of US geothermal energy products and services. In comparison, the study countries are promoting the commercialization of their geothermal energy products and services. As a result, some of these countries, in particular Japan, will probably have the largest share of the global market for geothermal energy products and services; these products and services being targeted toward the developing countries (the largest market for geothermal energy).

Bruch, V.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Maryland/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Geothermal Maryland/Geothermal < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maryland Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maryland No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maryland No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maryland No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maryland Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

357

Alabama/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Geothermal Alabama/Geothermal < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Alabama Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Alabama No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Alabama No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Alabama No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Alabama Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

358

Illinois/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois/Geothermal Illinois/Geothermal < Illinois Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Illinois Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Illinois No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Illinois No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Illinois No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Illinois Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

359

Minnesota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Geothermal Minnesota/Geothermal < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Minnesota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Minnesota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Minnesota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Minnesota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Minnesota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

360

Massachusetts/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Geothermal Massachusetts/Geothermal < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Massachusetts Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Massachusetts No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Massachusetts No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Massachusetts No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Massachusetts Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Delaware/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Delaware Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Delaware Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Delaware No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Delaware No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Delaware No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Delaware Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

362

Kansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Geothermal Kansas/Geothermal < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

363

Kentucky/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Geothermal Kentucky/Geothermal < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Kentucky Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Kentucky No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Kentucky No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Kentucky No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Kentucky Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

364

Nebraska/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Geothermal Nebraska/Geothermal < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nebraska Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nebraska No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Nebraska No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Nebraska No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Nebraska Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

365

Florida/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Geothermal Florida/Geothermal < Florida Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Florida Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Florida No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Florida No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Florida No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Florida Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

366

Pennsylvania/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Geothermal Pennsylvania/Geothermal < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Pennsylvania Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Pennsylvania No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Pennsylvania No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Pennsylvania No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Pennsylvania Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

367

Ohio/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ohio Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Ohio No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Ohio No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Ohio No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Ohio Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water resource acquisition, and relevant environmental considerations.

368

Missouri/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Geothermal Missouri/Geothermal < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Missouri Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Missouri No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Missouri No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Missouri No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Missouri Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

369

Oklahoma/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Oklahoma Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oklahoma Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oklahoma No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Oklahoma No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Oklahoma No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Oklahoma Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

370

Arkansas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arkansas/Geothermal Arkansas/Geothermal < Arkansas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arkansas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arkansas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arkansas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arkansas No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Arkansas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

371

Vermont/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Geothermal Vermont/Geothermal < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Vermont Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Vermont No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Vermont No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Vermont No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Vermont Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

372

Louisiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Geothermal Louisiana/Geothermal < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Louisiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Louisiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Louisiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Louisiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Louisiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

373

Mississippi/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi/Geothermal Mississippi/Geothermal < Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Mississippi Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Mississippi No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Mississippi No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Mississippi No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Mississippi Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

374

Maine/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maine/Geothermal Maine/Geothermal < Maine Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Maine Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Maine No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Maine No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Maine No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Maine Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

375

Connecticut/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Connecticut Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Connecticut No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Connecticut No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Connecticut No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Connecticut Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

376

Georgia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia/Geothermal Georgia/Geothermal < Georgia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Georgia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Georgia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Georgia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Georgia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Georgia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

377

Indiana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Geothermal < Indiana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Indiana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Indiana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Indiana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Indiana No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Indiana Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

378

Michigan/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan/Geothermal Michigan/Geothermal < Michigan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Michigan Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Michigan No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Michigan No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Michigan No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Michigan Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

379

An Overview of Geothermal Development in Tiwi and Mak-Ban, Philippines  

SciTech Connect

Commercial-scale geothermal development in the Philippines began i n 1972 with the completion of the discovery well in the southeastern portion of Luzon Island. A second geothermal anomaly was discovered i n 1975 on the southern flank of Mt . Makiling, forty miles south of Manila. Both fields are being developed and operated by Philippine Geothermal, Inc. (PGI) , a wholly-owned subsidiary of Union Oil Company of California. Currently the Philippines ranks second worldwide in installed geothermal-powered electrical generation capacity with 443 MW and PGI has developed 440 PW of the 443 MW country total. Additional generation capacity is planned or under construction in both fields. Over 1.9 billion kilowatt-hours of electrical power have been produced to date. This represents a savings of approximately three million barrels of imported fuel oil for power generation.

Raasch, G.D.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

380

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Enhanced Geothermal System Development of the AmeriCulture Leasehold in the Animas Valley  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Working under the grant with AmeriCulture, Inc., and its team of geothermal experts, assembled a plan to apply enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) techniques to increase both the temperature and flow rate of the geothermal waters on its leasehold. AmeriCulture operates a commercial aquaculture facility that will benefit from the larger quantities of thermal energy and low cost electric power that EGS technology can provide. The project brought together a team of specialists that, as a group, provided the full range of expertise required to successfully develop and implement the project.

Duchane, David V; Seawright, Gary L; Sewright, Damon E; Brown, Don; Witcher, James c.; Nichols, Kenneth E.

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

382

Assessment of geothermal development in the Imperial Valley of California. Volume 1. Environment, health, and socioeconomics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utilization of the Imperial Valley's geothermal resources to support energy production could be hindered if environmental impacts prove to be unacceptable or if geothermal operations are incompatible with agriculture. To address these concerns, an integrated environmental and socioeconomic assessment of energy production in the valley was prepared. The most important impacts examined in the assessment involved air quality changes resulting from emissions of hydrogen sulfide, and increases in the salinity of the Salton Sea resulting from the use of agricultural waste waters for power plant cooling. The socioeconomics consequences of future geothermal development will generally be beneficial. (MHR)

Layton, D. (ed.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Development of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology for Geothermal Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves. The first was an explosive package that generates a strong, azimuth-oriented, horizontal force vector when deployed in a conventional shot hole. This vector-explosive source has never been available to industry before. The second source was a dipole formed by operating two vertical vibrators in either a force or phase imbalance. Field data are shown that document the strong S-wave modes generated by these sources.

B. A. Hardage; J. L. Simmons, Jr.; M. DeAngelo

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal borehole televiewer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

Wonn, J.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal Borehole Televiewer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

Wonn, J.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Executive Order 2010-001: New Mexico Clean Energy Economy Action Report from the Deep Source Geothermal Commercialization Working Group to the Green Jobs Council and Clean Energy Development Council: New Mexico Geothermal Resource Assessment and Data Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Executive Order 2010-001 establishes directives for the Energy Minerals and Natural Resources Department (EMNRD) and New Mexico Tech (NMT) to convene a Geothermal Group to oversee the development of a statewide geothermal resource assessment and data base and develop technical and policy recommendations to accelerate full-scale development of New Mexicos deep-source geothermal resource: EMNRD, with the cooperation of the New Mexico Institute ofMining and Technology (NMT), shall convene a Deep Source Geothermal Commercialization Working Group (Geothermal Group) no later than March 1, 2010. The Geothermal Group shall be chaired by EMNRD. The Geothermal Group shall oversee the development of a statewide geothermal resource assessment and database. The purpose of the resource assessment and database shall be to sufficiently characterize the States geothermal resource and provide a database to prospective geothermal developers that shall promote commercial-scale development of the States geothermal resource. The Geothermal Group shall also develop technical and policy recommendations to accelerate full-scale development of New Mexicos deep-source geothermal resource.

Bill Richardson; Jim Noel; Karen W. Garcia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Exploration...

388

Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2006) Exploration Activity...

389

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1981 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Use geoscience data to develop a conceptual model of the reservoir. Notes The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic

390

An Economic Analysis of the Kilauea Geothermal Development and Inter-Island Cable Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study by NEA completed in April 1987 shows that a large scale (500 MW) geothermal development on the big island of Hawaii and the inter-island power transmission cable is economically infeasible. This updated report, utilizing additional information available since 1987, reaches the same conclusion: (1) The state estimate of $1.7 billion for development cost of the geothermal project is low and extremely optimistic. more realistic development costs are shown to be in the range of $3.4 to $4.3 billion and could go as high as $4.6 billion. (2) Compared to alternative sources of power generation, geothermal can be 1.7 to 2.4 times as costly as oil, and 1.2 to 1.7 times as costly as a solar/oil generating system. (3) yearly operation and maintenance costs for the large scale geothermal project are estimated to be 44.7 million, 72% greater than a solar/oil generating system. (4) Over a 40-year period ratepayers could pay, on average, between 1.3 (17.2%) and 2.4 cents (33%) per kWh per year more for electricity produced by geothermal than they are currently paying (even with oil prices stabilizing at $45 per barrel in 2010). (5) A comparable solar/oil thermal energy development project is technologically feasible, could be island specific, and would cost 20% to 40% less than the proposed geothermal development. (6) Conservation is the cheapest alternative of all, can significantly reduce demand, and provides the greatest return to ratepayers. There are better options than geothermal. Before the State commits the people of Hawaii to future indebtedness and unnecessary electricity rate increases, more specific study should be conducted on the economic feasibility, timing, and magnitude of the geothermal project. The California experience at The Geyers points up the fact that it can be a very risky and disappointing proposition. The state should demand that proponents and developers provide specific answers to geothermals troubling questions before they make an irreversible commitment to it. The state should also more carefully assess the potential risks and hazards of volcanic disturbances, the degree of environmental damage that could occur, the future demand for electricity, and the potential of supplying electricity from alternative energy sources, conservation and small scale power units. As they stated in the April 1987 study, to move ahead with rapid large scale geothermal development on Hawaii without thoroughly studying these aspects of its development is ill-advised and economically unsound.

None

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of San Kamphaeng Geothermal Energy Project in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

San Kamphaeng Geothermal Field located in northern Thailand, has been selected for a case study and exploration drilling program due to relevant geologic data obtained from the area and favorable sociological conditions. The first geothermal exploration well in Thailand, GTE-1, was commenced at the end of 1981. At present, six geothermal exploration wells (GTE-1 to GTE-6), with an average maximum depth of 500 m., have been drilled. Two wells encountered hot water while the rest are dry. GTE-2 is now discharging hot water of 85C with a very small discharge. GTE-6 encountered hot water of 120C at a depth of 489 m. It is now discharging hot water of 104SC at 3.6 bars pressure and at approximately 4 1/s at the well head. A number of shallow wells, with depths of less than 50 m., were drilled in the thermal manifestation area. Here, resistivity surveys showed relatively low values at shallow depths, suggesting possible zones of thermal water accumulation. Five shallow wells encountered hot water with temperatures ranging from 100C to 130C. A reservoir model of the San Kamphaeng geothermal system is proposed. Under the joint technical program between the governments of Thailand and Japan, a deep exploration well of 1500 m. is scheduled to start in July of 1984.

Ramingwong, T.; Praserdvigai, S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Reservoir Simulation Used to Plan Diatomite Developement in Mountainous Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Santa Barbara County, Santa Maria Pacific (an exploration and production company) is expanding their cyclic steam project in a diatomite reservoir. The hilly or mountainous topography and cut and fill restrictions have interfered with the company's ideal development plan. The steep hillsides prevent well pad development for about 22 vertical well locations in the 110 well expansion plan. Conventional production performs poorly in the area because the combination of relatively low permeability (1-10 md) and high viscosity (~220 cp) at the reservoir temperature. Cyclic steam injection has been widely used in diatomite reservoirs to take advantage of the diatomite rocks unique properties and lower the viscosity of the oil. Some companies used deviated wells for cyclic steam injection, but Santa Maria Pacific prefers the use only vertical wells for the expansion. Currently, the inability to create well pads above 22 vertical well target locations will result in an estimated $60,000,000 of lost revenue over a five year period. The target locations could be developed with unstimulated deviated or horizontal wells, but expected well rates and expenses have not been estimated. In this work, I use a thermal reservoir simulator to estimate production based on five potential development cases. The first case represents no development other than the cyclic wells. This case is used to calibrate the model based on the pilot program performance and serves as a reference point for the other cases. Two of the cases simulate a deviated well with and without artificial lift next to a cyclic well, and the final two cases simulate a horizontal well segment with and without artificial lift next to a cyclic well. The deviated well with artificial lift results in the highest NPV and profit after five years. The well experienced pressure support from the neighboring cyclic well and performed better with the cyclic well than without it. Adding 22 deviated wells with artificial lift will increase the project's net profit by an estimated $7,326,000 and NPV by $2,838,000 after five years.

Powell, Richard

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications NREL's geothermal team develops publications, including technical reports and conference papers, about geothermal resource assessments, market and policy analysis, and geothermal research and development (R&D) activities. In addition to the selected documents available below, you can find resources on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program Web site or search the NREL Publications Database. For additional geothermal documents, including those published since 1970, please visit the Office of Science and Technology Information Geothermal Legacy Collection. Policymakers' Guidebooks Five steps to effective policy. Geothermal Applications Market and Policy Analysis Program Activities R&D Activities Geothermal Applications

394

New Mexico Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 9 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the findings and conclusions of the New Mexico Team during the first project year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. The purpose of this project is to help realize a goal of the USDOE , Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), to accelerate the actual commercial utilization of geothermal energy. This was done by: (1) identifying the potential for development of geothermal energy in the five-state regions of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada and Utah; and (2) identifying the actions needed to accomplish that development.

Ortiz, Thomas A.; Fedor, Dennis

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

National forecast for geothermal resource exploration and development with techniques for policy analysis and resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The backgrund, structure and use of modern forecasting methods for estimating the future development of geothermal energy in the United States are documented. The forecasting instrument may be divided into two sequential submodels. The first predicts the timing and quality of future geothermal resource discoveries from an underlying resource base. This resource base represents an expansion of the widely-publicized USGS Circular 790. The second submodel forecasts the rate and extent of utilization of geothermal resource discoveries. It is based on the joint investment behavior of resource developers and potential users as statistically determined from extensive industry interviews. It is concluded that geothermal resource development, especially for electric power development, will play an increasingly significant role in meeting US energy demands over the next 2 decades. Depending on the extent of R and D achievements in related areas of geosciences and technology, expected geothermal power development will reach between 7700 and 17300 Mwe by the year 2000. This represents between 8 and 18% of the expected electric energy demand (GWh) in western and northwestern states.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Shimamoto, G.T.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.; Finan, W.F.; Smith, M.R.; Edeistein, R.H.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Geothermal Development and Resource Management in the Yakima Valley : A Guidebook for Local Governments.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The guidebook defines the barriers to geothermal energy development at all levels of government and proposes ways to overcome these various barriers. In recognition that wholesale development of the region's geothermal resources could create a series of environmental problems and possible conflicts between groundwater users, resource management options are identified as possible ways to ensure the quality and quantity of the resource for future generations. It is important for local governments to get beyond the discussion of the merits of geothermal energy and take positive actions to develop or to encourage the development of the resource. To this end, several sources of technical and financial assistance are described. These sources of assistance can enable local governments and others to take action should they choose to do so. Even though the Yakima Valley is the setting for the analysis of local issues that could hamper geothermal development, this guidebook could be used by any locale with geothermal energy resources. The guidebook is not a scientific manual, but rather a policy document written especially for local government staff and officials who do not have technical backgrounds in geology or hydrology.

Creager, Kurt

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Energy Efficient Enterprise Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) offers loans to small and mid-sized businesses, non-profits, schools and municipalities to improve energy efficiency through its...

398

The Influence of Vegetation on the Development and Structure of Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of vegetative cover on the development of mountain waves is analyzed using a two-dimensional meso-? model. The model includes a detailed representation of surface fluxes and friction that evolve in time as the incoming solar ...

Romualdo Romero; Sergio Alonso; Everett C. Nickerson; Clemente Ramis

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Natural Gas in the Rocky Mountains: Developing Infrastructure  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This Supplement to EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook analyzes current natural gas production, pipeline and storage infrastructure in the Rocky Mountains, as well as prospective pipeline projects in these States. The influence of these factors on regional prices and price volatility is examined.

Information Center

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

Geothermal Heat Pump Systems: Applications and Technology Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses a hybrid geothermal heat pump system, an efficient, all-electric heating and cooling option for small and large commercial buildings. In this system, the ground loop heat exchanger is sized for winter heating and supplemented by auxiliary heat rejection devices (such as fluid coolers or cooling towers) for summer operation that prevent performance-impeding heat buildup in the earth surrounding the ground loop.

2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Oregon/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon/Geothermal Oregon/Geothermal < Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oregon Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oregon Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Crump Geyser Geothermal Project Nevada Geo Power, Ormat Utah 80 MW80,000 kW 80,000,000 W 80,000,000,000 mW 0.08 GW 8.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Crump's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs II Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region

403

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bibliography Definition of Geothermal Reservoir EngineeringDevelopment of Geothermal Reservoir Engineering. * 1.4 DataF i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compaction, computers, geothermal energy, pore-waternot MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE T GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION Opromise f o r developing geothermal energy i n the United

Lippmann, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Present Status and Future Prospects of Geothermal Development in Italy with an Appendix on Reservoir Engineering  

SciTech Connect

This paper consists of two parts and an appendix. In the first part a review is made of the geothermal activity in Italy from 1975 to 1982, including electrical and non-electrical applications. Remarks then follow on the trends that occurred and the operational criteria that were applied in the same period, which can be considered a transitional period of geothermal development in Italy. Information on recent trends and development objectives up to 1990 are given in the second part of the paper, together with a summary on program activities in the various geothermal areas of Italy. The appendix specifically reviews the main reseroir engineering activities carried out in the past years and the problems likely to be faced in the coming years in developing Itallian fields.

Cataldi, R.; Calamai, A.; Neri, G.; Manetti, G.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Behavior in Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recent report found that power and heat produced from engineered (or enhanced) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the United States while incurring minimal environmental impacts. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distributions, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for commercial development of geothermal energy. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. Modeling capabilities are being developed as part of this project to support laboratory and field testing to characterize engineered geothermal systems in single- and multi-well tests using tracers. The objective of this report is to describe the simulation plan and the status of model development for simulating tracer tests for characterizing EGS.

Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Reimus, P. W.; Newell, D.; Watson, Tom B.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Geothermal Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to assist the physicist, chemist, engineer, and geologist engaged in discovering and developing geothermal energy resources. This first section contains a glossary of the approximately 500 most frequently occurring geological, physical, and engineering terms, chosen from the geothermal literature. Sections 2 through 8 are fact sheets that discuss such subjects as geothermal gradients, rock classification, and geological time scales. Section 9 contains conversion tables for the physical quantities of interest for energy research in general and for geothermal research in particular.

Leffel, C.S., Jr.; Eisenberg, R.A.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

NANA Geothermal Assessment Program Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, NANA Regional Corporation (NRC) assessed geothermal energy potential in the NANA region for both heat and/or electricity production. The Geothermal Assessment Project (GAP) was a systematic process that looked at community resources and the community's capacity and desire to develop these resources. In October 2007, the US Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program awarded grant DE-FG36-07GO17075 to NRC for the GAP studies. Two moderately remote sites in the NANA region were judged to have the most potential for geothermal development: (1) Granite Mountain, about 40 miles south of Buckland, and (2) the Division Hot Springs area in the Purcell Mountains, about 40 miles south of Shungnak and Kobuk. Data were collected on-site at Granite Mountain Hot Springs in September 2009, and at Division Hot Springs in April 2010. Although both target geothermal areas could be further investigated with a variety of exploration techniques such as a remote sensing study, a soil geochemical study, or ground-based geophysical surveys, it was recommended that on-site or direct heat use development options are more attractive at this time, rather than investigations aimed more at electric power generation.

Jay Hermanson

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

410

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

411

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Financing Geothermal Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance Thumbnail of the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance NREL's Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance provides an overview of the strategies used to raise capital for geothermal power projects that: Use conventional, proven technologies Are located in the United States Produce utility power (roughly 10 megawatts or more). Learn more about the Guidebook to Geothermal Power Finance. NREL's Financing Geothermal Power Projects website, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program, provides information for geothermal power project developers and investors interested in financing utility-scale geothermal power projects. Read an overview of how financing works for geothermal power projects, including

412

Research and development of improved geothermal well logging techniques, tools and components (current projects, goals and status). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key needs in the advancement of geothermal energy is availability of adequate subsurface measurements to aid the reservoir engineer in the development and operation of geothermal wells. Some current projects being sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy's Division of Geothermal Energy pertaining to the development of improved well logging techniques, tools and components are described. An attempt is made to show how these projects contribute to improvement of geothermal logging technology in forming key elements of the overall program goals.

Lamers, M.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

State geothermal commercialization programs in ten Rocky Mountain states. Semi-annual progress report, July-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

The activities and findings of the ten state teams participating in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Regional Hydrothermal Commercialization Program for the period are described. A summary of the state projects, compilation of project accomplishments, summary of findings, and a description of the major conclusions and recommendations are presented. Also included are chapters on the commercialization activities carried out by individual teams in each state: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New-Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming. (MHR)

Griffith, J.L. (comp.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Local population impacts of geothermal energy development in the Geysers: Calistoga region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The country-level population increase implications of two long-term geothermal development scenarios for the Geysers region in California are addressed. This region is defined to include the counties of Lake, Sonoma, Mendocino and Napa, all four in northern California. The development scenarios include two components: development for electrical energy production and direct use applications. Electrical production scenarios are derived by incorporating current development patterns into previous development scenarios by both industry and research organizations. The scenarios are made county-specific, specific to the type of geothermal system constructed, and are projected through the year 2000. Separate high growth rate and low growth rate scenarios are developed, based on a set of specified assumptions. Direct use scenarios are estimated from the nature of the available resource, existing local economic and demographic patterns, and available experience with various separate direct use options. From the composite development scenarios, required numbers of direct and indirect employees and the resultant in-migration patterns are estimated. In-migration patterns are compared to current county level population and ongoing trends in the county population change for each of the four counties. From this comparison, conclusions are drawn concerning the contributions of geothermal resource development to future population levels and the significance of geothermally induced population increase from a county planning perspective.

Haven, K.F.; Berg, V.; Ladson, Y.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Virginia/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia Virginia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Virginia Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Virginia No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Virginia No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Virginia No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Virginia Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

416

Tennessee/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee Tennessee Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Tennessee Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Tennessee No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Tennessee No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Tennessee No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Tennessee Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

417

South Carolina/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina Carolina Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Carolina Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Carolina No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Carolina No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Carolina No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Carolina Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

418

South Dakota/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dakota Dakota Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF South Dakota Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in South Dakota No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in South Dakota No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in South Dakota No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for South Dakota Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

419

Rhode Island/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rhode Island Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Rhode Island No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Rhode Island No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Rhode Island No areas listed. GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Rhode Island Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and drilling, plant construction and operation, transmission siting, water

420

Session 10: The Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico: The Experiences Gained from Its Exploration and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cerro Prieto case study demonstrated the value of a multidisciplinary effort for exploring and developing a geothermal field. There was no problem in recognizing the geothermal potential of the Cerro Prieto area because of the many obvious surface manifestations. However, the delineation of the geothermal reservoir at depth was not so straightforward. Wells drilled near the abundant surface manifestations only produced fluids of relatively low enthalpy. Later it was determined that these zones of high heat loss corresponded to discharge areas where faults and fractures allowed thermal fluids to leak to the surface, and not to the main geothermal reservoir. The early gravity and seismic refraction surveys provided important information on the general structure of the area. Unaware of the existence of a higher density zone of hydrothermally altered sediments capping the geothermal reservoir, CFE interpreted a basement horst in the western part of the field and hypothesized that the bounding faults were controlling the upward flow of thermal fluids. Attempting to penetrate the sedimentary column to reach the ''basement horst'', CFE discovered the {alpha} geothermal reservoir (in well M-5). The continuation of the geothermal aquifer (actually the {beta} reservoir) east of the original well field was later confirmed by a deep exploration well (M-53). The experience of Cerro Prieto showed the importance of chemical ratios, and geothermometers in general, in establishing the subsurface temperatures and fluid flow patterns. Fluid chemical and isotopic compositions have also been helpful to determine the origin of the fluids, fluid-production mechanisms and production induced effects on the reservoir.

Lippman, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mountain geothermal development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Geothermal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Geothermal Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating geothermal development. | Photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Geothermal energy is heat derived below the earth's surface which can be harnessed to generate clean, renewable energy. This vital, clean energy resource supplies renewable power around the clock and emits little or no greenhouse gases -- all while requiring a small environmental footprint to develop. The Energy Department is committed to responsibly developing, demonstrating, and deploying innovative technologies to support the continued expansion of the geothermal industry across the United States. Featured Pinpointing America's Geothermal Resources with Open Source Data

422

Public opinion in Cobb Valley concerning geothermal development in Lake County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Spring of 1975 the Friends of Cobb, a local environmental group, polled the registered voters of the Cobb Valley precinct, Lake County, California, about their opinions regarding the development of geothermal energy in Lake County. Sixty-five percent of those polled responded, and an analysis of their responses indicates the following: (1) The people of the Cobb Valley (which lies directly in the path of geothermal development) are rather less pleased with the prospect than a previous poll has shown the people of Lake County as a whole to be. As measured by an index of general support for development, one-third of the Cobb people are for development, one-third are against, and the remaining third are undecided or have mixed feelings. (Countywide, nearly two-thirds support development.) (2) Support for and opposition to geothermal development correlate most highly with the perception of environmental impacts, the expectation of economic benefits in the form of increased job opportunities and tax revenues, and size of land holdings. (3) Among those who own more than ten acres of land, the willingness to lease land for geothermal development correlates most highly with the perception of environmental impacts.

Vollintine, L.; Weres, O.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Exploration and development of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplinary effort to locate, delineate, and characterize the geothermal system at Cerro Prieto, Baja California, Mexico, began about 25 years ago. It led to the identification of an important high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system which went into production in 1973. Initially, the effort was undertaken principally by the Mexican electric power agency, the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). Starting in 1977 a group of US organizations sponsored by the US Department of Energy, joined CFE in this endeavor. An evaluation of the different studies carried out at Cerro Prieto has shown that: (1) surface electrical resistivity and seismic reflection surveys are useful in defining targets for exploratory drilling; (2) the mineralogical studies of cores and cuttings and the analysis of well logs are important in designing the completion of wells, identifying geological controls on fluid movement, determining thermal effects and inferring the thermal history of the field; (3) geochemical surveys help to define zones of recharge and paths of fluid migration; and (4) reservoir engineering studies are necessary in establishing the characteristics of the reservoir and in predicting its response to fluid production.

Lippmann, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.; Halfman, S.E.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of resources.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps EGS Links Related documents and websites DOE EGS Technical Roadmap DOE EGS Systems Demonstration Projects How EGS Works (Animation) EGS Development (Animation) EGS Schematic.jpg ] Dictionary.png Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are human engineered hydrothermal reservoirs developed for commercial use as an alternative to naturally

426

Geothermal resource area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two country area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 11 geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Geothermal Resource Area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two county area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this area development plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Robinson, S.; Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Geothermal industry position paper: EPA regulatory options and research and development information needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental impact of geothermal energy development may be less intense or widespread than that of some other energy sources; however, it is the first example of a number of emerging energy technologies that must be dealt with by EPA. EPA may consider a spectrum of options ranging from a posutre of business as usual to one of immediate setting of standards, as favored by ERDA. The paper discusses the regulatory approaches and the potential problems that geothermal energy may present in the areas of air quality, water quality, and other impacts. It is recommended that a coordinated program of research be drawn up, comprised of specific research projects, the types of geothermal resource to which they apply, and the date by which the information is required.

D'Alessio, G.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Geothermal Industry Position Paper: EPA Regulatory Options and Research and Development Information Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental impact of geothermal energy development may be less intense or widespread than that of some other energy sources; however, it is the first example of a number of emerging energy technologies that must be dealt with by EPA. EPA may consider a spectrum of options ranging from a posture of business as usual to one of immediate setting of standards, as favored by ERDA. The paper discusses the regulatory approaches and the potential problems that geothermal energy may present in the areas of air quality, water quality, and other impacts. It is recommended that a coordinated program of research be drawn up, comprised of specific research projects, the types of geothermal resource to which they apply, and the date by which the information is required.

Swetnam, G.F.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Geothermal direct applications hardware systems development and testing. 1979 summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities performed during calendar year 1979 for the hardware system development and testing task are presented. The fluidized bed technology was applied to the drying of potato by-products and to the exchange of heat to air in the space heating experiment. Geothermal water was flashed to steam and also used as the prime energy source in the steam distillation of peppermint oil. Geothermal water temperatures as low as 112.8/sup 0/C were utilized to distill alcohol from sugar beet juice, and lower temperature water provided air conditioning through an absorption air conditioning system. These experiments are discussed.

Keller, J.G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Problem definition study of subsidence caused by geopressured geothermal resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental and socio-economic settings of four environmentally representative Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal fairways were inventoried. Subsidence predictions were prepared using feasible development scenarios for the four representative subsidence sites. Based on the results of the subsidence estimates, an assessment of the associated potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts was prepared. An inventory of mitigation measures was also compiled. Results of the subsidence estimates and impact assessments are presented, as well as conclusions as to what are the major uncertainties, problems, and issues concerning the future study of geopressured geothermal subsidence.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Review and analysis of the adequacy of the legal and institutional framework for geothermal development in Washington State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The legal and institutional framework within which geothermal energy must develop has its origin in the early 1970s. In 1970, the Federal Geothermal Steam Act was passed into law and in 1974 the Washington State Geothermal Act was passed. The legal and institutional framework thus established by the state and federal governments differed substantially in format, content, and direction. In many instances, the legal and institutional framework established left as many questions unanswered as answered, and in some cases, the framework has proven to be more of an obstacle to development than an aid. From an examination of how the state and federal governments have addressed the varying needs of geothermal development and how the courts have interpreted some of their decisions, it is clear that in order to ensure that the legal and institutional framework is adequate to serve the needs of geothermal development, it must address, at a minimum, the following topics: (1) providing developers with access and a priority right to carry out exploration and development activities; (2) characterization of the resource so as to minimize conflicts with other natural resources; (3) establishing ownership; and (4) giving careful consideration to such lease terms as rentals and royalties, lease renewals, and diligence requirements. In addition, the framework must address groundwater law and its implications for geothermal development and how geothermal development will be considered in terms of establishing utility law. At the local level, it is imperative that geothermal be given careful consideration when decisions on resource management, zoning, and regulation are made. Local governments also have the power to establish programs which can provide substantial incentives for geothermal development and, by so doing, ensure that geothermal energy contributes to economic stability and growth.

Bloomquist, R.G.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Texas/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas/Geothermal Texas/Geothermal < Texas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Texas Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Texas No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Texas No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Texas Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Texas Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap project. The flowcharts cover the major requirements for developing geothermal energy, including, land access, exploration and

434

Colorado/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado/Geothermal Colorado/Geothermal < Colorado Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Colorado Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Colorado No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Colorado No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Colorado Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area 4.615 MW4,614.868 kW 4,614,868.309 W 4,614,868,309 mW 0.00461 GW 4.614868e-6 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Poncha Hot Springs Geothermal Area 5.274 MW5,273.619 kW 5,273,618.589 W

435

Geobotanical Remote Sensing for Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a plan for increasing the mapped resource base for geothermal exploration in the Western US. We plan to image large areas in the western US with recently developed high resolution hyperspectral geobotanical remote sensing tools. The proposed imaging systems have the ability to map visible faults, surface effluents, historical signatures, and discover subtle hidden faults and hidden thermal systems. Large regions can be imaged at reasonable costs. The technique of geobotanical remote sensing for geothermal signatures is based on recent successes in mapping faults and effluents the Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain in California.

Pickles, W L; Kasameyer, P W; Martini, B A; Potts, D C; Silver, E A

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

436

Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 5. Social and economic impacts of geothermal development in Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overview statement of the socio-economic effects of developing geothermal energy in the State of Hawaii is presented. The following functions are presented: (1) identification of key social and economic issues, (2) inventory of all available pertinent data, (3) analysis and assessment of available data, and (4) identification of what additional information is required for adequate assessment.

Canon, P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA David Duchane and Donald Brown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utility options such as pumped storage or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is that the HDR power plant1 Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA by David Duchane and Donald Brown Los energy resources lies right beneath our feet in the form of hot dry rock (HDR), the common geologic

439

Development of a Distributed Control System (DCS) for Geothermal Steamfield Operations at Kawerau, NZ  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A distributed control system (DCS) has been developed for operation of the Kawerau geothermal field. The DCS functions include steam pressure control, steam flow billing, flow and pressure monitoring, remote well flow control and auto paging field operators. The system has evolved over a number of years from paper chart recorders to dataloggers to a desktop PC system to an industrial DCS.

Koorey, K.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Governmental costs and revenues associated with geothermal energy development in Imperial County. Special Publication 3241  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study estimates the cost and revenue impacts to local governments of three geothermal energy growth scenarios in Imperial County. The level of geothermal energy potential for the three development scenarios tested is 2,000, 4,000 and 8,000 MW--enough power to serve 270,000 to 1,000,000 people. The government agencies involved do not expect any substantial additional capital costs due to geothermal energy development; therefore, average costing techniques have been used for projecting public service costs and government revenues. The analysis of the three growth scenarios tested indicates that county population would increase by 3, 7 and 19 percent and assessed values would increase by 20, 60, and 165 percent for Alternatives No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 respectively. Direct and indirect effects would increase new jobs in the county by 1,000, 3,000 and 8,000. Government revenues would tend to exceed public service costs for county and school districts, while city costs would tend to exceed revenues. In each of the alternatives, if county, cities and school districts are grouped together, the revenues exceed costs by an estimated $1,600 per additional person either directly or indirectly related to geothermal energy development in the operational stages. In the tenth year of development,