National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mound site plume

  1. Mound, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mound, Ohio, Site This fact sheet provides information about the Mound, Ohio, Site. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Location of the Mound, Ohio, Site Site Description and History The Mound site 1 in Miamisburg, Ohio, named for a nearby Native American burial ground, is located approximately 10 miles southwest of Dayton, Ohio. The Great Miami River fows southwest

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ohio Mound, Ohio, Site A CERCLA and/or RCRA Site Mound2014 Remediation of the Mound, Ohio, Site was conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The site long-term monitoring responsibility transferred to the Office of Legacy Management(LM) in 2010 and requires operation and maintenance of a pump and treatment system, groundwater monitoring, institutional controls monitoring, records-related activities, and stakeholder support.

  3. Mound Site Community Involvement Plan 2012

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Involvement Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Mound, Ohio, Site January 2015 LMS/MND/S02885-0.0 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Mound Community Involvement Plan January 2015 Doc. No. S02885-0.0 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Purpose and Introduction

  4. Reindustrialization Workshop Held at Mound Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has partnered with local communities to determine the best reuse of land, assets, and facilities, and the Mound-site community is no exception. In May, DOE’s...

  5. Renewed Importance of the Mound Site Annual Institutional Controls...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual, routine IC inspections are conducted at many LM sites. However, inspections at the Mound site are anything but routine, due to its unique nature. 1862.jpg Collaboration ...

  6. Mound site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, L.R.

    1992-06-01

    Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG&G Mound Applied Technologies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE`s weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear, and energy technology. The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound`s operations on the population and the environment. This report summarizes data from the Environmental Monitoring Program, through which Mound maintains continuous surveillance of radiological and nonradiological substances released from the facility.

  7. Dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume at Mound Laboratory, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.J.; Carpenter, M.V.

    1995-12-01

    A dig-face monitoring system consists of onsite hardware for collecting information on changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface soil during the hazardous site excavation. A prototype dig-face system was take to Mount Laboratory for a first trial. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of {sup 232}Th, {sup 227}Ac, and assorted debris. The system was used to monitor a deep excavation aimed at removing {sup 227}Ac-contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were used to scan across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed. A 3-D image of the contamination plumes was developed; the radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the {sup 227}Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate {sup 232}Th plume.

  8. Mound site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, L.R.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound operations on the population and the environment. Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG&G Mound Applied Technologies for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE`s weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear and energy technologies.

  9. Renewed Importance of the Mound Site Annual Institutional Controls Assessments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) completed its 2014 annual institutional controls (IC) assessment of the Mound site in Miamisburg, Ohio, and confirmed that the...

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    U.S. Department of Energy Miamisburg Closure Project Risk Management Plan Volume III Legacy Management Transition Risks April 30, 2005 Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup ...

  11. LEGAL NOTICE for Mound Site 2016 CERCLA Five-Year Review

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Page 1 of 2 LEGAL NOTICE for Mound Site 2016 CERCLA Five-Year Review The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is conducting the fourth Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Five-Year Review of the Mound Site in Miamisburg, Ohio. The Five-Year Review process ensures that the selected CERCLA remedies remain protective of human health and the environment. After the Mound Plant Site was placed on the CERCLA National Priority List

  12. The Mound site survey project for the characterization of radioactive materials in site soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stought, R.L.; Edling, D.A.; Draper, D.G.

    1988-05-16

    This report summarizes the results of a site survey project conducted at Monsanto Research Corporation's Mound Facility during 1982--1985. The objectives of the site survey were: To characterize the nineteen sites previously identified as having known levels of contamination; to identify and characterize by quantity and type of radionuclide(s) any additional major sites having levels of contamination exceeding 10 pCi/g (for Pu-238) of soil; to estimate the volume of contaminated soil; and to estimate the cost of stabilizing or removing the contaminated soil. This report provides information on objectives 1 and 2 above. A separate report will address objectives 3 and 4.

  13. The Mound site survey project for the characterization of radioactive materials in site soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stought, R.L.; Edling, D.A.; Draper, D.G.

    1988-05-16

    This report summarizes the results of a site survey project conducted at Monsanto Research Corporation`s Mound Facility during 1982--1985. The objectives of the site survey were: To characterize the nineteen sites previously identified as having known levels of contamination; to identify and characterize by quantity and type of radionuclide(s) any additional major sites having levels of contamination exceeding 10 pCi/g (for Pu-238) of soil; to estimate the volume of contaminated soil; and to estimate the cost of stabilizing or removing the contaminated soil. This report provides information on objectives 1 and 2 above. A separate report will address objectives 3 and 4.

  14. Concentration of Actinides in Plant Mounds at Safety Test Nuclear Sites in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Shafer; Jenna Gommes

    2008-09-15

    Plant mounds or blow-sand mounds are accumulations of soil particles and plant debris around large shrubs and are common features in deserts in the southwestern United States. Believed to be an important factor in their formation, the shrubs create surface roughness that causes wind-suspended particles to be deposited and resist further suspension. Shrub mounds occur in some plant communities on the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR), including areas of surface soil contamination from past nuclear testing. In the 1970s as part of early studies to understand properties of actinides in the environment, the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) examined the accumulation of isotopes of Pu, {sup 241}Am, and U in plant mounds at safety test sites. The NAEG studies found concentrations of these contaminants to be greater in shrub mounds than in the surrounding areas of desert pavement. For example, at Project 57 on the NTTR, it was estimated that 15 percent of the radionuclide inventory of the site was associated with shrub mounds, which accounted for 17 percent of the surface area of the site, a ratio of inventory to area of 0.85. At Clean Slate III at the TTR, 29 percent of the inventory was associated with approximately 32 percent of the site covered by shrub mounds, a ratio of 0.91. While the total inventory of radionuclides in intershrub areas was greater, the ratio of radionuclide inventory to area was 0.40 and 0.38, respectively, at the two sites. The comparison between the shrub mounds and adjacent desert pavement areas was made for only the top 5 cm since radionuclides at safety test sites are concentrated in the top 5 cm of intershrub areas. Not accounting for radionuclides associated with the shrub mounds would cause the inventory of contaminants and potential exposure to be underestimated. As part of its Environmental Restoration Soils Subproject, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear

  15. Conversion of the Bryan Mound geological site characterization reports to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2005-04-01

    The Bryan Mound salt dome, located near Freeport, Texas, is home to one of four underground crude oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Bryan Mound site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 20 oil-storage caverns at the site. This work provides an internally consistent geologic model of the Bryan Mound site that can be used in support of future work.

  16. Evaluation of brine disposal from the Bryan Mound site of the strategic petroleum reserve program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, Robert J.; Chittenden, Jr, Mark E.; Harper, Jr, Donald E.; Kelly, Jr, Francis J.; Loeblich, Laurel A.; McKinney, Larry D.; Minello, Thomas J.; Park, E. Taisoo; Randall, Robert E.; Slowey, J. Frank

    1981-01-01

    On March 10, 1980, the Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began leaching the Bryan Mound salt dome and discharging the resulting brine into the coastal waters off Freeport, Texas. During the months of March and April, a team of scientists and engineers from Texas A and M University conducted an intensive environmental study of the area surrounding the diffuser site. A pipeline has been laid from the Bryan Mound site to a location 12.5 statute miles (20 km) offshore. The last 3060 ft (933 m) of this pipeline is a 52-port diffuser through which brine can be discharged at a maximum rate of 680,000 barrels per day. Initially, 16 ports were open which permitted a maximum discharge rate of 350,000 barrels per day and a continuous brine discharge was achieved on March 13, 1980. The purpose of this report is to describe the findings of the project team during the intensive postdisposal study period of March and April, 1980. The major areas of investigation are physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management.

  17. Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest Plume |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest Plume Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest Plume January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest Plume Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated:

  18. Mound History and Information

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    The 306 acre facility is sited on a hill in the center of Miamisburg, Ohio. Construction of the Mound Plant began in 1946, and the site became operational in 1949. Mound, the ...

  19. EIS-0302: Transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) operations at the Mound Site near Miamisburg, Ohio, to an alternative DOE site.

  20. Site characterization and petroleum hydrocarbon plume mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravishankar, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a case study of site characterization and hydrocarbon contamination plume mapping/delineation in a gas processing plant in southern Mexico. The paper describes innovative and cost-effective use of passive (non-intrusive) and active (intrusive) techniques, including the use of compound-specific analytical methods for site characterization. The techniques used, on a demonstrative basis, include geophysical, geochemical, and borehole drilling. Geochemical techniques used to delineate the horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the site include soil gas surveys. The borehole drilling technique used to assess the vertical extent of contamination and confirm geophysical and geochemical data combines conventional hollow-stem auguring with direct push-probe using Geoprobe. Compound-specific analytical methods, such as hydrocarbon fingerprinting and a modified method for gasoline range organics, demonstrate the inherent merit and need for such analyses to properly characterize a site, while revealing the limitations of noncompound-specific total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. The results indicate that the techniques used in tandem can properly delineate the nature and extent of contamination at a site; often supplement or complement data, while reducing the risk of errors and omissions during the assessment phase; and provide data constructively to focus site-specific remediation efforts. 7 figs.

  1. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  2. Atmospheric Research - Manaus Plume: GoAmazon T3 Ground Site...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Atmospheric Research - Manaus Plume: GoAmazon T3 Ground Site Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmospheric Research - Manaus Plume: GoAmazon T3 Ground Site ...

  3. Chemistry and mineralogy of samples from the strategic petroleum reserve Bryan Mound site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bild, R. W.

    1980-08-01

    The goal of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is to protect the United States from a temporary cutoff of imported crude oil by stockpiling a reserve of oil in caverns in Gulf Coast salt domes. Some suitable caverns already exist as a result of solution mining activities by commercial mining companies. Most of the caverns for the program, however, will be solution mined specifically for the SPR program. The tasks assigned to Sandia National Laboratories include conducting a geotechnical program and providing interim technical support for the leaching of the first five caverns in the Bryan Mound, Texas, salt dome. This report describes chemical, mineralogical and petrological work done at Sandia as of May 1, 1980 in support of Bryan Mound activities. Samples of Bryan Mound salt cores, sidewall samples and drill cuttings have been subjected to chemical, mineralogical and petrographic analysis. Halite (NaCl) was the major mineral in all samples with anhydrite (CaSO/sub 4/) a common accessory. Minor or trace sylvite (KCl) and quartz (SiO/sub 2/) were detected in some sidewall samples. Other minor minerals found in drill cuttings included quartz; mixed carbonates of Fe, Ca and Mg; and several iron oxides. Possibly the carbonates are reaction products with the basic drilling mud or possibly pieces of caprock which contaminated the cuttings. The iron oxides were probably produced by corrosion of the drill stem or bit. Densities of several core samples were determined and insoluble residue was counted for radioactivity.

  4. Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Paducah Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Southwest Plume A 150-foot-tall crane turns an ...

  5. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Laboratory - OH 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mound Laboratory - OH 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mound Laboratory (OH.19) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Mound, Ohio, Site Documents Related to Mound Laboratory Workshop presentations emphasized the challenges of reindustrializing former DOE sites and the importance of involving local government and the community

  7. Offshore oceanographic and environmental monitoring services for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume I. Appendices. Annual report for the Bryan Mound Site, September 1982-August 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1984-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began leaching the Bryan Mound salt dome and discharging brine into the coastal waters offshore of Freeport, Texas on March 10, 1980. This report describes the findings of a team of Texas A and M University scientists and engineers who have conducted a study to evaluate the effects of the Bryan Mound brine discharge on the marine environment. The study addresses the areas of physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos and data management. It focuses on the period from September 1982 through August 1983. The ambient physical environment and its temporal and spatial variability were studied by means of continuously recording in situ current/conductivitiy/temperature meters and twelve, one-day synoptic hydrographic cruises. The quarterly water and sediment quality data show a small increase in salinity, sodium and chloride ions occurs in the bottom waters and sediment pore waters near the diffuser relative to those values measured at stations farther away. Data from the brine plume study for this reporting study show the largest areal extent within the +1 o/oo above ambient salinity contour was 40.0 km/sup 2/ which occurred on August 11, 1983. It appears that brine disposal at Bryan Mound has had neglible if any influence on the nekton community surrounding the diffuser. The benthic quarterly data from 26 stations, including 7 collections made after the diffuser outflow rate was increased to 1,000,000 barrels/day, show the total numbers of species at the diffuser station were higher than most other nearfield stations as well as many farfield stations in both the pre- and post-1,000,000 barrels/day brine flow periods. 138 references, 175 figures, 53 tables.

  8. Microsoft Word - 20110322_MoundNotice.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Legal Notice for Mound Site 2011 CERCLA Five-Year Review has been removed from the LM website. This document is outdated and no longer neededrequired...

  9. Mound facility physical characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  10. Evaluation of brine disposal from the Bryan Mound site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hann, R.W. Jr.; Randall, R.E.

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the environmental conditions found by the principal investigators during the predisposal study conducted from September 1977 through February 1980 prior to the start of brine discharge in March 1980. The major areas of investigation are physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management. Volume 1 describes the results of the predisposal study, and it is divided into eight chapters entitled: Physical Oceanography, Analysis of the Discharge Plume, Water and Sediment Quality, Nekton, Benthos, Zooplankton, Phytoplankton, and Data Management. Volume 2 consists of appendices which contain additional supporting data in the form of figures and tables.

  11. Field test of plutonium and thorium contaminated clay soils from the Mound Site using the ACT*DE*CON Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.O.; Swift, N.A.; Church, R.H.; Neff, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    A treatability test was run during the summer and fall of 1997 to demonstrate the effectiveness of ACT*DE*CON for removing plutonium and thorium from the clay soils around Mound. ACT*DE*CON is a proprietary solution patented by Selentec. The process utilized a highly selective dissolution of the contaminants by the use of a chemical wash. The pilot scale process involved pretreatment of the soil in an attrition scrubber with ACT*DE*CON solution. This blended solution was then passed through a counter-current extraction chamber where additional contact with ACT*DE*CON solution occurred, followed by a rinse cycle. During this process sand was added to aid contact of the solution with the soil particles. The sand is removed during the rinse step and reused. The chelating agent is separated from the contaminant and recycled back into the process, along with the reverse osmosis permeate. The resulting solution can be further treated to concentrate the contaminant. Three different types of environmental soils were tested -- plutonium and thorium contaminated soils with the natural clay content, and plutonium contaminated soils with a high percentage of fine clay particles. The goal of these tests was to reduce the plutonium levels from several hundreds of pCi/g to between 25 and 75 pCi/g and the thorium from a couple hundred pCi/g to less than 5 pCi/g. The results of these four tests are presented along with a discussion of the operating parameters and the lessons learned relating to full scale implementation at Mound as well as other potential applications of this process.

  12. Application Of ERT For Tracking CO2 Plume Growth And Movement At The SECARB Cranfield Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, C R; Ramirez, A L; Newmark, R L; Aines, R; Friedmann, S J

    2009-04-27

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) installed to track the development of an injected subsurface CO{sub 2} plume at the SECARB Cranfield, MS. sequestration site will be the deepest subsurface application of this method to date. ERT utilizes vertical arrays of electrodes, usually in a cross-well arrangement, to perform four-electrode measurements of changes in the spatial distribution of electrical resistance within a subsurface formation. Because a formation containing super-critical CO{sub 2} is approximately five times as resistive as its surroundings, significant resistance changes are anticipated during plume growth and movement within a brine-filled formation. ERT has also been shown to be quite sensitive to CO{sub 2} saturation changes. The Cranfield ERT electrode arrays will be emplaced at a depth exceeding 10,000 ft. (3280 m); the system design and installation must address significant challenges associated with both the depth and borehole conditions including temperatures of 258 F (126 C), pressures exceeding 5000 psi and a groundwater pH of 3. In addition, the system must allow co-located emplacement and concurrent operation with other monitoring techniques that utilize the same boreholes. ERT electrode and cabling will be attached to the outside of the well casing, allowing free access to the interior of the well, which is required by some of the other monitoring techniques being fielded. We will highlight these design challenges along with preliminary simulations indicating the anticipated level of imaging and the advantages of applying the technique in conjunction with other methods (such as cross-well seismics) to more accurately track the properties, location and movement of CO{sub 2} plumes.

  13. Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hranac, K.C.; Chromec, F.W.; Fiehweg, R.; Hopkins, J.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter.

  14. Mound Supports Galileo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monsanto Research Corporation

    1986-01-01

    This video describes the invention of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at Mound Laboratory, and radioisotope heat source production from 1 watt-thermal to 2400 watts-thermal. RTGs have been used in many space vehicles, but the RTG built for the Galileo mission to orbit Jupiter is the largest. This RTG unit will produce 4400 watts-thermal and convert to 300 watts-electric. The plutonium-238 heat source assembly and test at Mound is described. The RTGs are tested under simulated mission conditions. The RTG leakage radiation is carefully measured for background compensation for on-board radiation monitoring instruments.

  15. Mound publications for 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowka, Stephen L.

    1992-05-01

    This document is a compilation of all Mound formal technical publications and oral presentations for calendar year 1991. It is intended to serve as an aid to personnel in obtaining or referring to specific publications by giving the proper complete reference for each information item published during the year. Some items, such as proceedings publications, may have issue dates or periods of coverage prior to 1991; however, they were formally published during 1991.

  16. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30

    Contaminated groundwater associated with Building 100 at the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center, formerly the DOE Pinellas plant, is the primary remedial challenge that remains to be addressed at the site. Currently, Building 100 is an active industrial facility that is now owned and operated by the Pinellas county government. Groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells recently installed near the southern boundary of the site suggest that contaminated groundwater has migrated off the plant site. In response to the challenges presented by the Building 100 plume, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) requested assistance from the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) to provide a review team to make technical recommendations so that they can efficiently and effectively address characterization and remediation of the plume. The review team was unanimous in the conclusion that a dynamic strategy that combines a phased implementation of direct push samplers, sensors, and tools can be used to better delineate the extent of contamination, control plume migration, and rapidly remediate the contaminated groundwater at the site. The initial efforts of the team focused on reviewing the site history and data, organizing the information into a conceptual model, identifying appropriate technologies, and recommending an integrated strategy. The current groundwater data from the site indicate a two-lobed plume extending to the east and south. To the east vinyl chloride is the primary contaminant of concern, to the south, vinyl chloride and cis1, 2-DCE are the primary contaminants. The limited data that are available suggest that reductive dechlorination of the TCE is already occurring but is not sufficient to prevent offsite migration of low concentrations of TCE daughter products. The team recommends that DOE pursue a strategy that builds on the natural cleansing capacity of the subsurface with reductive methods including biostimulation

  17. Monsanto MOUND FACILITY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monsanto . MOUND FACILITY Operated for the United States Department of Energy March 26, 1981 Dr. William E. Mott, Director Environmental and Safety Engineering Division U. S. Department of Energy Washington, D. C. 20545 Dear Bill: Enclosed please find the short-term radon/radon progeny screening report conducted at the Seneca Army Depot in Romulus, New York per your request. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact me. Sincerely, WGY:mls Enclosure cc: R. Barber w/encl

  18. Environmental assessment for commercialization of the Mound Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-26

    In November 1993 US DOE decided to phase out operations at the Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, with the goal of releasing the site for commercial use. The broad concept is to transform the plant into an advanced manufacturing center with the main focus on commercializing products and other technology. DOE proposes to lease portions of the Mound Plant to commercial enterprises. This Environmental Impact statement has a finding of no significant impact in reference to such action.

  19. Independent technical review of the Mound Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report documents an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the facilities, organizations, plans, and activities required to transition particular elements of the Mound Plant from Defense Program (DP) funded operation as appropriate either to community developed reuse or safe deactivation leading to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The review was conducted at the request of the Dr. Willis Bixby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy EM-60, Office of Facility Transition and Management and is a consensus of the nine member ITR Team. Information for the review was drawn from documents provided to the ITR Team by the Miamisburg Area Office (MB) of the DOE, EG&G, the City of Miamisburg, and others; and from presentations, discussions, interviews, and facility inspections at the Mound Plant during the weeks of March 14 and March 28, 1994. During the week of April 25, 1994, the ITR Team met at Los Alamos, New Mexico to develop consensus recommendations. A presentation of the core recommendations was made at the Mound Plant on May 5, 1994. This is an independent assessment of information available to, and used by, the Mound Plant personnel. Repetition of the information is not meant to imply discovery by the ITR Team. Team members, however, acting as independent reviewers, frequently assess the information from a perspective that differs significantly from that of the Mound Plant personnel. The report is based on information obtained and conditions observed during the March 1994 review interval. The ITR process and normal site work often initiate rapid, beneficial changes in understanding and organization immediately following the review. These changes frequently alter conditions observed during the review, but the report does not address changes subsequent to the review interval.

  20. Analysis of Aquifer Response, Groundwater Flow, and PlumeEvolution at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Su, Grace W.

    2005-02-24

    This report presents a continuation from Oldenburg et al. (2002) of analysis of the hydrogeology, In-Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) results, aquifer response, and changes in the trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume at Operational Unit 1 (OU 1) adjacent to the former Fritzsche Army Airfield at the former Fort Ord Army Base, located on Monterey Bay in northern Monterey County. Fuels and solvents were burned on a portion of OU 1 called the Fire Drill Area (FDA) during airport fire suppression training between 1962 and 1985. This activity resulted in soil and groundwater contamination in the unconfined A-aquifer. In the late 1980's, soil excavation and bioremediation were successful in remediating soil contamination at the site. Shortly thereafter, a groundwater pump, treat, and recharge system commenced operation. This system has been largely successful at remediating groundwater contamination at the head of the groundwater plume. However, a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume extends approximately 3000 ft (900 m) to the northwest away from the FDA. In the analyses presented here, we augment our prior work (Oldenburg et al., 2002) with new information including treatment-system totalizer data, recent water-level and chemistry data, and data collected from new wells to discern trends in contaminant migration and groundwater flow that may be useful for ongoing remediation efforts. Some conclusions from the prior study have been modified based on these new analyses, and these are pointed out clearly in this report.

  1. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  2. From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits— Mound Science and Energy Museum Programs Cover a Wide Range of Topics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Mound Science and Energy Museum (MSEM) is an active, volunteer-led organization located at the former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mound site in Miamisburg, Ohio. MSEM keeps the 60-year...

  3. Environmental survey preliminary report, Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Plant, conducted August 18 through 29, 1986. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Mound Plant. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Mound Plant, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey found no environmental problems at the Mound Plant that represent an immediate threat to human life. The environmental problems identified at the Mound Plant by the Survey confirm that the site is confronted with a number of environmental problems which are by and large a legacy from past practices at a time when environmental problems were less well understood. Theses problems vary in terms of their magnitude and risk, as described in this report. Although the sampling and analysis performed by the Mound Plant Survey will assist in further identifying environmental problems at the site, a complete understanding of the significance of some of the environmental problems identified requires a level of study and characterization that is beyond the scope of the Survey. Actions currently under way or planned at the site, particularly the Phase II activities of the Comprehensive Environmental Analysis and Response Program (CEARP) as developed and implemented by the Albuquerque Operations Office, will contribute toward meeting this requirement. 85 refs., 24 figs., 20 tabs.

  4. A radioactive waste excavation at Mound Area 7 using INEL dig-face monitoring technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, M.V.; Josten, N.E.

    1996-12-31

    Dig-face characterization is a method to improve the safety and efficiency during hazardous waste retrieval. A dig-face characterization system consists of on-site hardware for collecting detailed information on the changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface throughout a hazardous site excavation. The dig-face characterization concept originated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory where it has been under development since 1992. In August 1995, a prototype dig-face system was taken to Mound Laboratory, Ohio, to monitor a hazardous waste site excavation. Mound Area 7 was the site of previous disposal of {sup 232}Th, {sup 227}Ac, and other waste. The dig-face characterization system was used to monitor a 20-ft x 20-ft x 5-ft-deep excavation intended to remove the {sup 227}Ac contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographical sensors were scanned across each of four successive excavated soil levels, each 1-ft to 2-ft thick. The radiation sensors produced highly detailed images showing the location of the contaminants {sup 232}Th and {sup 227}Ac, and the clear delineation between them. When combined into a single data set, the four levels of collected data produced a three dimensional image of the contamination. The radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil was actually contaminated. The information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct precise excavation activities in the area containing the {sup 227}Ac and to plan subsequent removal of the separate {sup 232}Th plume.

  5. EIS-0014: Mound Facility, Miamisburg, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to assess the environmental implications of its continuing and future programs at the Mound Facility (formerly designated Mound Laboratory), located in Miamisburg, Ohio.

  6. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 9): Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund Site, Muscoy Plume Operable Unit, San Bernardino, CA, March 24, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Muscoy Plume Operable Unit, Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund site. The Muscoy Plume OU is an interim action focusing on contamination in the underground water supply in the Bunker Hill Basin of San Bernardino, west of the Shandin Hills. The remedy involves groundwater extraction (pumping) and treatment of 6,200 gallons per minute (gpm) in San Bernardino at the leading edge of the contaminant plume. All the extracted contaminated groundwater shall be treated to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) by either of two proven treatment technologies: granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration or air stripping. The treated water will be transferred to a public water supply agency for distribution. Groundwater monitoring wells will be installed and sampled regularly to help evaluate the effectiveness of the remedy.

  7. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  8. Comparison of three field screening techniques for delineating petroleum hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater at a site in the southern Carson Desert, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smuin, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Three types of field screening techniques used in the characterization of potentially contaminated sites at Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada, are compared. The methods and results for each technique are presented. The three techniques include soil-gas surveys, electromagnetic geophysical surveys, and groundwater test hole screening. Initial screening at the first study site included two soil-gas surveys and electromagnetic geophysical studies. These screening methods identified I areas of contamination; however, results were inconclusive. Therefore groundwater test hole screening was performed. Groundwater screening consisted of auger drilling down to the shallow alluvial aquifer. Groundwater samples were collected from the open drill hole with a bailer. On-site head-space analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCS) were performed using a portable gas chromatograph (GC). Five areas of floating petroleum hydrocarbon product were identified along with the overall dissolved contaminant plume boundaries. Well placement was re-evaluated, and well sites were relocated based on the screening information. The most effective technique for identification of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminant plumes was groundwater test hole screening. Groundwater screening was subsequently performed at 19 other sites. A total of 450 test holes were analyzed resulting in the delineation of six plumes.

  9. Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence: Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume ...

  10. Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

    2014-01-08

    Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

  11. Sulphur Extraction at Bryan Mound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Carolyn L; Lord, Anna C. Snider

    2015-08-01

    The Bryan Mound caprock was subjected to extens ive sulphur mining prior to the development of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Undoubtedl y, the mining has modified the caprock integrity. Cavern wells at Bryan Mound have been subject to a host of well integr ity concerns with many likely compromised by the cavernous capro ck, surrounding corrosive environment (H 2 SO 4 ), and associated elevated residual temperatures al l of which are a product of the mining activities. The intent of this study was to understand the sulphur mining process and how the mining has affected the stability of the caprock and how the compromised caprock has influenced the integrity of the cavern wells. After an extensiv e search to collect pert inent information through state agencies, literature sear ches, and the Sandia SPR librar y, a better understanding of the caprock can be inferred from the knowledge gaine d. Specifically, the discovery of the original ore reserve map goes a long way towards modeling caprock stability. In addition the gained knowledge of sulphur mining - subs idence, superheated corrosive wa ters, and caprock collapse - helps to better predict the post mi ning effects on wellbore integrity. This page intentionally left blank

  12. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John

    2013-07-01

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  13. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficientmore » (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling

  14. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficient (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume

  15. Investigation of the Strontium-90 Contaminant Plume along the Shoreline of the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Patton, Gregory W.; Hartman, Mary J.; Spane, Frank A.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts are underway to remediate strontium-laden groundwater to the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site. Past practices of the 100-N reactor liquid waste disposal sites has left strontium-90 sorbed onto sediments which is a continuing source of contaminant discharge to the river. The Remediation Task of the Science and Technology Project assessed the interaction of groundwater and river water at the hyporheic zone. Limited data have been obtained at this interface of contaminant concentrations, geology, groundwater chemistry, affects of river stage and other variables that may affect strontium-90 release. Efforts were also undertaken to determine the extent, both laterally and horizontally, of the strontium-90 plume along the shoreline and to potentially find an alternative constituent to monitor strontium-90 that would be more cost effective and could possibly be done under real time conditions. A baseline of strontium-90 concentrations along the shoreline was developed to help assess remediation technologies.

  16. Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys | Department of Energy Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence: Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence: Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence: Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence: Literature Review

  17. Office of Inspector General report on audit of shutdown and transition of the Mound Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-24

    With the end of the Cold War, the Department of Energy (Department) has greatly reduced the production of nuclear weapons and redirected the capabilities and focus of the weapons complex. As part of this redirection, the Mound Plant was transferred from a Defense Program site to an Environmental Management site with emphasis on accelerated cleanup and transition of facilities and personal property to the local community. This audit was initiated to determine if the shutdown and transition of the Mound Plant was progressing effectively and efficiently. The Department prepared a Nonnuclear Consolidation Plan (NCP) designed to reduce its costs of operation by closing and consolidating facilities. In contrast to the goal of the NCP, the Department plans to keep a portion of the Mound Plant open solely to perform work for other Federal agencies. Specifically, the Department has decided to continue assembling and testing isotopic heat sources and radioisotope thermoelectric generators (HS/RTG) at the Mound Plant despite the transfer or planned transfer of all other production operations.The Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology decided to continue its HS/RTG operations at the Mound Plant without adequately considering the overall economic goals of the Department. As a result, the Department may not achieve the savings envisioned by the NCP. Also, the Department may incur between $4 million and $8.5 million more than necessary each year to continue its HS/RTG operations at the Mound Plant. Additionally, if the HS/RTG operations stay at the Mound Plant, the Department will spend more than $3 million to consolidate these operations into one location.

  18. Enforcement Letter, EG&G Mound Applied Technologies- August 22, 1996

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to EG&G Mound Applied Technologies related to the Inadvertent Transfer of Radiological Contamination at the Mound Plant

  19. City of Blue Mound, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mound, Kansas (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Blue Mound Place: Kansas Phone Number: (913) 756-2447 Outage Hotline: (913) 756-2447 References: EIA Form...

  20. Overview of the earth mounded concrete bunker prototype license application project: Objectives and approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, J.E.

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the objectives and approach taken in developing the Earth-mounded Concrete Bunker Prototype License Application Project. The Prototype License Application Project was initiated by the Department of Energy`s National Low-Level Waste Management Program in early 1987 and completed in November 1988. As part of this project a prototype safety analysis report was developed. The safety analysis report evaluates the licensibility of an earth-mounded concrete bunker for a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility located on a hypothetical site in the northeastern United States. The project required approximately five person-years and twenty months to develop.

  1. EIS-0001: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Brazoria County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve prepared this SEIS to address the environmental impacts of construction and operation of two types of brine disposal systems and a new water supply system. This EIS supplements FES 76/77-6, Bryan Mound Storage Site.

  2. Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    finances; Manufacturing; Research and development; Trainining and education;Other:Economic Development Phone Number: 937-865-4462 Website: www.mound.com...

  3. Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory’s Legacy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mound Science and Energy Museum (MSEM) owes its success to dedicated volunteers and supporters. The MSEM currently has 40 active volunteers and 200 dues-paying members.

  4. Enforcement Letter-Mound-08/22/1996

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy (DOE) by EG&G Mound (EG&G) in the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). ... We also reviewed your Contamination Control Review Team investigation report which ...

  5. Environmental assessment for Mound Plant decontamination and decommissioning projects, Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for seven decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects at the Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, that have not been previously addressed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Mound Facility (June 1979). Based on the information presented in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  6. Blue Mounds, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Blue Mounds is a village in Dane County, Wisconsin. It falls under Wisconsin's 2nd...

  7. EA-1001: Commercialization of the Mound Plant, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to commercialize surplus facilities such as the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio.  Commercialization will make...

  8. Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis. ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis. The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage ...

  9. EA-1239: Disposition of Mound Plant's South Property, Miamisburg, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared an EA for the proposed title transfer of 123 acres of land referred to as the “South Property” at the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio.

  10. Innovative Use of Cr(VI) Plume Depictions and Pump-and-Treat Capture Analysis to Estimate Risks of Contaminant Discharge to Surface Water at Hanford Reactor Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Chuck W.; Hanson, James P.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Tonkin, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Hanford Site nuclear reactor operations required large quantities of high-quality cooling water, which was treated with chemicals including sodium dichromate dihydrate for corrosion control. Cooling water leakage, as well as intentional discharge of cooling water to ground during upset conditions, produced extensive groundwater recharge mounds consisting largely of contaminated cooling water and resulted in wide distribution of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) contamination in the unconfined aquifer. The 2013 Cr(VI) groundwater plumes in the 100 Areas cover approximately 6 km2 (1500 acres), primarily in the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units (OUs). The Columbia River is a groundwater discharge boundary; where the plumes are adjacent to the Columbia River there remains a potential to discharge Cr(VI) to the river at concentrations above water quality criteria. The pump-and-treat systems along the River Corridor are operating with two main goals: 1) protection of the Columbia River, and 2) recovery of contaminant mass. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat systems was needed to determine if the Columbia River was protected from contamination, and also to determine where additional system modifications may be needed. In response to this need, a technique for assessing the river protection was developed which takes into consideration seasonal migration of the plume and hydraulic performance of the operating well fields. Groundwater contaminant plume maps are generated across the Hanford Site on an annual basis. The assessment technique overlays the annual plume and the capture efficiency maps for the various pump and treat systems. The river protection analysis technique was prepared for use at the Hanford site and is described in detail in M.J. Tonkin, 2013. Interpolated capture frequency maps, based on mapping dynamic water level observed in observation wells and derived water levels in the vicinity of extraction and injection wells

  11. Earth-mounded concrete bunker PLAP technical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eng, R.

    1989-11-01

    Under the US DOE Prototype License Application Project (PLAP), Ebasco Services Incorporated was commissioned to develop a preliminary design of the Earth-Mounded Concrete Bunker (EMCB) concept for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal. The EMCB disposal concept is of great interest because it represents the only engineered LLW disposal technology currently in use in the commercial sector. By definition, the EMCB disposal structure is located partially below grade and partially above grade. The concrete bunker is an engineered structure designed to be structurally stable for the prerequisite time horizon. The basic design parameters of the disposal facility were stipulated by US DOE, a northeast site location, representative waste, 30 year operational life, and a 250,000 ft{sup 3}/year disposal capacity. The design was developed to satisfy only US NRC Part 61 disposal requirements, not individual state requirements that may go beyond Part 61 requirements. The technical safety analysis of the preliminary design was documented according to the format specifications of NUREG-1199, to the extent practicable with quite limited resources.

  12. Mounded LPG storage - Experience and developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, D.

    1988-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is stored after production, and for distribution and use, in pressure vessels which vary in size from a few kilogrammes to many thousands of tons. The types of LPG under consideration are commercial butane, commercial propane, or mixtures of the two gases in varying proportions. Mounded storage systems are becoming popular as an alternative to the better-known traditional systems. The most widely used and therefore best-known of the traditional systems are the above-ground pressure-vessel designs. These more commonly comprise factory-made cylinders which are installed horizontally, being supported on saddles at each end of the vessel. When such vessels are installed in an LPG terminal, depot, or filling plant, they are required in multiple units to facilitate the storage of more than one grade of product and to enable regular maintenance and inspection to be carried out. Today's safety regulations require such installations to be divided into sub-groups of six tanks, with all the tanks located at a safe distance from one another, and from other facilities in the immediate area. These safety distances are being increased as a result of experience, which means terminals now require large areas of land.

  13. Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence. Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence. Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys This report on evaporite mineralization was completed as an Ancillary Work Plan for the Applied Studies and Technology program

  14. Microsoft Word - N01535_B100 Plume Delin Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Building 100 Off-Site Plume Delineation South of Bryan Dairy Road Data Report for Rally Stores Property November 2010 LMS/PIN/N01535 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01535 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Building 100 Area Off-Site Plume Delineation South of Bryan Dairy Road Data Report for Rally Stores Property November 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Building 100 Area Off-Site Plume Delineation South of Bryan Dairy Road November 2010 Doc.

  15. EM's Cleanup Mission: 16 Sites in 11 States Remaining

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the end of fiscal year 2013, EM completed cleanup and closed 90 sites in 28 states. This included cleanup and closure of 85 smaller sites and five major nuclear sites: Rocky Flats, Fernald, Mound, Pinellas, and Weldon Spring.

  16. Test fire environmental testing operations at Mound Applied Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes Mound Laboratory`s environmental testing operations. The function of environmental testing is to perform quality environmental (thermal, mechanical, spin, resistance, visual) testing/conditioning of inert/explosive products to assure their compliance with specified customer acceptance criteria. Capabilities, organization, equipment specifications, and test facilities are summarized.

  17. Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site .........9 2.2.3 Solar Ponds Plume Treatment System ...

  18. Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site .........8 2.2.3 Solar Ponds Plume Treatment System ...

  19. Focused risk assessment: Mound Plant, Miami-Erie Canal Operable Unit 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, D.R.; Dunning, D.F.

    1994-09-29

    In 1969, an underground waste line at Mound Plant ruptured and released plutonium-238 in a dilute nitric acid solution to the surrounding soils. Most of the acid was neutralized by the native soils. The plutonium, which in a neutral solution is tightly sorbed onto clay particles, remained within the spill area. During remediation, a severe storm eroded some of the contaminated soil. Fine grained plutonium-contaminated clay particles were carried away through the natural drainage courses to the remnants of the Miami-Erie Canal adjacent to Mound Plant, and then into the Great Miami River. This focused risk assessment considers exposure pathways relevant to site conditions, including incidental ingestion of contaminated soils, ingestion of drinking water and fish, and inhalation of resuspended soils and sediments. For each potential exposure pathway, a simplified conceptual model and exposure scenarios have been used to develop conservative estimates of potential radiation dose equivalents and health risks. The conservatism of the dose and risk estimates provides a substantive margin of safety in assuring that the public health is protected.

  20. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J.

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  1. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center ...

  2. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-02-14

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.

  3. DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

    2010-12-02

    Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

  4. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  5. Audit of Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant, IG-0408 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant, IG-0408 Audit of Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant, IG-0408 Audit of Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant, IG-0408 (68.17 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0302: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0302: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Semiannual Report to Congress: April 1 - September 30, 1997

  6. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Mound, Inc- December 22, 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Mound, Inc. related to a Radioactive Contamination Event during Remediation Activities at the Miamisburg Closure Project

  7. Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, P.D.

    2011-04-01

    One of the main concerns of storage in saline aquifers is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available for these aquifers. This necessitates a method using available fault data to estimate the probability of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault. The probability of encounter can be calculated from areal fault density statistics from available data, and carbon dioxide plume dimensions from numerical simulation. Given a number of assumptions, the dimension of the plume perpendicular to a fault times the areal density of faults with offsets greater than some threshold of interest provides probability of the plume encountering such a fault. Application of this result to a previously planned large-scale pilot injection in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin yielded a 3% and 7% chance of the plume encountering a fully and half seal offsetting fault, respectively. Subsequently available data indicated a half seal-offsetting fault at a distance from the injection well that implied a 20% probability of encounter for a plume sufficiently large to reach it.

  8. Overview of surface studies on high energy materials at Mound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moddeman, W.E.; Collins, L.W.; Wang, P.S.; Haws, L.D.; Wittberg, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1975 Mound has been examining the surface structure of high energy materials and the interaction of these materials with various metal containers. The high energy materials that have been studied include: the pyrotechnic TiH/sub x//KClO/sub 4/, the Al/Cu/sub 2/O machinable thermite, the PETN, HMX and RDX explosives, and two plastic bonded explosives (PBX). Aluminum and alloys of Fe, Ni and Cr have been used as the containment materials. Two aims in this research are: (1) the elucidation of the mechanism of pyrotechnic ignition and (2) the compatibility of high energy materials with their surroundings. New information has been generated by coupling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with thermal data. In particular, AES and XPS studies on the pyrotechnic materials and on thermites have shown the mechanism of ignition to be nearly independent of the type of oxidizer present but directly related to surface chemistry of the fuels. In studies on the two PBX's, PBX-9407 and LX-16, it was concluded that the Exon coating on 9407 was complete and greater than or equal to 100A; whereas in LX-16, the coating was < 100A or even incomplete. AES and scanning Auger have been used to characterize the surface composition and oxide thickness for an iron-nickel alloy and showed the thicker oxides to have the least propensity for atmospheric hydrocarbon adsorption. Data are presented and illustrations made which highlight this new approach to studying ignition and compatibility of high energy materials. Finally, the salient features of the X-SAM-800 purchased by Mound are discussed in light of future studies on high energy materials.

  9. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology

  10. Cost estimate for muddy water palladium production facility at Mound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAdams, R.K.

    1988-11-30

    An economic feasibility study was performed on the ''Muddy Water'' low-chlorine content palladium powder production process developed by Mound. The total capital investment and total operating costs (dollars per gram) were determined for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg in 1-kg increments. The report includes a brief description of the Muddy Water process, the process flow diagram, and material balances for the various production batch sizes. Two types of facilities were evaluated--one for production of new, ''virgin'' palladium powder, and one for recycling existing material. The total capital investment for virgin facilities ranged from $600,000 --$1.3 million for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg, respectively. The range for recycle facilities was $1--$2.3 million. The total operating cost for 100% acceptable powder production in the virgin facilities ranged from $23 per gram for a 1-kg production batch size to $8 per gram for a 10-kg batch size. Similarly for recycle facilities, the total operating cost ranged from $34 per gram to $5 per gram. The total operating cost versus product acceptability (ranging from 50%--100% acceptability) was also evaluated for both virgin and recycle facilities. Because production sizes studied vary widely and because scale-up factors are unknown for batch sizes greater than 1 kg, all costs are ''order-of-magnitude'' estimates. All costs reported are in 1987 dollars.

  11. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, J.H.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

  12. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  13. Environmental assessment and planning at Mound - environmental monitoring capabilities and personnel profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    Through its long experience with radioactive materials, Mound has developed a comprehensive, routine, offsite, environmental surveillance program to safeguard its employees, the physical plant, and the integrity of the surrounding environment from any potential adverse effects of its widely diverse operations. Effluent samples are analyzed for radiological and non-radiological parameters. The environment surrounding Mound Facility is continuously monitored - air, water, foodstuffs, vegetation, soil, and silt samples are analyzed to ensure that radioisotopic concentrations and other possible pollutants are well within the stringent standards adopted by the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agencies (both federal and state), and various regional and local agencies. Moreover, this environmental surveillance program has been designed to ensure that the facility is designed, constructed, managed, operated, and maintained in a manner that continues to meet all federal, state, and local standards for environmental protection. Work in environmental science has been broadened to assess environmental factors associated with various aspects of the National Energy Plan. Both the management and staff at Mound have undertaken a firm commitment to make Mound`s environmental monitoring capabilities available to agencies that have the responsibility for the resolution of important environmental issues.

  14. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  15. Solar-Powered Air Stripping at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado - 12361

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boylan, John A.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Site (the Site), near Denver, Colorado, is a former nuclear weapons facility that was constructed beginning in 1951. With the end of the Cold War, the Site was cleaned up and closed in 2005. Four gravity-driven groundwater treatment systems were installed during cleanup, and their continued operation was incorporated into the final remedy for the Site. All utilities, including electrical power, were removed as part of this closure, so all Site electrical power needs are now met with small solar-powered systems. The Mound Site Plume Treatment System (MSPTS) was installed in 1998 as an innovative system based on zero-valent iron (ZVI). Groundwater flow from the Mound source area containing elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily in the tetrachloroethene (PCE)-trichloroethene (TCE) family of chlorinated solvents, is intercepted by a collection trench and routed to twin ZVI treatment cells. Later, in 2005, remediation of VOC-contaminated soils at a second up-gradient source area included adding an electron donor to the backfill to help stimulate biodegradation. This reduced concentrations of primary constituents but caused down-gradient groundwater to contain elevated levels of recalcitrant degradation byproducts, particularly cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride. A gravel drain installed as part of the 2005 remediation directs contaminated groundwater from this second source area to the MSPTS for treatment. This additional contaminant load, coupled with correspondingly reduced residence time within the ZVI media due to the increased flow rate, resulted in reduced treatment effectiveness. Elevated concentrations of VOCs were then detected in MSPTS effluent, as well as in surface water at the downstream performance monitoring location for the MSPTS. Subsequent consultations with the Site regulators led to the decision to add a polishing component to reduce residual VOCs in MSPTS effluent

  16. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol; Macelloni, Leonardo; D'Emidio, Marco; Dunbar, John; Higley, Paul

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to

  17. Microsoft Word - plume_paper.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a forced immiscible displacement, such as gas injection into a water-saturated medium. Instead of pushing the water forward, the plume advances because the vertical pressure ...

  18. Conceptual design report for site drainage control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    The Mound Plant (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc. (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety & Health (ES&H) Upgrades Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by facility activities. The first project of this multiphase program is now in the final stages of construction, and the second project is currently under design. Four additional projects, one of which is presented in this report, are in the conceptual design stage. At Mound, 22 soil zones have become contaminated with radioactive material. These zones cover approximately 20 percent of the total area of developed property at the site. During a storm event, the rainwater washes contaminated soil from these zones into the storm sewer system. These radioactive contaminants may then be discharged along with the stormwater into the Great Miami River via the Miami Erie Canal. This conceptual design report (CDR), Site Drainage Control, the fourth project in the ES&H program, describes a project that will provide improvements and much needed repairs to inadequate and deteriorating portions of the storm drainage system on the developed property. The project also will provide a stormwater retention facility capable of storing the stormwater runoff, from the developed property, resulting from a 100-year storm event. These improvements will permit the effective control and monitoring of stormwater to prevent the spread of radioactive contaminants from contaminated soil zones and will provide a means to collect and contain accidental spills of hazardous substances.

  19. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Doc. No. S07757 Page B-1 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S07757 June 2011 Page B-2 U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page B-3 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S07757 June 2011

  20. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ......... 14 Figure 8. Solar array west of COS Building ... the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 3-ARI presentation - Mound - Tania Smith

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    are powered by clean energy, and major environmental ... to create jobs. * Local communities are advocates for site ... Area-Wide Planning Program; and * The Bureau of Land ...

  2. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN COAL POWER PLANT PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2006-06-01

    -September 5, 2003. The experimental site was the Pleasant Prairie Power Plant in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. The experiment involved using an aircraft to capture emissions and document chemistry changes in the plume. While using the airplane for sampling, supplemental fast-response sensors for NOx, connected to data loggers, were used to gauge entry and exit times and transect intervals through plume emissions material. The Frontier Geosciences Static Plume Dilution Chamber (SPDC) was employed simultaneously adjacent to the stack to correlate its findings with the aircraft sampling, as well as providing evaluation of the SPDC as a rapid, less costly sampler for mercury chemistry. A complementary stack plume method, the Dynamic Plume Dilution (DPD) was used in the latter portion of the experiment to measure mercury speciation to observe any mercury reduction reaction with respect to both the reaction time (5 to 30 seconds) and dilution ratio. In addition, stack sampling using the ''Ontario Hydro'' wet chemistry method and continuous mercury monitors (CMM) were used to establish the baseline chemistry in the stack. Comparisons among stack, SPDC, DPD and aircraft measurements allow establishment of whether significant chemical changes to mercury occur in the plume, and of the verisimilitude of the SPDC and DPD methods. This progress report summarizes activities during a period of results review from the stack/aircraft subcontractor, data analysis and synthesis, and preparation and presentation of preliminary results to technical and oversight meetings.

  3. Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shackson, R.H.

    1991-10-09

    This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

  4. Final alternatives assessment: Other contamination sources: Interim response action, South Tank Farm Plume. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The South Tank Farm Plume (STFP) is located in the southern half of sections 1 and 2. It is a composite plume of C6H6, MEC6H5, XYLEN, DCPD, and BCHPD which is migrating from the area of tank 464A. Recent investigations have shown that the STFP is being biodegraded naturally and will not migrate into either Lake Ladora or Lower Derby Lake prior to implementation of the final remedy. Monitoring with the specific objectives of (1) Verifying the rate of migration and (2) Locating the leading edge of the plume over the time frame of the IRA is proposed as the preferred alternative action. Sections of this assessment provide information on: (1) Site description-history, previous investigations, hydrogeology, LNAPL plume; (2) IRA objectives and evaluation; and (3) Work plan of the IRA-well network, sampling frequency. Appendices include comments and responses.

  5. Closure Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Closure Sites Closure Sites View a list of the compliance agreements for the many EM closure sites, such as Mound and Rocky Flats, below. Associated summaries are also included. Pinellas Remediation Agreement (1.87 MB) Pinellas Remediation Agreement Summary (44.6 KB) Maxey Flats Consent Decree -Part 1, April 18, 1996 (6.67 MB) Maxey Flats Consent Decree -Part 2, April 18, 1996 (2.8 MB) Maxey Flats Consent Decree April 18, 1996 Summary (49.79 KB) Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement,

  6. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page C-1 Figure 1. T Building Rooms with Special ICs Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S07757 June 2011 Page C-2 T Building Rooms with Special ICs In addition to the ICs for the entire site, T Building has the following additional IC restrictions as described in the Parcel 6, 7, and 8 Record of

  7. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northwest Plume | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northwest Plume Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northwest Plume January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater ...

  8. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Southwest Plume | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Southwest Plume Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Southwest Plume January 1, 2014 - ... InstallationName, State: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY Responsible DOE Office: ...

  9. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northeast Plume | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Northeast Plume Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northeast Plume January 1, 2014 - ... InstallationName, State: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY Responsible DOE Office: ...

  10. Expediting environmental cleanup--nationwide stakeholder involvement in U.S. Department of Energy`s plume focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, G.H.; Stein, S.L.; Serie, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) faces a major challenge in cleaning up its contaminated sites throughout the United States. One major area of concern is the plumes in soil and ground water, contaminated with a myriad of different pollutants. DOE recently established the Plume Focus Area to address these problems. The mission of the Plume Focus Area is to enhance the deployment of innovative technologies for containing and cleaning up contaminant plumes in ground water and soil at all DOE sites. By involving a range of stakeholders in the selection, demonstration, and evaluation of new technologies, the deployment of these technologies can be enhanced. Through this strategy, technology users join with other stakeholders to assess the appropriateness of new technologies for addressing plume contamination, and characterize the conditions under which those emerging technologies will be acceptable. If new plume cleanup technologies are to be deployable, they must improve on today`s baseline technologies. If sites and their stakeholders understood the technologies, recognize that their concerns are reflected in the evaluations and demonstrations, and participate in assessing how technology performance addresses their concerns, the likelihood of acceptance of those technologies is greater. Thus, broad stakeholder acceptance becomes part of the definition of an improved technology, evaluated in parallel with technical performance, cost, and other traditional parameters. This paper further describes the goals and objectives of the Plume Focus Area and emphasizes the importance of stakeholder involvement in achieving them. The process of coordinating with DOE sites is described to highlight how stakeholder input is considered throughout the Plume Focus Area decision-making process in selecting, developing, demonstrating, and evaluating innovative technologies to address plume problems.

  11. Progress Toward Operable Unit 1 Groundwater Cleanup at the Mound, Ohio, Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Groundwater in Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) has been impacted by volatile organic compound (VOC)-contaminated materials in the former solid waste landfill. The remedy for controlling contamination from...

  12. Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant East Plume (17.9 KB) Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant Quarry (17.53 KB) Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant VOC (16.06 KB) Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant West Plume (18.61 KB) More Documents & Publications South Valley Archived Soil &

  13. Annual Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........24 2.7.3 Solar Ponds Plume Treatment System ... Maintenance Activities at the Rocky Flats Site-CY 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  14. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plume of spent fuel-related contaminants beneath it. ... one alternative with no action except for the completion of source removal of waste sites at the surface, ...

  15. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Listings and Photos of Monitoring Wells and Seeps This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page D-i Contents 1.0 Parcel 6, 7, and 8 Remedy Wells and Seeps ..................................................................... D-1 2.0 OU-1 (Parcel 9) Wells ....................................................................................................... D-6 3.0 Phase I

  16. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher

  17. Puff/Plume for Windows 95-NT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-20

    PFPL-NT is a GUI event-driven scientific application integrating 14 background processes to access the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous materials from production facilities and transportation vehicles. A simple straight-line Gaussian assumption has been employed with observations from meteorological towers to calculate and visually display plume directions, plume width, and dose/concentration estimates in the immediate vicinity of a radiological or chemical release.

  18. Pre-operational safety appraisal Tritiated Scrap Recovery Facility, Mound facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauby, J.J.; Flanagan, T.M.; Metcalf, L.W.; Rhinehammer, T.B.

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify, assess, and document the hazards which are associated with the proposed operation of the Tritiated Scrap Recovery Facility at Mound Facility. A Pre-operational Safety Appraisal is a requirement as stated in Department of Energy Order 5481.1, Safety Analysis and Review System. The operations to be conducted in the new Tritiated Scrap Waste Recovery Facility are not new, but a continuation of a prime mission of Mound`s i.e. recovery of tritium from waste produced throughout the DOE complex. The new facility is a replacement of an existing process started in the early 1960`s and incorporates numerous design changes to enhance personnel and environmental safety. This report also documents the safety of a one time operation involving the recovery of tritium from material obtained by the Department of Energy from the State of Arizona. This project will involve the processing of 240,000 curies of tritium contained in glass ampoules that were to be used in items such as luminous dial watches. These were manufactured by the now defunct American Atomics Corporation, Tucson, Arizona.

  19. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF BLENDING RESIDUAL SOLIDS FROM TANKS 18/19 MOUNDS WITH TANK 7 OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eibling, R; Erich Hansen, E; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2007-03-29

    High level waste tanks 18F and 19F have residual mounds of waste which may require removal before the tanks can be closed. Conventional slurry pump technology, previously used for waste removal and tank cleaning, has been incapable of removing theses mounds from tanks 18F and 19F. A mechanical cleaning method has been identified that is potentially capable of removing and transferring the mound material to tank 7F for incorporation in a sludge batch for eventual disposal in high level waste glass by the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been requested to evaluate whether the material transferred from tanks 18F/19F by the mechanical cleaning technology can later be suspended in Tank 7F by conventional slurry pumps after mixing with high level waste sludge. The proposed mechanical cleaning process for removing the waste mounds from tanks 18 and 19 may utilize a high pressure water jet-eductor that creates a vacuum to mobilize solids. The high pressure jet is also used to transport the suspended solids. The jet-eductor system will be mounted on a mechanical crawler for movement around the bottom of tanks 18 and 19. Based on physical chemical property testing of the jet-eductor system processed IE-95 zeolite and size-reduced IE-95 zeolite, the following conclusions were made: (1) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite has a mean and median particle size (volume basis) of 115.4 and 43.3 microns in water. Preferential settling of these large particles is likely. (2) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite rapidly generates settled solid yield stresses in excess of 11,000 Pascals in caustic supernates and will not be easily retrieved from Tank 7 with the existing slurry pump technology. (3) Settled size-reduced IE-95 zeolite (less than 38 microns) in caustic supernate does not generate yield stresses in excess of 600 Pascals in less than 30 days. (4) Preferential settling of size-reduced zeolite is a function of the amount of

  20. PlumeSat: A Micro-Satellite Based Plume Imagery Collection Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.

    2002-06-30

    This paper describes a technical approach to cost-effectively collect plume imagery of boosting targets using a novel micro-satellite based platform operating in low earth orbit (LEO). The plume collection Micro-satellite or PlueSat for short, will be capable of carrying an array of multi-spectral (UV through LWIR) passive and active (Imaging LADAR) sensors and maneuvering with a lateral divert propulsion system to different observation altitudes (100 to 300 km) and different closing geometries to achieve a range of aspect angles (15 to 60 degrees) in order to simulate a variety of boost phase intercept missions. The PlumeSat will be a cost effective platform to collect boost phase plume imagery from within 1 to 10 km ranges, resulting in 0.1 to 1 meter resolution imagery of a variety of potential target missiles with a goal of demonstrating reliable plume-to-hardbody handover algorithms for future boost phase intercept missions. Once deployed on orbit, the PlumeSat would perform a series phenomenology collection experiments until expends its on-board propellants. The baseline PlumeSat concept is sized to provide from 5 to 7 separate fly by data collects of boosting targets. The total number of data collects will depend on the orbital basing altitude and the accuracy in delivering the boosting target vehicle to the nominal PlumeSat fly-by volume.

  1. Segmented electrode hall thruster with reduced plume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2004-08-17

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with segmented electrodes along the channel, which make the acceleration region as localized as possible. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to minimize erosion and arcing. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to produce a substantial reduction in plume divergence. The use of electrodes made of emissive material will reduce the radial potential drop within the channel, further decreasing the plume divergence. Also disclosed is a method of arranging and powering these electrodes so as to provide variable mode operation.

  2. MLM-462 Contract Number AT-33-l-GtiN-53 MOUND LABORATCRY Operatsd By

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    This Doeumr;t Consists of 116 ?zges This is COPY of i.3 k MLM-462 Contract Number AT-33-l-GtiN-53 MOUND LABORATCRY Operatsd By MONSAmOC~ALGoMPANY MIAMISBURG, OHIO REPORT NO. 3 OF STIEUING CaW'M'B FOR DISPUSAL CF UNITS 111 AND IV (Completion Report for Disposal of UrLt IV, Runnymeade Road sr,d Dixon live. Dayton, Ohlo) . Date: April 17, 1950 Prepared By: -36L254- F. L. Halbach Chairnan., St33ricg Gcicmittes 1ssue.d: DISTRIHJTION copy 1. - Dr. Carroll A. Hochwalt copy 2. - Dr. M. M. Haring copy 3.

  3. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead

  4. DOE/EA-2005 Draft Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    de San Ildefonso and are as high as 1,000 ppb in the plume center. Recent groundwater monitoring well sampling data show increasing chromium concentrations on the plume edges ...

  5. Containment and recovery of a light non-aqueous phase liquid plume at a woodtreating facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouse, D.; Powell, G.; Hawthorn, S.; Weinstock, S.

    1997-12-31

    A woodtreating site in Montana used a formulation (product) of 5 percent pentachlorophenol and 95 percent diesel fuel as a carrier liquid to pressure treat lumber. Through years of operations approximately 378,500 liters of this light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) product spilled onto the ground and soaked into the groundwater. A plume of this LNAPL product flowed in a northerly direction toward a stream located approximately 410 meters from the pressure treatment building. A 271-meter long high density polyethylene (HDPE) containment cutoff barrier wall was installed 15 meters from the stream to capture, contain, and prevent the product from migrating off site. This barrier was extended to a depth of 3.7 meters below ground surface and allowed the groundwater to flow beneath it. Ten product recovery wells, each with a dual-phase pumping system, were installed within the plume, and a groundwater model was completed to indicate how the plume would be contained by generating a cone of influence at each recovery well. The model indicated that the recovery wells and cutoff barrier wall would contain the plume and prevent further migration. To date, nearly 3{1/2} year`s later, approximately 106,000 liters of product have been recovered.

  6. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  7. Downstream extent of the N Reactor plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Ecker, R.M.; Vail, L.W.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    The downstream extent of the N Reactor thermal plume was studied to assess the potential for fisheries impacts downstream of N Reactor. The N Reactor plume, as defined by the 0.5/sup 0/F isotherm, will extend less than 10 miles downstream at river flows greater than or equal to annual average flows (120,000 cfs). Incremental temperature increases at the Oregon-Washington border are expected to be less than 0.5/sup 0/F during all Columbia River flows greater than the minimum regulated flows (36,000 cfs). The major physical factor affecting Columbia River temperatures in the Hanford Reach is solar radiation. Because the estimated temperature increase resulting from N Reactor operations is less than 0.3/sup 0/F under all flow scenarios, it is unlikely that Columbia River fish populations will be adversely impacted.

  8. Optimized Field Sampling and Monitoring of Airborne Hazardous Transport Plumes; A Geostatistical Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, DI-WEN

    2001-11-21

    Airborne hazardous plumes inadvertently released during nuclear/chemical/biological incidents are mostly of unknown composition and concentration until measurements are taken of post-accident ground concentrations from plume-ground deposition of constituents. Unfortunately, measurements often are days post-incident and rely on hazardous manned air-vehicle measurements. Before this happens, computational plume migration models are the only source of information on the plume characteristics, constituents, concentrations, directions of travel, ground deposition, etc. A mobile ''lighter than air'' (LTA) system is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will be part of the first response in emergency conditions. These interactive and remote unmanned air vehicles will carry light-weight detectors and weather instrumentation to measure the conditions during and after plume release. This requires a cooperative computationally organized, GPS-controlled set of LTA's that self-coordinate around the objectives in an emergency situation in restricted time frames. A critical step before an optimum and cost-effective field sampling and monitoring program proceeds is the collection of data that provides statistically significant information, collected in a reliable and expeditious manner. Efficient aerial arrangements of the detectors taking the data (for active airborne release conditions) are necessary for plume identification, computational 3-dimensional reconstruction, and source distribution functions. This report describes the application of stochastic or geostatistical simulations to delineate the plume for guiding subsequent sampling and monitoring designs. A case study is presented of building digital plume images, based on existing ''hard'' experimental data and ''soft'' preliminary transport modeling results of Prairie Grass Trials Site. Markov Bayes Simulation, a coupled Bayesian/geostatistical methodology, quantitatively combines soft information

  9. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  10. An aerial radiological survey of the EG G Mound Applied Technologies and surrounding area, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, Ohio, during the period of June 9--24, 1989. The purpose of the 41-square-kilometer (16-square-mile) survey was to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the plant and surrounding area. In addition, ground-based exposure rate measurements and soil samples were obtained to support the aerial data. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level was.constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. Exposure rates measured in the area typically ranged from 9 to 11 microroentgens per hour ([mu]R/h).

  11. Comment Period Extended: EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure and Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environmental Management has extended the Public Comment Period on the Draft Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los...

  12. Chromium Interim Measures Project and Ongoing Plume Investigation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Topic: Danny Katzman LANL, Provided Information on the Ongoing Characterization of the Chromium Plume in Mortandad Canyon and the Pump and Treat Pilot Test. Chromium Update - March...

  13. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

    1998-07-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

  14. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  15. Solar rocket plume-mirror interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S.T.; Chang, C.L.; Merkle, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which the plume from a solar thermal rocket will impinge on the solar collector is studied by flow field analysis. Such interaction can adversely affect collector performance through fouling, excessive heat loading, or pressure loads that deform the delicate structures. The geometrical shape of the collector is such that only the flow from the nozzle boundary layer can reach it, but the thrust levels of interest lead to very viscous nozzle flows with thick boundary layers. Reasonable accuracy in solving these flows requires a fully coupled viscous-inviscid procedure. Results show that the fraction of the plume that hits the collector can be well estimated by continuum theory, but that transitional and rarefied phenomena will have some impact on how it is distributed over the surface. Initial results for one representative condition show that approx. 4 percent of the total flow in the jet makes its way to the collector. The pressures on the collector, however, remain quite low because of its distance from the engine. Additional work is needed to document the effect of thrust scaling and wall cooling on impingement.

  16. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  17. Annual Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Maintenance Activities at the Rocky Flats Site-CY 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ... POE Point of Evaluation; PV photovoltaic; SPPTS Solar Ponds Plume Treatment System

  18. Certification of the Mound 1 kW package for shipping of plutonium dioxide source material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annese, C.E.; Mount, M.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established procedures for obtaining certification of packagings used by DOE and its contractors for the transport of radioactive materials. Specifically, DOE Orders 5480.3 and 1540.2 provide references for other DOE Orders which must be followed when an applicant submits a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). From the orders, Department EH of DOE, has internal oversight responsibility for transportation and Packaging safety; package certification falls under EH responsibility; transportation and packaging safety division in EH certifies packages for DOE; and use of DOE certified packages is authorized by DOT. An independent review of the SARP must confirm that the packaging designs and operations meet safety criteria at least equivalent to these standards. This paper will discuss the independent review process of the shielding section of the Mound 1 kW SARP; describe the geometry of the packaging and the load configurations; discuss the analysis of the various neutron and photon source terms that were used for the load configuration under analysis; and provide illustrations of the use of the monte-carlo code, COG{sup 3}, which was utilized to perform the shielding analysis.

  19. Identification of biological processes in a mixed hydrocarbon plume at a paint manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlan, R.G.; Walsh, K.P.; Henkler, R.D.; Anderson, B.N.

    1996-12-31

    In situ biodegradation is increasingly being used as a cost effective remedial strategy for contaminated sites. However, for the remediation to be successful, it is necessary to understand the fundamental geochemical and microbiological processes occurring at a particular site. At a paint manufacturing facility, a mixed hydrocarbon plume containing both BTEX and paraffinic hydrocarbons (Stoddard solvent) has contaminated the aquifer. The microbial processes occurring in the plume were investigated to better define the capacity of the aquifer to degrade hydrocarbons. Microbial oxidation of hydrocarbons is known to be coupled with the reduction of redox active species including oxygen, nitrate, ferric iron and sulphate as well as the production of methane. Water quality data, redox parameters and contaminant information were collected from the site to identify candidate biological processes occurring. The results show that as the contaminant concentration increases, the redox decreases indicating the generation of a more reduced environment. The decreasing redox correlates with increased concentrations of ammonia, ferrous iron and sulphide. The data indicates that there have been a range of different electron acceptor systems operating at the site. This has been correlated with a theoretical amount of benzene consumed. The chemistry from the wells at the site show that at least 47 mg/L of benzene is capable of being mineralized within the aquifer by microbial based transformations given the current contaminant loading and flowrate. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Baseline review of three groundwater plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry; et al.

    2002-09-26

    During the closeout session, members of the technical assistance team conveyed to the site how impressed they were at the thoroughness of the site's investigation and attempts at remediation. Team members were uniformly pleased at the skilled detection work to identify sources, make quick remediation decisions, and change course when a strategy did not work well. The technical assistance team also noted that, to their knowledge, this is the only DOE site at which a world-class scientist has had primary responsibility for the environmental restoration activities. This has undoubtedly contributed to the successes observed and DOE should take careful note. The following overall recommendations were agreed upon: (1) The site has done a phenomenal job of characterization and identifying and removing source terms. (2) Technologies selected to date are appropriate and high impact, e.g. collection trenches are an effective remedial strategy for this complicated geology. The site should continue using technology that is adapted to the site's unique geology, such as the collection trenches. (3) The site should develop a better way to determine the basis of cleanup for all sites. (4) The sentinel well system should be evaluated and modified, if needed, to assure that the sentinel wells provide coverage to the current site boundary. Potential modifications could include installation, abandonment or relocation of wells based on the large amount of data collected since the original sentinel well system was designed. (5) Modeling to assist in remedial design and communication should continue. (6) The site should develop a plan to ensure institutional memory. (7) The most likely possibility for improving closure to 2006 is by removing the residual source of the Old Town plume and establishing the efficacy of remediation for the 51/64 plume.

  1. Cooling tower and plume modeling for satellite remote sensing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    It is often useful in nonproliferation studies to be able to remotely estimate the power generated by a power plant. Such information is indirectly available through an examination of the power dissipated by the plant. Power dissipation is generally accomplished either by transferring the excess heat generated into the atmosphere or into bodies of water. It is the former method with which we are exclusively concerned in this report. We discuss in this report the difficulties associated with such a task. In particular, we primarily address the remote detection of the temperature associated with the condensed water plume emitted from the cooling tower. We find that the effective emissivity of the plume is of fundamental importance for this task. Having examined the dependence of the plume emissivity in several IR bands and with varying liquid water content and droplet size distributions, we conclude that the plume emissivity, and consequently the plume brightness temperature, is dependent upon not only the liquid water content and band, but also upon the droplet size distribution. Finally, we discuss models dependent upon a detailed point-by-point description of the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the plume dynamics and those based upon spatially integrated models. We describe in detail a new integral model, the LANL Plume Model, which accounts for the evolution of the droplet size distribution. Some typical results obtained from this model are discussed.

  2. Transient temperature measurements of a plume in a confined space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, C.H.; Hsieh, C.F.; Teng, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the present study is to measure the transient temperature profiles of a plume in a confined space and to develop an empirical formula relating heat transfer and buoyancy. The transient natural convective phenomenon, resulting from the buoyant effect, exists in confined spaces. This phenomenon is of practical importance in many fields, such as the formation process of material, cooling of electronic parts, design of solar collectors, cooling of fins, physics of space, fire plume in a compartment and movement of ocean current, etc. The present work is to study the transient natural convection phenomenon of a thermal plume. The plume is generated by locating a constant heat flux annular cylinder heater at the bottom of a confined cubic enclosure filled with water. The temperature profiles in the plume are measured and collected by six T-type thermocouples and a set of data acquisition system. Each test run lasts about 200 minutes and the measurement time step is 1 minute. The results indicate that the heat transfer mechanism in the plume is characterized by up-moving buoyancy-driven energy envelopes. Stratified temperature structure, which is caused by the retarding motion of the plume near the top surface, is also observed. An empirical correlation along local Nusselt number, Fourier number and modified Rayleigh number is obtained and written as Nu{sub x}/Ra{sub x}*{sup 1/4} = 0.00422Fo{sub L}{sup {minus}0.893}.

  3. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  4. Source-term development for a contaminant plume for use by multimedia risk assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene ); McDonald, John P. ); Taira, Randal Y. ); Gnanapragasam, Emmanuel K.; Yu, Charley; Lew, Christine S.; Mills, William B.

    1999-12-01

    Multimedia modelers from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are collaborating to conduct a comprehensive and quantitative benchmarking analysis of four intermedia models: DOE's Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS), EPA's MMSOILS, EPA's PRESTO, and DOE's RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD). These models represent typical analytically, semi-analytically, and empirically based tools that are utilized in human risk and endangerment assessments for use at installations containing radioactive and/or hazardous contaminants. Although the benchmarking exercise traditionally emphasizes the application and comparison of these models, the establishment of a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) should be viewed with equal importance. This paper reviews an approach for developing a CSM of an existing, real-world, Sr-90 plume at DOE's Hanford installation in Richland, Washington, for use in a multimedia-based benchmarking exercise bet ween MEPAS, MMSOILS, PRESTO, and RESRAD. In an unconventional move for analytically based modeling, the benchmarking exercise will begin with the plume as the source of contamination. The source and release mechanism are developed and described within the context of performing a preliminary risk assessment utilizing these analytical models. By beginning with the plume as the source term, this paper reviews a typical process and procedure an analyst would follow in developing a CSM for use in a preliminary assessment using this class of analytical tool.

  5. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates an interim measure to control chromium plume migration and maintain the 50 parts-per-billion (ppb) and greater chromium contamination level with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary while long-term corrective action remedies are evaluated and implemented. Concentrations of chromium within the groundwater plume beneath Mortadad Canyon exceed the New Mexico groundwater standard of 50 ppb near the property boundary between LANL and the Pueblo de San Ildefonso and are as high as 1,000 ppb in the plume center.

  6. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit) Area Plume

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Groundwater Database Report - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit) Area Plume

  7. False alarm recognition in hyperspectral gas plume identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conger, James L. (San Ramon, CA); Lawson, Janice K. (Tracy, CA); Aimonetti, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-03-29

    According to one embodiment, a method for analyzing hyperspectral data includes collecting first hyperspectral data of a scene using a hyperspectral imager during a no-gas period and analyzing the first hyperspectral data using one or more gas plume detection logics. The gas plume detection logic is executed using a low detection threshold, and detects each occurrence of an observed hyperspectral signature. The method also includes generating a histogram for all occurrences of each observed hyperspectral signature which is detected using the gas plume detection logic, and determining a probability of false alarm (PFA) for all occurrences of each observed hyperspectral signature based on the histogram. Possibly at some other time, the method includes collecting second hyperspectral data, and analyzing the second hyperspectral data using the one or more gas plume detection logics and the PFA to determine if any gas is present. Other systems and methods are also included.

  8. Chromium Interim Measures Project and Ongoing Plume Investigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the March 12, 2015 Committee meeting Danny Katzman LANL, Provided Information on the Ongoing Characterization of the Chromium Plume in Mortandad Canyon and the Pump and Treat Pilot Test.

  9. Three-dimensional contaminant plume dynamics in the vadose zone: Simulation of the 241-T-106 single-shell tank leak at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smoot, J.L.; Sagar, B.

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 2,000 m{sup 3} of liquid containing radioactive and chemical wastes leaked from the 241-T-106 single-shell tank at the Hanford Site. The leak discharged into the unsaturated, coarse-grained sediments of the Hanford formation which underlie the base of the tank. The PORFLO-3 computer code was used to study plume migration for {sup 106}Ru and {sup 137}Cs. The flow and transport properties of the soils through which the plume has migrated are critical input data for the model but are not available. Information from a catalogue of Hanford Site soil properties was used. The transient magnitudes and locations of the plume were simulated in three dimensions. Using the reduced vertical hydraulic conductivity, the migration of {sup 106}Ru and {sup 137}Cs was simulated for the time between 1973 and 1990. 24 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pumping tests on chromium plume Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume The chromium originated from cooling towers at a Laboratory power plant and was released from 1956 to 1972. May 22, 2013 Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo taken during well construction in 2011. Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pumping tests on chromium plume Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume The chromium originated from cooling towers at a Laboratory power plant and was released from 1956 to 1972. May 22, 2013 Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo taken during well construction in 2011. Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pumping tests on chromium plume Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume The chromium originated from cooling towers at a Laboratory power plant and was released from 1956 to 1972. May 22, 2013 Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo taken during well construction in 2011. Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo

  13. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots Simulations Run at NERSC Show How Seismic Waves Travel Through Mantle September 2, 2015 Robert Sanders, rlsanders@berkeley.edu, (510) 643-6998 NERSC PI: Barbara Romanowicz Lead Institution: University of California, Berkeley Project Title: Imaging and Calibration of Mantle Structure at Global and Regional Scales Using Full-Waveform Seismic Tomography NERSC Resources Used:

  14. Using ASCEM Modeling and Visualization to Inform Stakeholders of Contaminant Plume Evolution and Remediation Efficacy at F-Basin Savannah River, SC – 15156

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.; Wainwright, H.; Molins, S.; Davis, J.; Arora, B.; Faybishenko, B.; Krishnan, H.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Moulton, D.; Lipnikov, K.; Gable, C.; Miller, T.; Freshley, M.

    2015-01-28

    Communication with stakeholders, regulatory agencies, and the public is an essential part of implementing different remediation and monitoring activities, and developing site closure strategies at contaminated sites. Modeling of contaminant plume evolution plays a critical role in estimating the benefit, cost, and risk of particular options. At the same time, effective visualization of monitoring data and modeling results are particularly important for conveying the significance of the results and observations. In this paper, we present the results of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project, including the discussion of the capabilities of newly developed ASCEM software package, along with its application to the F-Area Seepage Basins located in the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). ASCEM software includes state-of-the-art numerical methods for simulating complex flow and reactive transport, as well as various toolsets such as a graphical user interface (GUI), visualization, data management, uncertainty quantification, and parameter estimation. Using this software, we have developed an advanced visualization of tritium plume migration coupled with a data management system, and simulated a three-dimensional model of flow and plume evolution on a high-performance computing platform. We evaluated the effect of engineered flow barriers on a nonreactive tritium plume, through advanced plume visualization and modeling of tritium plume migration. In addition, we developed a geochemical reaction network to describe complex geochemical processes at the site, and evaluated the impact of coupled hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These results are expected to support SRS’s monitoring activities and operational decisions.

  15. Savannah River Site - TNX | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TNX Savannah River Site - TNX January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: TNX Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 110 Yes 5 Fuel Present? No

  16. Integration of Predicted Atmospheric Contaminant Plumes into ArcView GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koffman, Larry D.

    2005-10-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) plays a key role in emergency response scenarios in which there may be a release of atmospheric chemical or radiological contamination at the DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). Meteorologists at SRNL use a variety of tools to predict the path of the plume and levels of contamination along the path. These predictions are used to guide field teams that take sample measurements for verification. Integration of these predicted plumes as well as field measurements into existing Geographic Information System (GIS) interactive maps provides key additional information for decision makers during an emergency. In addition, having this information in GIS format facilitates sharing the information with other agencies that use GIS. In order to be useful during an emergency, an application for converting predictions or measurements into GIS format must be automated and simple to use. Thus, a key design goal in developing such applications is ease of use. Simple menu selections and intuitive forms with graphical user interfaces are used to accomplish this goal. Applications have been written to convert two different predictive code results into ArcView GIS. Meteorologists at SRNL use the Puff/Plume code, which is tied to real-time wind data, to predict the direction and spread of the atmospheric plume for early assessment. The calculated circular puffs are converted into an ArcView polygon shapefile with attributes for predicted time, dose, and radius of the puff. The meteorologists use the more sophisticated Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) to predict particle dispersion and deposition. The calculational grid is brought into ArcView as a point shapefile and then interpolated to ARC GRID format using Spatial Analyst. This GRID can then be contoured into a line shapefile, which is easily shared with other agencies. The deposition grid is also automatically contoured for values that correspond to FDA Derived Intervention Levels

  17. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, A.K.; Maxson, J.A.; Hensinger, D.M.

    1993-12-21

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure. 24 figures.

  18. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, Antoni K.; Maxson, James A.; Hensinger, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  19. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-05-31

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  20. Site Index - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Index Site Index Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Site Index Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size About Us About Hanford Cleanup Regulators, Boards, Councils Hanford Advisory Board Hanford Natural Resource Trustee Council Environmental Protection Agency Washington State Department of Ecology Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs DOE Human Resources Management

  1. Plasma lens and plume divergence in the Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruchtman, A.; Cohen-Zur, A.

    2006-09-11

    The effect of magnetic field curvature on the plume divergence in the Hall thruster is analyzed. The two-dimensional plasma flow and electric field are determined self-consistently within the paraxial approximation in this plasma lens, a nearly axial electric field perpendicular to the curved magnetic field lines. The ion radial velocity along the thruster is described analytically. The authors suggest positioning the ionization layer near the zero of the magnetic field in a reversing-direction field configuration for a minimal beam divergence. They also show that an additional emitting electrode can reduce plume divergence.

  2. Instability of plasma plume of micro-hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-11-15

    The micro-hollow cathode gas discharge driven by thermionic emission is studied using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions simulation. The electron current is extracted from the plasma plume penetrating into the keeper–anode space through a small keeper orifice from the cathode-keeper space. The results of simulations and a simplified analytical model showed that the plasma density and extracted current can exhibit deep modulation in the range of frequencies of tens of MHz. This modulation appears when the space-charge limited current between the plume boundary and the anode exceeds the plasma thermal electron current through the orifice.

  3. STUDIES OF TWO-PHASE PLUMES IN STRATIFIED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott A. Socolofsky; Brian C. Crounse; E. Eric Adams

    1998-11-18

    Two-phase plumes play an important role in the more practical scenarios for ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}--i.e. dispersing CO{sub 2} as a buoyant liquid from either a bottom-mounted or ship-towed pipeline. Despite much research on related applications, such as for reservoir destratification using bubble plumes, our understanding of these flows is incomplete, especially concerning the phenomenon of plume peeling in a stratified ambient. To address this deficiency, we have built a laboratory facility in which we can make fundamental measurements of plume behavior. Although we are using air, oil and sediments as our sources of buoyancy (rather than CO{sub 2}), by using models, our results can be directly applied to field scale CO{sub 2} releases to help us design better CO{sub 2} injection systems, as well as plan and interpret the results of our up-coming international field experiment. The experimental facility designed to study two-phase plume behavior similar to that of an ocean CO{sub 2} release includes the following components: 1.22 x 1.22 x 2.44 m tall glass walled tank; Tanks and piping for the two-tank stratification method for producing step- and linearly-stratified ambient conditions; Density profiling system using a conductivity and temperature probe mounted to an automated depth profiler; Lighting systems, including a virtual point source light for shadowgraphs and a 6 W argon-ion laser for laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging; Imaging system, including a digital, progressive scanning CCD camera, computerized framegrabber, and image acquisition and analysis software; Buoyancy source diffusers having four different air diffusers, two oil diffusers, and a planned sediment diffuser; Dye injection method using a Mariotte bottle and a collar diffuser; and Systems integration software using the Labview graphical programming language and Windows NT. In comparison with previously reported experiments, this system allows us to extend the parameter range of

  4. Direct Measurement of Mercury Reactions In Coal Power Plant Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2005-12-31

    Recent field and pilot-scale results indicate that divalent mercury emitted from power plants may rapidly transform to elemental mercury within the power plant plumes. Simulations of mercury chemistry in plumes based on measured rates to date have improved regional model fits to Mercury Deposition Network wet deposition data for particular years, while not degrading model verification fits for remaining years of the ensemble. The years with improved fit are those with simulated deposition in grid cells in the State of Pennsylvania that have matching MDN station data significantly less than the model values. This project seeks to establish a full-scale data basis for whether or not significant reduction or oxidation reactions occur to mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants, and what numerical redox rate should apply for extension to other sources and for modeling of power plant mercury plumes locally, regionally, and nationally. Although in-stack mercury (Hg) speciation measurements are essential to the development of control technologies and to provide data for input into atmospheric fate and transport models, the determination of speciation in a cooling coal combustion plume is more relevant for use in estimating Hg fate and effects through the atmosphere. It is mercury transformations that may occur in the plume that determine the eventual rate and patterns of mercury deposited to the earth's surface. A necessary first step in developing a supportable approach to modeling any such transformations is to directly measure the forms and concentrations of mercury from the stack exit downwind to full dispersion in the atmosphere. As a result, a study was sponsored by EPRI and jointly funded by EPRI, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), and the Wisconsin Department of Administration. The study was designed to further our understanding of plume chemistry. The study was carried out at the We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant, Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just

  5. Mortality Among Mound Workers Exposed to Polonium-210 and Other Sources of Radiation, 1944–1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boice, John D.; Cohen, Sarah S.; Mumma, Michael T.; Ellis, Elizabeth Dupree; Cragle, Donna L.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Wallace, Phillip W.; Chadda, Bandana; Sonderman, Jennifer S.; Wiggs, Laurie D.; Richter, Bonnie S.; Leggett, Richard W.

    2014-02-14

    Polonium-210 is a naturally occurring radioactive element that decays by emitting an alpha particle. It is in the air we breathe and also a component of tobacco smoke. Polonium-210 is used as an anti-static device in printing presses and gained widespread notoriety in 2006 after the poisoning and subsequent death of a Russian citizen in London. More is known about the lethal effects of polonium-210 at high doses than about late effects from low doses. In this paper, cancer mortality was examined among 7,270 workers at the Mound nuclear facility near Dayton, OH where polonium-210 was used (1944–1972) in combination with beryllium as a source of neutrons for triggering nuclear weapons. Other exposures included external gamma radiation and to a lesser extent plutonium-238, tritium and neutrons. Vital status and cause of death was determined through 2009. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for comparisons with the general population. Lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought and incorporated into the analysis. Over 200,000 urine samples were analyzed to estimate radiation doses to body organs from polonium and other internally deposited radionuclides. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate dose-response relationships for specific organs and tissues. Vital status was determined for 98.7% of the workers of which 3,681 had died compared with 4,073.9 expected (SMR 0.90; 95% CI 0.88–0.93). The mean dose from external radiation was 26.1 mSv (maximum 939.1 mSv) and the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined was 100.1 mSv (maximum 17.5 Sv). Among the 4,977 radiation workers, all cancers taken together (SMR 0.86; 95% CI 0.79–0.93), lung cancer (SMR 0.85; 95% CI 0.74–0.98), and other types of cancer were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analysis revealed a significant positive dose-response trend for esophageal cancer [relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval at 100 mSv of 1

  6. Mortality Among Mound Workers Exposed to Polonium-210 and Other Sources of Radiation, 1944–1979

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boice, John D.; Cohen, Sarah S.; Mumma, Michael T.; Ellis, Elizabeth Dupree; Cragle, Donna L.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Wallace, Phillip W.; Chadda, Bandana; Sonderman, Jennifer S.; Wiggs, Laurie D.; et al

    2014-02-14

    Polonium-210 is a naturally occurring radioactive element that decays by emitting an alpha particle. It is in the air we breathe and also a component of tobacco smoke. Polonium-210 is used as an anti-static device in printing presses and gained widespread notoriety in 2006 after the poisoning and subsequent death of a Russian citizen in London. More is known about the lethal effects of polonium-210 at high doses than about late effects from low doses. In this paper, cancer mortality was examined among 7,270 workers at the Mound nuclear facility near Dayton, OH where polonium-210 was used (1944–1972) in combinationmore » with beryllium as a source of neutrons for triggering nuclear weapons. Other exposures included external gamma radiation and to a lesser extent plutonium-238, tritium and neutrons. Vital status and cause of death was determined through 2009. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for comparisons with the general population. Lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought and incorporated into the analysis. Over 200,000 urine samples were analyzed to estimate radiation doses to body organs from polonium and other internally deposited radionuclides. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate dose-response relationships for specific organs and tissues. Vital status was determined for 98.7% of the workers of which 3,681 had died compared with 4,073.9 expected (SMR 0.90; 95% CI 0.88–0.93). The mean dose from external radiation was 26.1 mSv (maximum 939.1 mSv) and the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined was 100.1 mSv (maximum 17.5 Sv). Among the 4,977 radiation workers, all cancers taken together (SMR 0.86; 95% CI 0.79–0.93), lung cancer (SMR 0.85; 95% CI 0.74–0.98), and other types of cancer were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analysis revealed a significant positive dose-response trend for esophageal cancer [relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval at 100 m

  7. WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH FEBRUARY 1999 Final (Revision 0) Department of Energy Babcock & Wilcox of Ohio Mr. Daniel Bird AICP, Planning Manager Miamisburg Mound Community

  8. Site Feeds - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Feeds Site Feeds Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Hanford RSS Feeds Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size RSS Feed Links Site News RSS Did You Know RSS What's New RSS Event Calendar RSS Recent Videos RSS Press Releases RSS What is a feed? A feed is a document that contains summaries of web content with web links to the original versions. It may be viewed with a feed reader or news aggregator. If you

  9. Idaho site completes demolition of Cold War-era nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facility doe logo CH2M-WG logo Joint News Release For Immediate Release Date: December 22, 2011 Media Contact: Erik Simpson, (208) 360-0426 Idaho site completes demolition of Cold War-era nuclear fuel reprocessing facility A gravel mound, larger than half a city block and several feet thick, is the only visible feature that remains at the site of a Cold War-era spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Idaho site. About $44 million in American Recovery

  10. Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility | Department of Energy Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility December 22, 2011 - 11:12am Addthis Media Contact Erik Simpson (208) 360-0426 A gravel mound, larger than half a city block and several feet thick, is the only visible feature that remains at the site of a Cold War-era spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho site.

  11. Proposed decision document, other contamination sources, interim response action, South Tank Farm Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-23

    The South Tank Farm Plume (STFP) is listed under the 'Remediation of Other Contamination Sources' Interim Response Action (IRA) sites under the Final Technical Program Plan FY88-FY92 and the Federal Facility Agreement. The process and guidelines used to assess alternatives, produce this Proposed Decision Document, and implement this IRA are specified in and conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement. The purposes of the Proposed Decision Document for Other Contamination Sources IRAs are to: (a) state the objective of the IRA; (b) discuss Interim Response Action alternatives, if any, that were considered; (c) provide the rationale for the alternative selected; (d) present the final ARAR decision; (e) summarize the significant comments received regarding the IRA and responses to those comments; and (f) establish an IRA Deadline for completion of the IRA, if appropriate. Each of the above mentioned issues is addressed in this document.

  12. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites

  13. Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W.; Jellison, James L.; Keicher, David M.; Oberkampf, William L.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system is provided. The laser weld plume control device includes a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity; the upper surface of the body circumscribes the base of the cone cavity, and the vertex of the cone cavity forms an orifice concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. According to the method of the invention, gas is directed radially inward through inlets in the upper surface of the body into and through channels in the wall of the body and finally through the orifice of the body, and downward onto the surface of the weldment. The gas flow is then converted by the orifice of the device from radial flow to an axisymmetric gas jet flowing away from the weldment surface in a direction perpendicular to the surface and opposite to that of the laser.

  14. Cassini detection of Enceladus's cold water-group plume ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokar, Robert L; Thomsen, Michelle F; Wilson, Robert J; Johnson, R E; Young, D T; Crary, F J; Coates, A J; Jones, G H; Paty, C S

    2009-01-01

    This study reports direct detection by the Cassini plasma spectrometer of freshly-produced water-group ions (O{sup +}, OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}) and heavier water dimer ions (H{sub x}O{sub 2}{sup +}) very close to Enceladus and where the plasma begins to emerge from the Enceladus plume The data wcre obtained during two close (52 and 25 km) flybys of Enceladus in 2008, and are similar to ion data in cometary comas. The ions are observed in detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction at energies consistent with the Cassini speed, indicating a nearly stagnant plasma flow in the plume. North of Enceladus the plasma slowing commences about 4 to 6 Enceladus radii away, while south of Enccladus signatures ofthe interaction are detected as far as 22 Enceladus radii away.

  15. Model Selection for Monitoring CO2 Plume during Sequestration

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-12-31

    The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly includes four steps: (1) assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, (2) model clustering using multidimensional scaling coupled with k-mean clustering, (3) model selection using the Bayes' rule in the reduced model space, (4) model expansion using iterative resampling of the posterior models. The fourth step expresses one of the advantages of the method: it provides a built-in means ofmore » quantifying the uncertainty in predictions made with the selected models. In our application to plume monitoring, by expanding the posterior space of models, the final ensemble of representations of geological model can be used to assess the uncertainty in predicting the future displacement of the CO2 plume. The software implementation of this approach is attached here.« less

  16. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-02-28

    This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and

  17. Wet processing of palladium for use in the tritium facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC. Preparation of palladium using the Mound Muddy Water process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.

    1998-11-10

    Palladium used at Savannah River for tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to better understand the processes involved in preparing this material, Savannah River is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material and into the conditions necessary to produce palladium powder that meets their specifications. This better understanding may help to guarantee a continued reliable source for this material in the future. As part of this evaluation, a work-for-others contract between Westinghouse Savannah River Company and the Ames Laboratory Metallurgy and Ceramics Program was initiated. During FY98, the process for producing palladium powder developed in 1986 by Dan Grove of Mound Applied Technologies (USDOE) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in morphology in the final product. This report details the results of this study of the Mound Muddy Water process, along with the results of a round-robin analysis of well-characterized palladium samples that was performed by Savannah River and Ames Laboratory. The Mound Muddy Water process is comprised of three basic wet chemical processes, palladium dissolution, neutralization, and precipitation, with a number of filtration steps to remove unwanted impurity precipitates.

  18. Alternative methods for dispoal of low-level radioactive wastes. Task 1. Description of methods and assessment of criteria. [Alternative methods are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults; earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, augered holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, R.D.; Miller, W.O.; Warriner, J.B.; Malone, P.G.; McAneny, C.C.

    1984-04-01

    The study reported herein contains the results of Task 1 of a four-task study entitled Criteria for Evaluating Engineered Facilities. The overall objective of this study is to ensure that the criteria needed to evaluate five alternative low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal methods are available to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Agreement States. The alternative methods considered are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults, earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, and augered holes. Each of these alternatives is either being used by other countries for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal or is being considered by other countries or US agencies. In this report the performance requirements are listed, each alternative is described, the experience gained with its use is discussed, and the performance capabilities of each method are addressed. Next, the existing 10 CFR Part 61 Subpart D criteria with respect to paragraphs 61.50 through 61.53, pertaining to site suitability, design, operations and closure, and monitoring are assessed for applicability to evaluation of each alternative. Preliminary conclusions and recommendations are offered on each method's suitability as an LLW disposal alternative, the applicability of the criteria, and the need for supplemental or modified criteria.

  19. Analysis of MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Site (3.46 MB) More Documents & Publications Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence: Literature Review and DOE-LM Site Surveys Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the

  20. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment - Task 4: Modeling - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Starr

    2005-10-31

    Trichloroethene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, can be degraded under certain conditions by microorganisms that occur naturally in the subsurface. TCE can be degraded under anaerobic conditions to less chlorinated compounds and ultimately into the non-chlorinated, non-hazardous end product, ethene, via anaerobic reductive dechlorination (ARD). ARD is widely recognized as a TCE degradation mechanism, and occurs in active groundwater remediation and can occur during monitored natural attenuation (MNA). MNA relies on natural processes, such as dispersion and degradation, to reduce contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels without active human intervention other than monitoring. TCE can also be biodegraded under aerobic conditions via cometabolism, in which microbial enzymes produced for other purposes fortuitously also react with TCE. In cometabolism, TCE is oxidized directly to non-hazardous products. Cometabolism as a TCE-degrading process under aerobic conditions is less well known than ARD. Natural attenuation is often discounted as a TCE remedial alternative in aerobic conditions based on the paradigm that TCE is biodegradable only under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to this paradigm, TCE was shown to degrade relative to conservative co-contaminants at an environmentally significant rate in a large (approximately 3 km long) TCE plume in aerobic groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the degradation mechanism was shown to be cometabolism. MNA was selected as the remedy for most of this plume, resulting in a considerable cost savings relative to conventional remedial methods. To determine if cometabolism might be a viable remedy at other sites with TCE-contaminated aerobic groundwater, TCE plumes at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were screened to evaluate whether TCE commonly degrades in aerobic groundwater, and if degradation rates are fast enough that natural attenuation could be a viable remedy. One hundred and twenty

  1. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Low Impact Soil Sites' and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Closure activities were conducted from February through April 2009 according to the FFACO (1996; as amended February 2008) and Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 107 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2009). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities are summarized.

  3. Probe for measurement of velocity and density of vapor in vapor plume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berzins, Leon V.; Bratton, Bradford A.; Fuhrman, Paul W.

    1997-01-01

    A probe which directs a light beam through a vapor plume in a first direction at a first angle ranging from greater than 0.degree. to less than 90.degree., reflecting the light beam back through the vapor plume at a 90.degree. angle, and then reflecting the light beam through the vapor plume a third time at a second angle equal to the first angle, using a series of mirrors to deflect the light beam while protecting the mirrors from the vapor plume with shields. The velocity, density, temperature and flow direction of the vapor plume may be determined by a comparison of the energy from a reference portion of the beam with the energy of the beam after it has passed through the vapor plume.

  4. Probe for measurement of velocity and density of vapor in vapor plume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berzins, L.V.; Bratton, B.A.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    1997-03-11

    A probe is disclosed which directs a light beam through a vapor plume in a first direction at a first angle ranging from greater than 0{degree} to less than 90{degree}, reflecting the light beam back through the vapor plume at a 90{degree} angle, and then reflecting the light beam through the vapor plume a third time at a second angle equal to the first angle, using a series of mirrors to deflect the light beam while protecting the mirrors from the vapor plume with shields. The velocity, density, temperature and flow direction of the vapor plume may be determined by a comparison of the energy from a reference portion of the beam with the energy of the beam after it has passed through the vapor plume. 10 figs.

  5. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindley, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  6. Experimental study of stack plume rise and dispersion at the power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-10

    This paper describes the primary results of stack plume rise and dispersion experiment at Xu Zhou power station during November-December, 1978. (1) Under neutral and near-neutral stratification conditions, the 2/3 power law is the optimizing formula up to date, because of its calculated values in coincidence with observed. (2) Vertical of the buoyant plume from the tall stack is obviously stronger than that of non buoyant plume from the low stack. It is shown that the concept sof Pasquill(1976) model are acceptable, but formula should be modified. (3) From reliable monitoring data of SO/sub 2/ ground concentration, it is found that the effects of topography and stack height should be comprehensively taken into account in estimating dispersion by gaussian model. (4) It is suggested that in analyzing the stereophoto grammetric data of fluctuating plume, the square deviation of plume distribution should be considered as the sum of two parts--the distribution square deviation of the plume particulates relative to the instantaneous center line of the plume, and the distriubtion square deviaton of the instantaneous center line relative to the average center line of the plume. (5) Lidar is shown to be as effective as steroegraphic method in studying behavior of chimney plumes.

  7. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plume) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corp Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup...

  8. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Legacy Management Plume Name: Chemical Plant (Quarry) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller ... by naturally occurring chemical reduction process and absorption onto aquifer materials. ...

  9. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Record 992011 http:www.em.doe.govPagesgroundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode175 Environmental Indicators (EIs) Groundwater Migration Under Control? Yes Confirmed by Lead...

  10. Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, P.D.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Nicot, J.-P.

    2011-05-15

    Emission of carbon dioxide from fossil-fueled power generation stations contributes to global climate change. Storage of this carbon dioxide within the pores of geologic strata (geologic carbon storage) is one approach to mitigating the climate change that would otherwise occur. The large storage volume needed for this mitigation requires injection into brine-filled pore space in reservoir strata overlain by cap rocks. One of the main concerns of storage in such rocks is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available. This necessitates a method for using available fault data to develop an estimate of the likelihood of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault, primarily due to buoyancy. Fault population statistics provide one of the main inputs to calculate the encounter probability. Previous fault population statistics work is shown to be applicable to areal fault density statistics. This result is applied to a case study in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin with the result that the probability of a carbon dioxide plume from a previously planned injection had a 3% chance of encountering a fully seal offsetting fault.

  11. Atmospheric Research - Manaus Plume: GoAmazon T3 Ground Site...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: DOELANL Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Environmental Sciences(54) ARM MAOS ...

  12. Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

  13. ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

    2008-06-27

    The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If

  14. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2001-03-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

  15. Biological Ocean Margins Program. Active Microbes Responding to Inputs from the Orinoco River Plume. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge E. Corredor

    2013-01-28

    The overall goal of the proposed work is to identify the active members of the heterotrophic community involved in C and N cycling in the perimeter of the Orinoco River Plume (ORP), assess their spatial distribution, quantify their metabolic activity, and correlate these parameters to plume properties such as salinity, organic matter content and phytoplankton biomass.

  16. Installation of reactive metals groundwater collection and treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, J.K.; Primrose, A.L.; Vogan, J.; Uhland, J.

    1998-07-01

    Three groundwater plumes contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site are scheduled for remediation by 1999 based on the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) (DOE, 1996). These three plumes are among the top 20 environmental cleanup sites at Rocky Flats. One of these plumes, the Mound Site Plume, is derived from a previous drum storage area, and daylights as seeps near the South Walnut Creek drainage. Final design for remediation of the Mound Site Plume has been completed based on use of reactive metals to treat the contaminated groundwater, and construction is scheduled for early 1998. The two other plumes, the 903 Pad/Ryan`s Pit and the East Trenches Plumes, are derived from VOCs either from drums that leaked or that were disposed of in trenches. These two plumes are undergoing characterization and conceptual design in 1998 and construction is scheduled in 1999. The contaminants of concern in these plumes are tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride and low levels of uranium and americium.

  17. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ? log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  18. Morphological changes in ultrafast laser ablation plumes with varying spot size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Polek, M. P.; Phillips, M. C.

    2015-06-04

    We investigated the role of spot size on plume morphology during ultrafast laser ablation of metal targets. Our results show that the spatial features of fs LA plumes are strongly dependent on the focal spot size. Two-dimensional self-emission images showed that the shape of the ultrafast laser ablation plumes changes from spherical to cylindrical with an increasing spot size from 100 to 600 ?m. The changes in plume morphology and internal structures are related to ion emission dynamics from the plasma, where broader angular ion distribution and faster ions are noticed for the smallest spot size used. The present resultsmoreclearly show that the morphological changes in the plume with spot size are independent of laser pulse width.less

  19. Hanford Site - 100-BC-5 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    BC-5 Hanford Site - 100-BC-5 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford Site Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 100-BC-5 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 2.8 No Metal Name Metal Concentration

  20. Hanford Site - 100-FR-3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FR-3 Hanford Site - 100-FR-3 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford Site, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 100-FR-3 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCS 15 Yes 5 (DWS) Fuel Present? No

  1. Hanford Site - 100-HR-3-D | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    D Hanford Site - 100-HR-3-D July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford Site, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 100-HR-3-D Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Isotopes Present? Yes Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants? No

  2. Hanford Site - 100-KR-4 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    KR-4 Hanford Site - 100-KR-4 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford Site, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 100-KR-4 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 8.3 Yes 5 (DWS) Fuel Present? No

  3. Hanford Site - 100-NR-2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NR-2 Hanford Site - 100-NR-2 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford Site, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 100-NR-2 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: No Fuel Present? Yes Metals Present? Yes Isotopes Present? Yes Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants? No

  4. Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Hachey

    2007-09-30

    The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose

  5. Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, G.

    1990-05-01

    A method and means are disclosed for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived. 15 figs.

  6. Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chen, Guoying

    1990-05-01

    A method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived.

  7. Mound Transition Schedule

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. MOUND Environmental Restoration Program

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... C). .e J is questionable whether this 11lng :. x is applicable In tb case of ... meeting this need. &sit fall, when d8cu88lng pereonnel requlrem8nt8, It wae pointed out ...

  9. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

  10. Biotic and Abiotic Transformation of a Volatile Organics Plume in a Semi-Arid Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, J.E.; Singletary, M.A.; Miller, D.R.

    1999-04-08

    An evaluation of biotic and abiotic attenuation processes potentially important to chlorinated and non-chlorinated volatile organic compound (VOC) fate and transport in the 148 meter thick vadose zone beneath the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was conducted. A unique feature of this evaluation is the comparison of two estimates of VOC mass present in the soil gas, pore-water, and solid phases (but not including mass as non-aqueous phase liquid [NAPL]) of the vadose zone in 1993. One estimate, 1,800 kg, was obtained from vadose zone transport modeling that incorporated molecular diffusion and volatilization to the atmosphere, but not biotic or chemical processes. The other estimate, 2,120 kg, was obtained from the sum of VOC mass physically removed during soil vapor extraction and an estimate of VOC mass remaining in the vadose zone in 1998, both adjusted to exclude NAPL mass. This comparison indicates that biogeochemical processes were at best slightly important to historical VOC plume development. Some evidence of aerobic degradation of non-chlorinated VOCs and abiotic transformation of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane was identified. Despite potentially amenable site conditions, no evidence was found of cometabolic and anaerobic transformation pathways. Relying principally on soil-gas analytical results, an upper-bound estimate of 21% mass reduction due to natural biogeochemical processes was developed. Although available information for the CWL indicates that natural attenuation processes other than volatilization to the atmosphere did not effective y enhance groundwater protection, these processes could be important in significantly reducing groundwater contamination and exposure risks at other sites. More laboratory and field research is required to improve our collective ability to characterize and exploit natural VOC attenuation processes, especially with respect to the combination of relatively thick and dry vadose zones and chlorinated VOCs.

  11. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; He, Z.; Voordeckers, J.; Zhou, A.; Lee, Y.-J.; Mason, O.U.; Dubinsky, E.; Chavarria, K.; Tom, L.; Fortney, J.; Lamendella, R.; Jansson, J.K.; D?haeseleer, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2011-06-15

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the deepest and largest offshore spill in U.S. history and its impacts on marine ecosystems are largely unknown. Here, we showed that the microbial community functional composition and structure were dramatically altered in a deep-sea oil plume resulting from the spill. A variety of metabolic genes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in the plume compared to outside the plume, indicating a great potential for intrinsic bioremediation or natural attenuation in the deep-sea. Various other microbial functional genes relevant to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur and iron cycling, metal resistance, and bacteriophage replication were also enriched in the plume. Together, these results suggest that the indigenous marine microbial communities could play a significant role in biodegradation of oil spills in deep-sea environments.

  12. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the ...

  13. Time resolved optical diagnostics of ZnO plasma plumes in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Shyam L.; Singh, Ravi Pratap; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-10-15

    We report dynamical evolution of laser ablated ZnO plasma plumes using interferometry and shadowgraphy; 2-D fast imaging and optical emission spectroscopy in air ambient at atmospheric pressure. Recorded interferograms using Nomarski interferometer and shadowgram images at various time delays show the presence of electrons and neutrals in the ablated plumes. The inference drawn from sign change of fringe shifts is consistent with two dimensional images of the plume and optical emission spectra at varying time delays with respect to ablating pulse. Zinc oxide plasma plumes are created by focusing 1.06 μm radiation on to ZnO target in air and 532 nm is used as probe beam.

  14. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    VOC) Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: Unknown Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No Hydrogeology Conduit Flow? Yes Multiple Units Affected? No Depth (feet): Avg Velocity (feet/year): Plume Information (no source) Source Plume

  15. CAUSE OF A MULTI-SPECIES RADIOIODINE PLUME THAT IS INCREASING IN CONCENTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.

    2010-09-30

    Field and laboratory studies were carried out to understand the cause for steady increases in {sup 129}I concentrations emanating from radiological seepage basins located on the Savannah River Site. The basins were closed in 1988 by adding limestone and blast furnace slag and then capping with a RCRA low permeability engineered cover. Groundwater {sup 129}I concentrations in a well near the seepage basin in 1993 were 200 pCi L{sup -1} and are presently between 400 and 1000 pCi L{sup -1}. Iodine speciation in the plume was not uniform. Near the source, the iodine was comprised of 86% iodide, 2% iodate, and 12% organo-iodine (total activity = 178 pCi L{sup -1}). Whereas, groundwater iodine speciation 365 m down stream (25 m up stream from a wetland) was 0% iodide, 93% iodate, and 7% organo iodine. Batch desorption studies demonstrated that high concentrations of {sup 129}I could be incrementally desorbed from an archived seepage basin sediment sample by raising the pH. Batch sorption studies showed that iodate, IO{sub 3}{sup -}, sorbed more strongly than iodide, I{sup -}, to a subsurface clayey sediment, but equally well as iodide to a subsurface sandy sediment and a wetland sediment. Placing an organic-rich wetland sediment, but not nearby mineral sediments, under reducing (or microaerobic) conditions resulted in a large decrease in iodide K{sub d} values (from 73 to 10 mL g{sup -1}) and iodate K{sub d} values (from 80 to 7 mL g{sup -1}). Between pH and reduction-oxidation potential, it appears that pH seems to have a stronger influence on iodide and iodate sorption to mineral sediment. This may not be true for sediments containing higher concentrations of organic matter, such as the 7.6% organic matter sediment used in this study. First order calculations based on desorption studies with seepage basin sediments indicate that the modest increase of 0.7 pH units detected in the study site groundwater over the last 17 years since closure of the seepage basin may be

  16. Uranium-Bearing Evaporite Mineralization Influencing Plume Persistence...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Surveys May 2016 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Legacy Management This page intentionally ......... 35 10.0 Green River, Utah, Disposal ...

  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Did You Know Did You Know Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Did You Know Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Close Did you know.... Close

  18. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R.

    1995-05-01

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  19. Emission features and expansion dynamics of nanosecond laser ablation plumes at different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S. Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2014-01-21

    The influence of ambient pressure on the spectral emission features and expansion dynamics of a plasma plume generated on a metal target has been investigated. The plasma plumes were generated by irradiating Cu targets using 6?ns, 1064?nm pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The emission and expansion dynamics of the plasma plumes were studied by varying air ambient pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric pressure. The ambient pressure levels were found to affect both the line intensities and broadening along with the signal to background and signal to noise ratios and the optimum pressure conditions for analytical applications were evaluated. The characteristic plume parameters were estimated using emission spectroscopy means and noticed that the excitation temperature peaked ?300?Torr, while the electron density showed a maximum ?100?Torr. Fast-gated images showed a complex interaction between the plume and background air leading to changes in the plume geometry with pressure as well as time. Surface morphology of irradiated surface showed that the pressure of the ambient gas affects the laser-target coupling significantly.

  20. TRACKING SITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site. https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack

  1. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Cleanup Tours Hanford Site Cleanup Tours Tour Registration Required Forms of ID Tour Information Tour Route Find Confirmation Seat Notification Frequently Asked Questions Media Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size This website will not function with Javascript disabled Tour Information Hanford Site Cleanup Tours Hanford Site Cleanup Tours for the public are planned on the following dates: May 3, 11, 17, 24 and 25 June 1, 7, 15, 21, 28, and

  2. Biogeochemical Considerations Related To The Remediation Of I-129 Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D. I.; Yeager, C.; Denham, M. E.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwehr, K. A.; Li, H. P.; Brinkmeyer, R.; Santschi, P. H.

    2012-09-24

    The objectives of this report were to: provide a current state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport at the Hanford Site; conduct a review of Hanford Site data dealing with groundwater {sup 129}I; and identify critical knowledge gaps necessary for successful selection, implementation, and technical defensibility in support of remediation decisions.

  3. Summary of Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-03-01

    This is a summary booklet of the main report: Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005. It is the summary section of the main report with a CD of the entire report included. The main report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the

  4. Evolution of a Groundwater Treatment System-Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Evolution of a Groundwater Treatment System-Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Evolution of a Groundwater Treatment System-Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site January 13, 2015 - 5:18pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment. A project to reconfigure the East Trenches Plume Treatment System (ETPTS) at the Rocky Flats site, to improve treatment effectiveness and meet the strict water quality standards in the area, is scheduled to be completed

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 9): Newmark Groundwater Contamination Site, San Bernardino, CA, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-04

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Newmark Operable Unit, Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund site. EPA has selected an interim remedy for the Newmark plume of groundwater contamination in the Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund Site. This portion of the site cleanup is referred to as the Newmark Operable Unit (OU). The Newmark OU is an interim action focusing on contamination in the undergound water supply in the Bunker Hill Basin of San Bernardino, north and east of the Shandin Hills.

  6. Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  7. Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  8. Strategic Petroleum Reserve site environmental report for calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The SER, provided annually in accordance with DOE order 5400.1, serves the public by summarizing monitoring data collected to assess how the SPR impacts the environment. The SER provides a balanced synopsis of non-radiological monitoring and regulatory compliance data and affirms that the SPR has been operating within acceptable regulatory limits. Included in this report is a describe of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1997. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of the Weeks Island site, involving the disposition of 11.6 million m{sup 3} (73 million barrels) of crude oil inventory, as well as the degasification of over 12.6 million m{sup 3} (79.3 million barrels) of crude oil inventory at the Big Hill and Bryan Mound facilities.

  9. Area 2: Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO2 Plume Migration using Injection Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2014-09-30

    In-depth understanding of the long-term fate of CO₂ in the subsurface requires study and analysis of the reservoir formation, the overlaying caprock formation, and adjacent faults. Because there is significant uncertainty in predicting the location and extent of geologic heterogeneity that can impact the future migration of CO₂ in the subsurface, there is a need to develop algorithms that can reliably quantify this uncertainty in plume migration. This project is focused on the development of a model selection algorithm that refines an initial suite of subsurface models representing the prior uncertainty to create a posterior set of subsurface models that reflect injection performance consistent with that observed. Such posterior models can be used to represent uncertainty in the future migration of the CO₂ plume. Because only injection data is required, the method provides a very inexpensive method to map the migration of the plume and the associated uncertainty in migration paths. The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly consists of assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, grouping the models on the basis of their expected dynamic response, selecting the subgroup of models that most closely yield dynamic response closest to the observed dynamic data, and finally quantifying the uncertainty in plume migration using the selected subset of models. The main accomplishment of the project is the development of a software module within the SGEMS earth modeling software package that implements the model selection methodology. This software module was subsequently applied to analyze CO₂ plume migration in two field projects – the In Salah CO₂ Injection project in Algeria and CO₂ injection into the Utsira formation in Norway. These applications of the software revealed that the proxies developed in this project for quickly assessing the dynamic characteristics of the reservoir were

  10. REMOTE DETECTION OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES USING MILLIMETER WAVE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnowski, R.; Chien; H.; Gopalsami, N.

    2009-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, a common method for manufacturing weapons-grade special nuclear materials, is accompanied by the release of fi ssion products trapped within the fuel. One of these fi ssion products is a radioactive isotope of Krypton (Kr-85); a pure β- emitter with a half-life of 10.72 years. Due to its chemical neutrality and relatively long half life, nearly all of the Kr-85 is released into the surrounding air during reprocessing, resulting in a concentration of Kr-85 near the source that is several orders of magnitude higher than the typical background (atmospheric) concentrations. This high concentration of Kr-85 is accompanied by a proportionately high increase in air ionization due to the release of beta radiation from Kr-85 decay. Millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology can be used to detect the presence of Kr-85 induced plumes since a high concentration of ions in the air increases the radar cross section due to a combination of atmospheric phenomena. Possible applications for this technology include the remote sensing of reprocessing activities across national borders bolstering global anti-proliferation initiatives. The feasibility of using MMW radar technology to uniquely detect the presence of Kr-85 can be tested using commercial ion generators or sealed radioactive sources in the laboratory. In this paper we describe our work to derive an ion dispersion model that will describe the spatial distribution of ions from Kr-85 and other common lab sources. The types and energies of radiation emitted by isotopes Co-60 and Cs-137 were researched, and these parameters were incorporated into these dispersion models. Our results can be compared with the results of MMW detection experiments in order to quantify the relationship between radar cross section and air ionization as well as to further calibrate the MMW detection equipment.

  11. Hanford Site - 200-BP-5 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    BP-5 Hanford Site - 200-BP-5 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 200-BP-5 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Isotopes Present? Yes Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants? Yes

  12. Hanford Site - 200-PO-1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PO-1 Hanford Site - 200-PO-1 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 200-PO-1 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Isotopes Present? Yes Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants? No

  13. Hanford Site - 300-FF-3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    300-FF-3 Hanford Site - 300-FF-3 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 300-FF-3 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement DCE 220 Yes 16 (CUL) TCE 430 Yes 4

  14. Remotely operated excavator needs assessment/site visit summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straub, J.; Haller, S.; Worsley, R.; King, M.

    1992-12-02

    The Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration requested an assessment of soil excavation needs relative to soil remediation. The following list identifies the DOE sites assessed: Mound Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, and Fernald Site. The reviewed sites fall into one or more of the following three categories: production, EPA National Priorities List, or CERCLA (superfund) designation. Only three of the sites appear to have the need for a remotely operated excavator rope. Hanford and Idaho Falls have areas of high-level radioactive contamination either buried or in/under buildings. The Fernald site has a need for remote operated equipment of different types. It is their feeling that remote equipment can be used to remove the health dangers to humans by removing them from the area. Most interviewees stated that characterization technologies needs are more immediate concern over excavation. In addition, the sites do not have similar geographic conditions which would aid in the development of a generic precision excavator. The sites visited were not ready to utilize or provide the required design information necessary to draft a performance specification. This creates a strong case against the development of one type of ROPE for use at these sites. Assuming soil characterization technology/methodology is improved sufficiently to allow accurate and real time field characterization then development of a precision excavator might be pursued based on FEMP needs, since the FEMP`s sole scope of work is remediation. The excavator could then be used/tested and then later modified for other sites as warranted.

  15. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the initial document for developing site-specific activities to achieve regulatory compliance in the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The regulatory framework used to select the proposed ground water compliance strategies is presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. The Shiprock site consists of two, interconnected hydrogeologic systems: the terrace system and the floodplain system. Separate compliance strategies are proposed for these two systems. The compliance strategy for the terrace aquifer is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards based on classification of the terrace aquifer as having Class III (limited-use) ground water. The compliance strategy for the floodplain aquifer is active remediation using a subsurface biological barrier. These strategies were selected by applying site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) (DOE, 1994a). The site conceptual model indicates that milling-related contamination has impacted the ground water in the terrace and floodplain aquifers. Ground water occurs in both aquifers in alluvium and in fractures in the underlying Cretaceous age Mancos Shale. A mound of ground water related to fluids from the milling operations is thought to exist in the terrace aquifer below the area where settling ponds were in use during the mill operations. Most of the water occurring in the floodplain aquifer is from recharge from the San Juan River.

  16. Geophysical discovery of a new LNAPL plume at the former Wurtsmith AFB, Oscoda, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermejo, J.L.; Sauck, W.A.; Atekwana, E.A.

    1997-12-31

    A light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) ground water contaminant plume has been discovered by purely geophysical means at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (AFB) near Oscoda, Michigan. The plume was discovered by ground penetrating radar (GPR) profiling while extending a long line from FT-02 to establish background variability around that plume. Further GPR surveys were conducted by students of a Western Michigan University geophysics field course to outline the proximal part of the plume. The GPR survey was supplemented by an electromagnetic induction (EM) survey which showed a group of four cables crossing the area. Finally, a magnetometer survey was conducted to search for any buried steel objects which might have been missed by the EM survey. The results of the three geophysical surveys were then used by students of a University of Michigan field course to guide subsurface soil and fluid sampling, which verified the presence of residual LNAPL product and ground water with conductivities 2.5 to 3.3 times above background. The plume source is in the vicinity of a vaulted underground storage tank (UST) formerly used for the collection of waste solvents and fuels for subsequent use in the fire training exercises at FT-02.

  17. Refining the site conceptual model at a former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dam, William; Campbell, Sam; Johnson, Ray; Looney, Brian; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Babits, Steven J.

    2015-07-07

    Milling activities at a former uranium mill site near Riverton, Wyoming, USA, contaminated the shallow groundwater beneath and downgradient of the site. Although the mill operated for <6 years (1958-1963), its impact remains an environmental liability. Groundwater modeling predicted that contaminant concentrations were declining steadily, which confirmed the conceptual site model (CSM). However, local flooding in 2010 mobilized contaminants that migrated downgradient from the Riverton site and resulted in a dramatic increase in groundwater contaminant concentrations. This observation indicated that the original CSM was inadequate to explain site conditions and needed to be refined. In response to the new observationsmore » after the flood, a collaborative investigation to better understand site conditions and processes commenced. This investigation included installing 103 boreholes to collect soil and groundwater samples, sampling and analysis of evaporite minerals along the bank of the Little Wind River, an analysis of evaportranspiration in the shallow aquifer, and sampling naturally organic-rich sediments near groundwater discharge areas. The enhanced characterization revealed that the existing CSM did not account for high uranium concentrations in groundwater remaining on the former mill site and groundwater plume stagnation near the Little Wind River. Observations from the flood and subsequent investigations indicate that additional characterization is still needed to continue refining the CSM and determine the viability of the natural flushing compliance strategy. Additional sampling, analysis, and testing of soil and groundwater are necessary to investigate secondary contaminant sources, mobilization of contaminants during floods, geochemical processes, contaminant plume stagnation, distribution of evaporite minerals and organic-rich sediments, and mechanisms and rates of contaminant transfer from soil to groundwater. Future data collection will be used to

  18. Refining the site conceptual model at a former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dam, William; Campbell, Sam; Johnson, Ray; Looney, Brian; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Babits, Steven J.

    2015-07-07

    Milling activities at a former uranium mill site near Riverton, Wyoming, USA, contaminated the shallow groundwater beneath and downgradient of the site. Although the mill operated for <6 years (1958-1963), its impact remains an environmental liability. Groundwater modeling predicted that contaminant concentrations were declining steadily, which confirmed the conceptual site model (CSM). However, local flooding in 2010 mobilized contaminants that migrated downgradient from the Riverton site and resulted in a dramatic increase in groundwater contaminant concentrations. This observation indicated that the original CSM was inadequate to explain site conditions and needed to be refined. In response to the new observations after the flood, a collaborative investigation to better understand site conditions and processes commenced. This investigation included installing 103 boreholes to collect soil and groundwater samples, sampling and analysis of evaporite minerals along the bank of the Little Wind River, an analysis of evaportranspiration in the shallow aquifer, and sampling naturally organic-rich sediments near groundwater discharge areas. The enhanced characterization revealed that the existing CSM did not account for high uranium concentrations in groundwater remaining on the former mill site and groundwater plume stagnation near the Little Wind River. Observations from the flood and subsequent investigations indicate that additional characterization is still needed to continue refining the CSM and determine the viability of the natural flushing compliance strategy. Additional sampling, analysis, and testing of soil and groundwater are necessary to investigate secondary contaminant sources, mobilization of contaminants during floods, geochemical processes, contaminant plume stagnation, distribution of evaporite minerals and organic-rich sediments, and mechanisms and rates of contaminant transfer from soil to groundwater. Future data collection will be used to

  19. Optical probe investigation of laser ablated carbon plasma plume in nitrogen ambient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ravi Pratap; Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-12-15

    We report the study of carbon plasma produced using 1064 nm laser in nitrogen ambient at atmospheric pressure using 2-dimensional fast imaging of ablated plume, optical emission spectroscopy, and optical probe at 532 nm for interferometry and shadowgraphy. The dominance of C{sub 2} and CN molecules over ionic species at later stages of expanding carbon plasma plume is reported. The observed ring structure in shadowgrams and change in the direction of fringe shift from positive to negative in recorded interferograms are correlated with the relative abundance of different species in the plasma plume as function of time delay with respect to ablating pulse. An agreement in observed onset time of formation of clusters/atomic species or low ionic species using different diagnostic techniques has been reported.

  20. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-09-30

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. (1) CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; (2) CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); (3) CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; (4) CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; (5) CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; (6) CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; (7) CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; (8) CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; (9) CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; (10) CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; (11) CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; (12) CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; (13) CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; (14) CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and (15) CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107. CAU 107 closure activities will consist of verifying that the current postings required under Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835 are in place and implementing use restrictions (URs) at two sites, CAS 03-23-29 and CAS 18-23-02. The current radiological postings combined with the URs are adequate administrative controls to limit site access and worker dose.

  1. Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting and Review Process Abstract Overview of the siting and review process for...

  2. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2004-04-12

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99

  3. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Wednesday, 24 November 2010 00:00 Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary

  4. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=10

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Transport Corridors

    doe.gov/media/Myths_and_Facts.pdf http://www.doe.gov/media/Myths_and_Facts.pdf http://www.doe.gov/media/Myths_and_Facts.pdf (143.91 KB) More Documents & Publications Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts Microsoft Word - 47C468D4-69BA-281F40.doc Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts

    South Valley Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: South Valley Plume Remediation Contractor:

  5. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Wednesday, 29 April 2009 00:00 Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in

  6. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home » Site Map Site Map Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Center Leadership Sudip Dosanjh Sudip Dosanjh: Select Publications Jeff Broughton Katie Antypas Richard Gerber Publications Center Administration James Craw Norma Early Jeff Grounds Betsy MacGowan Zaida McCunney Kerri Peyovich Lynn Rippe David Tooker Center Communications Jon Bashor Kathy Kincade Linda Vu Margie Wylie Advanced Technologies Nicholas Wright Brian Austin Research Projects Christopher Daley Glenn K.

  7. Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Looney, Brian B.; Seaman, John; Kmetz, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the

  8. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

  9. Hanford Site Tours - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tours Hanford Site Tours Hanford Tour Restrictions Hanford Site Tours Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The Hanford Site is a very unique place offering a number of tours for members of the public, elected officials and their staffs, tribal officials, stakeholders, and others. A list of the kinds of Hanford tours we provide is shown below, along with links to register for the tour or a contact person to call for more information on how to sign up.

  10. QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DYNAMICS OBSERVED WITH THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE. I. TURBULENT UPFLOW PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Thomas E.; Slater, Gregory; Hurlburt, Neal; Shine, Richard; Tarbell, Theodore; Title, Alan; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Magara, Tetsuya; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2010-06-20

    Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) observations reveal two new dynamic modes in quiescent solar prominences: large-scale (20-50 Mm) 'arches' or 'bubbles' that 'inflate' from below into prominences, and smaller-scale (2-6 Mm) dark turbulent upflows. These novel dynamics are related in that they are always dark in visible-light spectral bands, they rise through the bright prominence emission with approximately constant speeds, and the small-scale upflows are sometimes observed to emanate from the top of the larger bubbles. Here we present detailed kinematic measurements of the small-scale turbulent upflows seen in several prominences in the SOT database. The dark upflows typically initiate vertically from 5 to 10 Mm wide dark cavities between the bottom of the prominence and the top of the chromospheric spicule layer. Small perturbations on the order of 1 Mm or less in size grow on the upper boundaries of cavities to generate plumes up to 4-6 Mm across at their largest widths. All plumes develop highly turbulent profiles, including occasional Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex 'roll-up' of the leading edge. The flows typically rise 10-15 Mm before decelerating to equilibrium. We measure the flowfield characteristics with a manual tracing method and with the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) 'optical flow' code to derive velocity, acceleration, lifetime, and height data for several representative plumes. Maximum initial speeds are in the range of 20-30 km s{sup -1}, which is supersonic for a {approx}10,000 K plasma. The plumes decelerate in the final few Mm of their trajectories resulting in mean ascent speeds of 13-17 km s{sup -1}. Typical lifetimes range from 300 to 1000 s ({approx}5-15 minutes). The area growth rate of the plumes (observed as two-dimensional objects in the plane of the sky) is initially linear and ranges from 20,000 to 30,000 km{sup 2} s{sup -1} reaching maximum projected areas from 2 to 15 Mm{sup 2}. Maximum contrast of the dark flows relative to

  11. Microsoft Word - N01669_East Plume data rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Data Report for Pinellas Board of Public Instruction Property November 2011 LMS/PIN/N01669 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01669 Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Data Report for Pinellas Board of Public Instruction Property November 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Data Report for Pinellas Board of Public Instruction Property November 2011 Doc. No. N01669 Page i Contents Executive Summary

  12. LM Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison Sites Hallam Site Hamilton Site ...

  13. Microsoft Word - S08557_PhI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Office of Legacy Management Mound, Ohio, Site Phase I Groundwater Monitoring Report ... left blank LMSMNDS08557 Office of Legacy Management Mound, Ohio, Site Phase I ...

  14. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

  15. San Ignacio (La Tembladera) geothermal site, Departamento de Francisco Morazan, Honduras, Central America: Geological field report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, M.J.; Eppler, D.; Heiken, G.; Flores, W.; Ramos, N.; Ritchie, A.

    1987-06-01

    The San Ignacio (La Tembladera) geothermal site is located on the north side of the Siria Valley, Departamento de Francisco Morazan, near the village of Barrosa. Hot springs are located along a northwest-trending fault scarp at the edge of the valley and along north-trending faults that cross the scarp. The rocks in the area are primarily Paleozoic metamorphic rocks, overlain by patches of Tertiary Padre Miguel Group tuffs and alluvial deposits. Movement probably occurred along several faults during latest Tertiary and possibly early Quaternary times. Four spring areas were mapped. Area 1, the largest, is associated with a sinter mound and consists of 40 spring groups. About half of the springs, aligned along a north-south trend, are boiling. Area 2 is a small sinter mound with several seeps. Area 3 consists of a group of hot and boiling springs aligned along a north-trending fault. The springs rise through fractured schists and a thin cover of alluvium. Area 4 is located at the intersection of several faults and includes one of the largest boiling springs in the area.

  16. Forensic investigation of a chromium(VI) groundwater plume in Thiva, Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panagiotakis, I.; Dermatas, D.; Vatseris, C.; Chrysochoou, M.; Papassiopi, N.; Xenidis, A.; Vaxevanidou, K.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a forensic investigation with the aim of decoupling the contribution of geogenic and anthropogenic Cr(VI) sources in the wider area of Thiva. Groundwater and topsoil samples were collected from two Cr(VI) groundwater plumes of 160 μg/L and 75 μg/L. A series of evidence support the view that the origin of Cr(VI) detected in groundwater is mainly geogenic. These are: (a) the presence of Cr in topsoil of the wider area, (b) the moderate Cr(VI) groundwater concentrations, (c) the high Ni levels within the Cr(VI) plumes, (d) the predominance of Mn(IV), which is a prerequisite for Cr(III) oxidation to Cr(VI), and (e) the absence of co-contaminants. This study also revealed that, although both Cr(VI) plumes are clearly of geogenic origin, the plume with the elevated Cr(VI) values, in the north of Thiva town, exhibits also an anthropogenic component, which can potentially be attributed to the alkaline environment associated with the old uncontrolled landfill of Thiva and the industrial cluster located in this area.

  17. Comparison of limited measurements of the OTEC-1 plume with analytical-model predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paddock, R.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1981-07-01

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) requires significant amounts of warm surface waters and cold deep waters for power production. Because these waters are returned to the ocean as effluents, their behavior may affect plant operation and impact the environment. The OTEC-1 facility tested 1-MWe heat exchangers aboard the vessel Ocean Energy Converter moored off the island of Hawaii. The warm and cold waters used by the OTEC-1 facility were combined prior to discharge from the vessel to create a mixed discharge condition. A limited field survey of the mixed discharge plume using fluorescent dye as a tracer was conducted on April 11, 1981, as part of the environmental studies at OTEC-1 coordinated by the Marine Sciences Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Results of that survey were compared with analytical model predictions of plume behavior. Although the predictions were in general agreement with the results of the plume survey, inherent limitations in the field measurements precluded complete description of the plume or detailed evaluation of the models.

  18. Autonomous real-time detection of plumes and jets from moons and comets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Thompson, David R.; Bue, Brian D.; Fuchs, Thomas J.

    2014-10-10

    Dynamic activity on the surface of distant moons, asteroids, and comets can manifest as jets or plumes. These phenomena provide information about the interior of the bodies and the forces (gravitation, radiation, thermal) they experience. Fast detection and follow-up study is imperative since the phenomena may be time-varying and because the observing window may be limited (e.g., during a flyby). We have developed an advanced method for real-time detection of plumes and jets using onboard analysis of the data as it is collected. In contrast to prior work, our technique is not restricted to plume detection from spherical bodies, making it relevant for irregularly shaped bodies such as comets. Further, our study analyzes raw data, the form in which it is available on board the spacecraft, rather than fully processed image products. In summary, we contribute a vital assessment of a technique that can be used on board tomorrow's deep space missions to detect, and respond quickly to, new occurrences of plumes and jets.

  19. Savannah River Site - K Area Burning/Rubble Pit | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source: Controlled Area of Plume (acres): 0.5 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking in size Remedial Approach Remedy Name Status Start Date End Date Treatment Status (1) ...

  20. Construction of hexahedral elements mesh capturing realistic geometries of Bayou Choctaw SPR site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Roberts, Barry L.

    2015-09-01

    The three-dimensional finite element mesh capturing realistic geometries of Bayou Choctaw site has been constructed using the sonar and seismic survey data obtained from the field. The mesh is consisting of hexahedral elements because the salt constitutive model is coded using hexahedral elements. Various ideas and techniques to construct finite element mesh capturing artificially and naturally formed geometries are provided. The techniques to reduce the number of elements as much as possible to save on computer run time with maintaining the computational accuracy is also introduced. The steps and methodologies could be applied to construct the meshes of Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry strategic petroleum reserve sites. The methodology could be applied to the complicated shape masses for not only various civil and geological structures but also biological applications such as artificial limbs.

  1. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-03-31

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. {sm_bullet} CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2){sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a{sm_bullet} CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site{sm_bullet} CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil{sm_bullet} CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10{sm_bullet} CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky) Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107.

  2. The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Watson

    2005-04-18

    Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the

  3. Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2014 Inside this Update: 2014 LM All-Hands Training, LM to Meet Energy Metering Goals, Anatomy of a Groundwater Uranium Plume, DOE Submits Its Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress, Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications, Scientists Assess Damage Caused by Earthquake near Amchitka, DOE Weldon Spring Site Seeks Shelter, Reindustrialization Workshop Held at Mound Site, Chariot Remediation Work Completed on Schedule, Groundwater

  4. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Expand All | Collapse All Item Sir John Pople, Gaussian Code, and Complex Chemical Reactions Item DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Click to expand or collapse folder Folder DOE Research and Development Accomplishments About Item The Manhattan Project Click to expand or collapse folder Folder DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Alfred Nobel Laureates Associated with the DOE and Predecessors Item Abdus Salam and his International Influences Item Ahmed Zewail and

  5. Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

  6. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE`s mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company.

  7. Ground-water surveillance at the Hanford Site for CY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.; Rieger, J.T.; Cline, C.S.; Jensen, E.J.; Liikala, T.L.; Oster, K.R.

    1984-07-01

    Operations at the Hanford Site have resulted in the discharge of large volumes of process cooling water and other waste waters to the ground. These effluents contain low level of radioactive and chemical substances. During 1983, 328 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radioactive and chemical constituents. Three of these constituents, specifically tritium, nitrate, and gross beta activity, were selected for detailed discussion in this report because they are more readily transported in the ground water than some of the other constituents. Transport of these constituents in the ground water has resulted in the formation of plumes that can be mapped by contouring the analytical data obtained from the monitoring wells. This report describes recent changes in the configuration of the tritium, nitrate and gross beta plumes. Changes or trends in contaminant levels in wells located within both the main plumes (originating from the 200 Areas) and the smaller plumes are discussed in this report. Two potential pathways for radionuclide transport from the ground water to the environmental are discussed in this report, and the radiological impacts are examined. In addition to describing the present status of the ground water beneath the Hanford Site, this report contains the results of studies conducted in support of the ground-water surveillance effort during CY 1983. 21 references, 26 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Hanford.gov Site Maintenance - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size ...

  9. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 06934566 .l\ ~ ~ ~~9 u.s. Department of Energy Hanford Site OEC 2 8 2004 04-0RP-O78 Mr. Todd Martin, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 1933 Jadwin Avenue, Suite 135 Rich1and, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Martin: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) CONSENSUS ADVICE #167 -STOP WORK AUTHORITY Reference: HAB letter from T. Martin to P. Golan and J. Shaw, DOE-HQ; K. Klein, RL; R. Schepens, ORP; L. Hoffman, Ecology; and R. Kreizeneeck, EPA, "Stop Work Authority," dated November 5, 2004. This letter

  10. Remote sensing and spectral analysis of plumes from ocean dumping in the New York Bight Apex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    The application of the remote sensing techniques of aerial photography and multispectral scanning in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of plumes from ocean dumping of waste materials is investigated in the New York Bight Apex. Plumes resulting from the dumping of acid waste and sewage sludge were observed by Ocean Color Scanner at an altitude of 19.7 km and by Modular Multispectral Scanner and mapping camera at an altitude of 3.0 km. Results of the qualitative analysis of multispectral and photographic data for the mapping, location, and identification of pollution features without concurrent sea truth measurements are presented which demonstrate the usefulness of in-scene calibration. Quantitative distributions of the suspended solids in sewage sludge released in spot and line dumps are also determined by a multiple regression analysis of multispectral and sea truth data.

  11. Study of the spatial coherence of high order harmonic radiation generated from pre-formed plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, M.; Singhal, H.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Khan, R. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2013-07-21

    A study of the spatial coherence of the high order harmonic radiation generated by the interaction of 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser beam with carbon (graphite) plasma plume has been carried out using Young's double slit interferometry. It is observed that the spatial coherence varies with harmonic order, laser focal spot size in plasma plume, and peaks at an optimal spot size. It is also observed that the spatial coherence is higher when the laser pulse is focused before the plasma plume than when focused after the plume, and it decreases with increase in the harmonic order. The optimum laser parameters and the focusing conditions to achieve good spatial coherence with high harmonic conversion have been identified, which is desirable for practical applications of the harmonic radiation.

  12. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=16

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Shiprock Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: Shiprock Remediation Contractor: S. M. Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Mn 8300 No Se 530 Yes 0.05 U 2600 Yes 0.044 Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity (pCi/l) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Sr 11000 No Explosives Present?

  13. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=16

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Old North Continent Responsible DOE Office: Office of Legacy Management Plume Name: Slick Rock - Old North Continent Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Se 11.55 Yes 10 U 616.5 Yes 440 Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? Yes Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No

  14. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=16

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Union Carbide Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: Slick Rock - Union Carbide Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Se 2600 Yes 180 Mo 2200 Yes 100 U 111 Yes 44 Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? Yes Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? Yes Concentration:

  15. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spook Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: Spook Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Cr (total) No Se 0 No U No Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity (pCi/l) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement other (provide names) Ra-226 No other (provide names) Ra-228 No Explosives

  16. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tuba City Responsible DOE Office: Office of Legacy Management Plume Name: Tuba City Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Se 50 Yes 10 Mo 300 Yes 100 U 250 Yes 44 Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? Yes Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? Yes Concentration: 1000 (ppb) Regulatory Driver: Yes

  17. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Legacy Management Plume Name: Chemical Plant (Quarry) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement U 3486 Yes 30 Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? Yes Explosive Name Explosive Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement DNT (dinitrotoluene) 9.3 Yes 0.11 Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No

  18. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Plume) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corp Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 763 Yes 5 Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement U 264 Yes 20 Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? Yes Explosive Name Explosive Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement DNT (dinitrotoluene) Yes 0.11 Other

  19. Statistics for the Relative Detectability of Chemicals in Weak Gaseous Plumes in LWIR Hyperspectral Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metoyer, Candace N.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Chilton, Lawrence

    2008-10-30

    The detection and identification of weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temperature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based model that describes the at-sensor observed radiance. The motivating question for the analyses performed in this paper is as follows. Given a set of backgrounds, is there a way to predict the background over which the probability of detecting a given chemical will be the highest? Two statistics were developed to address this question. These statistics incorporate data from the long-wave infrared band to predict the background over which chemical detectability will be the highest. These statistics can be computed prior to data collection. As a preliminary exploration into the predictive ability of these statistics, analyses were performed on synthetic hyperspectral images. Each image contained one chemical (either carbon tetrachloride or ammonia) spread across six distinct background types. The statistics were used to generate predictions for the background ranks. Then, the predicted ranks were compared to the empirical ranks obtained from the analyses of the synthetic images. For the simplified images under consideration, the predicted and empirical ranks showed a promising amount of agreement. One statistic accurately predicted the best and worst background for detection in all of the images. Future work may include explorations of more complicated plume ingredients, background types, and noise structures.

  20. Analysis of plume following ultraviolet laser ablation of doped polymers: Dependence on polymer molecular weight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Bounos, Giannis; Kolloch, Andreas; Georgiou, Savas; Castillejo, Marta

    2007-02-01

    This work investigates the effect of polymer molecular weight M{sub W} on the plume characteristics of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) films doped with iodonaphthalene (NapI) and iodophenanthrene (PhenI) following irradiation in vacuum at 248 nm. Laser-induced fluorescence probing of the plume reveals the presence of ArH products (NapH and PhenH from, respectively, NapI- and PhenI-doped films). While a bimodal translational distribution of these products is observed in all cases, on average, a slower translational distribution is observed in the low M{sub W} system. The extent of the observed dependence is reduced as the optical absorption coefficient of the film increases, i.e., in the sequence NapI/PMMA, PhenI/PMMA, and PS-doped films. Further confirmation of the bimodal translational distributions is provided by monitoring in situ the temporally resolved attenuation by the plume as it expands in vacuum of a continuous wave helium-neon laser propagating parallel to the substrate. Results are discussed in the framework of the bulk photothermal model, according to which ejection requires that a critical number of bonds are broken.

  1. Method for analyzing ExB probe spectra from Hall thruster plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shastry, Rohit; Hofer, Richard R.; Reid, Bryan M.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2009-06-15

    Various methods for accurately determining ion species' current fractions using ExB probes in Hall thruster plumes are investigated. The effects of peak broadening and charge exchange on the calculated values of current fractions are quantified in order to determine the importance of accounting for them in the analysis. It is shown that both peak broadening and charge exchange have a significant effect on the calculated current fractions over a variety of operating conditions, especially at operating pressures exceeding 10{sup -5} torr. However, these effects can be accounted for using a simple approximation for the velocity distribution function and a one-dimensional charge exchange correction model. In order to keep plume attenuation from charge exchange below 30%, it is recommended that pz{<=}2, where p is the measured facility pressure in units of 10{sup -5} torr and z is the distance from the thruster exit plane to the probe inlet in meters. The spatial variation of the current fractions in the plume of a Hall thruster and the error induced from taking a single-point measurement are also briefly discussed.

  2. Dynamics of laser-blow-off induced Li plume in confined geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R K; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)

    2013-08-15

    Dynamics of Li plasma plume created by laser-blow-off technique in air ambient is reported. Plasma plume dynamics and its optical emission are investigated in planar and confined geometries using time resolved shadowgraph imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. Significant differences in the plasma characteristics in confined geometry are quantitatively investigated by comparing the plasma parameters (temperature and density) in free expansion and confined geometry configurations. Dynamics and physical parameters of the primary as well as the reflected shock waves (in confined geometry) and their interactions with expanding plasma are briefly addressed. A large enhancement in the emission intensities of Li I 610.3 nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}? 3d {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,5/2}) and 670.8 nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}? 2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}) is correlated with the shock wave dynamics in the two geometries. Strong self reversal in the neutral emission infers an increase in the population density of neutrals within the confined plasma plume.

  3. Propagation dynamics of laterally colliding plasma plumes in laser-blow-off of thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2014-08-15

    We report a systematic investigation of two plume interactions at different spatial separation (3-7?mm) in laser-blow-off. The plasmas plumes are created using Laser-blow-off (LBO) scheme of a thin film. The fast imaging technique is used to record the evolution of seed plasmas and the interaction zone which is formed as a result of interaction of the two seed plasmas. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to study evolution of optical emissions of the species present in the different regions of the plasmas. Neutral Li emissions (Li I 670.8?nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ? 2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2}) and Li I 610.3?nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2} ? 3d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2,5/2})) are dominant in the plasmas but significant differences are observed in the emission and estimated plasma parameters of the seed and the interaction zone. The transport of plasma species from the seed plasmas to the interaction zone is discussed in the terms of plume divergence, kinetic energy of particles, and ion acoustic speed. An attempt is made to understand the formation and dynamics of the interaction zone in the colliding LBO seed plasmas.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - 8-Mound Connector Presentation for Mound...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    delay WHY CHOOSE A ROUNDABOUT? * Miamisburg- Springboro Pike Construction Costs * 6,700,000 * Start construction in 2017 * Benner Road Construction Costs * 6,400,000 ...

  5. Strategic petroleum reserve site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-31

    The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Included in this report is a description of each site`s environment, an overview of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1995. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of 3 the weeks Island facility, involving the disposition of 11.6 million m{sup 3} (73 million barrels) of crude oil inventory, as well as the degasification of over 4.5 million m{sup 3} (30 million barrels) of crude oil inventory at the Bryan Mound and West Hackberry facilities. The decision to decommission the weeks Island facility is a result of diminishing mine integrity from ground water intrusion. Transfer of Weeks Island oil began in November, 1995 with 2.0 million m{sup 3} (12.5 million barrels) transferred by December 31, 1995. Degasifying the crude oil is a major pollution prevention initiative because it will reduce potentially harmful emissions that would occur during oil movements by three or more orders of magnitude. Spills to the environment, another major topic, indicates a positive trend. There were only two reportable oil and three reportable brine spills during 1995, down from a total of 10 reportable spills in 1994. Total volume of oil spilled in 1995 was 56.3 m{sup 3} (354 barrels), and the total volume of brine spilled was 131.1 m{sup 3} (825 barrels). The longer term trend for oil and brine spills has declined substantially from 27 in 1990 down to five in 1995. All of the spills were reported to appropriate agencies and immediately cleaned up, with no long term impacts observed.

  6. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-31

    The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. The SER, provided annually in accordance with Department of Energy DOE Order 5400.1, serves the public by summarizing monitoring data collected to assess how the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) impacts the environment. This report (SER) provides a balanced synopsis of non-radiological monitoring and regulatory compliance data and affirms that the SPR has been operating within acceptable regulatory limits. Included in this report is a description of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1994. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of the Weeks Island facility (disposition of 73 million barrels of crude oil inventory) as well as the degasification of up to 144 million barrels of crude oil inventory at the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry facilities. The decision to decommission the Weeks Island facility is a result of diminishing mine integrity from ground water intrusion. Degasifying the crude oil is required to reduce potentially harmful emissions that would occur during oil movements. With regard to still another major environmental action, 43 of the original 84 environmental findings from the 1992 DOE Tiger Team Assessment were closed by the end of 1994. Spills to the environment, another major topic, indicates a positive trend. Total volume of oil spilled in 1994 was only 39 barrels, down from 232 barrels in 1993, and the total volume of brine spilled was only 90 barrels, down from 370 barrels in 1993. The longer term trend for oil and brine spills has declined substantially from 27 in 1990 down to nine in 1994.

  7. Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program VPP Home VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP Communications VPP Conferences Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size 2013 VPPPA Outreach Award Winners VPP Committee Business Case (PDF)

  8. Hanford Site - 200-UP-1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    UP-1 Hanford Site - 200-UP-1 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 200-UP-1 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement CCI4 700 Yes 3.4 (RAO) TCE 7.2 Yes 5 (DWS)

  9. Hanford Site - 200-ZP-1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    200-ZP-1 Hanford Site - 200-ZP-1 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 200-ZP-1 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement CCI4 2600 Yes 3.4 (CUL) TCE 19 Yes 1

  10. Investigation of the September 13, 2011, Fatality at the Strategic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 13, 2011, Fatality at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Site Investigation of the September 13, 2011, Fatality at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound ...

  11. Hanford Site Wide Programs - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Hanford Site-Wide Programs Hanford Safety and Health Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Fire Department...

  12. Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-02-29

    This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

  13. EIS-0302: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transfer of the Heat Source / Radioisotope Themoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site

  14. Site Map | Geothermal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Map Site Map Home Basic Search Advanced Search Geothermal FAQ About Geothermal Site Map Geothermal Feedback Website PoliciesImportant Links

  15. Site Map | DOE Patents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Site Map Home Basic Search Advanced Search DOEpatents FAQ About DOEpatents Site Map Contact Us Website Policies/Important Links

  16. Ohio Web Sites

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Restructuring > Ohio Web Sites Ohio Web Sites Other Links Ohio Electricity Profile Ohio Energy Profile Ohio Restructuring Last Updated: April 2007 Sites Links Public Utilities ...

  17. Site Map | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer Site Map Site Map Home Basic Search Advanced Search Data Explorer FAQ About Data Explorer Site Map Data Explorer Feedback Website PoliciesImportant Links

  18. Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Considered Sites > Other Sites Summary Search Other Sites Considered Sites Other Sites All LM Quick Search All Other Sites Last Updated: 12

  19. Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, Christine

    2008-07-11

    Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

  20. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moscicki, T. Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  1. Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical and Chemical Measurements of PM Dispersing Plume of Heavy Duty Diesel Truck

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents plume characterization of three vehicles with different aftertreatment configuration, representative of legacy, current and future heavy-duty truck fleets

  2. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for Fiscal Year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

    1998-02-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1997 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction continued in the 200-West Area to remove carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-vapor monitoring, and analysis and characterization of sediments sampled below a vadose-zone monitoring well. Source-term analyses for strontium-90 in 100-N Area vadose-zone sediments were performed using recent groundwater-monitoring data and knowledge of strontium`s ion-exchange properties. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1996 and June 1997. Water levels near the Columbia River increased during this period because the river stage was unusually high. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level.

  3. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  4. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  5. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  6. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  7. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  8. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  9. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    East Plume) Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Explosive Name Explosive Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TNT (trinitrotoluene) 21 Yes 2.8 other (provide names) 2,4-DNT 200 Yes 0.11 other (provide names) 2,6-DNT 222 Yes 1.3 other (provide names) 1,3-DNB 0.16 Yes 1 Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present?

  10. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  11. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  12. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  13. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  14. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  15. Laser Transmission Measurements and Plume Particle Size Distributions for Propellant Burn Tests at ATK Elkton in May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willitsford, Adam H.; Brown, David M.; Brown, Andrea M.; Airola, Marc B.; Dinello-Fass, Ryan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Siegrist, Karen M.

    2014-08-28

    Multi-wavelength laser transmittance was measured during a series of open-air propellant burn tests at Alliant Techsystems, Inc., in Elkton, MD, in May 2012. A Mie scattering model was combined with an alumina optical properties model in a simple single-scatter approach to fitting plume transmittance. Wavelength-dependent plume transmission curves were fit to the measured multi-wave- length transmittance data to infer plume particle size distributions at several heights in the plume. Tri-modal lognormal distributions described transmittance data well at all heights. Overall distributions included a mode with nanometer-scale diameter, a second mode at a diameter of ~0.5 µm, and a third, larger particle mode. Larger parti- cles measured 2.5 µm in diameter at 34 cm (14 in.) above the burning propellant surface, but grew to 4 µm in diameter at a height of 57 cm (22 in.), indicative of particle agglomeration in progress as the plume rises. This report presents data, analysis, and results from the study.

  16. Modification of modulated plasma plumes for the quasi-phase-matching of high-order harmonics in different spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Sobirov, B.; Reyimbaev, S.; Sherniyozov, H.; Usmanov, T.; Suzuki, M.; Yoneya, S.; Kuroda, H.

    2015-01-15

    We demonstrate the technique allowing the fine tuning of the distance between the laser-produced plasma plumes on the surfaces of different materials, as well as the variation of the sizes of these plumes. The modification of plasma formations is based on the tilting of the multi-slit mask placed between the heating laser beam and target surface, as well as the positioning of this mask in the telescope placed on the path of heating radiation. The modulated plasma plumes with the sizes of single plume ranging between 0.1 and 1 mm were produced on the manganese and silver targets. Modification of the geometrical parameters of plasma plumes proved to be useful for the fine tuning of the quasi-phase-matched high-order harmonics generated in such structures during propagation of the ultrashort laser pulses. We show the enhancement of some groups of harmonics along the plateau range and the tuning of maximally enhanced harmonic by variable modulation of the plasma.

  17. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic – biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Kuang, Chongai; Sedlacek, Art; Senum, Gunnar I.; Springston, Stephen R.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Qi; Jayne, John T.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hubbe, John M.; et al

    2016-02-15

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced bymore » the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of CO and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein) or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Furthermore, linear and bi-linear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short time and distance scales can be explained by CO.« less

  18. VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Champions Committee Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program VPP Home VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Who We Are Annual Reports Assessments Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP Communications VPP Conferences VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee VPP Committee VPP Champions Committee Charter (PDF) Business Case (PDF) VPP Champions Committee Roster (PDF) Share on

  19. Hanford Site Safety Standards - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Safety Standards Documents Documents Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Tri-Party Agreement Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Hanford Site Budget Hanford Site Safety Standards Hanford Hoisting and Rigging Manual DOE - ORP Contracts/Procurements DOE - RL Contracts/Procurements Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RI/FS 100-D/H Operable Units RI/FS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental Hanford Site

  20. MIDC: Web Site Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MIDC Web Site Search Enter words or phrases: Search Clear Also see the site directory. [NREL] [MIDC]

  1. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  2. Deployable Plume and Aerosol Release Prediction and Tracking System. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Task 1. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleppe, John; Norris, William; Etezadi, Mehdi

    2006-07-19

    This contract was awarded in response to a proposal in which a deployable plume and aerosol release prediction and tracking system would be designed, fabricated, and tested. The system would gather real time atmospheric data and input it into a real time atmospheric model that could be used for plume predition and tracking. The system would be able to be quickly deployed by aircraft to points of interest or positioned for deployment by vehicles. The system would provide three dimensional (u, v, and w) wind vector data, inversion height measurements, surface wind information, classical weather station data, and solar radiation. The on-board real time computer model would provide the prediction of the behavior of plumes and released aerosols.

  3. International shipment of light weight radioisotopic heater units (LWRHU) using the USA/9516/B(U)F Mound 1 kW shipping package in support of the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barklay, C.D.; Merten, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopes have provided heat that has been used to maintain specific operating environments within remote satellites and spacecraft. For the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fueled light weight radioisotopic heater unit (LWRHU) will be used within the spacecraft. Since the current plan for the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission incorporates the use of a Russian launch platform for the spacecraft, the LWRHUs must be transported in an internationally certified shipping container. An internationally certified shipping package that is versatile enough to be reconfigured to transport the LWRHUs that will be required to support the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission is the Mound USA/9516/B(U)F. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Aerosol Plume Detection Algorithm Based on Image Segmentation of Scanning Atmospheric Lidar Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weekley, R. Andrew; Goodrich, R. Kent; Cornman, Larry B.

    2016-04-06

    An image-processing algorithm has been developed to identify aerosol plumes in scanning lidar backscatter data. The images in this case consist of lidar data in a polar coordinate system. Each full lidar scan is taken as a fixed image in time, and sequences of such scans are considered functions of time. The data are analyzed in both the original backscatter polar coordinate system and a lagged coordinate system. The lagged coordinate system is a scatterplot of two datasets, such as subregions taken from the same lidar scan (spatial delay), or two sequential scans in time (time delay). The lagged coordinatemore » system processing allows for finding and classifying clusters of data. The classification step is important in determining which clusters are valid aerosol plumes and which are from artifacts such as noise, hard targets, or background fields. These cluster classification techniques have skill since both local and global properties are used. Furthermore, more information is available since both the original data and the lag data are used. Performance statistics are presented for a limited set of data processed by the algorithm, where results from the algorithm were compared to subjective truth data identified by a human.« less

  5. Pinellas County, Florida, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... after soil removal, emulsifed soybean oil was injected into the subsurface at 75 ... Injection of emulsifed soybean oil in the dissolved phase plumes on the STAR Center ...

  6. MOVING BEYOND PUMP AND TREAT TOWARD ENHANCED ATTENUATION AND COMBINED REMEDIES T-AREA, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Jay Noonkester, J; Gerald Blount, G

    2008-04-03

    Groundwater beneath T-Area, a former laboratory and semiworks operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site, is contaminated by chlorinated solvents (cVOCs). Since the contamination was detected in the 1980s, the cVOCs at T-Area have been treated by a combination of soil vapor extraction and groundwater pump and treat. The site has received approval to discontinue the active treatments and implement a full scale test of enhanced attenuation--an engineering and regulatory strategy that has recently been developed by DOE and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council. Enhanced attenuation uses active engineering solutions to alter the target site in such a way that the contaminant plume will passively stabilize and shrink and to document that the action will be effective, timely, and sustainable. The paradigm recognizes that attenuation remedies are fundamentally based on a mass balance. Thus, long-term plume dynamics can be altered either by reducing the contaminant loading from the source or by increasing the rate of natural attenuation processes within all, or part of, the plume volume. The combination of technologies that emerged for T-Area included: (1) neat (pure) vegetable oil deployment in the deep vadose zone in the former source area, (2) emulsified vegetable oil deployment within the footprint of the groundwater plume, and (3) identification of attenuation mechanisms and rates for the distal portion of the plume. In the first part, neat oil spreads laterally forming a thin layer on the water table to intercept and reduce future cVOC loading (via partitioning) and reduce oxygen inputs (via biostimulation). In the second and third parts, emulsified oil forms active bioremediation reactor zones within the plume footprint to degrade existing groundwater contamination (via reductive dechlorination) and stimulates long-term attenuation capacity in the distal plume (via cometabolism). For T-Area, the enhanced attenuation development

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Gulfstream I measurements of the Kuwait oil-fire plume, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busness, K M; Hales, J M; Hannigan, R V; Thorp, J M; Tomich, S D; Warren, M J; Al-Sunaid, A A; Daum, P H; Mazurek, M

    1992-11-01

    In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of aircraft measurements to determine pollutant and radiative properties of the smoke plume from oil fires in Kuwait. This work was sponsored by the US Department emanating of Energy, in cooperation with several other agencies as part of an extensive effort coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization, to obtain a comprehensive data set to assess the characteristics of the plume and its environmental impact. This report describes field measurement activities and introduces the various data collected, but provides only limited analyses of these data. Results of further data analyses will be presented in subsequent open-literature publications.

  8. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  9. Atmospheric plume progression as a function of time and distance from the release point for radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Cameron, Ian M.; Hayes, James C.; Miley, Harry S.

    2015-10-01

    The International Monitoring System contains up to 80 stations around the world that have aerosol and xenon monitoring systems designed to detect releases of radioactive materials to the atmosphere from nuclear tests. A rule of thumb description of plume concentration and duration versus time and distance from the release point is useful when designing and deploying new sample collection systems. This paper uses plume development from atmospheric transport modeling to provide a power-law rule describing atmospheric dilution factors as a function of distance from the release point.

  10. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DB Barnett

    2000-05-17

    Seven years of groundwater monitoring at the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) have shown that the uppermost aquifer beneath the facility is unaffected by TEDF effluent. Effluent discharges have been well below permitted and expected volumes. Groundwater mounding from TEDF operations predicted by various models has not been observed, and waterlevels in TEDF wells have continued declining with the dissipation of the nearby B Pond System groundwater mound. Analytical results for constituents with enforcement limits indicate that concentrations of all these are below Practical Quantitation Limits, and some have produced no detections. Likewise, other constituents on the permit-required list have produced results that are mostly below sitewide background. Comprehensive geochemical analyses of groundwater from TEDF wells has shown that most constituents are below background levels as calculated by two Hanford Site-wide studies. Additionally, major ion proportions and anomalously low tritium activities suggest that groundwater in the aquifer beneath the TEDF has been sequestered from influences of adjoining portions of the aquifer and any discharge activities. This inference is supported by recent hydrogeologic investigations which indicate an extremely slow rate of groundwater movement beneath the TEDF. Detailed evaluation of TEDF-area hydrogeology and groundwater geochemistry indicate that additional points of compliance for groundwater monitoring would be ineffective for this facility, and would produce ambiguous results. Therefore, the current groundwater monitoring well network is retained for continued monitoring. A quarterly frequency of sampling and analysis is continued for all three TEDF wells. The constituents list is refined to include only those parameters key to discerning subtle changes in groundwater chemistry, those useful in detecting general groundwater quality changes from upgradient sources, or those retained for comparison with end

  11. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maps Individual Permit: Site Monitoring Area Maps Each Site Monitoring Area Map is updated whenever the map information is updated. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email What do these maps show? The Individual Permit for Storm Water site monitoring area maps display the following information: Surface hydrological features Locations of the Site(s) assigned to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring

  12. Development of Site Transition Plan, Use of the Site Transition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Transition Plan, Use of the Site Transition Framework, and Terms and Conditions for Site Transition Development of Site Transition Plan, Use of the Site Transition Framework, ...

  13. Integrated test plan for crosswell compressional and shear wave seismic tomography for site characterization at the VOC Arid Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbring, G.J.; Narbutovskih, S.M.

    1994-02-01

    This integrated test plan describes the demonstration of the crosswell acoustic tomography technique as part of the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The purpose of this demonstration is to image the subsurface seismic velocity structure and to relate the resulting velocity model to lithology and saturation. In fiscal year (FY) 1994 an initial fielding will test three different downhole sources at two different sites at the Hanford US Department of Energy facility to identify which sources will provide the energy required to propagate between existing steel-cased wells at these two sites. Once this has been established, a second fielding will perform a full compressional and shear wave tomographic survey at the most favorable site. Data reduction, analysis, and interpretation of this full data set will be completed by the end of this fiscal year. Data collection for a second survey will be completed by the end of the fiscal year, and data reduction for this data set will be completed in FY 1995. The specific need is detailed subsurface characterization with minimum intrusion. This technique also has applications for long term vadose zone monitoring for both Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste storage facilities and for remediation monitoring. Images produced are continuous between boreholes. This is a significant improvement over the single point data derived solely from core information. Saturation changes, either naturally occurring (e.g., perched water tables) or remediation induced (e.g., water table mounding from injection wells or during inwell air sparging) could be imaged. These crosswell data allow optimal borehole placement for groundwater remediation, associated monitoring wells and possibly evaluation of the effective influence of a particular remediation technique.

  14. Visitor Control / Site Access - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs Visitor Control / Site Access About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Cultural Resources Contact Us Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Planning to come to the Hanford Site? Map of Hanford Map of Hanford If you are planning on coming to Hanford as part of a job assignment, tour, or event, you need to be familiar with the requirements and restrictions associated with being on

  15. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2010 to January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2011-02-01

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer focus research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, and CY 2009 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project has responded to all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of “Modeling” and “Well-Field Mitigation” plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2010 including the quantification of well-bore flows in the fully screened wells and the testing of means to mitigate them; the development of site geostatistical models of hydrologic and geochemical properties including the distribution of U; developing and parameterizing a reactive transport model of the smear zone that supplies contaminant U to the groundwater plume; performance of a second passive experiment of the spring water table rise and fall event with a associated multi-point tracer test; performance of downhole biogeochemical experiments where colonization substrates and discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to the lower aquifer zone; and modeling of past injection experiments for

  16. SITE OFFICE CONSOLIDATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paul Golan, Site Office Manager, SLAC/LBNL, presented on the role of the DOE Site Office. Paul covered the role of the DOE Site Office, operating model, and vision.

  17. Sandia Energy - Siting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siting Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation Siting SitingTara Camacho-Lopez2015-03-20T19:23:23+00:00 At the...

  18. Dynamics Of A Laser-Induced Plume Self-Similar Expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D.; Djebli, M.

    2008-09-23

    The dynamics of a laser ablation plume during the first stage of its expansion, just after the termination of the laser pulse is modeled. First, we suppose the laser fluence range low enough to consider a neutral vapor. The expansion of the evaporated material is described by one-component fluid and one-dimensional Euler equations. The vapor is assumed to follow an ideal gas flow. For high energetic ions, the charge separation can be neglected and the hydrodynamics equations can be solved using self-similar formulation. The obtained ordinary differential equations are solved numerically. Secondly, the effect of ionization is investigated when the evaporated gas temperature is sufficiently high. In this case, Saha equation is included in the formulation of the model. We find a self-similar solution for a finite value of the similarity variable which depends on the laser ablation parameters.

  19. In situ mechanical spectroscopy of laser deposited films using plasma plume excited reed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-09-15

    We show a new approach to in situ measure the mechanical properties of pulsed laser deposited thin films by plasma plume excited reed with high accuracy. A vibrating reed, consisting of a Si substrate, is mounted into a pulsed laser deposition chamber. After deposition of the polymer film for investigation, the Si substrate is excited by the energy of the expanding laser plasma coming from a Ag target. The oscillations of the reed and their damping are measured using a diode laser reflected at the back side of the substrate, by observing the reflections with a position sensitive detector. Data collection as well as the coordination with the deposition setup are done computer controlled. Temperature dependent measurements of the damping of the reed oscillations then allow us to perform mechanical spectroscopy investigations of laser deposited polymer films.

  20. Spatial coherence measurements of non-resonant and resonant high harmonics generated in laser ablation plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Abdelrahman, Z. Frank, F.; Witting, T.; Okell, W. A.; Fabris, D.; Hutchison, C.; Marangos, J. P.; Tisch, J. W. G.

    2014-01-13

    We present measurements of the spatial coherence of the high-order harmonics generated in laser-produced ablation plumes. Harmonics were generated using 4 fs, 775 nm pulses with peak intensity 3 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2}. Double-slit fringe visibilities in the range of ≈0.6–0.75 were measured for non-resonant harmonics in carbon and resonantly enhanced harmonics in zinc and indium. These are somewhat higher than the visibility obtained for harmonics generated in argon gas under similar conditions. This is attributed to lower time-dependent ionization of the plasma ablation targets compared to argon during the high harmonics generation process.

  1. Potential Release Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and

  2. MAJOR SITE CONTRACTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NON-NNSA MANAGEMENT and OPERATING and MAJOR SITE CONTRACTS # DOE OFFICE HEAD OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS SENIOR DOE SITE PROCUREMENT MANAGERS M&O CONTRACT MAJOR SITE & FACILITIES CONTRACT CONTRACTOR NAME 1 Chicago Office (Ames Site Office) Jennifer A. Stricker Ames National Laboratory Iowa State University 2 Chicago Office (Argonne Site Office) Sergio E. Martinez Argonne National Laboratory University of Chicago Argonne, LLC 3 Chicago Office (Berkeley Site Office)

  3. [SITE NAME] Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Location of the Shiprock Disposal Site Site Description and History The Shiprock site is the location of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing facility within the Navajo Nation in the northwest corner of New

  4. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenicbiogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento Plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, L.; Kuang, C.; Sedlacek, A.; Senum, G.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Jayne, J.; Fast, J.; Hubbe, J.; et al

    2015-09-17

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced bymorethe simultaneous presence of high concentrations of CO and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein) or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, "Bio", for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short time and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ?OA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst ? values in order to probe day to day and location dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ?OA were ?O3 and ?CO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was ~ 60 % of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ?CO and ?Bio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al. (2012) and Shilling et al. (2013) to determine if anthropogenic-biogenic interactions enhance OA production. As found earlier, ?OA in the data subset having high ?CO and high ?Bio was

  5. Weather - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weather Weather Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Weather Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font...

  6. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. ); Yancey, E.F. )

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  7. Nevada Site Offce's Talbot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nevada Site Offce (NSO) manager, says Complex ... "The activities that occur at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) provide a very specifc value ...

  8. Search - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Search Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Search Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size

  9. Hanford Site Hazards Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Hazards Guide 2016 Approved for Public Release; Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Site Hazards Guide Contents ASBESTOS .............................................................................................................................................. 2 BERYLLIUM ........................................................................................................................................... 4 CHEMICAL SAFETY

  10. ARM - Cool Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox ...

  11. Nevada Test Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in greater detail in the Nevada Test Site Environ- mental Report 2004 (DOENV11718-1080). ... mental programs and efforts Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2004 Summary ...

  12. Siting and Barrier Mitigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Tool for Siting, Planning, and Encroachment Analysis for Renewables The Department of ... the Tool for Siting, Planning, and Encroachment Analysis for Renewables (TSPEAR). ...

  13. Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RIFS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Email Email...

  14. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

    2000-05-10

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in

  15. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1999-03-24

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous

  16. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  17. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 2, Big Hill Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-08-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 2 focuses on the Big Hill SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  18. Numerical simulation studies of the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume in a saline aquifer with a sloping caprock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.; Nordbotten, J.

    2010-12-28

    We have used the TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N code to perform numerical simulation studies of the long-term behavior of CO{sub 2} stored in an aquifer with a sloping caprock. This problem is of great practical interest, and is very challenging due to the importance of multi-scale processes. We find that the mechanism of plume advance is different from what is seen in a forced immiscible displacement, such as gas injection into a water-saturated medium. Instead of pushing the water forward, the plume advances because the vertical pressure gradients within the plume are smaller than hydrostatic, causing the groundwater column to collapse ahead of the plume tip. Increased resistance to vertical flow of aqueous phase in anisotropic media leads to reduced speed of updip plume advancement. Vertical equilibrium models that ignore effects of vertical flow will overpredict the speed of plume advancement. The CO{sub 2} plume becomes thinner as it advances, yet the speed of advancement remains constant over the entire simulation period of up to 400 years, with migration distances of more than 80 km. Our simulations include dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase and associated density increase, and molecular diffusion. However, no convection develops in the aqueous phase because it is suppressed by the relatively coarse (sub-) horizontal gridding required in a regional-scale model. A first crude sub-grid-scale model was developed to represent convective enhancement of CO{sub 2} dissolution. This process is found to greatly reduce the thickness of the CO{sub 2} plume, but, for the parameters used in our simulations, does not affect the speed of plume advancement.

  19. Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Savannah River Site 2014 Site-Level Exercise - January 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site-Level Exercise - January 2015 January 2015 Review of the ...

  20. Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Livermore Site Office - February 2011 Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 February 2011 Livermore Site Office Safety Basis Self-Assessment esults of the Office ...

  1. ARM - Site Tours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HomeroomSite Tours Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Site Tours As part of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium outreach program, Courtney Hammond brought third-grade students from Fred Ipalook Elementary School to the ARM site in Barrow, Alaska for a science field trip in

  2. Site Map | ScienceCinema

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Map Site Map Home Audio Search Fielded Search About FAQ Site Map Contact Us Website PoliciesImportant Links

  3. Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Bacon, Diana H.; Viswanathan, Hari; Stauffer, Philip; Jordan, Amy B.; Pawar, Rajesh

    2014-03-07

    Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). Themore » volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites.« less

  4. Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Bacon, Diana H.; Viswanathan, Hari; Stauffer, Philip; Jordan, Amy B.; Pawar, Rajesh

    2014-03-07

    Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). The volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites.

  5. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic–biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, L.; Kuang, C.; Sedlacek, A.; Senum, G.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Jayne, J.; Fast, J.; Hubbe, J.; et al

    2016-02-15

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA, plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced bymore » the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and either isoprene, MVK + MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein), or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short timescales and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ΔOA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst Δ values in order to probe day-to-day and location-dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ΔOA were ΔO3 and ΔCO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was  ∼  60 % of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil, even though the day-to-day and spatial variability of plume OA is best described by an anthropogenic tracer, CO. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ΔCO and ΔBio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al

  6. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akagi, Sheryl; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, Gavin; Sullivan, Amy; Lee, Taehyoung; Kredenweis, Sonia; Urbanski, Shawn; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Weise, David

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured the trace gas emission factors from 7 prescribed fires in South Carolina, U.S. using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analyses. The fires were intended to emulate high-intensity burns as they were lit during the dry season and in most cases represented stands that had not been treated with prescribed burns in 10+ years, if at all. A total of 97 trace gas species are reported here from both airborne and ground-based platforms making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements included the first data for a suite of monoterpene compounds emitted via distillation of plant tissues during real fires. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of ~0.40% of CO (molar basis), ~3.9% of NMOC (molar basis), and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis), suggests that they impacted post-emission formation of ozone, aerosol, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes. The variability in the terpene emissions in South Carolina (SC) fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the emitted gas-phase non-methane organic compounds was surprisingly different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that the slightly different ecosystems, time of year and the precursor variability all contributed to the variability in plume chemistry observed in this study and in the literature. The ?HCN/?CO emission ratio, however, is fairly consistent at 0.9 0.06 % for airborne fire measurements in coniferous-dominated ecosystems further confirming the value of HCN as a good biomass burning indicator/tracer. The SC results also support an earlier finding that C3-C4 alkynes may be of use as biomass burning indicators on the time-scale of hours to a day. It was

  7. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic - biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, Lawrence; Kuang, Chongai; Sedlacek, Arthur; Senum, Gunnar; Springston, Stephen; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Qi; Jayne, John; Fast, Jerome; Hubbe, John; et al

    2016-02-15

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA, plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrationsmore » are enhanced by the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein), or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short timescales and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ΔOA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst Δ values in order to probe day-to-day and location-dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ΔOA were ΔO3 and ΔCO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was ~60% of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil, even though the day-to-day and spatial variability of plume OA is best described by an anthropogenic tracer, CO. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ΔCO and ΔBio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al. (2012) and Shilling et

  8. Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    The Salmon, Mississippi, Site, also called the Tatum Dome Test Site, is a 1,470-acre tract ... The Salmon test took place on October 22, 1964, at a depth of 2,700 feet below ground ...

  9. Nevada National Security Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 24, 2014 Cultural Artifacts Cross Eras at the Nevada National Security Site It is well known that the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is home to many artifacts from the ...

  10. Considered Sites Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE maintains the Considered Sites Database to provide information to the public about sites that were formerly used in the nation’s nuclear weapons and early atomic energy programs and that had...

  11. nevada national security site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Nevada National Security Site operator recognized for green fleet http:www.nnsa.energy.govblognevada-national-security-site-operator-recognized-green-fleet

    The...

  12. SRNL Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Notice This web site is part of a Federal computer system used to accomplish Federal functions. The Savannah River Site (SRS) uses software programs to monitor this web ...

  13. Quantitative IR Spectrum and Vibrational Assignments for Glycolaldehyde Vapor: Glycolaldehyde Measurements in Biomass Burning Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Profeta, Luisa T.; Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Williams, Stephen D.

    2013-04-15

    Glycolaldehyde (GA, 2-hydroxyethanal, C2H4O2) is a semi-volatile molecule of atmospheric importance, recently proposed as a precursor in the formation of aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA). There are few methods to measure glycolaldehyde vapor, but infrared spectroscopy has been used successfully. Using vetted protocols we have completed the first assignment of all fundamental vibrational modes and derived quantitative IR absorption band strengths using both neat and pressure-broadened GA vapor. Even though GA is problematic due to its propensity to both dimerize and condense, our intensities agree well with the few previously published values. Using the reference ?10 band Q-branch at 860.51 cm-1, we have also determined GA mixing ratios in biomass burning plumes generated by field and laboratory burns of fuels from the southeastern and southwestern United States, including the first field measurements of glycolaldehyde in smoke. The GA emission factors were anti-correlated with modified combustion efficiency confirming release of GA from smoldering combustion. The GA emission factors (g of GA emitted per kg dry biomass burned on a dry mass basis) had a low dependence on fuel type consistent with the production mechanism being pyrolysis of cellulose. GA was emitted at 0.23 0.13% of CO from field fires and we calculate that it accounts for ~18% of the aqueous-phase SOA precursors that we were able to measure.

  14. Nonlinear Bayesian Algorithms for Gas Plume Detection and Estimation from Hyper-spectral Thermal Image Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Posse, Christian; Hylden, Jeff L.; Anderson, Kevin K.

    2007-06-13

    This paper presents a nonlinear Bayesian regression algorithm for the purpose of detecting and estimating gas plume content from hyper-spectral data. Remote sensing data, by its very nature, is collected under less controlled conditions than laboratory data. As a result, the physics-based model that is used to describe the relationship between the observed remotesensing spectra, and the terrestrial (or atmospheric) parameters that we desire to estimate, is typically littered with many unknown "nuisance" parameters (parameters that we are not interested in estimating, but also appear in the model). Bayesian methods are well-suited for this context as they automatically incorporate the uncertainties associated with all nuisance parameters into the error estimates of the parameters of interest. The nonlinear Bayesian regression methodology is illustrated on realistic simulated data from a three-layer model for longwave infrared (LWIR) measurements from a passive instrument. This shows that this approach should permit more accurate estimation as well as a more reasonable description of estimate uncertainty.

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Seymour Recycling Corporation site, Seymour, Indiana (second remedial action), September 1987. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    The Seymour Recycling Corporation (SRC) site, encompassing a fourteen-acre area, is approximately two miles southwest of Seymour, Indiana. SRC and its corporate predecessor, Seymour Manufacturing Company, processed, stored, and incinerated chemical wastes at the site from about 1970 to early 1980. The facility was closed when SRC failed to comply with a 1978 agreement with the State of Indiana to cease receiving wastes and to institute better waste-management practices. In 1980, several thousand drums were removed from the site by two potentially responsible parties (PRPs). In 1981, the U.S. EPA removed chemicals from tanks at the site and disposed of those wastes offsite. A 1982 Consent Decree with potential PRPs resulted in the removal, between December 1982 and January 1984, of approximately 50,000 drums, 100 storage tanks and the first foot of contaminated soil from about 75 percent of the site's surface. A Record of Decision, signed in September 1986, evaluated the stabilization of the ground water plume emanating from the site and selected the implementation of a plume stabilization system to extract, treat and discharge ground water to a waste water treatment plant.

  16. Completed Sites Listing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As of fiscal year 2012, EM (and its predecessor organization UMTRA) completed cleanup and closed 91 sites in 24 states.

  17. Annual Site Environmental Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Annual Site Environmental Report Updated July 24, 2015 NETL's Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 -ii- 2014 Annual Site Environmental Report September 9, 2015 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Albany, Oregon Anchorage, Alaska Morgantown, West Virginia Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Sugar Land, Texas NETL's Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 -iii- Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government.

  18. Far-field model of the regional influence of effluent plumes from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, D.P.

    1985-07-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants discharge large volumes of cold water into the upper ocean. A three-dimensional, limited-area model was developed to investigate the regional influence of the far-field effluent plume created by the negatively buoyant discharge. The model was applied to discharges from a 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant into coastal waters characterized by various ambient ocean conditions. A typical ambient temperature structure and nutrient distribution, as well as the behavior of the effluent plume itself, were strongly modified by the discharge-induced circulation. Although temperature perturbations in the plume were small, upward entrainment of nutrients from below the thermocline was significant. The regional influence of discharges from an 80-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant, the interactions between the discharges from two adjacent 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plants, and the effects of coastal boundary and bottom discharge were examined with respect to the regional influence of a 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant located in deep water off a coast (base case).

  19. WINDExchange: Siting Wind Turbines

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers Economic Development Siting Resources & Tools Siting Wind Turbines This page provides resources about wind turbine siting. American Wind Wildlife Institute The American Wind Wildlife Institute (AWWI) facilitates timely and responsible development of wind energy, while protecting wildlife and wildlife habitat. AWWI was created and is sustained by a unique collaboration of environmentalists, conservationists,

  20. Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-21

    This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

  1. Site Environmental Report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1-Mike Grauwelman's presentation - 5.20.14_comp

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    REDEVELOPMENT USDOE MOUND FACILITY MIAMISBURG, OHIO MIKE GRAUWELMAN MOUND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (RETIRED) AGENDA * Mound Background * DOE History * Community Organizational Structure * Redevelopment Plan * Economic Development 2 MOUND SITE Site Information: * Founded 1948 * Manhattan Project * 306 Acres * 1.3M Sq. Ft. Buildings * Topo Variance 180' * Buried Valley Aquifer Workforce Information: * Peak Employment: 2,400 * 25% PhD's 3 MOUND MISSIONS Recent Missions * Environmental Remediation

  3. Borehole induction logging for the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project LLNL gasoline spill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, S.; Newmark, R.; Wilt, M.

    1994-01-21

    Borehole induction logs were acquired for the purpose of characterizing subsurface physical properties and monitoring steam clean up activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work was part of the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project`s demonstrated clean up of a gasoline spin. The site is composed of unconsolidated days, sands and gravels which contain gasoline both above and below the water table. Induction logs were used to characterize lithology, to provide ``ground truth`` resistivity values for electrical resistance tomography (ERT), and to monitor the movement of an underground steam plume used to heat the soil and drive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the extraction wells.

  4. Hanford Site Comprehensive site Compliance Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1997-08-05

    This document is the second annual submittal by WHC, ICF/KH, PNL and BHI and contains the results of inspections of the stormwater outfalls listed in the Hanford Site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) (WHC 1993a) as required by General Permit No. WA-R-00-000F (WA-R-00-A17F): This report also describes the methods used to conduct the Storm Water Comprehensive Site Compliance Evaluation, as required in Part IV, Section D, {ampersand} C of the General Permit, summarizes the results of the compliance evaluation, and documents significant leaks and spills.

  5. FIREPLUME model for plume dispersion from fires: Application to uranium hexafluoride cylinder fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.F.; Dunn, W.E.; Policastro, A.J.; Maloney, D.

    1997-06-01

    This report provides basic documentation of the FIREPLUME model and discusses its application to the prediction of health impacts resulting from releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in fires. The model application outlined in this report was conducted for the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted UF{sub 6}. The FIREPLUME model is an advanced stochastic model for atmospheric plume dispersion that predicts the downwind consequences of a release of toxic materials from an explosion or a fire. The model is based on the nonbuoyant atmospheric dispersion model MCLDM (Monte Carlo Lagrangian Dispersion Model), which has been shown to be consistent with available laboratory and field data. The inclusion of buoyancy and the addition of a postprocessor to evaluate time-varying concentrations lead to the current model. The FIREPLUME model, as applied to fire-related UF{sub 6} cylinder releases, accounts for three phases of release and dispersion. The first phase of release involves the hydraulic rupture of the cylinder due to heating of the UF{sub 6} in the fire. The second phase involves the emission of material into the burning fire, and the third phase involves the emission of material after the fire has died during the cool-down period. The model predicts the downwind concentration of the material as a function of time at any point downwind at or above the ground. All together, five fire-related release scenarios are examined in this report. For each scenario, downwind concentrations of the UF{sub 6} reaction products, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride, are provided for two meteorological conditions: (1) D stability with a 4-m/s wind speed, and (2) F stability with a 1-m/s wind speed.

  6. FTCP Site Specific Information - Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office FTCP Site Specific Information - Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report Calendar Year 2013...

  7. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Attachment A: Site Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Attachment A: Site Description DOENV25946--790-ATT A Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Disclaimer Reference herein to any specific ...

  8. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2010-02-01

    The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust

  9. Environmental - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents Environmental Documents Documents Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Tri-Party Agreement Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Hanford Site Budget Hanford Site Safety Standards DOE - ORP Contracts/Procurements DOE - RL Contracts/Procurements Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RI/FS 100-D/H Operable Units RI/FS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental CERCLA Five-Year Review NEPA - Categorical Exclusions

  10. Getting Started - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program Getting Started Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program VPP Home VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP Communications VPP Conferences Getting Started Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size History of VPP (PDF) VPP How To Guide (PDF) VPP Getting Started Tools Employee Pocket Guide (PDF) What is a Personal Safety Action Plan (PDF) Picture This (PDF) VPP Tenets Tenet 1 (PDF)

  11. Colorado, Processing Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites September 2014 LMS/RFO-RFN/S11940 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFO-RFN/S11940 2014 Verification Monitoring Report for the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites September 2014 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2014 Verification Monitoring Report for the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites September 2014 Doc. No. S11940 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  12. What's New - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What's New About Us Hanford Cultural Resources Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Tools Points of Contact What's New Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size February 2011 - Revision 16 of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria A Revision of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria has been released. The document can be found on the Acceptance Criteria page. Waste packages (55

  13. Land Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Management About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Cultural Resources Contact Us Land Management Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Hanford Site - Hanford Reach The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for the management of Hanford Site property. RL has issued the Mission Support Contract (MSC) to provide direct support to RL, DOE Office River Protection (ORP)

  14. Uranium Fate and Transport Modeling, Guterl Specialty Steel Site, New York - 13545

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, Bill; Tandon, Vikas

    2013-07-01

    The Former Guterl Specialty Steel Corporation Site (Guterl Site) is located 32 kilometers (20 miles) northeast of Buffalo, New York, in Lockport, Niagara County, New York. Between 1948 and 1952, up to 15,875 metric tons (35 million pounds) of natural uranium metal (U) were processed at the former Guterl Specialty Steel Corporation site in Lockport, New York. The resulting dust, thermal scale, mill shavings and associated land disposal contaminated both the facility and on-site soils. Uranium subsequently impacted groundwater and a fully developed plume exists below the site. Uranium transport from the site involves legacy on-site pickling fluid handling, the leaching of uranium from soil to groundwater, and the groundwater transport of dissolved uranium to the Erie Canal. Groundwater fate and transport modeling was performed to assess the transfer of dissolved uranium from the contaminated soils and buildings to groundwater and subsequently to the nearby Erie Canal. The modeling provides a tool to determine if the uranium contamination could potentially affect human receptors in the vicinity of the site. Groundwater underlying the site and in the surrounding area generally flows southeasterly towards the Erie Canal; locally, groundwater is not used as a drinking water resource. The risk to human health was evaluated outside the Guterl Site boundary from the possibility of impacted groundwater discharging to and mixing with the Erie Canal waters. This condition was evaluated because canal water is infrequently used as an emergency water supply for the City of Lockport via an intake located approximately 122 meters (m) (400 feet [ft]) southeast of the Guterl Site. Modeling was performed to assess whether mixing of groundwater with surface water in the Erie Canal could result in levels of uranium exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) established drinking water standard for total uranium; the Maximum Concentration Limit (MCL). Geotechnical test

  15. Small Business Internet Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Site: http:thomas.loc.gov Executive Orders: http:www.whitehouse.govnewsorders Senate Small Business Committee: http:sbc.senate.gov House Small ...

  16. Primary and Site Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    electricity reflect the amount of energy actually consumed within the building. Site energy data are most useful to building engineers, energy managers, building owners and others...

  17. Paducah Site Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion (PGDP) Site is located in McCracken County, Kentucky, 10 miles west of the city of Paducah.  

  18. Beryllium Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site workers. Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program inspection and corrective action documents Feedback & Suggestions A closely monitored area to submit questions,...

  19. 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2002-09-01

    THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

  20. WRPS Contract - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Services and Interface Requirements Matrix 382 PDF J.4 Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) 350 PDF J.5 Performance Guarantee Agreement PDF J.6 Small ...

  1. 1994 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  2. 1999 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-09-01

    The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

  3. Site Transition Guidance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Transition Guidance March 2010 Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington D. C. 20585 Standard Review Plan (SRP) Technical Framework for EM...

  4. Site Sustainability Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    436.1 SITE SUSTAINABILITY PLAN Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory PPPL is operated by ... Laboratory Director, Operations Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory December 2014 FY 2015 ...

  5. Outreach - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tribal Program Hanford Advisory Board Hanford Site Tours Hanford Speakers Bureau FOIA Reading Room Hanford For Students Administrative Record (AR) Outreach Email Email Page |...

  6. FOIA EDocuments - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Contractors and Subcontractors since 1947 ContractorSubcontractor listing dated December 18, 2008 Prime Contractor of Subcontractors with Employment Records Available ...

  7. Beryllium FAQs - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Hanford Site employee meetings were held May 17, 2010 to discuss beryllium and the Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). Questions & Answers about Beryllium are...

  8. Information Exchange management site

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-01

    Django site used to manage the approved information exchanges (content models) after creation and public comment at https://github.com/usgin-models.

  9. Annual Site Environmental Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Site Environmental Report - 2002 Annual Site Environmental Report - 2002 DOE/NV11718--842 Prepared by Bechtel Nevada Post Office Box 98521 Las Vegas, NV 89193-8521 Prepared by Bechtel Nevada Post Office Box 98521 Las Vegas, NV 89193-8521 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Contract Number DE-AC08-96NV11718 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Contract Number

  10. The DOD Siting Clearinghouse

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    impacts or that need multi-Service coordination will receive full Clearinghouse attention 18 Annual Report to Congress * Provides an overview of all DoD Siting...

  11. Contact Us - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Wide Programs Health & Safety Exposition Contact Us About Us Booth Awards Special Events Exhibitor Information What is EXPO Electronic Registration Form Contact Us...

  12. Berkeley Lab Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Berkeley Lab | Laboratory Site Map Laboratory Organization Chart DivisionalDepartmental Organization Charts Laboratory Map Interactive Laboratory Map History of the...

  13. Investigation of CO2 plume behavior for a large-scale pilot test of geologic carbon storage in a saline formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on trapping mechanisms that lead to CO{sub 2} plume stabilization. A numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture is developed to simulate a planned pilot test, in which 1,000,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} is injected over a four-year period, and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume for hundreds of years. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of the partitioning of CO{sub 2} between dissolved, immobile free-phase, and mobile free-phase forms. Model results indicate that the injected CO{sub 2} plume is effectively immobilized at 25 years. At that time, 38% of the CO{sub 2} is in dissolved form, 59% is immobile free phase, and 3% is mobile free phase. The plume footprint is roughly elliptical, and extends much farther up-dip of the injection well than down-dip. The pressure increase extends far beyond the plume footprint, but the pressure response decreases rapidly with distance from the injection well, and decays rapidly in time once injection ceases. Sensitivity studies that were carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual CO{sub 2} saturation indicate that small changes in properties can have a large impact on plume evolution, causing significant trade-offs between different trapping mechanisms.

  14. Berkeley, California, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    California, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Berkeley, California, ...

  15. Portsmouth Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portsmouth Site Portsmouth Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Environmental Cleanup Program at Portsmouth supports site investigations, ...

  16. Volume II NEVADA TEST SITE ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    630-l 1 DOENVl 0630-l 1 Volume II NEVADA TEST SITE ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT - ... DOENVl 0830-l 1 Volume II NEVADA TEST SITE ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT - ...

  17. Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing sites and disposal site at Slick Rock, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History The Slick Rock processing sites consist of two former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing

  18. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  19. Site Map - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Site Map Page Content Pantex.com Mission & Strategies Mission National Security Nuclear Explosive Operations Nuclear Material Operations HE Operations Strategies Advance HE Center of Excellence Exemplify a High Reliability Organization Health & Safety Safety Training Occupational Medicine Contractor Safety Environment Environmental Projects & Operations Regulatory Compliance Waste Operations Environmental Management System Environmental Document Library Public Meetings Doing

  20. VPP Conferences - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conferences Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program VPP Home VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP Communications VPP Conferences National Presentations Regional Presentations VPP Conferences Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size 2014 Regional and National Conferences Regional Conference Event National Conference Event

  1. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The spatial location and boundaries for each Site shown on the Site Monitoring Area maps ... P-SMA-2 DP-SMA-0.4 LA-SMA-2.3 LA-SMA-5.51 LA-SMA-6.38 P-SMA-2.15 DP-SMA-0.6 ...

  2. Site characterization handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Site directed recombination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  4. Site decommissioning management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  5. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2012-03-05

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the

  6. Expedited site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCreary, I.; Booth, S.R.

    1997-03-01

    Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) is being offered as a new, more cost-effective way to perform DOE environmental site characterizations. Site characterization of environmental cleanup sites can be costly and time consuming. {open_quotes}Traditional techniques,{close_quotes} though effective, are the outgrowth of cautious and often restrictive regulatory control. At some sites up to 40% of the funds and 70% of the time spent on cleanup operations have been devoted to characterization. More realistically, the DOE`s Ten Year Plan (TYP) Cost Rollup by Category (high budgetary version) budgets $1.34 billion to remedial action assessments out of a total of $9.7 billion in remedial actions - about 14% of the total TYP expenditures for this type of cleanup work. The expenditure percentage for characterization drops to a much lower 3% of total expenditures during outyears, after 2006, as most of the assessments will have been completed during the early TYP years. (The sampling and monitoring costs, however, rise from 7% of the budget during the TYP to 30% during the outyears as this activity continues and others decline. Improved characterizations could have the potential to reduce the need for some of these ongoing monitoring costs.) Fortunately, regulatory agencies have begun to relax many of the constraints on site characterization allowing more efficient and innovative approaches to be applied. Argonne National Laboratory`s Expedited Site Characterization is perhaps the best defined of these new approaches. ESC is founded on the premise that it is cheaper, faster, and more efficient to develop and test a conceptual model (or {open_quotes}hypothesis{close_quotes}) of contamination at a site than it is to collect data on a statistical basis and then attempt to model a site from those data. The difference between these two approaches has been described as a {open_quotes}scientific versus an engineering approach{close_quotes}.

  7. Nevada National Security Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nevada National Security Site Proud Past, Exciting Future Nevada National Security Site Pre-Proposal Meeting November 19, 2015 Agenda * 8:30 am Welcome * 9:00 am Overview of NNSS and NFO * 10:00 am Break * 10:30 am NNSS Video * 11:00 am Questions * 11:30 am Lunch * 1:00 pm Solicitation Overview * 2:15 pm Break * 2:45 pm Questions * 4:00 pm Conclusion The Nevada National Security Site * Large geographically diverse outdoor laboratory - 1,360 square miles of federally owned and controlled land -

  8. Portsmouth Site Sustainability Team

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Planning and coordination of recycling and other environmentally responsible efforts. Site Sustainability Team (SST). environmental stewardship and compliance, Executive Order Orders 13514 13423, Environmental Compliance, Acquisition, Cleanup, EMS, Energy, Greenhouse Gases, High Performance Buildings, NEPA, Electronics Stewardship, Pollution Prevention, Chemical Management, Sustainability, Transportation, Climate Change Adaption, Water Efficiency, Natural Resources and development and implementation of the PORTS Site Sustainability Plan Portsmouth Site Sustainability Plan. Fluor-B&W Portsmouth, Fluor-BWXT Portsmouth, BWCS BWXT Conversion Services, WEMS Wastren EnergX Mission Support.

  9. TWP Darwin Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Darwin Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists TWP Darwin Site-Inactive Location: 12° 25' 28.56" S, 130° 53' 29.75" E Altitude: 29.9 meters The third TWP climate research facility was established in April 2002 in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. The facility is

  10. EM Active Sites (large) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Active Sites (large) EM Active Sites (large) Center

  11. Strategic Petroleum Reserve | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crude oil pipes at SPR Bryan Mound site near Freeport, TX. Crude oil pipes at SPR Bryan Mound site near Freeport, TX. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) is the world's largest...

  12. A Variable Trajectory Plume Segment Model to Assess Ground-Level Air Concentrations and Depositions of Routine Effluent Releases from Nuclear Power Facilities.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1986-05-27

    Version: 00 MESODIF-II, which embodies a variable trajectory plume segment atmospheric transport model, is designed to predict normalized air concentrations and deposition of radioactive, but otherwise non-reactive, effluents released from one or two levels over the same position in an xy-plane. In such a model, calculated particle trajectories vary as synoptic scale wind varies. At all sampling times, the particles are connected to form a segmented plume centerline. The lateral and vertical dimensions of themore » plume are determined by a parameterization of turbulence scale diffusion. The impetus for the development of this model arose from the need of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess radiological effects resulting from routine nuclear power reactor operations, as outlined in U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Guide 1.111.« less

  13. Distinctive plume formation in atmospheric Ar and He plasmas in microwave frequency band and suitability for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H. Wk.; Kang, S. K.; Won, I. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Kwon, H. C.; Sim, J. Y.; Lee, J. K.

    2013-12-15

    Distinctive discharge formation in atmospheric Ar and He plasmas was observed in the microwave frequency band using coaxial transmission line resonators. Ar plasmas formed a plasma plume whereas He formed only confined plasmas. As the frequency increased from 0.9 GHz to 2.45 GHz, the Ar plasma exhibited contraction and filamentation, and the He plasmas were constricted. Various powers and gas flow rates were applied to identify the effect of the electric field and gas flow rate on plasma plume formation. The He plasmas were more strongly affected by the electric field than the Ar plasmas. The breakdown and sustain powers yielded opposite results from those for low-frequency plasmas (?kHz). The phenomena could be explained by a change in the dominant ionization process with increasing frequency. Penning ionization and the contribution of secondary electrons in sheath region reduced as the frequency increased, leading to less efficient ionization of He because its ionization and excitation energies are higher than those of Ar. The emission spectra showed an increase in the NO and N{sub 2} second positive band in both the Ar and He plasmas with increasing frequency whereas the hydroxyl radical and atomic O peaks did not increase with increasing frequency but were highest at particular frequencies. Further, the frequency effect of properties such as the plasma impedance, electron density, and device efficiency were presented. The study is expected to be helpful for determining the optimal conditions of plasma systems for biomedical applications.

  14. Potential Release Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    head of Los AlamosPueblo watershed, and then continued on to the Mortandad and WaterCanon de Valle watersheds. Work will progress to the remaining watersheds until sites in all...

  15. VPP Communications - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    373-5157 (509) 539-7728 JackEGriffith@rl.gov CHPRCVPP Site Co-ChairOS&H Barbara Williams (509)376-2518 (509)438-1488 BarbaraAWilliams@rl.gov CHPRCVPP Recorder Ronnie Feil...

  16. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    L ED--INVO-V AT SITE ------... ccmtra1 (-J AECIrlED managed CperatiOn q Health Physics Protection L Little or None, G AECtlED responsible for ...

  17. Fermilab Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use this map The Village Fermilab Meson, Nuetrino and Proton Experiment Areas Wilson Hall, Ramsey Auditorium Site 38 (Support Area) and vicinity CDF, D0, TD, Tevatron Main Injector...

  18. Oak Ridge Site Specific

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Government leaders in Nevada indicated they would oppose DOE's plans to ship and dispose about 400 canisters of uranium-233 at the Nevada National Security Site. The canisters are ...

  19. Small Site Closures

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Center, OR 1993 Baker and Williams Warehouses, NY 1993 Falls City, TX 1994 Grand Junction Mill Tailings Site, CO 1994 Monument Valley, AZ 1994 Salton Sea Test Base, CA 1994 ...

  20. Nevada National Security Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    HISTORYIn 1950, President Truman established what is now known as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to perform nuclear weapons testing activities.  In support of national defense initiatives...

  1. Hanford History - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beginning in 1943, the site was used to produce plutonium for the bomb that brought an end to World War II. After a short lull, production was ramped up in 1947 to meet the ...

  2. Active Sites Additional Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) supports the Department’s Strategic Plan to complete the environmental remediation of legacy and active sites, while protecting human health and the...

  3. Chapter 3: Building Siting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Sustainable Design Guide 35 This aerial photo of portions ... LANL Chapter 3 | Building Siting To promote sustainable land use, it is better to build on ...

  4. Savannah river site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to supply and process tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen that is a vital component of nuclear weapons. SRS loads tritium and non-tritium...

  5. C Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C Reactor About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs ... 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and ...

  6. Accessibility - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy is committed to providing access to our Web pages for individuals with disabilities. To meet this committment, this site is built to comply with the requirements of...

  7. T Plant - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T Plant About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact ... and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage ...

  8. The DOD Siting Clearinghouse

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—provides an overview on the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) clearinghouse for siting renewable energy technologies.

  9. CERCLA - Site Selector

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    | 1000 Independence Ave., SW | Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7550 | f202-586-1540 Web Policies | No Fear Act | Site Map | Privacy & Security | USA Jobs | Plug-Ins | Document ...

  10. Portsmouth Site Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Portsmouth site is in rural Pike County, Ohio, north of the city of Portsmouth. It is located on a federal reservation that encompasses 3,777 acres. The site employs more than 2,000 workers, making it one of the largest employers in the region. It consists of three operational areas: the gaseous diffusion plant, centrifuge facility and depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility.

  11. ORISE: Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Contents About ORISE Careers Climate and Atmospheric Research Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Health Communication Media Center National Security and Emergency Management REAC/TS Safety Science Education Scientific Peer Review UNIRIB Worker Health Studies Working With Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Site Map About ORISE Message from the Director Mission and Vision History Our Culture Publications Visiting Us ORISE Facilities ORISE Contract Back to top Careers

  12. About Us - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Us About Us About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us About Us Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Cleanup of the Hanford Site is overseen by two Department of Energy Offices, the Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Office of River Protection (ORP). Each office has a staff of about 250 federal employees. The work largely involves contract oversight and safety and compliance-related work. The U.S.

  13. [SITE NAME] Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater occurs in both the alluvial and volcanic sections. The depth to groundwater near the UC-1 emplacement borehole is about 500 feet below ground surface. Surface Conditions Drilling operations associated with the three emplacement boreholes (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4) resulted in areas of surface contamination identifed as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417. This CAU comprised 34 corrective action sites. DOE completed closure of these sites using a variety of methods, including removing

  14. What's New - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What's New What's New Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New What's New Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size September 4, 2016 200 Area 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility Benefits and Services Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility Documents DOE Employment DOE Human Resources Management Division DOE ORP Purchase Card Buyers DOE Public Reading Room Hanford Natural

  15. Helpful Links - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helpful Links Helpful Links Helpful Links Hanford Staff Directory Hanford Site Wide Programs Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Hanford Workers Compensation Projects & Facilities HERO PHOENIX Hanford Meteorological Station Definitions Abbreviations and Acronyms Visitor Control and Site Access Visitor Hanford Computer Access Request Helpful Links Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Contact Us Do you have a question? Contact Hanford

  16. Hanford Site Freedom

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Freedom ofInformation Act ~ Department of Energy HANFORD SITE FOIA Requests FOIA Home FOIA Admin Page 1 of3 FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Freedom of Information Act Administration: Electronic FOIA Request Detail Thank you for your Freedom of Information Act Information Request. Within the next four weeks we will notify you of either how long the search will take to complete or the availability of the information you requested. Request Number: Name: Organization: Address: Country: Phone Number:

  17. Summary Site Environmental Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013 ANL-14/02 (Summary) Environment, Safety, and Quality Assurance Division Argonne National Laboratory For more information about Argonne's Site Environmental Report, contact Theresa Davis, 630.252.6077 or tmdavis@anl.gov. For more information about Argonne and its programs, visit the laboratory's website at www.anl.gov or contact Communications, Education, and Public Affairs, at 630.252.5575. Katherine Obmascik edited the text. Photos by Mark Lopez.

  18. USGIN Lab site

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-01

    This web site provides information related to service profiles and implementation in development for the US Geoscience information network (USGIN). It is meant to be a site where developers can learn about the standard in use, the objectives of the application profiles being developed, software being used or tested for implementation of services, and details about particular implementations. Forums are provided for asking questions about the services, profiles, and implemenation issues.

  19. Photo Gallery - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gov Inslee Tours WTP and TF Gov Inslee Tours WTP and TF Groundwater Groundwater Groundwater Treatment Record Groundwater Treatment Record Groundwater Treatment Resin Groundwater Treatment Resin HAMMER Site-Wide Safety Standards HAMMER Site-Wide Safety Standards Helicopter Removes Truck on ALE Helicopter Removes Truck on ALE Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete HSS Beryllium Out Brief HSS Beryllium Out Brief Improving Access to Tank C-107 Improving

  20. Photo Gallery - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington Closure Job Creation Job Creation Waste Site Sampling Waste Site Sampling Borescope Borescope ERDF Pull Boxes ERDF Pull Boxes Super Cell 9 Winter Construction Super Cell 9 Winter Construction Cone Penetrometer Display Cone Penetrometer Display Touching Lives Touching Lives Super Cell 9 Construction Super Cell 9 Construction Super Cell 9 Super Cell 9 Cone Penetrometers Cone Penetrometers New Bulldozers New Bulldozers Subcontractor Worker Subcontractor Worker "Green"

  1. Site Sustainability Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 DOE ORDER 436.1 SITE SUSTAINABILITY PLAN Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory PPPL is operated by Princeton University for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-09CH1 PLAN APPROVAL Robert S. Sheneman Deputy Head Environment, Safety, Health & Security Department Michael Viola Head, Facilities & Site Services Division Jerry D. Levine Head, Environment, Safety, Health & Security Department William B. Davis Head, Information Technology Department, CIO Michael D. Williams

  2. Paducah Site Historical Timeline | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site Background » Paducah Site Historical Timeline Paducah Site Historical Timeline

  3. Completed Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Completed Sites Completed Sites Completed Sites The Office of Environmental Management (EM) has been or is currently responsible for cleaning up sites across the United States. These sites were associated with the legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and other DOE research and development activities. Many of these sites have been cleaned up and transferred to other entities or to DOE's Legacy Management (LM) Program. Completed Sites Listing

  4. EA-1438: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test Operations at the Mound Site, Miamisburg, Ohio

  5. Investigation of the September 13, 2011, Fatality at the Strategic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Site | Department of Energy September 13, 2011, Fatality at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Site Investigation of the September 13, 2011, Fatality at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Site November 2011 On September 13, 2011, a recently-hired, untrained subcontractor employee struck three large elevated pipes while operating a front deck mower at the Cavern 5 area of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound (SPR-BM) site. The employee

  6. Evaluation of natural attenuation processes for trichloroethylene and technetium-99 in the Northeast and Northwest plumes at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clausen, J.L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Heraty, L.J.; Huang, L.; Abrajano,T.

    1997-11-25

    NA processes such as biodegradation, sorption, dilution dispersion, advection, and possibly sorption and diffusion are occurring in the Northeast and Northwest plumes. However, the overall biological attenuation rate for TCE within the plumes is not sufficiently rapid to utilize as remedial option. The mobility and toxicity of {sup 99}Tc is not being reduced by attenuating processes within the Northwest Plume. The current EPA position is that NA is not a viable remedial approach unless destructive processes are present or processes are active which reduce the toxicity and mobility of a contaminant. Therefore, active remediation of the dissolved phase plumes will be necessary to reduce contaminant concentrations before an NA approach could be justified at PGDP for either plume. Possible treatment methods for the reduction of dissolved phase concentrations within the plumes are pump-and-treat bioaugmentation, biostimulation, or multiple reactive barriers. Another possibility is the use of a regulatory instrument such as an Alternate Concentration Limit (ACL) petition. Biodegradation of TCE is occurring in both plumes and several hypothesis are possible to explain the apparent conflicts with some of the geochemical data. The first hypothesis is active intrinsic bioremediation is negligible or so slow to be nonmeasurable. In this scenario, the D.O., chloride, TCE, and isotopic results are indicative of past microbiological reactions. It is surmised in this scenario, that when the initial TCE release occurred, sufficient energy sources were available for microorganisms to drive aerobic reduction of TCE, but these energy sources were rapidly depleted. The initial degraded TCE has since migrated to downgradient locations. In the second scenario, TCE anaerobic degradation occurs in organic-rich micro-environments within a generally aerobic aquifer. TCE maybe strongly absorbed to organic-rich materials in the aquifer matrix and degraded by local Immunities of microbes

  7. Near-field thermal radiative transfer and thermoacoustic effects from vapor plumes produced by pulsed CO{sub 2} laser ablation of bulk water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudryashov, S. I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, S. D.

    2006-12-15

    Submillimeter deep heating of bulk water by thermal radiation from ablative water plumes produced by a 10.6 {mu}m transversely excited atmospheric CO{sub 2} laser and the related acoustic generation has been studied using a contact time-resolved photoacoustic technique. Effective penetration depths of thermal radiation in water were measured as a function of incident laser fluence and the corresponding plume temperatures were estimated. The near-field thermal and thermoacoustic effects of thermal radiation in laser-ablated bulk water and their potential near-field implications are discussed.

  8. Site clearance working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana continue to be areas with a high level of facility removal, and the pace of removal is projected to increase. Regulations were promulgated for the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana requiring that abandoned sites be cleared of debris that could interfere with fishing and shrimping activities. The site clearance regulations also required verification that the sites were clear. Additionally, government programs were established to compensate fishermen for losses associated with snagging their equipment on oil and gas related objects that remained on the water bottoms in areas other than active producing sites and sites that had been verified as clear of obstructions and snags. The oil and gas industry funds the compensation programs. This paper reviews the regulations and evolving operating practices in the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana where site clearance and fisherman`s gear compensation regulations have been in place for a number of years. Although regulations and guidelines may be in place elsewhere in the world, this paper focuses on the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana. Workshop participants are encouraged to bring up international issues during the course of the workshop. Additionally, this paper raises questions and focuses on issues that are of concern to the various Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana water surface and water bottom stakeholders. This paper does not have answers to the questions or issues. During the workshop participants will debate the questions and issues in an attempt to develop consensus opinions and/or make suggestions that can be provided to the appropriate organizations, both private and government, for possible future research or policy adjustments. Site clearance and facility removal are different activities. Facility removal deals with removal of the structures used to produce oil and gas including platforms, wells, casing, piles, pipelines, well protection structures, etc.

  9. Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1993-09-01

    Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

  10. 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, Mark D.

    2008-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

  11. Conceptual Model of Iodine Behavior in the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Brady D.; Johnson, Christian D.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Last, George V.; Lee, Michelle H.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2015-09-01

    The fate and transport of 129I in the environment and potential remediation technologies are currently being studied as part of environmental remediation activities at the Hanford Site. A conceptual model describing the nature and extent of subsurface contamination, factors that control plume behavior, and factors relevant to potential remediation processes is needed to support environmental remedy decisions. Because 129I is an uncommon contaminant, relevant remediation experience and scientific literature are limited. Thus, the conceptual model also needs to both describe known contaminant and biogeochemical process information and to identify aspects about which additional information needed to effectively support remedy decisions. this document summarizes the conceptual model of iodine behavior relevant to iodine in the subsurface environment at the Hanford site.

  12. Three-Dimensional Groundwater Models of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site, Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Chen, Yousu

    2008-09-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed field-scale groundwater flow and transport simulations of the 300 Area to support the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Phase III Feasibility Study. The 300 Area is located in the southeast portion of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. Historical operations involving uranium fuel fabrication and research activities at the 300 Area have contaminated engineered liquid-waste disposal facilities, the underlying vadose zone, and the uppermost aquifer with uranium. The main objectives of this research were to develop numerical groundwater flow and transport models to help refine the site conceptual model, and to assist assessment of proposed alternative remediation technologies focused on the 300 Area uranium plume.

  13. TREATABILITY STUDY FOR EDIBLE OIL DEPLOYMENT FOR ENHANCED CVOC ATTENUATION FOR T-AREA, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B.; Looney, B.; Noonkester, J.; Hyde, W.; Walker, R.

    2012-05-15

    Groundwater beneath T-Area, a former laboratory and semiworks operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS), is contaminated by chlorinated solvents (cVOCs). Since the contamination was detected in the 1980s, the cVOCs at T-Area have been treated by a combination of soil vapor extraction and groundwater pump and treat. The site received approval to temporarily discontinue the active groundwater treatment and implement a treatability study of enhanced attenuation - an engineering and regulatory strategy that has recently been developed by DOE and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC 2007). Enhanced attenuation uses active engineering solutions to alter the target site in such a way that the contaminant plume will passively stabilize and shrink and to document that the action will be effective, timely, and sustainable. The paradigm recognizes that attenuation remedies are fundamentally based on a mass balance. Thus, long-term plume dynamics can be altered either by reducing the contaminant loading from the source or by increasing the rate of natural attenuation processes within all, or part of, the plume volume. The combination of technologies that emerged for T-Area included: (1) neat (pure) vegetable oil deployment in the deep vadose zone in the former source area, (2) emulsified vegetable oil deployment within the footprint of the groundwater plume, and (3) identification of attenuation mechanisms and rates for the distal portion of the plume. In the first part, neat oil spreads laterally forming a thin layer on the water table to intercept and reduce future cVOC loading (via partitioning) and reduce oxygen inputs (via biostimulation). In the second and third parts, emulsified oil forms active bioremediation reactor zones within the plume footprint to degrade existing groundwater contamination (via reductive dechlorination and/or cometabolism) and stimulates long-term attenuation capacity in the distal plume (via

  14. Legacy Management FUSRAP Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Falls Vicinity Properties, New York, Site Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Warehouses Site Oxford, Ohio, Site Painesville, Ohio, Site Seymour, Connecticut, Site Springdale, ...

  15. Burris Park, California, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Burris Park, California, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy ... Burris Park, California, Site Location of the Burris Park, California, Site Site ...

  16. Grand Junction, Colorado, Processing Site and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal and Processing Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal and processing sites at Grand Junction, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Sites Site Description and History The former Grand Junction processing site, historically known as the Climax uranium mill, sits at an elevation of

  17. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    units complies with all environmental, safety, and operational requirements. This web site describes the Hanford Site program for acceptance of radioactive waste....

  18. S1147500-Mound_Parcels.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  19. Mound_2000_Risk_Management.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  20. Mound, Ohio, Second Five-Year Review

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... and pursuant to the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, Section 161 (g) (42 ... of an 80 acre tract as conveyed from Ray C. Dunaway and Thelma Mae Dunaway to Oak ...

  1. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  2. PPPL Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virginia Finley, Robeert Sheneman and Jerry Levine

    2012-12-21

    Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratorys Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on?site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non?radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protections Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non?radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011, are documented and certified to be correct.

  3. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :i" _,, ' _~" ORISE 95/C-70 :E : i:; :' l,J : i.: RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY Op BUILDINGS 401, ' 403, AND ' m HITTMAN BUILDING $ <,' 2:. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE I .~~ ; " LEWISTON, ' NEW YORK : f? j:,:i I ,.J- ;b f" /: Li _e.*. ~,, I ,,~, ,:,,;:, Prepared by T. .I. Vitkus i,c Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division ;>::; Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education .,:, "Oak Ridge, Temressee 37831-0117 .F P ., ? :_ &,d

  4. Nevada National Security Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proud Past, Exciting Future Nevada National Security Site Pre-Proposal Meeting November 19, 2015 Agenda * 8:30 am Welcome * 9:00 am Overview of NNSS and NFO * 10:00 am Break * 10:30 am NNSS Video * 11:00 am Questions * 11:30 am Lunch * 1:00 pm Solicitation Overview * 2:15 pm Break * 2:45 pm Questions * 4:00 pm Conclusion The Nevada National Security Site * Large geographically diverse outdoor laboratory - 1,360 square miles of federally owned and controlled land - Surrounded by 4,500 square

  5. Nevada Site Office News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSA/NSO Office of Public Affairs http://www.nv.doe.gov P.O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, NV 89193-8518 News Media Contact: For Immediate Release: Darwin J. Morgan December 13, 2011 morgan@nv.doe.gov Kelly J. Snyder snyderk@nv.doe.gov 702-295-3521 New Support Services Contract Awarded for Nevada Site Office A new support services contract has been awarded at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Site Office. J.G. Management Systems, Inc., of Grand Junction, Colorado, will provide office

  6. Ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site, January-December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, C.S.; Rieger, J.T.; Raymond, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    This program is designed to evaluate existing and potential pathways of exposure to radioactivity and hazardous chemicals from site operations. This document contains an evaluation of data collected during CY 1984. During 1984, 339 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Two of these constituents, specifically, tritium and nitrate, have been selected for detailed discussion in this report. Tritium and nitrate in the primary plumes originating from the 200 Areas continue to move generally eastward toward the Columbia River in the direction of ground-water flow. The movement within these plumes is indicated by changes in trends within the analytical data from the monitoring wells. No discernible impact on ground water has yet been observed from the start-up of the PUREX plant in December 1983. The shape of the present tritium plume is similar to those described in previous ground-water monitoring reports, although slight changes on the outer edges have been noted. Radiological impacts from two potential pathways for radionuclide transport in ground water to the environment are discussed in this report. The pathways are: (1) human consumption of ground water from onsite wells, and (2) seepage of ground water into the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium in spring samples that were collected and analyzed in 1983, and in wells sampled adjacent to the Columbia River in 1984 confirmed that constituents in the ground water are entering the river via springs and subsurface flow. The primary areas where radionuclides enter the Columbia River via ground-water flow are the 100-N and 300 Areas and the shoreline adjacent to the Hanford Townsite. 44 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

  8. Oxnard, California, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Oxnard, California, Site This fact sheet provides information about the Oxnard, California, Site. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management manages historical records of work performed for the federal government at the Oxnard site. Location of the Oxnard, California, Site Site Description and History The Oxnard site occupies 13.75 acres in an industrial section of Oxnard, California, about 50 miles northwest of Los Angeles. Allis-Chalmers, a farm implement manufacturing company,

  9. Small Wind Site Assessment Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Tim; Preus, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Site assessment for small wind energy systems is one of the key factors in the successful installation, operation, and performance of a small wind turbine. A proper site assessment is a difficult process that includes wind resource assessment and the evaluation of site characteristics. These guidelines address many of the relevant parts of a site assessment with an emphasis on wind resource assessment, using methods other than on-site data collection and creating a small wind site assessment report.

  10. Untitled Page -- Considered Sites Summary

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Considered Sites Summary Considered Sites Select a Site 11 E (2) DISPOSAL CELL - 037 ACF INDUSTRIES (Albuquerque, New Mexico) ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. (Buffalo, New York) ACID/PUEBLO CANYON, NM, SITE (Los Alamos, New Mexico) ADRIAN, MI, SITE (Adrian, Michigan) AEROPROJECTS, INC. (West Chester, Pennsylvania) AFRICAN METALS (New York, New York) AIR FORCE PLANT NO. 36 (Lockland, Ohio) AJAX-MAGNETHERMIC CORP. (Youngstown, Ohio) ALABAMA ORDNANCE WORKS (Sylacauga, Alabama) ALBANY, OR, SITE (Albany,

  11. Fairfield, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected with the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup, including the ...

  12. Albany, Oregon, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected with the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup, including the ...

  13. Springdale, Pennsylvania, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected with the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup, including the ...

  14. Seymour, Connecticut, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected with the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup, including the ...

  15. Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected with the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup, including the ...

  16. Madison, Illinois, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected with the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup, including the ...

  17. Oxford, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected with the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup, including the ...

  18. Painesville, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected to the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup. In 1997 Congress ...

  19. Hamilton, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected with the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup, including the ...

  20. Paducah DOE and Site Contractors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paducah Site Office. DOE manages the day-to-day operations out of the Paducah site office, located at the PGDP.