National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mound site plume

  1. Mound, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mound, Ohio, Site This fact sheet provides information about the Mound, Ohio, Site. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Location of the Mound, Ohio, Site Site Description and History The Mound site 1 in Miamisburg, Ohio, named for a nearby Native American burial ground, is located approximately 10 miles southwest of Dayton, Ohio. The Great Miami River fows southwest

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ohio Mound, Ohio, Site A CERCLA and/or RCRA Site Mound2014 Remediation of the Mound, Ohio, Site was conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The site long-term monitoring responsibility transferred to the Office of Legacy Management(LM) in 2010 and requires operation and maintenance of a pump and treatment system, groundwater monitoring, institutional controls monitoring, records-related activities, and stakeholder support.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ohio Mound, Ohio, Site Site Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet Annual Institutional Controls Report Community Involvement Plan Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan Operations and Maintenance Plan Internal Links Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Administrative Records External Links Mound Development Corporation (MDC) Ohio Environmental Protection Agency U.S. Environmental Protection

  4. Renewed Importance of the Mound Site Annual Institutional Controls...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual, routine IC inspections are conducted at many LM sites. However, inspections at the Mound site are anything but routine, due to its unique nature. 1862.jpg Collaboration ...

  5. Mound site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, L.R.

    1992-06-01

    Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG&G Mound Applied Technologies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE`s weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear, and energy technology. The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound`s operations on the population and the environment. This report summarizes data from the Environmental Monitoring Program, through which Mound maintains continuous surveillance of radiological and nonradiological substances released from the facility.

  6. Renewed Importance of the Mound Site Annual Institutional Controls

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assessments | Department of Energy Renewed Importance of the Mound Site Annual Institutional Controls Assessments Renewed Importance of the Mound Site Annual Institutional Controls Assessments July 10, 2014 - 3:55pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) completed its 2014 annual institutional controls (IC) assessment of the Mound site in Miamisburg, Ohio, and confirmed that the

  7. Reindustrialization Workshop Held at Mound Site | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reindustrialization Workshop Held at Mound Site Reindustrialization Workshop Held at Mound Site October 14, 2014 - 10:13am Addthis What does this project do? Goal 4. Optimize the use of land and assets. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has partnered with local communities to determine the best reuse of land, assets, and facilities, and the Mound-site community is no exception. In May, DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) and the Mound Development Corporation (MDC) co-hosted a

  8. Mound site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, L.R.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound operations on the population and the environment. Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG&G Mound Applied Technologies for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE`s weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear and energy technologies.

  9. LEGAL NOTICE for Mound Site 2016 CERCLA Five-Year Review

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Page 1 of 2 LEGAL NOTICE for Mound Site 2016 CERCLA Five-Year Review The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is conducting the fourth Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Five-Year Review of the Mound Site in Miamisburg, Ohio. The Five-Year Review process ensures that the selected CERCLA remedies remain protective of human health and the environment. After the Mound Plant Site was placed on the CERCLA National Priority List

  10. Conversion of the Bryan Mound geological site characterization reports to a three-dimensional model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2005-04-01

    The Bryan Mound salt dome, located near Freeport, Texas, is home to one of four underground crude oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Bryan Mound site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 20 oil-storage caverns at the site. This work provides an internally consistent geologic model of the Bryan Mound site that can be used in support of future work.

  11. Evaluation of brine disposal from the Bryan Mound site of the strategic petroleum reserve program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, Robert J.; Chittenden, Jr, Mark E.; Harper, Jr, Donald E.; Kelly, Jr, Francis J.; Loeblich, Laurel A.; McKinney, Larry D.; Minello, Thomas J.; Park, E. Taisoo; Randall, Robert E.; Slowey, J. Frank

    1981-01-01

    On March 10, 1980, the Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began leaching the Bryan Mound salt dome and discharging the resulting brine into the coastal waters off Freeport, Texas. During the months of March and April, a team of scientists and engineers from Texas A and M University conducted an intensive environmental study of the area surrounding the diffuser site. A pipeline has been laid from the Bryan Mound site to a location 12.5 statute miles (20 km) offshore. The last 3060 ft (933 m) of this pipeline is a 52-port diffuser through which brine can be discharged at a maximum rate of 680,000 barrels per day. Initially, 16 ports were open which permitted a maximum discharge rate of 350,000 barrels per day and a continuous brine discharge was achieved on March 13, 1980. The purpose of this report is to describe the findings of the project team during the intensive postdisposal study period of March and April, 1980. The major areas of investigation are physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management.

  12. EIS-0302: Transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) operations at the Mound Site near Miamisburg, Ohio, to an alternative DOE site.

  13. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  14. MOUND Environmental Restoration Program

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Environmental Restoration Program ._. I s ! I " ' Al /. i i : MOUND Environmental Restoration Program VlOUND I MOUND PLANT POTENTIAL RELEASE SITE PACKAGE Notice of Public Review Period hgram The following potential release site (PRS) packages will be available for public review ir he CERCLA Public Reading Room, 305 E. Central Ave., Miamisburg, Ohio beginning lune 17, 1997. Public comment will be accepted on these packages from June 17, 1997, .hrough July 18, 1997. PRS 30: Building 27

  15. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Laboratory - OH 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mound Laboratory - OH 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mound Laboratory (OH.19) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Mound, Ohio, Site Documents Related to Mound Laboratory Workshop presentations emphasized the challenges of reindustrializing former DOE sites and the importance of involving local government and the community

  17. Offshore oceanographic and environmental monitoring services for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume I. Appendices. Annual report for the Bryan Mound Site, September 1982-August 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1984-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began leaching the Bryan Mound salt dome and discharging brine into the coastal waters offshore of Freeport, Texas on March 10, 1980. This report describes the findings of a team of Texas A and M University scientists and engineers who have conducted a study to evaluate the effects of the Bryan Mound brine discharge on the marine environment. The study addresses the areas of physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos and data management. It focuses on the period from September 1982 through August 1983. The ambient physical environment and its temporal and spatial variability were studied by means of continuously recording in situ current/conductivitiy/temperature meters and twelve, one-day synoptic hydrographic cruises. The quarterly water and sediment quality data show a small increase in salinity, sodium and chloride ions occurs in the bottom waters and sediment pore waters near the diffuser relative to those values measured at stations farther away. Data from the brine plume study for this reporting study show the largest areal extent within the +1 o/oo above ambient salinity contour was 40.0 km/sup 2/ which occurred on August 11, 1983. It appears that brine disposal at Bryan Mound has had neglible if any influence on the nekton community surrounding the diffuser. The benthic quarterly data from 26 stations, including 7 collections made after the diffuser outflow rate was increased to 1,000,000 barrels/day, show the total numbers of species at the diffuser station were higher than most other nearfield stations as well as many farfield stations in both the pre- and post-1,000,000 barrels/day brine flow periods. 138 references, 175 figures, 53 tables.

  18. Microsoft Word - 20110322_MoundNotice.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Legal Notice for Mound Site 2011 CERCLA Five-Year Review has been removed from the LM website. This document is outdated and no longer needed/required

  19. Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy April 17, 2013 - 11:39am Addthis Ray Seiler, Mound Science and Energy Museum President, is one of the many museum volunteers who routinely talks to visitors, such as this group from Iowa who are interested in the history of the Mound site. Ray Seiler, Mound Science and Energy Museum President, is one of the many museum volunteers who routinely talks to visitors, such as

  20. Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Deep soil mixing at the Paducah site will involve a large-diameter auger like this one. Deep soil mixing at the Paducah site will involve a large-diameter auger like this one. Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (right) and Paducah Site Lead Reinhard Knerr look at a three-dimensional model

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound_Benefits

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ohio > Mound_Benefits Mound, Ohio, Site Former Workers' Employment Verification and Benefits Administration Contractor Employment Verification Mercer, Mound Benefits Center (866) 296-5036 Medical and Life Insurance for Former EG&G, BWXTO, and CH2M HILL Employees For questions about health insurance coverage and/or dependent information, life insurance and/or beneficiaries, etc.: Mercer, Mound Benefits Center P.O. Box 9735, Providence, RI 02940 Benefit Center Website (866) 296-5036 9:00

  2. Evaluation of brine disposal from the Bryan Mound site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hann, R.W. Jr.; Randall, R.E.

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the environmental conditions found by the principal investigators during the predisposal study conducted from September 1977 through February 1980 prior to the start of brine discharge in March 1980. The major areas of investigation are physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management. Volume 1 describes the results of the predisposal study, and it is divided into eight chapters entitled: Physical Oceanography, Analysis of the Discharge Plume, Water and Sediment Quality, Nekton, Benthos, Zooplankton, Phytoplankton, and Data Management. Volume 2 consists of appendices which contain additional supporting data in the form of figures and tables.

  3. Application Of ERT For Tracking CO2 Plume Growth And Movement At The SECARB Cranfield Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, C R; Ramirez, A L; Newmark, R L; Aines, R; Friedmann, S J

    2009-04-27

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) installed to track the development of an injected subsurface CO{sub 2} plume at the SECARB Cranfield, MS. sequestration site will be the deepest subsurface application of this method to date. ERT utilizes vertical arrays of electrodes, usually in a cross-well arrangement, to perform four-electrode measurements of changes in the spatial distribution of electrical resistance within a subsurface formation. Because a formation containing super-critical CO{sub 2} is approximately five times as resistive as its surroundings, significant resistance changes are anticipated during plume growth and movement within a brine-filled formation. ERT has also been shown to be quite sensitive to CO{sub 2} saturation changes. The Cranfield ERT electrode arrays will be emplaced at a depth exceeding 10,000 ft. (3280 m); the system design and installation must address significant challenges associated with both the depth and borehole conditions including temperatures of 258 F (126 C), pressures exceeding 5000 psi and a groundwater pH of 3. In addition, the system must allow co-located emplacement and concurrent operation with other monitoring techniques that utilize the same boreholes. ERT electrode and cabling will be attached to the outside of the well casing, allowing free access to the interior of the well, which is required by some of the other monitoring techniques being fielded. We will highlight these design challenges along with preliminary simulations indicating the anticipated level of imaging and the advantages of applying the technique in conjunction with other methods (such as cross-well seismics) to more accurately track the properties, location and movement of CO{sub 2} plumes.

  4. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site-Wide Institutional Controls Applied to the Former DOE Mound Site Property June 2011 LMS/MND/S07757 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MND/S07757 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls Applied to the Former DOE Mound Site Property June 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  5. Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hranac, K.C.; Chromec, F.W.; Fiehweg, R.; Hopkins, J.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter.

  6. Mound Supports Galileo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monsanto Research Corporation

    1986-01-01

    This video describes the invention of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at Mound Laboratory, and radioisotope heat source production from 1 watt-thermal to 2400 watts-thermal. RTGs have been used in many space vehicles, but the RTG built for the Galileo mission to orbit Jupiter is the largest. This RTG unit will produce 4400 watts-thermal and convert to 300 watts-electric. The plutonium-238 heat source assembly and test at Mound is described. The RTGs are tested under simulated mission conditions. The RTG leakage radiation is carefully measured for background compensation for on-board radiation monitoring instruments.

  7. Mound, Ohio, Second Five-Year Review

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Report Second Five-Year Review for the Mound, Ohio, Site Miamisburg, Ohio September 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1308-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Mound, Ohio, Second Five-Year Review September 2006

  8. Mound publications for 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowka, Stephen L.

    1992-05-01

    This document is a compilation of all Mound formal technical publications and oral presentations for calendar year 1991. It is intended to serve as an aid to personnel in obtaining or referring to specific publications by giving the proper complete reference for each information item published during the year. Some items, such as proceedings publications, may have issue dates or periods of coverage prior to 1991; however, they were formally published during 1991.

  9. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30

    Contaminated groundwater associated with Building 100 at the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center, formerly the DOE Pinellas plant, is the primary remedial challenge that remains to be addressed at the site. Currently, Building 100 is an active industrial facility that is now owned and operated by the Pinellas county government. Groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells recently installed near the southern boundary of the site suggest that contaminated groundwater has migrated off the plant site. In response to the challenges presented by the Building 100 plume, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) requested assistance from the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) to provide a review team to make technical recommendations so that they can efficiently and effectively address characterization and remediation of the plume. The review team was unanimous in the conclusion that a dynamic strategy that combines a phased implementation of direct push samplers, sensors, and tools can be used to better delineate the extent of contamination, control plume migration, and rapidly remediate the contaminated groundwater at the site. The initial efforts of the team focused on reviewing the site history and data, organizing the information into a conceptual model, identifying appropriate technologies, and recommending an integrated strategy. The current groundwater data from the site indicate a two-lobed plume extending to the east and south. To the east vinyl chloride is the primary contaminant of concern, to the south, vinyl chloride and cis1, 2-DCE are the primary contaminants. The limited data that are available suggest that reductive dechlorination of the TCE is already occurring but is not sufficient to prevent offsite migration of low concentrations of TCE daughter products. The team recommends that DOE pursue a strategy that builds on the natural cleansing capacity of the subsurface with reductive methods including biostimulation and/or bioaugmentation to provide a sustainable remediation system within the flow path of the plume. Additional data will be required to implement this approach and will include: (1) Better delineation of the nature and extent of contamination; (2) Demonstration the plume is currently stable or shrinking; and (3) Demonstration the full reductive dechlorination is occurring. The technical team recommends that DOE use a phased approach to identify residual contamination and to provide rapid installation of remedies. Matrices of characterization and remediation sensors, technologies, and tools were developed by the team in order to match the specific conditions and requirements of the site. The team provides a specific example of remedy that includes the incorporation of a dynamic characterization strategy moving from minimally invasive to more aggressive field techniques, the consideration of multiple complementary remediation approaches based on a spatiotemporally phased approach keyed to the different demands of different parts of the plume, and the integration and sequencing of the characterization and remediation activities.

  10. Independent technical review of the Mound Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report documents an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the facilities, organizations, plans, and activities required to transition particular elements of the Mound Plant from Defense Program (DP) funded operation as appropriate either to community developed reuse or safe deactivation leading to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The review was conducted at the request of the Dr. Willis Bixby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy EM-60, Office of Facility Transition and Management and is a consensus of the nine member ITR Team. Information for the review was drawn from documents provided to the ITR Team by the Miamisburg Area Office (MB) of the DOE, EG&G, the City of Miamisburg, and others; and from presentations, discussions, interviews, and facility inspections at the Mound Plant during the weeks of March 14 and March 28, 1994. During the week of April 25, 1994, the ITR Team met at Los Alamos, New Mexico to develop consensus recommendations. A presentation of the core recommendations was made at the Mound Plant on May 5, 1994. This is an independent assessment of information available to, and used by, the Mound Plant personnel. Repetition of the information is not meant to imply discovery by the ITR Team. Team members, however, acting as independent reviewers, frequently assess the information from a perspective that differs significantly from that of the Mound Plant personnel. The report is based on information obtained and conditions observed during the March 1994 review interval. The ITR process and normal site work often initiate rapid, beneficial changes in understanding and organization immediately following the review. These changes frequently alter conditions observed during the review, but the report does not address changes subsequent to the review interval.

  11. Analysis of Aquifer Response, Groundwater Flow, and PlumeEvolution at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Su, Grace W.

    2005-02-24

    This report presents a continuation from Oldenburg et al. (2002) of analysis of the hydrogeology, In-Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) results, aquifer response, and changes in the trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume at Operational Unit 1 (OU 1) adjacent to the former Fritzsche Army Airfield at the former Fort Ord Army Base, located on Monterey Bay in northern Monterey County. Fuels and solvents were burned on a portion of OU 1 called the Fire Drill Area (FDA) during airport fire suppression training between 1962 and 1985. This activity resulted in soil and groundwater contamination in the unconfined A-aquifer. In the late 1980's, soil excavation and bioremediation were successful in remediating soil contamination at the site. Shortly thereafter, a groundwater pump, treat, and recharge system commenced operation. This system has been largely successful at remediating groundwater contamination at the head of the groundwater plume. However, a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume extends approximately 3000 ft (900 m) to the northwest away from the FDA. In the analyses presented here, we augment our prior work (Oldenburg et al., 2002) with new information including treatment-system totalizer data, recent water-level and chemistry data, and data collected from new wells to discern trends in contaminant migration and groundwater flow that may be useful for ongoing remediation efforts. Some conclusions from the prior study have been modified based on these new analyses, and these are pointed out clearly in this report.

  12. Monsanto MOUND FACILITY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monsanto . MOUND FACILITY Operated for the United States Department of Energy March 26, 1981 Dr. William E. Mott, Director Environmental and Safety Engineering Division U. S. Department of Energy Washington, D. C. 20545 Dear Bill: Enclosed please find the short-term radon/radon progeny screening report conducted at the Seneca Army Depot in Romulus, New York per your request. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact me. Sincerely, WGY:mls Enclosure cc: R. Barber w/encl

  13. From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits— Mound Science and Energy Museum Programs Cover a Wide Range of Topics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mound Science and Energy Museum (MSEM) is an active, volunteer-led organization located at the former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mound site in Miamisburg, Ohio. MSEM keeps the 60-year...

  14. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  15. Environmental survey preliminary report, Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Plant, conducted August 18 through 29, 1986. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Mound Plant. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Mound Plant, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey found no environmental problems at the Mound Plant that represent an immediate threat to human life. The environmental problems identified at the Mound Plant by the Survey confirm that the site is confronted with a number of environmental problems which are by and large a legacy from past practices at a time when environmental problems were less well understood. Theses problems vary in terms of their magnitude and risk, as described in this report. Although the sampling and analysis performed by the Mound Plant Survey will assist in further identifying environmental problems at the site, a complete understanding of the significance of some of the environmental problems identified requires a level of study and characterization that is beyond the scope of the Survey. Actions currently under way or planned at the site, particularly the Phase II activities of the Comprehensive Environmental Analysis and Response Program (CEARP) as developed and implemented by the Albuquerque Operations Office, will contribute toward meeting this requirement. 85 refs., 24 figs., 20 tabs.

  16. EIS-0014: Mound Facility, Miamisburg, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to assess the environmental implications of its continuing and future programs at the Mound Facility (formerly designated Mound Laboratory), located in Miamisburg, Ohio.

  17. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 9): Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund Site, Muscoy Plume Operable Unit, San Bernardino, CA, March 24, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Muscoy Plume Operable Unit, Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund site. The Muscoy Plume OU is an interim action focusing on contamination in the underground water supply in the Bunker Hill Basin of San Bernardino, west of the Shandin Hills. The remedy involves groundwater extraction (pumping) and treatment of 6,200 gallons per minute (gpm) in San Bernardino at the leading edge of the contaminant plume. All the extracted contaminated groundwater shall be treated to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) by either of two proven treatment technologies: granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration or air stripping. The treated water will be transferred to a public water supply agency for distribution. Groundwater monitoring wells will be installed and sampled regularly to help evaluate the effectiveness of the remedy.

  18. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  19. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IC Assessment Checklist This page intentionally left blank CHECKLIST WORKSHEET - COMBINED - ALL PARCELS Review of Effectiveness of Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page A-1 Scope: Entire Mound Site Preliminary inspections performed on: April 5 and 7, 2011 Physical Inspection Walk around on: April 12, 2011 Review led by: Art Kleinrath, DOE LM Phone #: 937-227-2237 Participants in

  20. Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

    2014-01-08

    Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2-ECA Mound Presentation - Kirshenberg_comp

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Opportunities and DOE Processes HOW DOES DOE MEET THE GOALS WITHOUT SIGNIFICANT FUNDING - PARTNER WITH COMMUNITIES UTILIZE DOE ASSETS Primary Assets to Use Mound * Primary types of assets: - Land/Property Based - Technology Based COMBINATION - People Based Mound Story * A unique site * Community Created a vision * Fought for the vision - Were told no 100 times - Turned the no's into yes - Created a success story Assets * Land * Buffer zones * Supportive Host Communities who have assets and

  2. Sulphur Extraction at Bryan Mound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Carolyn L; Lord, Anna C. Snider

    2015-08-01

    The Bryan Mound caprock was subjected to extens ive sulphur mining prior to the development of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Undoubtedl y, the mining has modified the caprock integrity. Cavern wells at Bryan Mound have been subject to a host of well integr ity concerns with many likely compromised by the cavernous capro ck, surrounding corrosive environment (H 2 SO 4 ), and associated elevated residual temperatures al l of which are a product of the mining activities. The intent of this study was to understand the sulphur mining process and how the mining has affected the stability of the caprock and how the compromised caprock has influenced the integrity of the cavern wells. After an extensiv e search to collect pert inent information through state agencies, literature sear ches, and the Sandia SPR librar y, a better understanding of the caprock can be inferred from the knowledge gaine d. Specifically, the discovery of the original ore reserve map goes a long way towards modeling caprock stability. In addition the gained knowledge of sulphur mining - subs idence, superheated corrosive wa ters, and caprock collapse - helps to better predict the post mi ning effects on wellbore integrity. This page intentionally left blank

  3. Mound Site Community Involvement Plan 2012

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... and efficiently manage the environmental and human legacy issues for current and future generations related to the federal government's Cold War nuclear weapons program. ...

  4. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John

    2013-07-01

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  5. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficient (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.

  6. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficientmore » (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.« less

  7. Investigation of the Strontium-90 Contaminant Plume along the Shoreline of the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Patton, Gregory W.; Hartman, Mary J.; Spane, Frank A.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts are underway to remediate strontium-laden groundwater to the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site. Past practices of the 100-N reactor liquid waste disposal sites has left strontium-90 sorbed onto sediments which is a continuing source of contaminant discharge to the river. The Remediation Task of the Science and Technology Project assessed the interaction of groundwater and river water at the hyporheic zone. Limited data have been obtained at this interface of contaminant concentrations, geology, groundwater chemistry, affects of river stage and other variables that may affect strontium-90 release. Efforts were also undertaken to determine the extent, both laterally and horizontally, of the strontium-90 plume along the shoreline and to potentially find an alternative constituent to monitor strontium-90 that would be more cost effective and could possibly be done under real time conditions. A baseline of strontium-90 concentrations along the shoreline was developed to help assess remediation technologies.

  8. Office of Inspector General report on audit of shutdown and transition of the Mound Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-24

    With the end of the Cold War, the Department of Energy (Department) has greatly reduced the production of nuclear weapons and redirected the capabilities and focus of the weapons complex. As part of this redirection, the Mound Plant was transferred from a Defense Program site to an Environmental Management site with emphasis on accelerated cleanup and transition of facilities and personal property to the local community. This audit was initiated to determine if the shutdown and transition of the Mound Plant was progressing effectively and efficiently. The Department prepared a Nonnuclear Consolidation Plan (NCP) designed to reduce its costs of operation by closing and consolidating facilities. In contrast to the goal of the NCP, the Department plans to keep a portion of the Mound Plant open solely to perform work for other Federal agencies. Specifically, the Department has decided to continue assembling and testing isotopic heat sources and radioisotope thermoelectric generators (HS/RTG) at the Mound Plant despite the transfer or planned transfer of all other production operations.The Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology decided to continue its HS/RTG operations at the Mound Plant without adequately considering the overall economic goals of the Department. As a result, the Department may not achieve the savings envisioned by the NCP. Also, the Department may incur between $4 million and $8.5 million more than necessary each year to continue its HS/RTG operations at the Mound Plant. Additionally, if the HS/RTG operations stay at the Mound Plant, the Department will spend more than $3 million to consolidate these operations into one location.

  9. City of Blue Mound, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mound, Kansas (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Blue Mound Place: Kansas Phone Number: (913) 756-2447 Outage Hotline: (913) 756-2447 References: EIA Form...

  10. EIS-0001: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Brazoria County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve prepared this SEIS to address the environmental impacts of construction and operation of two types of brine disposal systems and a new water supply system. This EIS supplements FES 76/77-6, Bryan Mound Storage Site.

  11. Mound Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mound Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Page 1 of 16 EM Home | Regulatory Compliance | Environmental Compliance Agreements Mound Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 BEFORE THE OHIO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY In the Matter Of: United States Department of Energy : Director's Final Mound Facility : Findings and Order P.O. Box 66 : Miamisburg, Ohio 45343-0066 : Respondent It is hereby agreed by and among the parties hereto as follows: Table of

  12. Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    finances; Manufacturing; Research and development; Trainining and education;Other:Economic Development Phone Number: 937-865-4462 Website: www.mound.com...

  13. Enforcement Letter, EG&G Mound Applied Technologies - August 22, 1996 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy EG&G Mound Applied Technologies - August 22, 1996 Enforcement Letter, EG&G Mound Applied Technologies - August 22, 1996 August 22, 1996 Issued to EG&G Mound Applied Technologies related to the Inadvertent Transfer of Radiological Contamination at the Mound Plant On August 22, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to EG&G Mound Applied Technologies regarding theinadvertent transfer of radiological contamination that

  14. EA-1239: Disposition of Mound Plant's South Property, Miamisburg, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared an EA for the proposed title transfer of 123 acres of land referred to as the “South Property” at the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio.

  15. Blue Mounds, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Blue Mounds is a village in Dane County, Wisconsin. It falls under Wisconsin's 2nd...

  16. EA-1001: Commercialization of the Mound Plant, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to commercialize surplus facilities such as the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio.  Commercialization will make...

  17. Innovative Use of Cr(VI) Plume Depictions and Pump-and-Treat Capture Analysis to Estimate Risks of Contaminant Discharge to Surface Water at Hanford Reactor Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Chuck W.; Hanson, James P.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Tonkin, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Hanford Site nuclear reactor operations required large quantities of high-quality cooling water, which was treated with chemicals including sodium dichromate dihydrate for corrosion control. Cooling water leakage, as well as intentional discharge of cooling water to ground during upset conditions, produced extensive groundwater recharge mounds consisting largely of contaminated cooling water and resulted in wide distribution of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) contamination in the unconfined aquifer. The 2013 Cr(VI) groundwater plumes in the 100 Areas cover approximately 6 km2 (1500 acres), primarily in the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units (OUs). The Columbia River is a groundwater discharge boundary; where the plumes are adjacent to the Columbia River there remains a potential to discharge Cr(VI) to the river at concentrations above water quality criteria. The pump-and-treat systems along the River Corridor are operating with two main goals: 1) protection of the Columbia River, and 2) recovery of contaminant mass. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat systems was needed to determine if the Columbia River was protected from contamination, and also to determine where additional system modifications may be needed. In response to this need, a technique for assessing the river protection was developed which takes into consideration seasonal migration of the plume and hydraulic performance of the operating well fields. Groundwater contaminant plume maps are generated across the Hanford Site on an annual basis. The assessment technique overlays the annual plume and the capture efficiency maps for the various pump and treat systems. The river protection analysis technique was prepared for use at the Hanford site and is described in detail in M.J. Tonkin, 2013. Interpolated capture frequency maps, based on mapping dynamic water level observed in observation wells and derived water levels in the vicinity of extraction and injection wells, are developed initially. Second, simulated capture frequency maps are developed, based on transport modelling results. Both interpolated and simulated capture frequency maps are based on operation of the systems over a full year. These two capture maps are then overlaid on the plume distribution maps for inspection of the relative orientation of the contaminant plumes with the capture frequency. To quantify the relative degree of protection of the river from discharges of Cr(VI) (and conversely, the degree of threat) at any particular location, a systematic method of evaluating and mapping the plume/capture relationship was developed. By comparing the spatial relationship between contaminant plumes and hydraulic capture frequency, an index of relative protectiveness is developed and the results posted on the combined plume/capture plan view map. Areas exhibiting lesser degrees of river protection are identified for remedial process optimization actions to control plumes and prevent continuing discharge of Cr(VI) to the river.

  18. Mounded LPG storage - Experience and developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, D.

    1988-01-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is stored after production, and for distribution and use, in pressure vessels which vary in size from a few kilogrammes to many thousands of tons. The types of LPG under consideration are commercial butane, commercial propane, or mixtures of the two gases in varying proportions. Mounded storage systems are becoming popular as an alternative to the better-known traditional systems. The most widely used and therefore best-known of the traditional systems are the above-ground pressure-vessel designs. These more commonly comprise factory-made cylinders which are installed horizontally, being supported on saddles at each end of the vessel. When such vessels are installed in an LPG terminal, depot, or filling plant, they are required in multiple units to facilitate the storage of more than one grade of product and to enable regular maintenance and inspection to be carried out. Today's safety regulations require such installations to be divided into sub-groups of six tanks, with all the tanks located at a safe distance from one another, and from other facilities in the immediate area. These safety distances are being increased as a result of experience, which means terminals now require large areas of land.

  19. Microsoft Word - N01535_B100 Plume Delin Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Building 100 Off-Site Plume Delineation South of Bryan Dairy Road Data Report for Rally Stores Property November 2010 LMS/PIN/N01535 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01535 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Building 100 Area Off-Site Plume Delineation South of Bryan Dairy Road Data Report for Rally Stores Property November 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Building 100 Area Off-Site Plume Delineation South of Bryan Dairy Road November 2010 Doc.

  20. Enforcement Letter-Mound-08/22/1996

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2, 1996 Mr. Michael T. Sullivan [ ] EG&G Mound Applied Technologies P.O. Box 3000 Miamisburg, OH 45343-3000 Re: Noncompliance Number NTS-OH-MB-EGGM-EGGMAT01-1996-0001 Dear Mr. Sullivan: On April 17, 1996, the Office of Enforcement and Investigation conducted an onsite evaluation of the referenced potential noncompliance reported to Department of Energy (DOE) by EG&G Mound (EG&G) in the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). This potential noncompliance, which occurred on January 11,

  1. Test fire environmental testing operations at Mound Applied Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes Mound Laboratory`s environmental testing operations. The function of environmental testing is to perform quality environmental (thermal, mechanical, spin, resistance, visual) testing/conditioning of inert/explosive products to assure their compliance with specified customer acceptance criteria. Capabilities, organization, equipment specifications, and test facilities are summarized.

  2. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J.

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  3. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-02-14

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.

  4. DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

    2010-12-02

    Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

  5. CERCLA - Site Selector

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Management About Legacy Management News Request Information photo_header OLM_bannerblue CERCLA Home: About CERCLA, CERLCA Indexes, CERCLA Help Current Site > None Selected CERCLA HOME Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Fernald Preserve Monticello Site Mound Site - Miamisburg Closure Project Rocky Flats Site Weldon Spring Search the Administrative Record The White House USA.gov E-Gov Information Quality FOIA Privacy Program Jobs Opportunity Bulletin Board U.S. Department of

  6. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - 8-Mound Connector Presentation for Mound Development Corp. 5-13-14-Stanley_comp

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CONNECTOR Miamisburg-Springboro Pike and Benner Road Benner Road Miamisburg- Springboro Pike PURPOSE OF PROJECT * Improve access between the I-75/Austin Boulevard interchange the City of Miamisburg, Miami Township and the Mound Advanced Technology Center * Improve safety by addressing design deficiencies * Improve access for pedestrians and bicyclists * Widening to three lanes between Medlar Road and Benner Road * Intersection reconstruction * Replace bridge over stream * Raise road to eliminate

  8. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Mound, Inc- December 22, 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Mound, Inc. related to a Radioactive Contamination Event during Remediation Activities at the Miamisburg Closure Project

  9. Persistent source influences on the trailing edge of a groundwater plume,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and natural attenuation timeframes: The F-Area Savannah River Site (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Persistent source influences on the trailing edge of a groundwater plume, and natural attenuation timeframes: The F-Area Savannah River Site Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Persistent source influences on the trailing edge of a groundwater plume, and natural attenuation timeframes: The F-Area Savannah River Site Authors: Wan, J. ; Tokunaga, T. ; Dong, W. ; Denham, M. ; Hubbard,

  10. Overview of surface studies on high energy materials at Mound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moddeman, W.E.; Collins, L.W.; Wang, P.S.; Haws, L.D.; Wittberg, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1975 Mound has been examining the surface structure of high energy materials and the interaction of these materials with various metal containers. The high energy materials that have been studied include: the pyrotechnic TiH/sub x//KClO/sub 4/, the Al/Cu/sub 2/O machinable thermite, the PETN, HMX and RDX explosives, and two plastic bonded explosives (PBX). Aluminum and alloys of Fe, Ni and Cr have been used as the containment materials. Two aims in this research are: (1) the elucidation of the mechanism of pyrotechnic ignition and (2) the compatibility of high energy materials with their surroundings. New information has been generated by coupling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with thermal data. In particular, AES and XPS studies on the pyrotechnic materials and on thermites have shown the mechanism of ignition to be nearly independent of the type of oxidizer present but directly related to surface chemistry of the fuels. In studies on the two PBX's, PBX-9407 and LX-16, it was concluded that the Exon coating on 9407 was complete and greater than or equal to 100A; whereas in LX-16, the coating was < 100A or even incomplete. AES and scanning Auger have been used to characterize the surface composition and oxide thickness for an iron-nickel alloy and showed the thicker oxides to have the least propensity for atmospheric hydrocarbon adsorption. Data are presented and illustrations made which highlight this new approach to studying ignition and compatibility of high energy materials. Finally, the salient features of the X-SAM-800 purchased by Mound are discussed in light of future studies on high energy materials.

  11. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for carbon dioxide geologic sequestration protecting the sources of potable water.

  12. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, J.H.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

  13. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM | Department of Energy 05: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM Summary This Environmental Assessment evaluates an interim measure to control chromium plume migration and maintain the 50 parts-per-billion (ppb) and

  14. Cost estimate for muddy water palladium production facility at Mound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAdams, R.K.

    1988-11-30

    An economic feasibility study was performed on the ''Muddy Water'' low-chlorine content palladium powder production process developed by Mound. The total capital investment and total operating costs (dollars per gram) were determined for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg in 1-kg increments. The report includes a brief description of the Muddy Water process, the process flow diagram, and material balances for the various production batch sizes. Two types of facilities were evaluated--one for production of new, ''virgin'' palladium powder, and one for recycling existing material. The total capital investment for virgin facilities ranged from $600,000 --$1.3 million for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg, respectively. The range for recycle facilities was $1--$2.3 million. The total operating cost for 100% acceptable powder production in the virgin facilities ranged from $23 per gram for a 1-kg production batch size to $8 per gram for a 10-kg batch size. Similarly for recycle facilities, the total operating cost ranged from $34 per gram to $5 per gram. The total operating cost versus product acceptability (ranging from 50%--100% acceptability) was also evaluated for both virgin and recycle facilities. Because production sizes studied vary widely and because scale-up factors are unknown for batch sizes greater than 1 kg, all costs are ''order-of-magnitude'' estimates. All costs reported are in 1987 dollars.

  15. Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudeen, David Keith; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

  16. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, James H. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  17. Environmental assessment and planning at Mound - environmental monitoring capabilities and personnel profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    Through its long experience with radioactive materials, Mound has developed a comprehensive, routine, offsite, environmental surveillance program to safeguard its employees, the physical plant, and the integrity of the surrounding environment from any potential adverse effects of its widely diverse operations. Effluent samples are analyzed for radiological and non-radiological parameters. The environment surrounding Mound Facility is continuously monitored - air, water, foodstuffs, vegetation, soil, and silt samples are analyzed to ensure that radioisotopic concentrations and other possible pollutants are well within the stringent standards adopted by the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agencies (both federal and state), and various regional and local agencies. Moreover, this environmental surveillance program has been designed to ensure that the facility is designed, constructed, managed, operated, and maintained in a manner that continues to meet all federal, state, and local standards for environmental protection. Work in environmental science has been broadened to assess environmental factors associated with various aspects of the National Energy Plan. Both the management and staff at Mound have undertaken a firm commitment to make Mound`s environmental monitoring capabilities available to agencies that have the responsibility for the resolution of important environmental issues.

  18. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  19. Solar-Powered Air Stripping at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado - 12361

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boylan, John A.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Site (the Site), near Denver, Colorado, is a former nuclear weapons facility that was constructed beginning in 1951. With the end of the Cold War, the Site was cleaned up and closed in 2005. Four gravity-driven groundwater treatment systems were installed during cleanup, and their continued operation was incorporated into the final remedy for the Site. All utilities, including electrical power, were removed as part of this closure, so all Site electrical power needs are now met with small solar-powered systems. The Mound Site Plume Treatment System (MSPTS) was installed in 1998 as an innovative system based on zero-valent iron (ZVI). Groundwater flow from the Mound source area containing elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily in the tetrachloroethene (PCE)-trichloroethene (TCE) family of chlorinated solvents, is intercepted by a collection trench and routed to twin ZVI treatment cells. Later, in 2005, remediation of VOC-contaminated soils at a second up-gradient source area included adding an electron donor to the backfill to help stimulate biodegradation. This reduced concentrations of primary constituents but caused down-gradient groundwater to contain elevated levels of recalcitrant degradation byproducts, particularly cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride. A gravel drain installed as part of the 2005 remediation directs contaminated groundwater from this second source area to the MSPTS for treatment. This additional contaminant load, coupled with correspondingly reduced residence time within the ZVI media due to the increased flow rate, resulted in reduced treatment effectiveness. Elevated concentrations of VOCs were then detected in MSPTS effluent, as well as in surface water at the downstream performance monitoring location for the MSPTS. Subsequent consultations with the Site regulators led to the decision to add a polishing component to reduce residual VOCs in MSPTS effluent. Initially, several alternatives such as commercial air strippers and cascade aerators were evaluated; resulting cost estimates exceeded $100,000. After several simpler alternatives were considered and prototype testing was conducted, the existing effluent metering manhole was converted to house a spray-nozzle based, solar-powered air stripper, at a cost of approximately $20,000. About two-thirds of this cost was for the solar power system, which was initially designed to only provide power for 12 hours per day. Performance data are being collected and adjustments made to optimize the design, determine maintenance requirements, and establish power needs for continuous operation. Analytical data confirm the air stripper is sharply reducing concentrations of residual contaminants. (authors)

  20. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol; Macelloni, Leonardo; D'Emidio, Marco; Dunbar, John; Higley, Paul

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to detect short-term changes within the hydrates system, identify relationships/impacts of local oceanographic parameters on the hydrates system, and improve our understanding of how seafloor instability is affected by hydrates-driven changes. A 2009 DCR survey of MC118 demonstrated that we could image resistivity anomalies to a depth of 75m below the seafloor in water depths of 1km. We reconfigured this system to operate autonomously on the seafloor in a pre-programmed mode, for periods of months. We designed and built a novel seafloor lander and deployment capability that would allow us to investigate the seafloor at potential deployment sites and deploy instruments only when conditions met our criteria. This lander held the DCR system, controlling computers, and battery power supply, as well as instruments to record oceanographic parameters. During the first of two cruises to the study site, we conducted resistivity surveying, selected a monitoring site, and deployed the instrumented lander and DCR, centered on what appeared to be the most active locations within the site, programmed to collect a DCR profile, weekly. After a 4.5-month residence on the seafloor, the team recovered all equipment. Unfortunately, several equipment failures occurred prior to recovery of the instrument packages. Prior to the failures, however, two resistivity profiles were collected together with oceanographic data. Results show, unequivocally, that significant changes can occur in both hydrate volume and distribution during time periods as brief as one week. Occurrences appear to be controlled by both deep and near-surface structure. Results have been integrated with seismic data from the area and show correspondence in space of hydrate and structures, including faults and gas chimneys.

  1. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN COAL POWER PLANT PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2006-06-01

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Program Area of Interest: No.5--Environmental and Water Resources. The project team includes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) as the contractor and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Frontier Geosciences as subcontractors. Wisconsin Energies and its Pleasant Prairie Power Plant acted as host for the field-testing portion of the research. The project is aimed at clarifying the role, rates, and end results of chemical transformations that may occur to mercury that has been emitted from elevated stacks of coal-fired electric power plants. Mercury emitted from power plants emerges in either its elemental, divalent, or particulate-bound form. Deposition of the divalent form is more likely to occur closer to the source than that of the other two forms, due to its solubility in water. Thus, if chemical transformations occur in the stack emissions plume, measurements in the stack may mischaracterize the fate of the material. Initial field and pilot plant measurements have shown significant and rapid chemical reduction of divalent to elemental mercury may occur in these plumes. Mercury models currently assume that the chemical form of mercury occurring in stacks is the same as that which enters the free atmosphere, with no alteration occurring in the emissions plume. Recent data indicate otherwise, but need to be evaluated at full operating scale under field conditions. Prestbo and others have demonstrated the likelihood of significant mercury chemical reactions occurring in power plant plumes (Prestbo et al., 1999; MDNR-PPRP, 2000; EERC, 2001). This experiment will thus increase our understanding of mercury atmospheric chemistry, allowing informed decisions regarding source attribution. The experiment was carried out during the period August 22-September 5, 2003. The experimental site was the Pleasant Prairie Power Plant in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. The experiment involved using an aircraft to capture emissions and document chemistry changes in the plume. While using the airplane for sampling, supplemental fast-response sensors for NOx, connected to data loggers, were used to gauge entry and exit times and transect intervals through plume emissions material. The Frontier Geosciences Static Plume Dilution Chamber (SPDC) was employed simultaneously adjacent to the stack to correlate its findings with the aircraft sampling, as well as providing evaluation of the SPDC as a rapid, less costly sampler for mercury chemistry. A complementary stack plume method, the Dynamic Plume Dilution (DPD) was used in the latter portion of the experiment to measure mercury speciation to observe any mercury reduction reaction with respect to both the reaction time (5 to 30 seconds) and dilution ratio. In addition, stack sampling using the ''Ontario Hydro'' wet chemistry method and continuous mercury monitors (CMM) were used to establish the baseline chemistry in the stack. Comparisons among stack, SPDC, DPD and aircraft measurements allow establishment of whether significant chemical changes to mercury occur in the plume, and of the verisimilitude of the SPDC and DPD methods. This progress report summarizes activities during a period of results review from the stack/aircraft subcontractor, data analysis and synthesis, and preparation and presentation of preliminary results to technical and oversight meetings.

  2. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Doc. No. S07757 Page B-1 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S07757 June 2011 Page B-2 U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page B-3 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S07757 June 2011

  3. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page C-1 Figure 1. T Building Rooms with Special ICs Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S07757 June 2011 Page C-2 T Building Rooms with Special ICs In addition to the ICs for the entire site, T Building has the following additional IC restrictions as described in the Parcel 6, 7, and 8 Record of

  4. Expediting environmental cleanup--nationwide stakeholder involvement in U.S. Department of Energy`s plume focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, G.H.; Stein, S.L.; Serie, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) faces a major challenge in cleaning up its contaminated sites throughout the United States. One major area of concern is the plumes in soil and ground water, contaminated with a myriad of different pollutants. DOE recently established the Plume Focus Area to address these problems. The mission of the Plume Focus Area is to enhance the deployment of innovative technologies for containing and cleaning up contaminant plumes in ground water and soil at all DOE sites. By involving a range of stakeholders in the selection, demonstration, and evaluation of new technologies, the deployment of these technologies can be enhanced. Through this strategy, technology users join with other stakeholders to assess the appropriateness of new technologies for addressing plume contamination, and characterize the conditions under which those emerging technologies will be acceptable. If new plume cleanup technologies are to be deployable, they must improve on today`s baseline technologies. If sites and their stakeholders understood the technologies, recognize that their concerns are reflected in the evaluations and demonstrations, and participate in assessing how technology performance addresses their concerns, the likelihood of acceptance of those technologies is greater. Thus, broad stakeholder acceptance becomes part of the definition of an improved technology, evaluated in parallel with technical performance, cost, and other traditional parameters. This paper further describes the goals and objectives of the Plume Focus Area and emphasizes the importance of stakeholder involvement in achieving them. The process of coordinating with DOE sites is described to highlight how stakeholder input is considered throughout the Plume Focus Area decision-making process in selecting, developing, demonstrating, and evaluating innovative technologies to address plume problems.

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 3-ARI presentation - Mound - Tania Smith

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Asset Revitalization Initiative Moving Toward a Vision Tania Smith ARI Vision for DOE * Site operations are conducted in a sustainable manner, facilities and transit are powered by clean energy, and major environmental remediation is complete. * Site infrastructure is modern, adaptable, and efficient, and multiple federal agencies conduct operations in a seamless manner. * Public-private partnerships thrive, and commercial entities invest in new opportunities to create jobs. * Local communities

  6. Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant East Plume PDF icon Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant Quarry PDF icon Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant VOC PDF icon Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant West Plume More Documents & Publications South Valley Archived Soil &

  7. Progress Toward Operable Unit 1 Groundwater Cleanup at the Mound, Ohio, Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Groundwater in Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) has been impacted by volatile organic compound (VOC)-contaminated materials in the former solid waste landfill. The remedy for controlling contamination from...

  8. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates an interim measure to control chromium plume migration and maintain the 50 parts-per-billion (ppb) and greater chromium contamination level ...

  9. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher plume propagation estimates in a high-permeability conduit like a vertical fracture.

  10. Puff/Plume for Windows 95-NT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-20

    PFPL-NT is a GUI event-driven scientific application integrating 14 background processes to access the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous materials from production facilities and transportation vehicles. A simple straight-line Gaussian assumption has been employed with observations from meteorological towers to calculate and visually display plume directions, plume width, and dose/concentration estimates in the immediate vicinity of a radiological or chemical release.

  11. EM's Cleanup Mission: 16 Sites in 11 States Remaining | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy EM's Cleanup Mission: 16 Sites in 11 States Remaining EM's Cleanup Mission: 16 Sites in 11 States Remaining At the end of fiscal year 2013, EM completed cleanup and closed 90 sites in 28 states. This included cleanup and closure of 85 smaller sites and five major nuclear sites: Rocky Flats, Fernald, Mound, Pinellas, and Weldon Spring. PDF icon Small Site Closures More Documents & Publications Completed Sites Listing Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1998 Report

  12. Mound Plant Federal Facility Agreement, July 15, 1993 Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    United States Environmental Protection Agency Region V and the State of Ohio Federal Facility Agreement State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary DOE shall identify Interim Remedial Actions (IRAs) alternatives and implement US EPA and OEPA approved remedies for the site in accordance with CERCLA Parties EPA; Ohio EPA (OEPA); DOE Date 07/15/1993 SCOPE * Identify Interim Remedial Action (IRA) alternatives which include Remedial Investigations (RI)

  13. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Listings and Photos of Monitoring Wells and Seeps This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page D-i Contents 1.0 Parcel 6, 7, and 8 Remedy Wells and Seeps ..................................................................... D-1 2.0 OU-1 (Parcel 9) Wells ....................................................................................................... D-6 3.0 Phase I

  14. Pre-operational safety appraisal Tritiated Scrap Recovery Facility, Mound facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauby, J.J.; Flanagan, T.M.; Metcalf, L.W.; Rhinehammer, T.B.

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify, assess, and document the hazards which are associated with the proposed operation of the Tritiated Scrap Recovery Facility at Mound Facility. A Pre-operational Safety Appraisal is a requirement as stated in Department of Energy Order 5481.1, Safety Analysis and Review System. The operations to be conducted in the new Tritiated Scrap Waste Recovery Facility are not new, but a continuation of a prime mission of Mound`s i.e. recovery of tritium from waste produced throughout the DOE complex. The new facility is a replacement of an existing process started in the early 1960`s and incorporates numerous design changes to enhance personnel and environmental safety. This report also documents the safety of a one time operation involving the recovery of tritium from material obtained by the Department of Energy from the State of Arizona. This project will involve the processing of 240,000 curies of tritium contained in glass ampoules that were to be used in items such as luminous dial watches. These were manufactured by the now defunct American Atomics Corporation, Tucson, Arizona.

  15. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF BLENDING RESIDUAL SOLIDS FROM TANKS 18/19 MOUNDS WITH TANK 7 OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eibling, R; Erich Hansen, E; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2007-03-29

    High level waste tanks 18F and 19F have residual mounds of waste which may require removal before the tanks can be closed. Conventional slurry pump technology, previously used for waste removal and tank cleaning, has been incapable of removing theses mounds from tanks 18F and 19F. A mechanical cleaning method has been identified that is potentially capable of removing and transferring the mound material to tank 7F for incorporation in a sludge batch for eventual disposal in high level waste glass by the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been requested to evaluate whether the material transferred from tanks 18F/19F by the mechanical cleaning technology can later be suspended in Tank 7F by conventional slurry pumps after mixing with high level waste sludge. The proposed mechanical cleaning process for removing the waste mounds from tanks 18 and 19 may utilize a high pressure water jet-eductor that creates a vacuum to mobilize solids. The high pressure jet is also used to transport the suspended solids. The jet-eductor system will be mounted on a mechanical crawler for movement around the bottom of tanks 18 and 19. Based on physical chemical property testing of the jet-eductor system processed IE-95 zeolite and size-reduced IE-95 zeolite, the following conclusions were made: (1) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite has a mean and median particle size (volume basis) of 115.4 and 43.3 microns in water. Preferential settling of these large particles is likely. (2) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite rapidly generates settled solid yield stresses in excess of 11,000 Pascals in caustic supernates and will not be easily retrieved from Tank 7 with the existing slurry pump technology. (3) Settled size-reduced IE-95 zeolite (less than 38 microns) in caustic supernate does not generate yield stresses in excess of 600 Pascals in less than 30 days. (4) Preferential settling of size-reduced zeolite is a function of the amount of sludge and the level of dilution for the mixture. (5) Blending the size-reduced zeolite into larger quantities of sludge can reduce the amount of preferential settling. (6) Periodic dilution or resuspension due to sludge washing or other mixing requirements will increase the chances of preferential settling of the zeolite solids. (7) Mixtures of Purex sludge and size-reduced zeolite did not produce yield stresses greater than 200 Pascals for settling times less than thirty days. Most of the sludge-zeolite blends did not exceed 50 Pascals. These mixtures should be removable by current pump technology if sufficient velocities can be obtained. (8) The settling rate of the sludge-zeolite mixtures is a function of the ionic strength (or supernate density) and the zeolite- sludge mixing ratio. (9) Simulant tests indicate that leaching of Si may be an issue for the processed Tank 19 mound material. (10) Floating zeolite fines observed in water for the jet-eductor system and size-reduced zeolite were not observed when the size-reduced zeolite was blended with caustic solutions, indicating that the caustic solutions cause the fines to agglomerate. Based on the test programs described in this report, the potential for successfully removing Tank 18/19 mound material from Tank 7 with the current slurry pump technology requires the reduction of the particle size of the Tank 18/19 mound material.

  16. Segmented electrode hall thruster with reduced plume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2004-08-17

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with segmented electrodes along the channel, which make the acceleration region as localized as possible. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to minimize erosion and arcing. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to produce a substantial reduction in plume divergence. The use of electrodes made of emissive material will reduce the radial potential drop within the channel, further decreasing the plume divergence. Also disclosed is a method of arranging and powering these electrodes so as to provide variable mode operation.

  17. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead to improved monitoring while simultaneously reducing costs. This paradigm is being tested at the SRS F-Area where an innovative passive remedial system is being monitored and evaluated over the long term prior to traditional regulatory closure. Contaminants being addressed at this site are uranium, strontium-90, iodine-129, and tritium. We believe that the proposed strategies will be more effective in early identification of potential risks; these strategies will also be cost effective because controlling variables are relatively simple to measure. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate large cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

  18. MLM-462 Contract Number AT-33-l-GtiN-53 MOUND LABORATCRY Operatsd By

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    This Doeumr;t Consists of 116 ?zges This is COPY of i.3 k MLM-462 Contract Number AT-33-l-GtiN-53 MOUND LABORATCRY Operatsd By MONSAmOC~ALGoMPANY MIAMISBURG, OHIO REPORT NO. 3 OF STIEUING CaW'M'B FOR DISPUSAL CF UNITS 111 AND IV (Completion Report for Disposal of UrLt IV, Runnymeade Road sr,d Dixon live. Dayton, Ohlo) . Date: April 17, 1950 Prepared By: -36L254- F. L. Halbach Chairnan., St33ricg Gcicmittes 1ssue.d: DISTRIHJTION copy 1. - Dr. Carroll A. Hochwalt copy 2. - Dr. M. M. Haring copy 3.

  19. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northwest Plume | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northwest Plume Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Northwest Plume January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: GW OU Northwest Plume Remediation Contractor: LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC PBS Number: PA-0040 Report Last Updated: 2014

  20. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Southwest Plume | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Southwest Plume Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - GW OU Southwest Plume January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: GW OW Southwest Plume Remediation Contractor: LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC PBS Number: PA-0040 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs

  1. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  2. Downstream extent of the N Reactor plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Ecker, R.M.; Vail, L.W.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    The downstream extent of the N Reactor thermal plume was studied to assess the potential for fisheries impacts downstream of N Reactor. The N Reactor plume, as defined by the 0.5/sup 0/F isotherm, will extend less than 10 miles downstream at river flows greater than or equal to annual average flows (120,000 cfs). Incremental temperature increases at the Oregon-Washington border are expected to be less than 0.5/sup 0/F during all Columbia River flows greater than the minimum regulated flows (36,000 cfs). The major physical factor affecting Columbia River temperatures in the Hanford Reach is solar radiation. Because the estimated temperature increase resulting from N Reactor operations is less than 0.3/sup 0/F under all flow scenarios, it is unlikely that Columbia River fish populations will be adversely impacted.

  3. Optimized Field Sampling and Monitoring of Airborne Hazardous Transport Plumes; A Geostatistical Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, DI-WEN

    2001-11-21

    Airborne hazardous plumes inadvertently released during nuclear/chemical/biological incidents are mostly of unknown composition and concentration until measurements are taken of post-accident ground concentrations from plume-ground deposition of constituents. Unfortunately, measurements often are days post-incident and rely on hazardous manned air-vehicle measurements. Before this happens, computational plume migration models are the only source of information on the plume characteristics, constituents, concentrations, directions of travel, ground deposition, etc. A mobile ''lighter than air'' (LTA) system is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will be part of the first response in emergency conditions. These interactive and remote unmanned air vehicles will carry light-weight detectors and weather instrumentation to measure the conditions during and after plume release. This requires a cooperative computationally organized, GPS-controlled set of LTA's that self-coordinate around the objectives in an emergency situation in restricted time frames. A critical step before an optimum and cost-effective field sampling and monitoring program proceeds is the collection of data that provides statistically significant information, collected in a reliable and expeditious manner. Efficient aerial arrangements of the detectors taking the data (for active airborne release conditions) are necessary for plume identification, computational 3-dimensional reconstruction, and source distribution functions. This report describes the application of stochastic or geostatistical simulations to delineate the plume for guiding subsequent sampling and monitoring designs. A case study is presented of building digital plume images, based on existing ''hard'' experimental data and ''soft'' preliminary transport modeling results of Prairie Grass Trials Site. Markov Bayes Simulation, a coupled Bayesian/geostatistical methodology, quantitatively combines soft information regarding contaminant location with hard experimental results. Soft information is used to build an initial conceptual image of where contamination is likely to be. As experimental data are collected and analyzed, indicator kriging is used to update the initial conceptual image. The sequential Gaussian simulation is then practiced to make a comparison between the two simulations. Simulated annealing is served as a postprocessor to improve the result of Markov Bayes simulation or sequential Gaussian simulation.

  4. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  5. Comment Period Extended: EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure and Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environmental Management has extended the Public Comment Period on the Draft Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los...

  6. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  7. Chromium Interim Measures Project and Ongoing Plume Investigation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Topic: Danny Katzman LANL, Provided Information on the Ongoing Characterization of the Chromium Plume in Mortandad Canyon and the Pump and Treat Pilot Test. Chromium Update - March...

  8. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

    1998-07-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

  9. Savannah River Site - TNX | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    100 Plume Information Source: Controlled Area of Plume (acres): 7 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking in size Remedial Approach Remedy Name Status Start Date End Date...

  10. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  11. Identification of biological processes in a mixed hydrocarbon plume at a paint manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlan, R.G.; Walsh, K.P.; Henkler, R.D.; Anderson, B.N.

    1996-12-31

    In situ biodegradation is increasingly being used as a cost effective remedial strategy for contaminated sites. However, for the remediation to be successful, it is necessary to understand the fundamental geochemical and microbiological processes occurring at a particular site. At a paint manufacturing facility, a mixed hydrocarbon plume containing both BTEX and paraffinic hydrocarbons (Stoddard solvent) has contaminated the aquifer. The microbial processes occurring in the plume were investigated to better define the capacity of the aquifer to degrade hydrocarbons. Microbial oxidation of hydrocarbons is known to be coupled with the reduction of redox active species including oxygen, nitrate, ferric iron and sulphate as well as the production of methane. Water quality data, redox parameters and contaminant information were collected from the site to identify candidate biological processes occurring. The results show that as the contaminant concentration increases, the redox decreases indicating the generation of a more reduced environment. The decreasing redox correlates with increased concentrations of ammonia, ferrous iron and sulphide. The data indicates that there have been a range of different electron acceptor systems operating at the site. This has been correlated with a theoretical amount of benzene consumed. The chemistry from the wells at the site show that at least 47 mg/L of benzene is capable of being mineralized within the aquifer by microbial based transformations given the current contaminant loading and flowrate. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Cooling tower and plume modeling for satellite remote sensing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    It is often useful in nonproliferation studies to be able to remotely estimate the power generated by a power plant. Such information is indirectly available through an examination of the power dissipated by the plant. Power dissipation is generally accomplished either by transferring the excess heat generated into the atmosphere or into bodies of water. It is the former method with which we are exclusively concerned in this report. We discuss in this report the difficulties associated with such a task. In particular, we primarily address the remote detection of the temperature associated with the condensed water plume emitted from the cooling tower. We find that the effective emissivity of the plume is of fundamental importance for this task. Having examined the dependence of the plume emissivity in several IR bands and with varying liquid water content and droplet size distributions, we conclude that the plume emissivity, and consequently the plume brightness temperature, is dependent upon not only the liquid water content and band, but also upon the droplet size distribution. Finally, we discuss models dependent upon a detailed point-by-point description of the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the plume dynamics and those based upon spatially integrated models. We describe in detail a new integral model, the LANL Plume Model, which accounts for the evolution of the droplet size distribution. Some typical results obtained from this model are discussed.

  13. Transient temperature measurements of a plume in a confined space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, C.H.; Hsieh, C.F.; Teng, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the present study is to measure the transient temperature profiles of a plume in a confined space and to develop an empirical formula relating heat transfer and buoyancy. The transient natural convective phenomenon, resulting from the buoyant effect, exists in confined spaces. This phenomenon is of practical importance in many fields, such as the formation process of material, cooling of electronic parts, design of solar collectors, cooling of fins, physics of space, fire plume in a compartment and movement of ocean current, etc. The present work is to study the transient natural convection phenomenon of a thermal plume. The plume is generated by locating a constant heat flux annular cylinder heater at the bottom of a confined cubic enclosure filled with water. The temperature profiles in the plume are measured and collected by six T-type thermocouples and a set of data acquisition system. Each test run lasts about 200 minutes and the measurement time step is 1 minute. The results indicate that the heat transfer mechanism in the plume is characterized by up-moving buoyancy-driven energy envelopes. Stratified temperature structure, which is caused by the retarding motion of the plume near the top surface, is also observed. An empirical correlation along local Nusselt number, Fourier number and modified Rayleigh number is obtained and written as Nu{sub x}/Ra{sub x}*{sup 1/4} = 0.00422Fo{sub L}{sup {minus}0.893}.

  14. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit) Area Plume

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Groundwater Database Report - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit) Area Plume

  15. Chromium Interim Measures Project and Ongoing Plume Investigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the March 12, 2015 Committee meeting Danny Katzman LANL, Provided Information on the Ongoing Characterization of the Chromium Plume in Mortandad Canyon and the Pump and Treat Pilot Test.

  16. False alarm recognition in hyperspectral gas plume identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conger, James L. (San Ramon, CA); Lawson, Janice K. (Tracy, CA); Aimonetti, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-03-29

    According to one embodiment, a method for analyzing hyperspectral data includes collecting first hyperspectral data of a scene using a hyperspectral imager during a no-gas period and analyzing the first hyperspectral data using one or more gas plume detection logics. The gas plume detection logic is executed using a low detection threshold, and detects each occurrence of an observed hyperspectral signature. The method also includes generating a histogram for all occurrences of each observed hyperspectral signature which is detected using the gas plume detection logic, and determining a probability of false alarm (PFA) for all occurrences of each observed hyperspectral signature based on the histogram. Possibly at some other time, the method includes collecting second hyperspectral data, and analyzing the second hyperspectral data using the one or more gas plume detection logics and the PFA to determine if any gas is present. Other systems and methods are also included.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pumping tests on chromium plume Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume The chromium originated from cooling towers at a Laboratory power plant and was released from 1956 to 1972. May 22, 2013 Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo taken during well construction in 2011. Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pumping tests on chromium plume Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume The chromium originated from cooling towers at a Laboratory power plant and was released from 1956 to 1972. May 22, 2013 Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo taken during well construction in 2011. Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo

  19. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots Simulations Run at NERSC Show How Seismic Waves Travel Through Mantle September 2, 2015 Robert Sanders, rlsanders@berkeley.edu, (510) 643-6998 NERSC PI: Barbara Romanowicz Lead Institution: University of California, Berkeley Project Title: Imaging and Calibration of Mantle Structure at Global and Regional Scales Using Full-Waveform Seismic Tomography NERSC Resources Used:

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pumping tests on chromium plume Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume The chromium originated from cooling towers at a Laboratory power plant and was released from 1956 to 1972. May 22, 2013 Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo taken during well construction in 2011. Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo

  1. Using ASCEM Modeling and Visualization to Inform Stakeholders of Contaminant Plume Evolution and Remediation Efficacy at F-Basin Savannah River, SC – 15156

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.; Wainwright, H.; Molins, S.; Davis, J.; Arora, B.; Faybishenko, B.; Krishnan, H.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Moulton, D.; Lipnikov, K.; Gable, C.; Miller, T.; Freshley, M.

    2015-01-28

    Communication with stakeholders, regulatory agencies, and the public is an essential part of implementing different remediation and monitoring activities, and developing site closure strategies at contaminated sites. Modeling of contaminant plume evolution plays a critical role in estimating the benefit, cost, and risk of particular options. At the same time, effective visualization of monitoring data and modeling results are particularly important for conveying the significance of the results and observations. In this paper, we present the results of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project, including the discussion of the capabilities of newly developed ASCEM software package, along the its application to the F-Area Seepage Basins located in the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). ASCEM software includes state-of-the-art numerical methods for simulating complex flow and reactive transport, as well as various toolsets such as a graphical user interface (GUI), visualization, data management, uncertainty quantification, and parameter estimation. Using this software, we have developed an advanced visualization of tritium plume migration coupled with a data management system, and simulated a three-dimensional model of flow and plume evolution on a high-performance computing platform. We evaluated the effect of engineered flow barriers on a nonreactive tritium plume, through advanced plume visualization and modeling of tritium plume migration. In addition, we developed a geochemical reaction network to describe complex geochemical processes at the site, and evaluated the impact of coupled hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These results are expected to support SRS’s monitoring activities and operational decisions.

  2. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, Antoni K. (Kensington, CA); Maxson, James A. (Berkeley, CA); Hensinger, David M. (Albany, CA)

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  3. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oppenheim, A.K.; Maxson, J.A.; Hensinger, D.M.

    1993-12-21

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure. 24 figures.

  4. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-05-31

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  5. Savannah River Site - Sanitary Landfill | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    100 Plume Information Source: Controlled Area of Plume (acres): 65 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking in size Remedial Approach Remedy Name Status Start Date End Date...

  6. Savannah River Site - R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    100 Plume Information Source: Controlled Area of Plume (acres): 55 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking in size Remedial Approach Remedy Name Status Start Date End Date...

  7. Savannah River Site - L-Area Southern Groundwater | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plume Information Source: Not Present Area of Plume (acres): 225 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking in size Remedial Approach Remedy Name Status Start Date End Date...

  8. Direct Measurement of Mercury Reactions In Coal Power Plant Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2005-12-31

    Recent field and pilot-scale results indicate that divalent mercury emitted from power plants may rapidly transform to elemental mercury within the power plant plumes. Simulations of mercury chemistry in plumes based on measured rates to date have improved regional model fits to Mercury Deposition Network wet deposition data for particular years, while not degrading model verification fits for remaining years of the ensemble. The years with improved fit are those with simulated deposition in grid cells in the State of Pennsylvania that have matching MDN station data significantly less than the model values. This project seeks to establish a full-scale data basis for whether or not significant reduction or oxidation reactions occur to mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants, and what numerical redox rate should apply for extension to other sources and for modeling of power plant mercury plumes locally, regionally, and nationally. Although in-stack mercury (Hg) speciation measurements are essential to the development of control technologies and to provide data for input into atmospheric fate and transport models, the determination of speciation in a cooling coal combustion plume is more relevant for use in estimating Hg fate and effects through the atmosphere. It is mercury transformations that may occur in the plume that determine the eventual rate and patterns of mercury deposited to the earth's surface. A necessary first step in developing a supportable approach to modeling any such transformations is to directly measure the forms and concentrations of mercury from the stack exit downwind to full dispersion in the atmosphere. As a result, a study was sponsored by EPRI and jointly funded by EPRI, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), and the Wisconsin Department of Administration. The study was designed to further our understanding of plume chemistry. The study was carried out at the We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant, Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. Aircraft and ground measurements support the occurrence of a reduction in the fraction of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) (with a corresponding increase in elemental mercury) as part of the Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM) emitted from the Pleasant Prairie stack. This occurrence is based on comparison of the RGM concentrations in the plume (at standard conditions) compared to the RGM in the stack. There was found to be a 44% drop in the fraction of RGM between the stack exit and the first sampling arc and a 66% reduction from the stack to the 5-mile sampling arc, with no additional drop between the 5- and 10-mile arcs. Smaller-scale experiments in both test chambers and pilot-scale coal combustor exhaust streams have indicated the presence of rapid and relatively complete reduction reactions converting divalent into elemental mercury within power plant plumes prior to full dispersion in the atmosphere. These measurements, however, have been unable to identify whether the reactions occur during plume rise from physical to virtual stack height (during positive thermal buoyancy). The presence, rate, completeness, ubiquity, and dependence on source characteristics of these reactions, however, must be demonstrated in plume environments associated with fully operational power plants. That requirement, to capture either the reactions or the reaction products of chemistry that may be occurring very close to stack exits in highly turbulent environments, constrains the precision and reproducibility with which such full-scale experiments can be carried out. The work described here is one of several initial steps required to test whether, and in what direction, such rapid mercury redox reactions might be occurring in such plumes.

  9. STUDIES OF TWO-PHASE PLUMES IN STRATIFIED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott A. Socolofsky; Brian C. Crounse; E. Eric Adams

    1998-11-18

    Two-phase plumes play an important role in the more practical scenarios for ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}--i.e. dispersing CO{sub 2} as a buoyant liquid from either a bottom-mounted or ship-towed pipeline. Despite much research on related applications, such as for reservoir destratification using bubble plumes, our understanding of these flows is incomplete, especially concerning the phenomenon of plume peeling in a stratified ambient. To address this deficiency, we have built a laboratory facility in which we can make fundamental measurements of plume behavior. Although we are using air, oil and sediments as our sources of buoyancy (rather than CO{sub 2}), by using models, our results can be directly applied to field scale CO{sub 2} releases to help us design better CO{sub 2} injection systems, as well as plan and interpret the results of our up-coming international field experiment. The experimental facility designed to study two-phase plume behavior similar to that of an ocean CO{sub 2} release includes the following components: 1.22 x 1.22 x 2.44 m tall glass walled tank; Tanks and piping for the two-tank stratification method for producing step- and linearly-stratified ambient conditions; Density profiling system using a conductivity and temperature probe mounted to an automated depth profiler; Lighting systems, including a virtual point source light for shadowgraphs and a 6 W argon-ion laser for laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging; Imaging system, including a digital, progressive scanning CCD camera, computerized framegrabber, and image acquisition and analysis software; Buoyancy source diffusers having four different air diffusers, two oil diffusers, and a planned sediment diffuser; Dye injection method using a Mariotte bottle and a collar diffuser; and Systems integration software using the Labview graphical programming language and Windows NT. In comparison with previously reported experiments, this system allows us to extend the parameter range of our experiments to better match CO{sub 2} injection scenario field conditions and to make detailed measurements of the experimental plumes. To date we have run a basic suite of experiments covering a range of injected fluids (air and oil), flow rates (0.004 to 0.083 1/s), bubble/droplet sizes (0.05 to 1.5 cm), bubble slip velocities (5 to 35 cm/s), and ambient stratification types (linear and step). Qualitative observations of plume type (frequency and nature of peeling) from these experiments, as well as other experiments from the literature, have been correlated with dimensionless parameters to help us better characterize plume behavior. At the same time, quantitative data are being compared with a new analytical model which treats the flow as an upward-moving inner plume, coupled with an annular, downward-flowing outer plume which entrains from and intrudes into the ambient seawater. The model also includes CO{sub 2} specific features such as bubble/droplet mass transfer, solute dissolution effects on plume buoyancy, and change in total CO{sub 2} concentration and pH. We are continuing to conduct experiments which will provide additional data for model calibration. In turn, the model will be applied to CO{sub 2} injection to help us better understand field-scale CO{sub 2} releases, including those associated with the up-coming international field experiment.

  10. Site Index - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Index Site Index Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Site Index Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size About Us About Hanford Cleanup Regulators, Boards, Councils Hanford Advisory Board Hanford Natural Resource Trustee Council Environmental Protection Agency Washington State Department of Ecology Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs DOE Human Resources Management

  11. Evolution of a Groundwater Treatment System—Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A project to reconfigure the East Trenches Plume Treatment System (ETPTS) at the Rocky Flats site, to improve treatment effectiveness and meet the strict water quality standards in the area, is...

  12. DOE/EA-2005 Draft Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume Control Interim

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure and Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico September 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure and Plume-Center Characterization ii DOE/EA-2005-Draft The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 United States Code 4321 et seq.), requires federal

  13. DOE/EA-2005 Final Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume Control Interim

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure and Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico December 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure and Plume-Center Characterization ii DOE/EA-2005-Final The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 United States Code 4321 et seq.), requires federal

  14. WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH FEBRUARY 1999 Final (Revision 0) Department of Energy Babcock & Wilcox of Ohio Mr. Daniel Bird AICP, Planning Manager Miamisburg Mound Community

  15. Idaho site completes demolition of Cold War-era nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facility doe logo CH2M-WG logo Joint News Release For Immediate Release Date: December 22, 2011 Media Contact: Erik Simpson, (208) 360-0426 Idaho site completes demolition of Cold War-era nuclear fuel reprocessing facility A gravel mound, larger than half a city block and several feet thick, is the only visible feature that remains at the site of a Cold War-era spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at the U.S. Department of Energyïżœs Idaho site. About $44 million in American Recovery

  16. Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Facility | Department of Energy Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility December 22, 2011 - 11:12am Addthis Media Contact Erik Simpson (208) 360-0426 A gravel mound, larger than half a city block and several feet thick, is the only visible feature that remains at the site of a Cold War-era spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho site.

  17. Site Feeds - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Feeds Site Feeds Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Hanford RSS Feeds Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size RSS Feed Links Site News RSS Did You Know RSS What's New RSS Event Calendar RSS Recent Videos RSS Press Releases RSS What is a feed? A feed is a document that contains summaries of web content with web links to the original versions. It may be viewed with a feed reader or news aggregator. If you

  18. Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W. (Tijeras, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Oberkampf, William L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system is provided. The laser weld plume control device includes a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity; the upper surface of the body circumscribes the base of the cone cavity, and the vertex of the cone cavity forms an orifice concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. According to the method of the invention, gas is directed radially inward through inlets in the upper surface of the body into and through channels in the wall of the body and finally through the orifice of the body, and downward onto the surface of the weldment. The gas flow is then converted by the orifice of the device from radial flow to an axisymmetric gas jet flowing away from the weldment surface in a direction perpendicular to the surface and opposite to that of the laser.

  19. Model Selection for Monitoring CO2 Plume during Sequestration

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-12-31

    The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly includes four steps: (1) assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, (2) model clustering using multidimensional scaling coupled with k-mean clustering, (3) model selection using the Bayes' rule in the reduced model space, (4) model expansion using iterative resampling of the posterior models. The fourth step expresses one of the advantages of the method: it provides a built-in means ofmore » quantifying the uncertainty in predictions made with the selected models. In our application to plume monitoring, by expanding the posterior space of models, the final ensemble of representations of geological model can be used to assess the uncertainty in predicting the future displacement of the CO2 plume. The software implementation of this approach is attached here.« less

  20. Cassini detection of Enceladus's cold water-group plume ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokar, Robert L; Thomsen, Michelle F; Wilson, Robert J; Johnson, R E; Young, D T; Crary, F J; Coates, A J; Jones, G H; Paty, C S

    2009-01-01

    This study reports direct detection by the Cassini plasma spectrometer of freshly-produced water-group ions (O{sup +}, OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}) and heavier water dimer ions (H{sub x}O{sub 2}{sup +}) very close to Enceladus and where the plasma begins to emerge from the Enceladus plume The data wcre obtained during two close (52 and 25 km) flybys of Enceladus in 2008, and are similar to ion data in cometary comas. The ions are observed in detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction at energies consistent with the Cassini speed, indicating a nearly stagnant plasma flow in the plume. North of Enceladus the plasma slowing commences about 4 to 6 Enceladus radii away, while south of Enccladus signatures ofthe interaction are detected as far as 22 Enceladus radii away.

  1. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment - Task 4: Modeling - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Starr

    2005-10-31

    Trichloroethene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, can be degraded under certain conditions by microorganisms that occur naturally in the subsurface. TCE can be degraded under anaerobic conditions to less chlorinated compounds and ultimately into the non-chlorinated, non-hazardous end product, ethene, via anaerobic reductive dechlorination (ARD). ARD is widely recognized as a TCE degradation mechanism, and occurs in active groundwater remediation and can occur during monitored natural attenuation (MNA). MNA relies on natural processes, such as dispersion and degradation, to reduce contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels without active human intervention other than monitoring. TCE can also be biodegraded under aerobic conditions via cometabolism, in which microbial enzymes produced for other purposes fortuitously also react with TCE. In cometabolism, TCE is oxidized directly to non-hazardous products. Cometabolism as a TCE-degrading process under aerobic conditions is less well known than ARD. Natural attenuation is often discounted as a TCE remedial alternative in aerobic conditions based on the paradigm that TCE is biodegradable only under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to this paradigm, TCE was shown to degrade relative to conservative co-contaminants at an environmentally significant rate in a large (approximately 3 km long) TCE plume in aerobic groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the degradation mechanism was shown to be cometabolism. MNA was selected as the remedy for most of this plume, resulting in a considerable cost savings relative to conventional remedial methods. To determine if cometabolism might be a viable remedy at other sites with TCE-contaminated aerobic groundwater, TCE plumes at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were screened to evaluate whether TCE commonly degrades in aerobic groundwater, and if degradation rates are fast enough that natural attenuation could be a viable remedy. One hundred and twenty seven plumes at 24 DOE facilities were screened, and 14 plumes were selected for detailed examination. In the plumes selected for further study, spatial changes in the concentration of a conservative co-contaminant were used to compensate for the effects of mixing and temporal changes in TCE release from the contaminant source. Decline in TCE concentration along a flow path in excess of the co contaminant concentration decline was attributed to cometabolic degradation. This study indicated that TCE was degraded in 9 of the 14 plumes examined, with first order degradation half-lives ranging from about 1 to 12 years. TCE degradation in about two-thirds of the plumes examined suggests that cometabolism of TCE in aerobic groundwater is a common occurrence, in contrast to the conventional wisdom that TCE is recalcitrant in aerobic groundwater. The degradation half-life values calculated in this study are short enough that natural attenuation may be a viable remedy in many aerobic plumes. Computer modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport and degradation is frequently used to predict the evolution of groundwater plumes, and for evaluating natural attenuation and other remedial alternatives. An important aspect of a computer model is the mathematical approach for describing degradation kinetics. A common approach is to assume that degradation occurs as a first-order process. First order kinetics are easily incorporated into transport models and require only a single value (a degradation half-life) to describe reaction kinetics. The use of first order kinetics is justified in many cases because more elaborate kinetic equations often closely approximate first order kinetics under typical field conditions. A previous modeling study successfully simulated the INL TCE plume using first order degradation kinetics. TCE cometabolism is the result of TCE reacting with microbial enzymes that were produced for other purposes, such as oxidizing a growth substrate to obtain energy. Both TCE and the growth substrate compete for enzyme reactive sites, and the presence of

  2. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

  3. Wet processing of palladium for use in the tritium facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC. Preparation of palladium using the Mound Muddy Water process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.P.; Zamzow, D.S.

    1998-11-10

    Palladium used at Savannah River for tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to better understand the processes involved in preparing this material, Savannah River is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material and into the conditions necessary to produce palladium powder that meets their specifications. This better understanding may help to guarantee a continued reliable source for this material in the future. As part of this evaluation, a work-for-others contract between Westinghouse Savannah River Company and the Ames Laboratory Metallurgy and Ceramics Program was initiated. During FY98, the process for producing palladium powder developed in 1986 by Dan Grove of Mound Applied Technologies (USDOE) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in morphology in the final product. This report details the results of this study of the Mound Muddy Water process, along with the results of a round-robin analysis of well-characterized palladium samples that was performed by Savannah River and Ames Laboratory. The Mound Muddy Water process is comprised of three basic wet chemical processes, palladium dissolution, neutralization, and precipitation, with a number of filtration steps to remove unwanted impurity precipitates.

  4. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-02-28

    This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

  5. Savannah River Site Takes on Another Environmental Cleanup Challenge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    average-sized dump trucks. When complete, the top of this mound will be as long as 17 football fields, end to end. After completing the first mound, SRNS will consolidate ash from...

  6. First Quarter FY 2010 - Low-Level and Mixed Low-Level Waste Shipment Routing to the Nevada Test Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TN, WA, CA TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Boeing/Rocketdyne Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Idaho National Labaratoy Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Demonstration Project National Security Technologies, Inc. Mound Closure Project Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Fernald Closure Project Savannah River Site BWXT Y-12

  7. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  8. Savannah River Site - Central Shops GW OU | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Central Shops GW OU Savannah River Site - Central Shops GW OU January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: Central Shops GW OU Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup

  9. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindley, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  10. Experimental study of stack plume rise and dispersion at the power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-10

    This paper describes the primary results of stack plume rise and dispersion experiment at Xu Zhou power station during November-December, 1978. (1) Under neutral and near-neutral stratification conditions, the 2/3 power law is the optimizing formula up to date, because of its calculated values in coincidence with observed. (2) Vertical of the buoyant plume from the tall stack is obviously stronger than that of non buoyant plume from the low stack. It is shown that the concept sof Pasquill(1976) model are acceptable, but formula should be modified. (3) From reliable monitoring data of SO/sub 2/ ground concentration, it is found that the effects of topography and stack height should be comprehensively taken into account in estimating dispersion by gaussian model. (4) It is suggested that in analyzing the stereophoto grammetric data of fluctuating plume, the square deviation of plume distribution should be considered as the sum of two parts--the distribution square deviation of the plume particulates relative to the instantaneous center line of the plume, and the distriubtion square deviaton of the instantaneous center line relative to the average center line of the plume. (5) Lidar is shown to be as effective as steroegraphic method in studying behavior of chimney plumes.

  11. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plume) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corp Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup...

  12. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Record 992011 http:www.em.doe.govPagesgroundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode175 Environmental Indicators (EIs) Groundwater Migration Under Control? Yes Confirmed by Lead...

  13. Enhanced Bioremediation-Pinellas County, Florida, Site

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhanced Bioremediation-Pinellas County, Florida, Site Operations to develop and manufacture components for the nation's nuclear weapons program at the former Pinellas Plant in Florida during the Cold War era, released solvents to subsurface soils beneath the plant's 11-acre Building 100. Release areas became sources of dissolved contamination, creating groundwater plumes that extended from the source areas beneath Building 100 to the south and east, and onto private property. After the Cold War

  14. ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

    2008-06-27

    The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

  15. Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

  16. Biological Ocean Margins Program. Active Microbes Responding to Inputs from the Orinoco River Plume. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge E. Corredor

    2013-01-28

    The overall goal of the proposed work is to identify the active members of the heterotrophic community involved in C and N cycling in the perimeter of the Orinoco River Plume (ORP), assess their spatial distribution, quantify their metabolic activity, and correlate these parameters to plume properties such as salinity, organic matter content and phytoplankton biomass.

  17. Installation of reactive metals groundwater collection and treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, J.K.; Primrose, A.L.; Vogan, J.; Uhland, J.

    1998-07-01

    Three groundwater plumes contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site are scheduled for remediation by 1999 based on the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) (DOE, 1996). These three plumes are among the top 20 environmental cleanup sites at Rocky Flats. One of these plumes, the Mound Site Plume, is derived from a previous drum storage area, and daylights as seeps near the South Walnut Creek drainage. Final design for remediation of the Mound Site Plume has been completed based on use of reactive metals to treat the contaminated groundwater, and construction is scheduled for early 1998. The two other plumes, the 903 Pad/Ryan`s Pit and the East Trenches Plumes, are derived from VOCs either from drums that leaked or that were disposed of in trenches. These two plumes are undergoing characterization and conceptual design in 1998 and construction is scheduled in 1999. The contaminants of concern in these plumes are tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride and low levels of uranium and americium.

  18. Morphological changes in ultrafast laser ablation plumes with varying spot size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Polek, M. P.; Phillips, M. C.

    2015-06-04

    We investigated the role of spot size on plume morphology during ultrafast laser ablation of metal targets. Our results show that the spatial features of fs LA plumes are strongly dependent on the focal spot size. Two-dimensional self-emission images showed that the shape of the ultrafast laser ablation plumes changes from spherical to cylindrical with an increasing spot size from 100 to 600 ?m. The changes in plume morphology and internal structures are related to ion emission dynamics from the plasma, where broader angular ion distribution and faster ions are noticed for the smallest spot size used. The present resultsmore »clearly show that the morphological changes in the plume with spot size are independent of laser pulse width.« less

  19. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ? log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  20. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2001-03-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

  1. Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S. (Ames, IA); Chen, Guoying (Laramie, WY)

    1990-05-01

    A method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived.

  2. Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, G.

    1990-05-01

    A method and means are disclosed for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived. 15 figs.

  3. Mound History and Information

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    In the 1950s, the facility began to manufacture a variety of nuclear weapons parts, in- cluding cable assemblies, explosive detonators, and the electronic firing sets that ...

  4. Mound Transition Schedule

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  5. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

  6. Biotic and Abiotic Transformation of a Volatile Organics Plume in a Semi-Arid Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, J.E.; Singletary, M.A.; Miller, D.R.

    1999-04-08

    An evaluation of biotic and abiotic attenuation processes potentially important to chlorinated and non-chlorinated volatile organic compound (VOC) fate and transport in the 148 meter thick vadose zone beneath the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was conducted. A unique feature of this evaluation is the comparison of two estimates of VOC mass present in the soil gas, pore-water, and solid phases (but not including mass as non-aqueous phase liquid [NAPL]) of the vadose zone in 1993. One estimate, 1,800 kg, was obtained from vadose zone transport modeling that incorporated molecular diffusion and volatilization to the atmosphere, but not biotic or chemical processes. The other estimate, 2,120 kg, was obtained from the sum of VOC mass physically removed during soil vapor extraction and an estimate of VOC mass remaining in the vadose zone in 1998, both adjusted to exclude NAPL mass. This comparison indicates that biogeochemical processes were at best slightly important to historical VOC plume development. Some evidence of aerobic degradation of non-chlorinated VOCs and abiotic transformation of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane was identified. Despite potentially amenable site conditions, no evidence was found of cometabolic and anaerobic transformation pathways. Relying principally on soil-gas analytical results, an upper-bound estimate of 21% mass reduction due to natural biogeochemical processes was developed. Although available information for the CWL indicates that natural attenuation processes other than volatilization to the atmosphere did not effective y enhance groundwater protection, these processes could be important in significantly reducing groundwater contamination and exposure risks at other sites. More laboratory and field research is required to improve our collective ability to characterize and exploit natural VOC attenuation processes, especially with respect to the combination of relatively thick and dry vadose zones and chlorinated VOCs.

  7. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; He, Z.; Voordeckers, J.; Zhou, A.; Lee, Y.-J.; Mason, O.U.; Dubinsky, E.; Chavarria, K.; Tom, L.; Fortney, J.; Lamendella, R.; Jansson, J.K.; D?haeseleer, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2011-06-15

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the deepest and largest offshore spill in U.S. history and its impacts on marine ecosystems are largely unknown. Here, we showed that the microbial community functional composition and structure were dramatically altered in a deep-sea oil plume resulting from the spill. A variety of metabolic genes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in the plume compared to outside the plume, indicating a great potential for intrinsic bioremediation or natural attenuation in the deep-sea. Various other microbial functional genes relevant to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur and iron cycling, metal resistance, and bacteriophage replication were also enriched in the plume. Together, these results suggest that the indigenous marine microbial communities could play a significant role in biodegradation of oil spills in deep-sea environments.

  8. ARM - Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSites Assets and Locations ARM Aerial Facility ARM's site in the sky Eastern North Atlantic Beginning in late 2013 on Graciosa Island in the Azores Mobile Facilities Providing portability, flexibility, and accessibility North Slope of Alaska Providing high-latitude data Southern Great Plains The first ARM site in north-central Oklahoma Tropical Western Pacific Improving circulation models for climate research Virtual Tour Visit ARM sites... virtually! Sites The ARM Climate Research Facility

  9. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    VOC) Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: Unknown Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No Hydrogeology Conduit Flow? Yes Multiple Units Affected? No Depth (feet): Avg Velocity (feet/year): Plume Information (no source) Source Plume

  10. Emission features and expansion dynamics of nanosecond laser ablation plumes at different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S. Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2014-01-21

    The influence of ambient pressure on the spectral emission features and expansion dynamics of a plasma plume generated on a metal target has been investigated. The plasma plumes were generated by irradiating Cu targets using 6?ns, 1064?nm pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The emission and expansion dynamics of the plasma plumes were studied by varying air ambient pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric pressure. The ambient pressure levels were found to affect both the line intensities and broadening along with the signal to background and signal to noise ratios and the optimum pressure conditions for analytical applications were evaluated. The characteristic plume parameters were estimated using emission spectroscopy means and noticed that the excitation temperature peaked ?300?Torr, while the electron density showed a maximum ?100?Torr. Fast-gated images showed a complex interaction between the plume and background air leading to changes in the plume geometry with pressure as well as time. Surface morphology of irradiated surface showed that the pressure of the ambient gas affects the laser-target coupling significantly.

  11. Biogeochemical Considerations Related To The Remediation Of I-129 Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D. I.; Yeager, C.; Denham, M. E.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwehr, K. A.; Li, H. P.; Brinkmeyer, R.; Santschi, P. H.

    2012-09-24

    The objectives of this report were to: provide a current state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport at the Hanford Site; conduct a review of Hanford Site data dealing with groundwater {sup 129}I; and identify critical knowledge gaps necessary for successful selection, implementation, and technical defensibility in support of remediation decisions.

  12. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R.

    1995-05-01

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  13. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Did You Know Did You Know Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Did You Know Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Close Did you know.... Close

  14. Area 2: Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO2 Plume Migration using Injection Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2014-09-30

    In-depth understanding of the long-term fate of CO? in the subsurface requires study and analysis of the reservoir formation, the overlaying caprock formation, and adjacent faults. Because there is significant uncertainty in predicting the location and extent of geologic heterogeneity that can impact the future migration of CO? in the subsurface, there is a need to develop algorithms that can reliably quantify this uncertainty in plume migration. This project is focused on the development of a model selection algorithm that refines an initial suite of subsurface models representing the prior uncertainty to create a posterior set of subsurface models that reflect injection performance consistent with that observed. Such posterior models can be used to represent uncertainty in the future migration of the CO? plume. Because only injection data is required, the method provides a very inexpensive method to map the migration of the plume and the associated uncertainty in migration paths. The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly consists of assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, grouping the models on the basis of their expected dynamic response, selecting the subgroup of models that most closely yield dynamic response closest to the observed dynamic data, and finally quantifying the uncertainty in plume migration using the selected subset of models. The main accomplishment of the project is the development of a software module within the SGEMS earth modeling software package that implements the model selection methodology. This software module was subsequently applied to analyze CO? plume migration in two field projects – the In Salah CO? Injection project in Algeria and CO? injection into the Utsira formation in Norway. These applications of the software revealed that the proxies developed in this project for quickly assessing the dynamic characteristics of the reservoir were highly efficient and yielded accurate grouping of reservoir models. The plume migration paths probabilistically assessed by the method were confirmed by field observations and auxiliary data. The report also documents the application of the software to answer practical questions such as the optimum location of monitoring wells to reliably assess the migration of CO? plume, the effect of CO?-rock interactions on plume migration and the ability to detect the plume under those conditions and the effect of a slow, unresolved leak on the predictions of plume migration.

  15. TRACKING SITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site.  https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack 

  16. Summary of Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-03-01

    This is a summary booklet of the main report: Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005. It is the summary section of the main report with a CD of the entire report included. The main report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

  17. Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  18. Savannah River Site - K Area Burning/Rubble Pit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    K Area Burning/Rubble Pit Savannah River Site - K Area Burning/Rubble Pit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: K Area Burning/Rubble Pit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb)

  19. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 9): Newmark Groundwater Contamination Site, San Bernardino, CA, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-04

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Newmark Operable Unit, Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund site. EPA has selected an interim remedy for the Newmark plume of groundwater contamination in the Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund Site. This portion of the site cleanup is referred to as the Newmark Operable Unit (OU). The Newmark OU is an interim action focusing on contamination in the undergound water supply in the Bunker Hill Basin of San Bernardino, north and east of the Shandin Hills.

  20. Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: D-Area Oil Seepage Basin Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb)

  1. Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  2. Strategic Petroleum Reserve site environmental report for calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The SER, provided annually in accordance with DOE order 5400.1, serves the public by summarizing monitoring data collected to assess how the SPR impacts the environment. The SER provides a balanced synopsis of non-radiological monitoring and regulatory compliance data and affirms that the SPR has been operating within acceptable regulatory limits. Included in this report is a describe of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1997. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of the Weeks Island site, involving the disposition of 11.6 million m{sup 3} (73 million barrels) of crude oil inventory, as well as the degasification of over 12.6 million m{sup 3} (79.3 million barrels) of crude oil inventory at the Big Hill and Bryan Mound facilities.

  3. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Public Tours Hanford Site Public Tours Tour Registration Required Forms of ID Tour Information Tour Route Find Confirmation Seat Notification Frequently Asked Questions Media Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size This website will not function with Javascript disabled Tour Information The Hanford Site Cleanup Tours for the public will begin in May 2016, with online registration opening in early April. The 4-1/2 hour tour focuses on Hanford's

  4. Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - IM: BeckyLaura) o Hanford site traffic status update: Weather - who decides the roads ... assumptions? o Waste processing Decommissioning and Decontamination workers - ...

  5. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Public Involvement Evaluation Survey Hanford Public Comment Period Hanford Public Comment Period Top Stories Workers Remove Most Contaminated Processing Equipment from Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford Site Department of Energy completes chromium cleanup along Columbia River Agencies welcome Manhattan Project National Historical Park United

  6. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Wednesday, 29 April 2009 00:00 Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in

  7. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Wednesday, 24 November 2010 00:00 Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary

  8. Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    leakage into aquifers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers In this study, we apply an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to CO2 sequestration problems. In one scenario, we look at the risk of wellbore leakage of CO2 into a shallow unconfined aquifer in an urban area; in

  9. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-09-30

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. (1) CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; (2) CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); (3) CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; (4) CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; (5) CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; (6) CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; (7) CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; (8) CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; (9) CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; (10) CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; (11) CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; (12) CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; (13) CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; (14) CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and (15) CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107. CAU 107 closure activities will consist of verifying that the current postings required under Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835 are in place and implementing use restrictions (URs) at two sites, CAS 03-23-29 and CAS 18-23-02. The current radiological postings combined with the URs are adequate administrative controls to limit site access and worker dose.

  10. QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DYNAMICS OBSERVED WITH THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE. I. TURBULENT UPFLOW PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Thomas E.; Slater, Gregory; Hurlburt, Neal; Shine, Richard; Tarbell, Theodore; Title, Alan; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Magara, Tetsuya; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2010-06-20

    Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) observations reveal two new dynamic modes in quiescent solar prominences: large-scale (20-50 Mm) 'arches' or 'bubbles' that 'inflate' from below into prominences, and smaller-scale (2-6 Mm) dark turbulent upflows. These novel dynamics are related in that they are always dark in visible-light spectral bands, they rise through the bright prominence emission with approximately constant speeds, and the small-scale upflows are sometimes observed to emanate from the top of the larger bubbles. Here we present detailed kinematic measurements of the small-scale turbulent upflows seen in several prominences in the SOT database. The dark upflows typically initiate vertically from 5 to 10 Mm wide dark cavities between the bottom of the prominence and the top of the chromospheric spicule layer. Small perturbations on the order of 1 Mm or less in size grow on the upper boundaries of cavities to generate plumes up to 4-6 Mm across at their largest widths. All plumes develop highly turbulent profiles, including occasional Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex 'roll-up' of the leading edge. The flows typically rise 10-15 Mm before decelerating to equilibrium. We measure the flowfield characteristics with a manual tracing method and with the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) 'optical flow' code to derive velocity, acceleration, lifetime, and height data for several representative plumes. Maximum initial speeds are in the range of 20-30 km s{sup -1}, which is supersonic for a {approx}10,000 K plasma. The plumes decelerate in the final few Mm of their trajectories resulting in mean ascent speeds of 13-17 km s{sup -1}. Typical lifetimes range from 300 to 1000 s ({approx}5-15 minutes). The area growth rate of the plumes (observed as two-dimensional objects in the plane of the sky) is initially linear and ranges from 20,000 to 30,000 km{sup 2} s{sup -1} reaching maximum projected areas from 2 to 15 Mm{sup 2}. Maximum contrast of the dark flows relative to the bright prominence plasma in SOT images is negative and ranges from -10% for smaller flows to -50% for larger flows. Passive scalar 'cork movies' derived from NAVE measurements show that prominence plasma is entrained by the upflows, helping to counter the ubiquitous downflow streams in the prominence. Plume formation shows no clear temporal periodicity. However, it is common to find 'active cavities' beneath prominences that can spawn many upflows in succession before going dormant. The mean flow recurrence time in these active locations is roughly 300-500 s (5-8 minutes). Locations remain active on timescales of tens of minutes up to several hours. Using a column density ratio measurement and reasonable assumptions on plume and prominence geometries, we estimate that the mass density in the dark cavities is at most 20% of the visible prominence density, implying that a single large plume could supply up to 1% of the mass of a typical quiescent prominence. We hypothesize that the plumes are generated from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability taking place on the boundary between the buoyant cavities and the overlying prominence. Characteristics, such as plume size and frequency, may be modulated by the strength and direction of the cavity magnetic field relative to the prominence magnetic field. We conclude that buoyant plumes are a source of quiescent prominence mass as well as a mechanism by which prominence plasma is advected upward, countering constant gravitational drainage.

  11. Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting and Review Process Abstract Overview of the siting and review process for...

  12. Visitor Control / Site Access - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs Visitor Control Site Access About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us Visitor Control Site Access...

  13. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2004-04-12

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

  14. Anatomy of a Groundwater Uranium Plume | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1. Protect human health and the environment. Groundwater containing legacy contaminants (pollutants that remain after their sources have been controlled) moves through aquifers in response to the hydraulic gradient. As the groundwater moves, contaminants accumulate on solids (e.g., soil, alluvium, and rock). Clean groundwater entering the aquifer upgradient of the site is contaminated by "bleed back" from the solids phases in the soil or rock. Accurate cleanup times are difficult to

  15. Microsoft Word - N01669_East Plume data rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Data Report for Pinellas Board of Public Instruction Property November 2011 LMS/PIN/N01669 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01669 Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Data Report for Pinellas Board of Public Instruction Property November 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Data Report for Pinellas Board of Public Instruction Property November 2011 Doc. No. N01669 Page i Contents Executive Summary

  16. Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Looney, Brian B.; Seaman, John; Kmetz, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. A robust suite of relatively inexpensive tools is commercially available to measure these variables. Traditional plume/contaminant variables are various measures of contaminant concentration including traditional analysis of chemicals in groundwater samples. An innovative long term monitoring strategy has been developed for acidic or caustic groundwater plumes contaminated with metals and/or radionuclides. Not only should the proposed strategy be more effective at early identification of potential risks, this strategy should be significantly more cost effective because measurement of controlling boundary conditions and master variables is relatively simple. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate significant cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gov Inslee Tours WTP and TF Gov Inslee Tours WTP and TF Groundwater Groundwater Groundwater Treatment Record Groundwater Treatment Record Groundwater Treatment Resin Groundwater Treatment Resin HAMMER Site-Wide Safety Standards HAMMER Site-Wide Safety Standards Helicopter Removes Truck on ALE Helicopter Removes Truck on ALE Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete HSS Beryllium Out Brief HSS Beryllium Out Brief Improving Access to Tank C-107 Improving

  18. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington Closure Job Creation Job Creation Waste Site Sampling Waste Site Sampling Borescope Borescope ERDF Pull Boxes ERDF Pull Boxes Super Cell 9 Winter Construction Super Cell 9 Winter Construction Cone Penetrometer Display Cone Penetrometer Display Touching Lives Touching Lives Super Cell 9 Construction Super Cell 9 Construction Super Cell 9 Super Cell 9 Cone Penetrometers Cone Penetrometers New Bulldozers New Bulldozers Subcontractor Worker Subcontractor Worker "Green"

  19. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home » Site Map Site Map Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Center Leadership Sudip Dosanjh Sudip Dosanjh: Select Publications Jeff Broughton Katie Antypas Richard Gerber Publications John Shalf Center Administration James Craw Norma Early Jeff Grounds Betsy MacGowan Zaida McCunney Kerri Peyovich Lynn Rippe David Tooker Center Communications Jon Bashor Kathy Kincade Linda Vu Margie Wylie Advanced Technologies Nicholas Wright Brian Austin Research Projects Christopher Daley Glenn

  20. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

  1. Hanford Site Tours - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tours Hanford Site Tours Hanford Tour Restrictions Hanford Site Tours Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The Hanford Site is a very unique place offering a number of tours for members of the public, elected officials and their staffs, tribal officials, stakeholders, and others. A list of the kinds of Hanford tours we provide is shown below, along with links to register for the tour or a contact person to call for more information on how to sign up.

  2. Comparison of limited measurements of the OTEC-1 plume with analytical-model predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paddock, R.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1981-07-01

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) requires significant amounts of warm surface waters and cold deep waters for power production. Because these waters are returned to the ocean as effluents, their behavior may affect plant operation and impact the environment. The OTEC-1 facility tested 1-MWe heat exchangers aboard the vessel Ocean Energy Converter moored off the island of Hawaii. The warm and cold waters used by the OTEC-1 facility were combined prior to discharge from the vessel to create a mixed discharge condition. A limited field survey of the mixed discharge plume using fluorescent dye as a tracer was conducted on April 11, 1981, as part of the environmental studies at OTEC-1 coordinated by the Marine Sciences Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Results of that survey were compared with analytical model predictions of plume behavior. Although the predictions were in general agreement with the results of the plume survey, inherent limitations in the field measurements precluded complete description of the plume or detailed evaluation of the models.

  3. Autonomous real-time detection of plumes and jets from moons and comets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Thompson, David R.; Bue, Brian D.; Fuchs, Thomas J.

    2014-10-10

    Dynamic activity on the surface of distant moons, asteroids, and comets can manifest as jets or plumes. These phenomena provide information about the interior of the bodies and the forces (gravitation, radiation, thermal) they experience. Fast detection and follow-up study is imperative since the phenomena may be time-varying and because the observing window may be limited (e.g., during a flyby). We have developed an advanced method for real-time detection of plumes and jets using onboard analysis of the data as it is collected. In contrast to prior work, our technique is not restricted to plume detection from spherical bodies, making it relevant for irregularly shaped bodies such as comets. Further, our study analyzes raw data, the form in which it is available on board the spacecraft, rather than fully processed image products. In summary, we contribute a vital assessment of a technique that can be used on board tomorrow's deep space missions to detect, and respond quickly to, new occurrences of plumes and jets.

  4. Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Harmless | Department of Energy Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

  5. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

  6. Construction of hexahedral elements mesh capturing realistic geometries of Bayou Choctaw SPR site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Roberts, Barry L.

    2015-09-01

    The three-dimensional finite element mesh capturing realistic geometries of Bayou Choctaw site has been constructed using the sonar and seismic survey data obtained from the field. The mesh is consisting of hexahedral elements because the salt constitutive model is coded using hexahedral elements. Various ideas and techniques to construct finite element mesh capturing artificially and naturally formed geometries are provided. The techniques to reduce the number of elements as much as possible to save on computer run time with maintaining the computational accuracy is also introduced. The steps and methodologies could be applied to construct the meshes of Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry strategic petroleum reserve sites. The methodology could be applied to the complicated shape masses for not only various civil and geological structures but also biological applications such as artificial limbs.

  7. The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Watson

    2005-04-18

    Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies.

  8. Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2014 Inside this Update: 2014 LM All-Hands Training, LM to Meet Energy Metering Goals, Anatomy of a Groundwater Uranium Plume, DOE Submits Its Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress, Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications, Scientists Assess Damage Caused by Earthquake near Amchitka, DOE Weldon Spring Site Seeks Shelter, Reindustrialization Workshop Held at Mound Site, Chariot Remediation Work Completed on Schedule, Groundwater

  9. Site C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' u. s. A r my Corps or Engineers Kurfal.. Ilisfr ifl om« 1776 N1 . ~lI rll Sfred , lIu fflll" , New v ur k. 14207 Site C loseout Report for th e Ashland I (Includlng Seaway Arca D), Ashland 2 and Rattlesnake Creek FUS RAP Sites To nawanda . New Yor k F ina l - Octo ber 2006 Formerl y Ut ilized Sites Remedi al Actiun Program Dt:CLAlUlfiO lO OF RF ~ I'O""" A <:n o .. ('oMnLflOI'O '" 1 S-~1 1 A "n* nvnn: S Ill: C'lO'iU 'U l RtrUlIT f OR A SlIu x u l (I "ICLU

  10. Sacandaga Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sacandaga Site Certification tp2ket KAPL-4804 :; Post Remedial Action Report for the Sacqndaga Site Property :. in Glenville, New York August 1994 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Schenectady Naval Reactors Office By: Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Schenectady, New York CONTENTS iz%me List of Pigureki. .'iic:-9"- List ' of .Tables -.. 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Remedial Action Guidelines " i rtid.-Cu..i.- 3.0 Remedial Action 4.0" Post-R&edial Action Sampling 5.0

  11. Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

  12. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE`s mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company.

  13. Ground-water surveillance at the Hanford Site for CY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.; Rieger, J.T.; Cline, C.S.; Jensen, E.J.; Liikala, T.L.; Oster, K.R.

    1984-07-01

    Operations at the Hanford Site have resulted in the discharge of large volumes of process cooling water and other waste waters to the ground. These effluents contain low level of radioactive and chemical substances. During 1983, 328 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radioactive and chemical constituents. Three of these constituents, specifically tritium, nitrate, and gross beta activity, were selected for detailed discussion in this report because they are more readily transported in the ground water than some of the other constituents. Transport of these constituents in the ground water has resulted in the formation of plumes that can be mapped by contouring the analytical data obtained from the monitoring wells. This report describes recent changes in the configuration of the tritium, nitrate and gross beta plumes. Changes or trends in contaminant levels in wells located within both the main plumes (originating from the 200 Areas) and the smaller plumes are discussed in this report. Two potential pathways for radionuclide transport from the ground water to the environmental are discussed in this report, and the radiological impacts are examined. In addition to describing the present status of the ground water beneath the Hanford Site, this report contains the results of studies conducted in support of the ground-water surveillance effort during CY 1983. 21 references, 26 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recovery Waste Site Cleanup 100K Area Waste Site Cleanup 100K Area 100K Area D&D 100K Area D&D 100K Area D&D 100K Area D&D BC Control Area Cleanup BC Control Area Cleanup BC Control Area Cleanup BC Control Area Cleanup 100K Area D&D 100K Area D&D U Plant D&D (Radiological Surveys) U Plant D&D (Radiological Surveys) U Plant D&D U Plant D&D U Plant D&D (Asbestos Removal) U Plant D&D (Asbestos Removal) Drilling Treatment Wells at 100N Drilling

  15. Site Map

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Map Expand All | Collapse All Item Sir John Pople, Gaussian Code, and Complex Chemical Reactions Item DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Click to expand or collapse folder Folder DOE Research and Development Accomplishments About Item The Manhattan Project Click to expand or collapse folder Folder DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Alfred Nobel Laureates Associated with the DOE and Predecessors Item Abdus Salam and his International Influences Item Ahmed Zewail and

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome The Department of Energy's Photo Gallery consists of collections of photographs relevant to the history, operation, and clean up of the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. These photo collections can be easily paged through, searched, downloaded, and printed. If, as viewing these galleries, you have additional information on people or places, you can submit that information on the "Contact Us" link below. If you have related photographs and would like to submit them for

  17. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Main Menu About the ALS ALS@20 .... Quick Facts Mission Statement ALS in the News Strategic Plan Director's Office Organization Advisory Panels History Future Research Areas Applied Science/Techniques Bioscience Chemistry Energy Science Geoscience/Environment Materials/Condensed Matter Physics .... Spectroscopy Scattering Imaging Time-Resolved Science Highlights Science Highlights Industry @ ALS Science Briefs Journal Covers Science Cafés User Information ALSHub User Portal Link opens

  18. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=16

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Shiprock Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: Shiprock Remediation Contractor: S. M. Stoller Corporation Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Mn 8300 No Se 530 Yes 0.05 U 2600 Yes 0.044 Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity (pCi/l) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Sr 11000 No Explosives Present?

  19. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=16

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Old North Continent Responsible DOE Office: Office of Legacy Management Plume Name: Slick Rock - Old North Continent Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Se 11.55 Yes 10 U 616.5 Yes 440 Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? Yes Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present? No Sulfates Present? No

  20. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spook Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: Spook Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Cr (total) No Se 0 No U No Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity (pCi/l) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement other (provide names) Ra-226 No other (provide names) Ra-228 No Explosives

  1. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Legacy Management Plume Name: Chemical Plant (Quarry) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement U 3486 Yes 30 Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? Yes Explosive Name Explosive Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement DNT (dinitrotoluene) 9.3 Yes 0.11 Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No

  2. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Plume) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corp Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 763 Yes 5 Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement U 264 Yes 20 Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? Yes Explosive Name Explosive Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement DNT (dinitrotoluene) Yes 0.11 Other

  3. Statistics for the Relative Detectability of Chemicals in Weak Gaseous Plumes in LWIR Hyperspectral Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metoyer, Candace N.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Chilton, Lawrence

    2008-10-30

    The detection and identification of weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temperature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based model that describes the at-sensor observed radiance. The motivating question for the analyses performed in this paper is as follows. Given a set of backgrounds, is there a way to predict the background over which the probability of detecting a given chemical will be the highest? Two statistics were developed to address this question. These statistics incorporate data from the long-wave infrared band to predict the background over which chemical detectability will be the highest. These statistics can be computed prior to data collection. As a preliminary exploration into the predictive ability of these statistics, analyses were performed on synthetic hyperspectral images. Each image contained one chemical (either carbon tetrachloride or ammonia) spread across six distinct background types. The statistics were used to generate predictions for the background ranks. Then, the predicted ranks were compared to the empirical ranks obtained from the analyses of the synthetic images. For the simplified images under consideration, the predicted and empirical ranks showed a promising amount of agreement. One statistic accurately predicted the best and worst background for detection in all of the images. Future work may include explorations of more complicated plume ingredients, background types, and noise structures.

  4. Dynamics of laser-blow-off induced Li plume in confined geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R K; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)

    2013-08-15

    Dynamics of Li plasma plume created by laser-blow-off technique in air ambient is reported. Plasma plume dynamics and its optical emission are investigated in planar and confined geometries using time resolved shadowgraph imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. Significant differences in the plasma characteristics in confined geometry are quantitatively investigated by comparing the plasma parameters (temperature and density) in free expansion and confined geometry configurations. Dynamics and physical parameters of the primary as well as the reflected shock waves (in confined geometry) and their interactions with expanding plasma are briefly addressed. A large enhancement in the emission intensities of Li I 610.3 nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}? 3d {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,5/2}) and 670.8 nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}? 2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}) is correlated with the shock wave dynamics in the two geometries. Strong self reversal in the neutral emission infers an increase in the population density of neutrals within the confined plasma plume.

  5. Propagation dynamics of laterally colliding plasma plumes in laser-blow-off of thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2014-08-15

    We report a systematic investigation of two plume interactions at different spatial separation (3-7?mm) in laser-blow-off. The plasmas plumes are created using Laser-blow-off (LBO) scheme of a thin film. The fast imaging technique is used to record the evolution of seed plasmas and the interaction zone which is formed as a result of interaction of the two seed plasmas. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to study evolution of optical emissions of the species present in the different regions of the plasmas. Neutral Li emissions (Li I 670.8?nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ? 2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2}) and Li I 610.3?nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2} ? 3d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2,5/2})) are dominant in the plasmas but significant differences are observed in the emission and estimated plasma parameters of the seed and the interaction zone. The transport of plasma species from the seed plasmas to the interaction zone is discussed in the terms of plume divergence, kinetic energy of particles, and ion acoustic speed. An attempt is made to understand the formation and dynamics of the interaction zone in the colliding LBO seed plasmas.

  6. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 06934566 .l\ ~ ~ ~~9 u.s. Department of Energy Hanford Site OEC 2 8 2004 04-0RP-O78 Mr. Todd Martin, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 1933 Jadwin Avenue, Suite 135 Rich1and, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Martin: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) CONSENSUS ADVICE #167 -STOP WORK AUTHORITY Reference: HAB letter from T. Martin to P. Golan and J. Shaw, DOE-HQ; K. Klein, RL; R. Schepens, ORP; L. Hoffman, Ecology; and R. Kreizeneeck, EPA, "Stop Work Authority," dated November 5, 2004. This letter

  7. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-31

    The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. The SER, provided annually in accordance with Department of Energy DOE Order 5400.1, serves the public by summarizing monitoring data collected to assess how the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) impacts the environment. This report (SER) provides a balanced synopsis of non-radiological monitoring and regulatory compliance data and affirms that the SPR has been operating within acceptable regulatory limits. Included in this report is a description of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1994. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of the Weeks Island facility (disposition of 73 million barrels of crude oil inventory) as well as the degasification of up to 144 million barrels of crude oil inventory at the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry facilities. The decision to decommission the Weeks Island facility is a result of diminishing mine integrity from ground water intrusion. Degasifying the crude oil is required to reduce potentially harmful emissions that would occur during oil movements. With regard to still another major environmental action, 43 of the original 84 environmental findings from the 1992 DOE Tiger Team Assessment were closed by the end of 1994. Spills to the environment, another major topic, indicates a positive trend. Total volume of oil spilled in 1994 was only 39 barrels, down from 232 barrels in 1993, and the total volume of brine spilled was only 90 barrels, down from 370 barrels in 1993. The longer term trend for oil and brine spills has declined substantially from 27 in 1990 down to nine in 1994.

  8. Strategic petroleum reserve site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-31

    The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Included in this report is a description of each site`s environment, an overview of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1995. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of 3 the weeks Island facility, involving the disposition of 11.6 million m{sup 3} (73 million barrels) of crude oil inventory, as well as the degasification of over 4.5 million m{sup 3} (30 million barrels) of crude oil inventory at the Bryan Mound and West Hackberry facilities. The decision to decommission the weeks Island facility is a result of diminishing mine integrity from ground water intrusion. Transfer of Weeks Island oil began in November, 1995 with 2.0 million m{sup 3} (12.5 million barrels) transferred by December 31, 1995. Degasifying the crude oil is a major pollution prevention initiative because it will reduce potentially harmful emissions that would occur during oil movements by three or more orders of magnitude. Spills to the environment, another major topic, indicates a positive trend. There were only two reportable oil and three reportable brine spills during 1995, down from a total of 10 reportable spills in 1994. Total volume of oil spilled in 1995 was 56.3 m{sup 3} (354 barrels), and the total volume of brine spilled was 131.1 m{sup 3} (825 barrels). The longer term trend for oil and brine spills has declined substantially from 27 in 1990 down to five in 1995. All of the spills were reported to appropriate agencies and immediately cleaned up, with no long term impacts observed.

  9. Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program VPP Home VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP Communications VPP Conferences Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size 2013 VPPPA Outreach Award Winners VPP Committee Business Case (PDF)

  10. EIS-0302: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transfer of the Heat Source / Radioisotope Themoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site

  11. Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-02-29

    This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

  12. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  13. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  14. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  15. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  16. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  17. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  18. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode=17

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    East Plume) Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No Explosive Name Explosive Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TNT (trinitrotoluene) 21 Yes 2.8 other (provide names) 2,4-DNT 200 Yes 0.11 other (provide names) 2,6-DNT 222 Yes 1.3 other (provide names) 1,3-DNB 0.16 Yes 1 Other Contaminants?No Tritium Present? No Nitrates Present?

  19. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  20. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to

  1. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  2. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  3. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  4. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  5. Modification of modulated plasma plumes for the quasi-phase-matching of high-order harmonics in different spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Sobirov, B.; Reyimbaev, S.; Sherniyozov, H.; Usmanov, T.; Suzuki, M.; Yoneya, S.; Kuroda, H.

    2015-01-15

    We demonstrate the technique allowing the fine tuning of the distance between the laser-produced plasma plumes on the surfaces of different materials, as well as the variation of the sizes of these plumes. The modification of plasma formations is based on the tilting of the multi-slit mask placed between the heating laser beam and target surface, as well as the positioning of this mask in the telescope placed on the path of heating radiation. The modulated plasma plumes with the sizes of single plume ranging between 0.1 and 1 mm were produced on the manganese and silver targets. Modification of the geometrical parameters of plasma plumes proved to be useful for the fine tuning of the quasi-phase-matched high-order harmonics generated in such structures during propagation of the ultrashort laser pulses. We show the enhancement of some groups of harmonics along the plateau range and the tuning of maximally enhanced harmonic by variable modulation of the plasma.

  6. Site Map | Geothermal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Map Site Map Home Basic Search Advanced Search Frequently Asked Questions Site Map Contact Us Website Policies/Important Links

  7. Site Map | DOEpatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Map Site Map Home Basic Search Advanced Search DOEpatents FAQ About DOEpatents Site Map Contact Us Website Policies/Important Links

  8. Site Map | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Map Site Map Home Basic Search Advanced Search Data Explorer FAQ About Data Explorer Site Map Data Explorer Feedback Website Policies/Important Links

  9. Chapter 3: Building Siting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 3 of the LANl Sustainable Design Guide features site issues, site inventory and analysis, site design, and transportation and parking at LANL.

  10. Deployable Plume and Aerosol Release Prediction and Tracking System. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Task 1. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleppe, John; Norris, William; Etezadi, Mehdi

    2006-07-19

    This contract was awarded in response to a proposal in which a deployable plume and aerosol release prediction and tracking system would be designed, fabricated, and tested. The system would gather real time atmospheric data and input it into a real time atmospheric model that could be used for plume predition and tracking. The system would be able to be quickly deployed by aircraft to points of interest or positioned for deployment by vehicles. The system would provide three dimensional (u, v, and w) wind vector data, inversion height measurements, surface wind information, classical weather station data, and solar radiation. The on-board real time computer model would provide the prediction of the behavior of plumes and released aerosols.

  11. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  12. VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Champions Committee Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program VPP Home VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Who We Are Annual Reports Assessments Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP Communications VPP Conferences VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee VPP Committee VPP Champions Committee Charter (PDF) Business Case (PDF) VPP Champions Committee Roster (PDF) Share on

  13. Hanford Site Safety Standards - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Safety Standards Documents Documents Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Tri-Party Agreement Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Hanford Site Budget Hanford Site Safety Standards Hanford Hoisting and Rigging Manual DOE - ORP Contracts/Procurements DOE - RL Contracts/Procurements Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RI/FS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental Hanford Site Safety Standards Email Email

  14. Hanford Site Wide Programs - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us Hanford Site Wide Programs Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Hanford Site-Wide Programs Hanford Safety and Health Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Fire Department Health & Safety Exposition Hanford Traffic Safety Beryllium Program Employee Concerns Program (ECP) Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program

  15. Chapter 3: Building Siting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Building Siting Site Issues at LANL Site Inventory and Analysis Site Design Transportation and Parking LANL | Chapter 3 Site Issues at LANL Definitions and related documents Building Siting Laboratory site-wide issues include transportation and travel distances for building occupants, impacts on wildlife corridors and hydrology, and energy supply and distribution limitations. Decisions made during site selec- tion and planning impact the surrounding natural habitat, architectural design

  16. MIDC: Web Site Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MIDC Web Site Search Enter words or phrases: Search Clear Help Also see the site directory. NREL MIDC

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Gulfstream I measurements of the Kuwait oil-fire plume, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Hannigan, R.V.; Thorp, J.M.; Tomich, S.D.; Warren, M.J. ); Al-Sunaid, A.A. ); Daum, P.H.; Mazurek, M. )

    1992-11-01

    In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of aircraft measurements to determine pollutant and radiative properties of the smoke plume from oil fires in Kuwait. This work was sponsored by the US Department emanating of Energy, in cooperation with several other agencies as part of an extensive effort coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization, to obtain a comprehensive data set to assess the characteristics of the plume and its environmental impact. This report describes field measurement activities and introduces the various data collected, but provides only limited analyses of these data. Results of further data analyses will be presented in subsequent open-literature publications.

  18. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1?atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1?atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  19. International shipment of light weight radioisotopic heater units (LWRHU) using the USA/9516/B(U)F Mound 1 kW shipping package in support of the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barklay, C.D.; Merten, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopes have provided heat that has been used to maintain specific operating environments within remote satellites and spacecraft. For the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fueled light weight radioisotopic heater unit (LWRHU) will be used within the spacecraft. Since the current plan for the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission incorporates the use of a Russian launch platform for the spacecraft, the LWRHUs must be transported in an internationally certified shipping container. An internationally certified shipping package that is versatile enough to be reconfigured to transport the LWRHUs that will be required to support the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission is the Mound USA/9516/B(U)F. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    09 Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Navigating the Regulatory Framework Prepared by Pacific Energy Ventures, LLC on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy December 2009 Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics: Navigating the Regulatory Framework 2009 December 2009 Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Intentionally Left Blank Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics: Navigating the Regulatory Framework 2009 December 2009 Siting Methodologies for

  1. MOVING BEYOND PUMP AND TREAT TOWARD ENHANCED ATTENUATION AND COMBINED REMEDIES T-AREA, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Jay Noonkester, J; Gerald Blount, G

    2008-04-03

    Groundwater beneath T-Area, a former laboratory and semiworks operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site, is contaminated by chlorinated solvents (cVOCs). Since the contamination was detected in the 1980s, the cVOCs at T-Area have been treated by a combination of soil vapor extraction and groundwater pump and treat. The site has received approval to discontinue the active treatments and implement a full scale test of enhanced attenuation--an engineering and regulatory strategy that has recently been developed by DOE and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council. Enhanced attenuation uses active engineering solutions to alter the target site in such a way that the contaminant plume will passively stabilize and shrink and to document that the action will be effective, timely, and sustainable. The paradigm recognizes that attenuation remedies are fundamentally based on a mass balance. Thus, long-term plume dynamics can be altered either by reducing the contaminant loading from the source or by increasing the rate of natural attenuation processes within all, or part of, the plume volume. The combination of technologies that emerged for T-Area included: (1) neat (pure) vegetable oil deployment in the deep vadose zone in the former source area, (2) emulsified vegetable oil deployment within the footprint of the groundwater plume, and (3) identification of attenuation mechanisms and rates for the distal portion of the plume. In the first part, neat oil spreads laterally forming a thin layer on the water table to intercept and reduce future cVOC loading (via partitioning) and reduce oxygen inputs (via biostimulation). In the second and third parts, emulsified oil forms active bioremediation reactor zones within the plume footprint to degrade existing groundwater contamination (via reductive dechlorination) and stimulates long-term attenuation capacity in the distal plume (via cometabolism). For T-Area, the enhanced attenuation development process proved to be a powerful tool in developing a defensible strategy that provides a high degree of performance while minimizing adverse collateral impacts of remediation (e.g., energy use and wetland damage) and minimizing life-cycle costs.

  2. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maps Individual Permit: Site Monitoring Area Maps Each Site Monitoring Area Map is updated whenever the map information is updated. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email What do these maps show? The Individual Permit for Storm Water site monitoring area maps display the following information: Surface hydrological features Locations of the Site(s) assigned to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring

  3. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2010 to January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2011-02-01

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer focus research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, and CY 2009 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project has responded to all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of “Modeling” and “Well-Field Mitigation” plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2010 including the quantification of well-bore flows in the fully screened wells and the testing of means to mitigate them; the development of site geostatistical models of hydrologic and geochemical properties including the distribution of U; developing and parameterizing a reactive transport model of the smear zone that supplies contaminant U to the groundwater plume; performance of a second passive experiment of the spring water table rise and fall event with a associated multi-point tracer test; performance of downhole biogeochemical experiments where colonization substrates and discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to the lower aquifer zone; and modeling of past injection experiments for model parameterization, deconvolution of well-bore flow effects, system understanding, and publication. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, and have now implemented a new strategy for this activity to bypass an approach that was found unworkable. An important focus of CY 2010 activities has been infrastructure modification to the IFRC site to eliminate vertical well bore flows in the fully screened wells. The mitigation procedure was carefully evaluated and is now being implementated. A new experimental campaign is planned for early spring 2011 that will utilize the modified well-field for a U reactive transport experiment in the upper aquifer zone. Preliminary geophysical monitoring experiments of rainwater recharge in the vadose zone have been initiated with promising results, and a controlled infiltration experiment to evaluate U mobilization from the vadose zone is now under planning for the September 2011. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes.

  4. Spatial coherence measurements of non-resonant and resonant high harmonics generated in laser ablation plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Abdelrahman, Z. Frank, F.; Witting, T.; Okell, W. A.; Fabris, D.; Hutchison, C.; Marangos, J. P.; Tisch, J. W. G.

    2014-01-13

    We present measurements of the spatial coherence of the high-order harmonics generated in laser-produced ablation plumes. Harmonics were generated using 4 fs, 775 nm pulses with peak intensity 3 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2}. Double-slit fringe visibilities in the range of ≈0.6–0.75 were measured for non-resonant harmonics in carbon and resonantly enhanced harmonics in zinc and indium. These are somewhat higher than the visibility obtained for harmonics generated in argon gas under similar conditions. This is attributed to lower time-dependent ionization of the plasma ablation targets compared to argon during the high harmonics generation process.

  5. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site—10281

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Miller, D.E.; Morris, S.A.; Sheader, L.R.; Glenn, E.P.; Moore, D.; Carroll, K.C.; Benally, L.; Roanhorse, M.; Bush, R.P.; none,

    2010-03-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Navajo Nation, and the University of Arizona are exploring natural and enhanced attenuation remedies for groundwater contamination at a former uranium-ore processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. DOE removed radioactive tailings from the Monument Valley site in 1994. Nitrate and ammonium, waste products of the milling process, remain in an alluvial groundwater plume spreading from the soil source where tailings were removed. Planting and irrigating two native shrubs, fourwing saltbush and black greasewood, markedly reduced both nitrate and ammonium in the source area over an 8-year period. Total nitrogen dropped from 350 mg/kg in 2000 to less than 200 mg/kg in 2008. Most of the reduction is attributable to irrigation-enhanced microbial denitrification rather than plant uptake. However, soil moisture and percolation flux monitoring show that the plantings control the soil water balance in the source area, preventing additional leaching of nitrogen compounds. Enhanced denitrification and phytoremediation also look promising for plume remediation. Microcosm experiments, nitrogen isotopic fractionation analysis, and solute transport modeling results suggest that (1) up to 70 percent of nitrate in the plume has been lost through natural denitrification since the mill was closed in 1968, and (2) injection of ethanol may accelerate microbial denitrification in plume hot spots. A field-scale ethanol injection pilot study is underway. Landscape-scale remote sensing methods developed for the project suggest that transpiration from restored native phreatophyte populations rooted in the aquifer could limit further expansion of the plume. An evaluation of landfarm phytoremediation, the irrigation of native shrub plantings with high nitrate water pumped from the alluvial aquifer, is also underway.

  6. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic–biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento Plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, L.; Kuang, C.; Sedlacek, A.; Senum, G.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Jayne, J.; Fast, J.; Hubbe, J.; et al

    2015-09-17

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced bymore »the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of CO and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein) or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, "Bio", for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short time and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ?OA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst ? values in order to probe day to day and location dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ?OA were ?O3 and ?CO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was ~ 60 % of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ?CO and ?Bio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al. (2012) and Shilling et al. (2013) to determine if anthropogenic-biogenic interactions enhance OA production. As found earlier, ?OA in the data subset having high ?CO and high ?Bio was several-fold greater than in other subsets. Part of this difference is consistent with a synergistic interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic precursors and part to an independent linear dependence of ?OA on precursors. Highest values of ?O3 also occur in the high ?CO–high ?Bio data set, raising the possibility that the coincidence of high concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic tracers as well as OA and O3 may be associated with high temperatures, clear skies, and poor ventilation in addition to specific interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic compounds.« less

  7. Sandia Energy - Siting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siting Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation Siting SitingTara Camacho-Lopez2015-03-20T19:23:23+00:00 At the...

  8. SITE OFFICE CONSOLIDATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paul Golan, Site Office Manager, SLAC/LBNL, presented on the role of the DOE Site Office. Paul covered the role of the DOE Site Office, operating model, and vision.

  9. Potential Release Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and

  10. [SITE NAME] Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Location of the Shiprock Disposal Site Site Description and History The Shiprock site is the location of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing facility within the Navajo Nation in the northwest corner of New

  11. Search - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Search Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Search Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size

  12. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. ); Yancey, E.F. )

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  13. Hanford Site Hazards Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Hazards Guide 2016 Approved for Public Release; Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Site Hazards Guide Contents ASBESTOS .............................................................................................................................................. 2 BERYLLIUM ........................................................................................................................................... 4 CHEMICAL SAFETY

  14. Weather - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weather Weather Calendar Hanford Blog Archive Search Site Feeds Site Index Weather What's New Weather Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font...

  15. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HITTMAN BUILDING <,' 2:. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE I . ; " LEWISTON, ' NEW YORK : f? ... Survey and Site Assessment Program EnergyEnvironment Systems Division ;>::; Oak ...

  16. Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Salmon, Mississippi, Site Location of the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Site Description and History The Salmon, Mississippi, Site, also called the Tatum Dome Test Site, is a 1,470-acre tract of land in Lamar County, Mississippi, 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg. The nearest town is Purvis, about 10 miles east of the site. The site is in a forested region known as the long-leaf pine belt of the Gulf Coastal Plain. Elevations in the area range from about 240 to 350 feet above sea level. The site

  17. Numerical simulation studies of the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume in a saline aquifer with a sloping caprock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.; Nordbotten, J.

    2010-12-28

    We have used the TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N code to perform numerical simulation studies of the long-term behavior of CO{sub 2} stored in an aquifer with a sloping caprock. This problem is of great practical interest, and is very challenging due to the importance of multi-scale processes. We find that the mechanism of plume advance is different from what is seen in a forced immiscible displacement, such as gas injection into a water-saturated medium. Instead of pushing the water forward, the plume advances because the vertical pressure gradients within the plume are smaller than hydrostatic, causing the groundwater column to collapse ahead of the plume tip. Increased resistance to vertical flow of aqueous phase in anisotropic media leads to reduced speed of updip plume advancement. Vertical equilibrium models that ignore effects of vertical flow will overpredict the speed of plume advancement. The CO{sub 2} plume becomes thinner as it advances, yet the speed of advancement remains constant over the entire simulation period of up to 400 years, with migration distances of more than 80 km. Our simulations include dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase and associated density increase, and molecular diffusion. However, no convection develops in the aqueous phase because it is suppressed by the relatively coarse (sub-) horizontal gridding required in a regional-scale model. A first crude sub-grid-scale model was developed to represent convective enhancement of CO{sub 2} dissolution. This process is found to greatly reduce the thickness of the CO{sub 2} plume, but, for the parameters used in our simulations, does not affect the speed of plume advancement.

  18. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 2, Big Hill Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-08-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 2 focuses on the Big Hill SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  19. Hanford.gov Site Maintenance - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Hanford.gov Site Maintenance Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Hanford.gov will be undergoing scheduled upgrades and will be unavailable from 7:00 am Saturday, March 19th, 2016 until 5:00pm Sunday, March 20th, 2016. Questions and inquiries regarding this maintenance outage please email Anel Suarez MSA Information Management. Thank you for your patience. If you need

  20. Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RIFS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Email Email...

  1. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1999-03-24

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

  2. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

    2000-05-10

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

  3. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  4. Small Site Closures

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Closures This table lists the 85 small sites closed as of 2012 in chronological order of completion. 1 A number of these sites were cleaned up under the Formerly Utilized Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), for which the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for site surveys and remediation. Uranium processing sites were addressed by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under an U.S.

  5. ARM - Site Tours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HomeroomSite Tours Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Site Tours As part of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium outreach program, Courtney Hammond brought third-grade students from Fred Ipalook Elementary School to the ARM site in Barrow, Alaska for a science field trip in

  6. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    April 1 - June 30, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during April through June 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status

  7. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    January 1 - March 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during January through March 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. The first semi-annual FFA

  8. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .. ' \ MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 -December 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Dayvault JR 7CJ7 This report summarizes current project status and activities implemented during October tiU'ough December 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities for the Monticello MIII Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection repmis,

  9. Microsoft Word - Appendix G.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 are included in this appendix. Appendix G, Page 1 RFLMA Contact Record 2011-01 1 of 5 ROCKY FLATS SITE REGULATORY CONTACT RECORD Purpose: Replace Mound Site Plume Treatment System (MSPTS) media and maintain/repair discharge gallery. Contact Record Approval Date: 1/14/11 Site Contact(s)/Affiliation(s): Scott Surovchak, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); John Boylan, S.M. Stoller (Stoller); Rick DiSalvo, Stoller Regulatory Contact(s)/Affiliation(s): Carl Spreng, Colorado Department of Public

  10. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akagi, Sheryl; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, Gavin; Sullivan, Amy; Lee, Taehyoung; Kredenweis, Sonia; Urbanski, Shawn; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Weise, David

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured the trace gas emission factors from 7 prescribed fires in South Carolina, U.S. using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analyses. The fires were intended to emulate high-intensity burns as they were lit during the dry season and in most cases represented stands that had not been treated with prescribed burns in 10+ years, if at all. A total of 97 trace gas species are reported here from both airborne and ground-based platforms making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements included the first data for a suite of monoterpene compounds emitted via distillation of plant tissues during real fires. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of ~0.40% of CO (molar basis), ~3.9% of NMOC (molar basis), and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis), suggests that they impacted post-emission formation of ozone, aerosol, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes. The variability in the terpene emissions in South Carolina (SC) fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the emitted gas-phase non-methane organic compounds was surprisingly different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that the slightly different ecosystems, time of year and the precursor variability all contributed to the variability in plume chemistry observed in this study and in the literature. The ?HCN/?CO emission ratio, however, is fairly consistent at 0.9 ± 0.06 % for airborne fire measurements in coniferous-dominated ecosystems further confirming the value of HCN as a good biomass burning indicator/tracer. The SC results also support an earlier finding that C3-C4 alkynes may be of use as biomass burning indicators on the time-scale of hours to a day. It was possible to measure the chemical evolution of the plume on four of the fires and significant ozone (O3) formation (?O3/?CO from 10-90%) occurred in all of these plumes. Slower O3 production was observed on a cloudy day with low co-emissions of NOx and the fastest O3 production was observed on a sunny day when the plume almost certainly incorporated significant additional NOx by passing over the Columbia, SC metropolitian area. Due to rapid plume dilution, it was only possible to acquire high quality downwind data for two other species (formaldehyde and methanol) on two of the fires. In all four cases significant increases were observed. This is likely the first direct observation of post-emission methanol production in biomass burning plumes and the precursors likely included terpenes.

  11. Site Map | ScienceCinema

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Map Site Map Home Audio Search Fielded Search About FAQ Site Map Contact Us Website Policies/Important Links

  12. Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Other Sites Summary Search Other Sites Considered Sites Other Sites All LM Quick Search All Other Sites 11 E (2) Disposal Cell - 037 ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 Argonne National Laboratory - West - 014 Bodo Canyon Cell - 006 Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 Chevron Panna Maria Site - 030 Clive Disposal Cell - 036 Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 Conoco Conquista Site - 031 Cotter Canon City Site - 009 Dawn Ford Site - 038 EFB White Mesa

  13. Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Bacon, Diana H.; Viswanathan, Hari; Stauffer, Philip; Jordan, Amy B.; Pawar, Rajesh

    2014-03-07

    Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). The volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites.

  14. Nonlinear Bayesian Algorithms for Gas Plume Detection and Estimation from Hyper-spectral Thermal Image Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Posse, Christian; Hylden, Jeff L.; Anderson, Kevin K.

    2007-06-13

    This paper presents a nonlinear Bayesian regression algorithm for the purpose of detecting and estimating gas plume content from hyper-spectral data. Remote sensing data, by its very nature, is collected under less controlled conditions than laboratory data. As a result, the physics-based model that is used to describe the relationship between the observed remotesensing spectra, and the terrestrial (or atmospheric) parameters that we desire to estimate, is typically littered with many unknown "nuisance" parameters (parameters that we are not interested in estimating, but also appear in the model). Bayesian methods are well-suited for this context as they automatically incorporate the uncertainties associated with all nuisance parameters into the error estimates of the parameters of interest. The nonlinear Bayesian regression methodology is illustrated on realistic simulated data from a three-layer model for longwave infrared (LWIR) measurements from a passive instrument. This shows that this approach should permit more accurate estimation as well as a more reasonable description of estimate uncertainty.

  15. Quantitative IR Spectrum and Vibrational Assignments for Glycolaldehyde Vapor: Glycolaldehyde Measurements in Biomass Burning Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Profeta, Luisa T.; Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Williams, Stephen D.

    2013-04-15

    Glycolaldehyde (GA, 2-hydroxyethanal, C2H4O2) is a semi-volatile molecule of atmospheric importance, recently proposed as a precursor in the formation of aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA). There are few methods to measure glycolaldehyde vapor, but infrared spectroscopy has been used successfully. Using vetted protocols we have completed the first assignment of all fundamental vibrational modes and derived quantitative IR absorption band strengths using both neat and pressure-broadened GA vapor. Even though GA is problematic due to its propensity to both dimerize and condense, our intensities agree well with the few previously published values. Using the reference ?10 band Q-branch at 860.51 cm-1, we have also determined GA mixing ratios in biomass burning plumes generated by field and laboratory burns of fuels from the southeastern and southwestern United States, including the first field measurements of glycolaldehyde in smoke. The GA emission factors were anti-correlated with modified combustion efficiency confirming release of GA from smoldering combustion. The GA emission factors (g of GA emitted per kg dry biomass burned on a dry mass basis) had a low dependence on fuel type consistent with the production mechanism being pyrolysis of cellulose. GA was emitted at 0.23 ± 0.13% of CO from field fires and we calculate that it accounts for ~18% of the aqueous-phase SOA precursors that we were able to measure.

  16. Far-field model of the regional influence of effluent plumes from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, D.P.

    1985-07-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants discharge large volumes of cold water into the upper ocean. A three-dimensional, limited-area model was developed to investigate the regional influence of the far-field effluent plume created by the negatively buoyant discharge. The model was applied to discharges from a 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant into coastal waters characterized by various ambient ocean conditions. A typical ambient temperature structure and nutrient distribution, as well as the behavior of the effluent plume itself, were strongly modified by the discharge-induced circulation. Although temperature perturbations in the plume were small, upward entrainment of nutrients from below the thermocline was significant. The regional influence of discharges from an 80-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant, the interactions between the discharges from two adjacent 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plants, and the effects of coastal boundary and bottom discharge were examined with respect to the regional influence of a 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant located in deep water off a coast (base case).

  17. Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-21

    This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Seymour Recycling Corporation site, Seymour, Indiana (second remedial action), September 1987. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-30

    The Seymour Recycling Corporation (SRC) site, encompassing a fourteen-acre area, is approximately two miles southwest of Seymour, Indiana. SRC and its corporate predecessor, Seymour Manufacturing Company, processed, stored, and incinerated chemical wastes at the site from about 1970 to early 1980. The facility was closed when SRC failed to comply with a 1978 agreement with the State of Indiana to cease receiving wastes and to institute better waste-management practices. In 1980, several thousand drums were removed from the site by two potentially responsible parties (PRPs). In 1981, the U.S. EPA removed chemicals from tanks at the site and disposed of those wastes offsite. A 1982 Consent Decree with potential PRPs resulted in the removal, between December 1982 and January 1984, of approximately 50,000 drums, 100 storage tanks and the first foot of contaminated soil from about 75 percent of the site's surface. A Record of Decision, signed in September 1986, evaluated the stabilization of the ground water plume emanating from the site and selected the implementation of a plume stabilization system to extract, treat and discharge ground water to a waste water treatment plant.

  19. nevada national security site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Nevada National Security Site operator recognized for green fleet http:www.nnsa.energy.govblognevada-national-security-site-operator-recognized-green-fleet

    The...

  20. SRNL Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Notice This web site is part of a Federal computer system used to accomplish Federal functions. The Savannah River Site (SRS) uses software programs to monitor this web ...

  1. Annual Site Environmental Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... it is recommended that DOE sites meet international limits for terrestrial biota that are ... 2010 ASER 4.6.9.1 Deer Samples of liver, kidney, and muscle from a deer killed on site in ...

  2. Hanford Site Freedom

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Freedom ofInformation Act Department of Energy HANFORD SITE FOIA Requests FOIA Home FOIA Admin Page 1 of3 FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Freedom of Information Act...

  3. Nevada Site Offce's Talbot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Offce's Talbot relays Complex 2030 vision 1 erry Talbot, who recently assumed the position as National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nevada Site Offce (NSO) manager, says Complex 2030 is just one piece of his strategic vision to help the Department of Energy secure America's future. "The activities that occur at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) provide a very specifc value chain," explains Talbot. "That chain includes not only the science that is conducted at the site,

  4. Completed Sites Listing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As of fiscal year 2012, EM (and its predecessor organization UMTRA) completed cleanup and closed 91 sites in 24 states.

  5. site_transition.cdr

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF This fact sheet explains the process for transferring a site to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Introduction Transition Process After environmental remediation is completed at a site and there is no continuing mission, responsibility for the site and the associated records are transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management for post-closure management.

  6. Disposal Information - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program Tools Disposal Information About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Tools Approved High Integrity Containers Approved Sorbents, Stabilizers, and Void Fillers Disposal Information Points of Contact Disposal Information Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Disposal of Radioactive Waste at Hanford The Hanford Site

  7. ARM - Cool Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sites Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Cool Sites The ARM friends have been searching the Internet to locate the best resources to help you! The websites that they found (and gave their official stamp of approval) are broken into three areas: Climate Change, Weather, and Other

  8. WINDExchange: Siting Wind Turbines

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers Economic Development Siting Resources & Tools Siting Wind Turbines This page provides resources about wind turbine siting. American Wind Wildlife Institute The American Wind Wildlife Institute (AWWI) facilitates timely and responsible development of wind energy, while protecting wildlife and wildlife habitat. AWWI was created and is sustained by a unique collaboration of environmentalists, conservationists,

  9. FIREPLUME model for plume dispersion from fires: Application to uranium hexafluoride cylinder fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.F.; Dunn, W.E.; Policastro, A.J.; Maloney, D.

    1997-06-01

    This report provides basic documentation of the FIREPLUME model and discusses its application to the prediction of health impacts resulting from releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in fires. The model application outlined in this report was conducted for the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted UF{sub 6}. The FIREPLUME model is an advanced stochastic model for atmospheric plume dispersion that predicts the downwind consequences of a release of toxic materials from an explosion or a fire. The model is based on the nonbuoyant atmospheric dispersion model MCLDM (Monte Carlo Lagrangian Dispersion Model), which has been shown to be consistent with available laboratory and field data. The inclusion of buoyancy and the addition of a postprocessor to evaluate time-varying concentrations lead to the current model. The FIREPLUME model, as applied to fire-related UF{sub 6} cylinder releases, accounts for three phases of release and dispersion. The first phase of release involves the hydraulic rupture of the cylinder due to heating of the UF{sub 6} in the fire. The second phase involves the emission of material into the burning fire, and the third phase involves the emission of material after the fire has died during the cool-down period. The model predicts the downwind concentration of the material as a function of time at any point downwind at or above the ground. All together, five fire-related release scenarios are examined in this report. For each scenario, downwind concentrations of the UF{sub 6} reaction products, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride, are provided for two meteorological conditions: (1) D stability with a 4-m/s wind speed, and (2) F stability with a 1-m/s wind speed.

  10. Site Environmental Report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

  11. Borehole induction logging for the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project LLNL gasoline spill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, S.; Newmark, R.; Wilt, M.

    1994-01-21

    Borehole induction logs were acquired for the purpose of characterizing subsurface physical properties and monitoring steam clean up activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work was part of the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project`s demonstrated clean up of a gasoline spin. The site is composed of unconsolidated days, sands and gravels which contain gasoline both above and below the water table. Induction logs were used to characterize lithology, to provide ``ground truth`` resistivity values for electrical resistance tomography (ERT), and to monitor the movement of an underground steam plume used to heat the soil and drive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the extraction wells.

  12. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2010-02-01

    The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  13. Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Fact Sheet UMTRCA Title I UMTRCA Title I Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing sites and disposal site near Rifle, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Rife Processing Sites and Disposal Site Site Description and History Two former uranium and vanadium processing sites are located near the

  14. Uranium Fate and Transport Modeling, Guterl Specialty Steel Site, New York - 13545

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, Bill; Tandon, Vikas

    2013-07-01

    The Former Guterl Specialty Steel Corporation Site (Guterl Site) is located 32 kilometers (20 miles) northeast of Buffalo, New York, in Lockport, Niagara County, New York. Between 1948 and 1952, up to 15,875 metric tons (35 million pounds) of natural uranium metal (U) were processed at the former Guterl Specialty Steel Corporation site in Lockport, New York. The resulting dust, thermal scale, mill shavings and associated land disposal contaminated both the facility and on-site soils. Uranium subsequently impacted groundwater and a fully developed plume exists below the site. Uranium transport from the site involves legacy on-site pickling fluid handling, the leaching of uranium from soil to groundwater, and the groundwater transport of dissolved uranium to the Erie Canal. Groundwater fate and transport modeling was performed to assess the transfer of dissolved uranium from the contaminated soils and buildings to groundwater and subsequently to the nearby Erie Canal. The modeling provides a tool to determine if the uranium contamination could potentially affect human receptors in the vicinity of the site. Groundwater underlying the site and in the surrounding area generally flows southeasterly towards the Erie Canal; locally, groundwater is not used as a drinking water resource. The risk to human health was evaluated outside the Guterl Site boundary from the possibility of impacted groundwater discharging to and mixing with the Erie Canal waters. This condition was evaluated because canal water is infrequently used as an emergency water supply for the City of Lockport via an intake located approximately 122 meters (m) (400 feet [ft]) southeast of the Guterl Site. Modeling was performed to assess whether mixing of groundwater with surface water in the Erie Canal could result in levels of uranium exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) established drinking water standard for total uranium; the Maximum Concentration Limit (MCL). Geotechnical test data indicate that the major portion of uranium in the soil will adsorb or remain bound to soil, yet leaching to groundwater appears as an on-site source. Soil leaching was modeled using low adsorption factors to replicate worst-case conditions where the uranium leaches to the groundwater. Results indicate that even after several decades, which is the period of time since uranium was processed at the Guterl Site, leaching from soil does not fully account for the currently observed levels of groundwater contamination. Modeling results suggest that there were historic releases of uranium from processing operations directly to the shallow fractured rock and possibly other geochemical conditions that have produced the current groundwater contamination. Groundwater data collected at the site between 1997 and 2011 do not indicate an increasing level of uranium in the main plume, thus the uranium adsorbed to the soil is in equilibrium with the groundwater geochemistry and transport conditions. Consequently, increases in the overall plume concentration or size are not expected. Groundwater flowing through fractures under the Guterl Site transports dissolved uranium from the site to the Erie Canal, where the groundwater has been observed to seep from the northern canal wall at some locations. The seeps discharge uranium at concentrations near or below the MCL to the Erie Canal. Conservative mixing calculations were performed using two worst-case assumptions: 1) the seeps were calculated as contiguous discharges from the Erie Canal wall and 2) the uranium concentration of the seepage is 274 micrograms per liter (?g/L) of uranium, which is the highest on-site uranium concentration in groundwater and nearly ten-fold the actual seep concentrations. The results indicate that uranium concentrations in the seep water would have to be more than 200 times greater than the highest observed on-site groundwater concentrations (or nearly 55,000 ?g/L) to potentially exceed the drinking water standard (the MCL) for total uranium in the Erie Canal. (authors)

  15. Consent-Based Siting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BASED SITING CONSENT-BASED SITING PUBLIC MEETING University of Chicago, Gleacher Center 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive Chicago, IL 60611 March 29, 2016 12:00-1:00 PM Informal Open House and Poster Session (Before Meeting Begins) 1:00-1:15 PM Welcoming Remarks Robert Rosner, Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics & Physics, University of Chicago 1:15-1:30 PM Moving Forward with Consent-Based Siting John Kotek, Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear

  16. Nevada National Security Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 24, 2014 Cultural Artifacts Cross Eras at the Nevada National Security Site It is well known that the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is home to many artifacts from the Cold War. Few people may be aware of the older important cultural resources that exist throughout the site as well. Artifacts ranging from hundreds to thousands of years old are part of the NNSS cultural inventory. The NNSS' Cultural Resources Management Program has documented tools and dwellings associated with

  17. Getting Started - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program Getting Started Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program VPP Home VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP Communications VPP Conferences Getting Started Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size History of VPP (PDF) VPP How To Guide (PDF) VPP Getting Started Tools Employee Pocket Guide (PDF) What is a Personal Safety Action Plan (PDF) Picture This (PDF) VPP Tenets Tenet 1 (PDF)

  18. Maintaining STAR - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Voluntary Protection Program Maintaining STAR Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program VPP Home VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP Campaign/Posters VPP Tools VPP Presentations VPP Awareness VPP Communications VPP Conferences Maintaining STAR Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Once STAR status is achieved, please access the below information as a guide, tools, posters that will help to maintain STAR status.

  19. Colorado, Processing Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites September 2014 LMS/RFO-RFN/S11940 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFO-RFN/S11940 2014 Verification Monitoring Report for the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites September 2014 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2014 Verification Monitoring Report for the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites September 2014 Doc. No. S11940 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  20. Information Exchange management site

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-01

    Django site used to manage the approved information exchanges (content models) after creation and public comment at https://github.com/usgin-models.

  1. Newsroom - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video Gallery Media Contacts Hanford Blog DOE Richland Operations Office Hanford @ Social Media River Corridor and Central Plateau Cleanup Hanford Site Facebook Hanford...

  2. 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2002-09-01

    THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

  3. Site Sustainability Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SUSTAINABILITY PLAN Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory PPPL is operated by Princeton ... Director, Operations Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory December 2014 FY 2015 Site ...

  4. Primary and Site Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    electricity reflect the amount of energy actually consumed within the building. Site energy data are most useful to building engineers, energy managers, building owners and others...

  5. Gold Awards - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Wide Programs DOE Human Resources Management Recognition and Awards Program Gold Awards About Us DOE Human Resources Management Division DOE Employment Recognition and...

  6. Approved Ballots - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the appointed Hoisting & Rigging reviewing subcommittee, were determined to be editorial in nature or the current Hanford site program already met or exceeds the change....

  7. Contact Us - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Wide Programs Health & Safety Exposition Contact Us About Us Booth Awards Special Events Exhibitor Information What is EXPO Electronic Registration Form Contact Us...

  8. Environmental Surveillance - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reach of the Columbia River (PDF) Calendar Year 2012 Assessment of Porcupines and Woody Vegetation in the 100 Areas of the Hanford Site (PDF) Environmental Surveillance Share...

  9. Berkeley Lab Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Berkeley Lab | Laboratory Site Map Laboratory Organization Chart DivisionalDepartmental Organization Charts Laboratory Map Interactive Laboratory Map History of the...

  10. Site Transition Guidance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Transition Guidance March 2010 Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington D. C. 20585 Standard Review Plan (SRP) Technical Framework for EM...

  11. TWP Nauru Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical...

  12. Land Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Management About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us Land Management Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size...

  13. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2012-03-05

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

  14. Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing sites and disposal site at Slick Rock, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History The Slick Rock processing sites consist of two former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing

  15. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  16. VPP Conferences - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conferences Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program VPP Home VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee Getting Started Maintaining STAR VPP Communications VPP Conferences National Presentations Regional Presentations VPP Conferences Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size 2014 Regional and National Conferences Regional Conference Event National Conference Event

  17. Site Map - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Site Map Page Content Pantex.com Mission & Strategies Mission National Security Nuclear Explosive Operations Nuclear Material Operations HE Operations Strategies Advance HE Center of Excellence Exemplify a High Reliability Organization Health & Safety Safety Training Occupational Medicine Contractor Safety Environment Environmental Projects & Operations Regulatory Compliance Waste Operations Environmental Management System Environmental Document Library Public Meetings Doing

  18. Strategic Petroleum Reserve | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crude oil pipes at SPR Bryan Mound site near Freeport, TX. Crude oil pipes at SPR Bryan Mound site near Freeport, TX. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) is the world's largest...

  19. Site decommissioning management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  20. Site directed recombination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jurka, Jerzy W. (Los Altos, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  1. Distinctive plume formation in atmospheric Ar and He plasmas in microwave frequency band and suitability for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H. Wk.; Kang, S. K.; Won, I. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Kwon, H. C.; Sim, J. Y.; Lee, J. K.

    2013-12-15

    Distinctive discharge formation in atmospheric Ar and He plasmas was observed in the microwave frequency band using coaxial transmission line resonators. Ar plasmas formed a plasma plume whereas He formed only confined plasmas. As the frequency increased from 0.9 GHz to 2.45 GHz, the Ar plasma exhibited contraction and filamentation, and the He plasmas were constricted. Various powers and gas flow rates were applied to identify the effect of the electric field and gas flow rate on plasma plume formation. The He plasmas were more strongly affected by the electric field than the Ar plasmas. The breakdown and sustain powers yielded opposite results from those for low-frequency plasmas (?kHz). The phenomena could be explained by a change in the dominant ionization process with increasing frequency. Penning ionization and the contribution of secondary electrons in sheath region reduced as the frequency increased, leading to less efficient ionization of He because its ionization and excitation energies are higher than those of Ar. The emission spectra showed an increase in the NO and N{sub 2} second positive band in both the Ar and He plasmas with increasing frequency whereas the hydroxyl radical and atomic O peaks did not increase with increasing frequency but were highest at particular frequencies. Further, the frequency effect of properties such as the plasma impedance, electron density, and device efficiency were presented. The study is expected to be helpful for determining the optimal conditions of plasma systems for biomedical applications.

  2. Columbus, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 Columbus, Ohio, Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Columbus, Ohio, Sites. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is responsible for maintaining records for this site. Location of the Columbus Sites Site Description and History The Columbus, Ohio, Sites consist of two geographically separate properties owned by the Battelle Memorial Institute: the King Avenue site, located in the city of Columbus, and the West Jefferson site, located approximately 15 miles

  3. Expedited site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCreary, I.; Booth, S.R.

    1997-03-01

    Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) is being offered as a new, more cost-effective way to perform DOE environmental site characterizations. Site characterization of environmental cleanup sites can be costly and time consuming. {open_quotes}Traditional techniques,{close_quotes} though effective, are the outgrowth of cautious and often restrictive regulatory control. At some sites up to 40% of the funds and 70% of the time spent on cleanup operations have been devoted to characterization. More realistically, the DOE`s Ten Year Plan (TYP) Cost Rollup by Category (high budgetary version) budgets $1.34 billion to remedial action assessments out of a total of $9.7 billion in remedial actions - about 14% of the total TYP expenditures for this type of cleanup work. The expenditure percentage for characterization drops to a much lower 3% of total expenditures during outyears, after 2006, as most of the assessments will have been completed during the early TYP years. (The sampling and monitoring costs, however, rise from 7% of the budget during the TYP to 30% during the outyears as this activity continues and others decline. Improved characterizations could have the potential to reduce the need for some of these ongoing monitoring costs.) Fortunately, regulatory agencies have begun to relax many of the constraints on site characterization allowing more efficient and innovative approaches to be applied. Argonne National Laboratory`s Expedited Site Characterization is perhaps the best defined of these new approaches. ESC is founded on the premise that it is cheaper, faster, and more efficient to develop and test a conceptual model (or {open_quotes}hypothesis{close_quotes}) of contamination at a site than it is to collect data on a statistical basis and then attempt to model a site from those data. The difference between these two approaches has been described as a {open_quotes}scientific versus an engineering approach{close_quotes}.

  4. EA-1438: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test Operations at the Mound Site, Miamisburg, Ohio

  5. Investigation of the September 13, 2011, Fatality at the Strategic

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Site | Department of Energy September 13, 2011, Fatality at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Site Investigation of the September 13, 2011, Fatality at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Site November 2011 On September 13, 2011, a recently-hired, untrained subcontractor employee struck three large elevated pipes while operating a front deck mower at the Cavern 5 area of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound (SPR-BM) site. The employee

  6. Hanford History - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford History About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us Hanford History Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The Hanford Site sits on 586-square-miles of shrub-steppe desert in southeastern Washington State. Beginning in 1943, the site was used to produce plutonium for the bomb that brought an end to World War II. After a short lull, production was ramped up in 1947 to meet the challenges of the

  7. Portsmouth Site Sustainability Team

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Planning and coordination of recycling and other environmentally responsible efforts. Site Sustainability Team (SST). environmental stewardship and compliance, Executive Order Orders 13514 13423, Environmental Compliance, Acquisition, Cleanup, EMS, Energy, Greenhouse Gases, High Performance Buildings, NEPA, Electronics Stewardship, Pollution Prevention, Chemical Management, Sustainability, Transportation, Climate Change Adaption, Water Efficiency, Natural Resources and development and implementation of the PORTS Site Sustainability Plan Portsmouth Site Sustainability Plan. Fluor-B&W Portsmouth, Fluor-BWXT Portsmouth, BWCS BWXT Conversion Services, WEMS Wastren EnergX Mission Support.

  8. Nevada National Security Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Security Site Proud Past, Exciting Future Nevada National Security Site Pre-Proposal Meeting November 19, 2015 Agenda * 8:30 am Welcome * 9:00 am Overview of NNSS and NFO * 10:00 am Break * 10:30 am NNSS Video * 11:00 am Questions * 11:30 am Lunch * 1:00 pm Solicitation Overview * 2:15 pm Break * 2:45 pm Questions * 4:00 pm Conclusion The Nevada National Security Site * Large geographically diverse outdoor laboratory - 1,360 square miles of federally owned and controlled land -

  9. Near-field thermal radiative transfer and thermoacoustic effects from vapor plumes produced by pulsed CO{sub 2} laser ablation of bulk water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudryashov, S. I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, S. D.

    2006-12-15

    Submillimeter deep heating of bulk water by thermal radiation from ablative water plumes produced by a 10.6 {mu}m transversely excited atmospheric CO{sub 2} laser and the related acoustic generation has been studied using a contact time-resolved photoacoustic technique. Effective penetration depths of thermal radiation in water were measured as a function of incident laser fluence and the corresponding plume temperatures were estimated. The near-field thermal and thermoacoustic effects of thermal radiation in laser-ablated bulk water and their potential near-field implications are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of natural attenuation processes for trichloroethylene and technetium-99 in the Northeast and Northwest plumes at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clausen, J.L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Heraty, L.J.; Huang, L.; Abrajano,T.

    1997-11-25

    NA processes such as biodegradation, sorption, dilution dispersion, advection, and possibly sorption and diffusion are occurring in the Northeast and Northwest plumes. However, the overall biological attenuation rate for TCE within the plumes is not sufficiently rapid to utilize as remedial option. The mobility and toxicity of {sup 99}Tc is not being reduced by attenuating processes within the Northwest Plume. The current EPA position is that NA is not a viable remedial approach unless destructive processes are present or processes are active which reduce the toxicity and mobility of a contaminant. Therefore, active remediation of the dissolved phase plumes will be necessary to reduce contaminant concentrations before an NA approach could be justified at PGDP for either plume. Possible treatment methods for the reduction of dissolved phase concentrations within the plumes are pump-and-treat bioaugmentation, biostimulation, or multiple reactive barriers. Another possibility is the use of a regulatory instrument such as an Alternate Concentration Limit (ACL) petition. Biodegradation of TCE is occurring in both plumes and several hypothesis are possible to explain the apparent conflicts with some of the geochemical data. The first hypothesis is active intrinsic bioremediation is negligible or so slow to be nonmeasurable. In this scenario, the D.O., chloride, TCE, and isotopic results are indicative of past microbiological reactions. It is surmised in this scenario, that when the initial TCE release occurred, sufficient energy sources were available for microorganisms to drive aerobic reduction of TCE, but these energy sources were rapidly depleted. The initial degraded TCE has since migrated to downgradient locations. In the second scenario, TCE anaerobic degradation occurs in organic-rich micro-environments within a generally aerobic aquifer. TCE maybe strongly absorbed to organic-rich materials in the aquifer matrix and degraded by local Immunities of microbes, perhaps even under anaerobic conditions. Chloride, generated by degradation in such microenvironment is released rapidly into the water, as is CO{sub 2}, from respiration of the microorganisms. TCE and its organic degradation products are retained on the aquifer matrix by sorption, and released more slowly into the groundwater. In this process, chloride produced from the microbial reaction may become separated in the plume from the residual TCE. This may explain why the chloride isotope ratio and dissolved TCE do not correlate with the DIC isotope ratio. The relationship between the {delta}{sup 37}Cl values of TCE and dissolved inorganic chloride is consistent with what would be expected from the degradation of TCE, but is complicated by the elevated levels of background chloride, presumably due to agriculture practice, and complex behavior of TCE in the aquifer.

  11. N Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects & Facilities N Reactor About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A...

  12. Potential Release Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    head of Los AlamosPueblo watershed, and then continued on to the Mortandad and WaterCanon de Valle watersheds. Work will progress to the remaining watersheds until sites in all...

  13. Fermilab Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use this map The Village Fermilab Meson, Nuetrino and Proton Experiment Areas Wilson Hall, Ramsey Auditorium Site 38 (Support Area) and vicinity CDF, D0, TD, Tevatron Main Injector...

  14. Nevada National Security Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HISTORYIn 1950, President Truman established what is now known as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to perform nuclear weapons testing activities.  In support of national defense initiatives...

  15. Savannah river site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to supply and process tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen that is a vital component of nuclear weapons. SRS loads tritium and non-tritium...

  16. C Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C Reactor About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area...

  17. F Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Projects & Facilities F Reactor About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S...

  18. VPP Communications - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    373-5157 (509) 539-7728 JackEGriffith@rl.gov CHPRCVPP Site Co-ChairOS&H Barbara Williams (509)376-2518 (509)438-1488 BarbaraAWilliams@rl.gov CHPRCVPP Recorder Ronnie Feil...

  19. INSIDE: ITER Site Progress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of all 400 kV substation equipment and all 22 kV switchgear. 2 Four US-supplied HV transformers were the first plant components installed at the ITER site in October 2015. Photo:...

  20. Summary Site Environmental Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013 ANL-14/02 (Summary) Environment, Safety, and Quality Assurance Division Argonne National Laboratory For more information about Argonne's Site Environmental Report, contact Theresa Davis, 630.252.6077 or tmdavis@anl.gov. For more information about Argonne and its programs, visit the laboratory's website at www.anl.gov or contact Communications, Education, and Public Affairs, at 630.252.5575. Katherine Obmascik edited the text. Photos by Mark Lopez.

  1. Site Sustainability Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 DOE ORDER 436.1 SITE SUSTAINABILITY PLAN Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory PPPL is operated by Princeton University for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-09CH1 PLAN APPROVAL Robert S. Sheneman Deputy Head Environment, Safety, Health & Security Department Michael Viola Head, Facilities & Site Services Division Jerry D. Levine Head, Environment, Safety, Health & Security Department William B. Davis Head, Information Technology Department, CIO Michael D. Williams

  2. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesNorth Slope of AlaskaNSA Barrow FacilityInstruments NSA Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk Oliktok Point (AMF3) ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site NSA Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility, Barrow AK Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through the ARM Aerial Facility. AERI Atmospheric

  3. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Darwin Site-InactiveInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility, Darwin, Australia Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through the ARM Aerial Facility. MFRSR Multifilter

  4. USGIN Lab site

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-01

    This web site provides information related to service profiles and implementation in development for the US Geoscience information network (USGIN). It is meant to be a site where developers can learn about the standard in use, the objectives of the application profiles being developed, software being used or tested for implementation of services, and details about particular implementations. Forums are provided for asking questions about the services, profiles, and implemenation issues.

  5. Outreach - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Outreach Outreach Outreach Hanford Tribal Program Hanford Advisory Board Hanford Site Tours Hanford Speakers Bureau FOIA Reading Room Hanford For Students Administrative Record (AR) Outreach Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size There are numerous ways the Department of Energy reaches out to the public about Hanford cleanup. We provide three different tour programs to show the public firsthand about the B Reactor, historic sites, and the cleanup progress

  6. Helpful Links - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helpful Links Helpful Links Helpful Links Hanford Staff Directory Hanford Site Wide Programs Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Hanford Workers Compensation Projects & Facilities HERO PHOENIX Hanford Meteorological Station Definitions Abbreviations and Acronyms Visitor Control and Site Access Visitor Hanford Computer Access Request Helpful Links Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Contact Us Do you have a question? Contact Hanford

  7. About Us - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Us About Us About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us About Us Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Cleanup of the Hanford Site is overseen by two Department of Energy Offices, the Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Office of River Protection (ORP). Each office has a staff of about 250 federal employees. The work largely involves contract oversight and safety and compliance-related work. The U.S.

  8. ORISE: Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Contents About ORISE Careers Climate and Atmospheric Research Environmental Assessments and Health Physics Health Communication Media Center National Security and Emergency Management REAC/TS Safety Science Education Scientific Peer Review UNIRIB Worker Health Studies Working With Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Site Map About ORISE Message from the Director Mission and Vision History Our Culture Publications Visiting Us ORISE Facilities ORISE Contract Back to top Careers

  9. Microsoft Word - Site Selection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection One of the very first tasks of General Leslie Groves and the Manhattan Project in early 1943 was to locate and acquire sites in the United States where uranium and plutonium could be produced, as well as a site where the atomic bomb actually would be constructed. Production of uranium and plutonium required vast amounts of power. Thus, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington, were chosen because of proximity to major rivers. Oak Ridge could draw on the power of the hydroelectric

  10. ARM - Site Index

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSite Index Expand | Collapse Site Index Image Library Videos About ARM About ARM (home) ARM and the Recovery Act ARM and the Recovery Act (home) ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Recovery Act Instruments ARM Engineering and Operations Contacts ARM Facility Contributions to International Polar Year ARM Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (home) ARM Education and Outreach Efforts Support IPY Research Support for International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Organization ARM Organization (home)

  11. Accessibility - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accessibility About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us Accessibility Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to providing access to our Web pages for individuals with disabilities. To meet this committment, this site is built to comply with the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 508 requires that individuals with disabilities, who are members

  12. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 - December 31, 2007 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no problems that have not been addressed. (inspection checklists attached). * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no unacceptable conditions. * Pond 4 leachate detection and removal systems continue to operate at normal levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Repository

  13. The DOD Siting Clearinghouse

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The DoD Siting Clearinghouse Dave Belote Director, Siting Clearinghouse Office of the Secretary of Defense The Nexus of National Security & Renewable Energy * Unintended Consequences - Rapid development of renewable technologies - Rapidly changing military technology research & development * Existing Policy and Processes - Not up to date with changing technologies - Land use decision-making authorities fragmented across all levels of government 2 From Nellis to Shepherds Flat:

  14. Completed Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Completed Sites Completed Sites Completed Sites The Office of Environmental Management (EM) has been or is currently responsible for cleaning up sites across the United States. These sites were associated with the legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and other DOE research and development activities. Many of these sites have been cleaned up and transferred to other entities or to DOE's Legacy Management (LM) Program. Completed Sites Listing

  15. Untitled Page -- Considered Sites Summary

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Considered Sites Summary Considered Sites Select a Site ACF INDUSTRIES (Albuquerque, New Mexico) ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. (Buffalo, New York) ACID/PUEBLO CANYON, NM, SITE (Los Alamos, New Mexico) ADRIAN, MI, SITE (Adrian, Michigan) AEROPROJECTS, INC. (West Chester, Pennsylvania) AFRICAN METALS (New York, New York) AIR FORCE PLANT NO. 36 (Lockland, Ohio) AJAX-MAGNETHERMIC CORP. (Youngstown, Ohio) ALABAMA ORDNANCE WORKS (Sylacauga, Alabama) ALBANY, OR, SITE (Albany, Oregon) ALIQUIPPA, PA, SITE

  16. Annual Site Environmental Report Paducah Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report Paducah Site 2011 PAD-REG-1012 BACK TABLE OF CONTENTS FORWARD Fractions and Multiples of Units Multiple Decimal Equivalent Prefix Symbol Engineering Format 10 6 1,000,000 mega- M E+06 10 3 1,000 kilo- k E+03 10 2 100 hecto- h E+02 10 10 deka- da E+01 10 -1 0.1 deci- d E-01 10 -2 0.01 centi- c E-02 10 -3 0.001 milli- m E-03 10 -6 0.000001 micro- Ό E-06 10 -9 0.000000001 nano- n E-09 10 -12 0.000000000001 pico- P E-12 10 -15 0.000000000000001 femto- F E-15 10 -18 0.000000000000000001 atto-

  17. TREATABILITY STUDY FOR EDIBLE OIL DEPLOYMENT FOR ENHANCED CVOC ATTENUATION FOR T-AREA, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B.; Looney, B.; Noonkester, J.; Hyde, W.; Walker, R.

    2012-05-15

    Groundwater beneath T-Area, a former laboratory and semiworks operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS), is contaminated by chlorinated solvents (cVOCs). Since the contamination was detected in the 1980s, the cVOCs at T-Area have been treated by a combination of soil vapor extraction and groundwater pump and treat. The site received approval to temporarily discontinue the active groundwater treatment and implement a treatability study of enhanced attenuation - an engineering and regulatory strategy that has recently been developed by DOE and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC 2007). Enhanced attenuation uses active engineering solutions to alter the target site in such a way that the contaminant plume will passively stabilize and shrink and to document that the action will be effective, timely, and sustainable. The paradigm recognizes that attenuation remedies are fundamentally based on a mass balance. Thus, long-term plume dynamics can be altered either by reducing the contaminant loading from the source or by increasing the rate of natural attenuation processes within all, or part of, the plume volume. The combination of technologies that emerged for T-Area included: (1) neat (pure) vegetable oil deployment in the deep vadose zone in the former source area, (2) emulsified vegetable oil deployment within the footprint of the groundwater plume, and (3) identification of attenuation mechanisms and rates for the distal portion of the plume. In the first part, neat oil spreads laterally forming a thin layer on the water table to intercept and reduce future cVOC loading (via partitioning) and reduce oxygen inputs (via biostimulation). In the second and third parts, emulsified oil forms active bioremediation reactor zones within the plume footprint to degrade existing groundwater contamination (via reductive dechlorination and/or cometabolism) and stimulates long-term attenuation capacity in the distal plume (via cometabolism). For TArea, the enhanced attenuation development process proved to be a powerful tool in developing a strategy that provides a high degree of performance while minimizing adverse collateral impacts of the remediation (e.g., energy use and wetland damage) and minimizing life-cycle costs. As depicted in Figure 1, Edible oil deployment results in the development of structured geochemical zones and serves to decrease chlorinated compound concentrations in two ways: (1) physical sequestration, which reduces effective aqueous concentration and mobility; and (2) stimulation of anaerobic, abiotic and cometabolic degradation processes. In the central deployment area, contaminant initially partitions into the added oil phase. Biodegradation of the added organic substrate depletes the aquifer of oxygen and other terminal electron acceptors and creates conditions conducive to anaerobic degradation processes. The organic substrate is fermented to produce hydrogen, which is used as an electron donor for anaerobic dechlorination by organisms such as Dehalococcoides. Daughter products leaving the central treatment zone are amenable to aerobic oxidation. Further, the organic compounds leaving the central deployment zone (e.g., methane and propane) stimulate and enhance down gradient aerobic cometabolism which degrades both daughter compounds and several parent cVOCs. Figure 1 depicts TCE concentration reduction processes (labeled in green) along with their corresponding breakdown products in a structured geochemical zone scenario. A consortium of bacteria with the same net effect of Dehalococcoides may be present in the structured geochemical zones leading to the degradation of TCE and daughter products. Figure 2 shows a schematic of the documented cVOC degradation processes in both the anaerobic and aerobic structured geochemical zones. Specific aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and their degradation pathways are also listed in the diagram and have either been confirmed in the field or the laboratory. See references in the bibliography in Section 11.

  18. Conceptual Model of Iodine Behavior in the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Brady D.; Johnson, Christian D.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Last, George V.; Lee, Michelle H.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2015-09-01

    The fate and transport of 129I in the environment and potential remediation technologies are currently being studied as part of environmental remediation activities at the Hanford Site. A conceptual model describing the nature and extent of subsurface contamination, factors that control plume behavior, and factors relevant to potential remediation processes is needed to support environmental remedy decisions. Because 129I is an uncommon contaminant, relevant remediation experience and scientific literature are limited. Thus, the conceptual model also needs to both describe known contaminant and biogeochemical process information and to identify aspects about which additional information needed to effectively support remedy decisions. this document summarizes the conceptual model of iodine behavior relevant to iodine in the subsurface environment at the Hanford site.

  19. 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, Mark D.

    2008-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

  20. Three-Dimensional Groundwater Models of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site, Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Chen, Yousu

    2008-09-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed field-scale groundwater flow and transport simulations of the 300 Area to support the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Phase III Feasibility Study. The 300 Area is located in the southeast portion of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. Historical operations involving uranium fuel fabrication and research activities at the 300 Area have contaminated engineered liquid-waste disposal facilities, the underlying vadose zone, and the uppermost aquifer with uranium. The main objectives of this research were to develop numerical groundwater flow and transport models to help refine the site conceptual model, and to assist assessment of proposed alternative remediation technologies focused on the 300 Area uranium plume.

  1. FTCP Site Specific Information - Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office FTCP Site Specific Information - Nuclear Energy Oak Ridge Site Office Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report Calendar Year 2013 Calendar Year 2012

  2. Grand Junction, Colorado, Processing Site and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal and Processing Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal and processing sites at Grand Junction, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Sites Site Description and History The former Grand Junction processing site, historically known as the Climax uranium mill, sits at an elevation of

  3. Ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site, January-December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, C.S.; Rieger, J.T.; Raymond, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    This program is designed to evaluate existing and potential pathways of exposure to radioactivity and hazardous chemicals from site operations. This document contains an evaluation of data collected during CY 1984. During 1984, 339 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Two of these constituents, specifically, tritium and nitrate, have been selected for detailed discussion in this report. Tritium and nitrate in the primary plumes originating from the 200 Areas continue to move generally eastward toward the Columbia River in the direction of ground-water flow. The movement within these plumes is indicated by changes in trends within the analytical data from the monitoring wells. No discernible impact on ground water has yet been observed from the start-up of the PUREX plant in December 1983. The shape of the present tritium plume is similar to those described in previous ground-water monitoring reports, although slight changes on the outer edges have been noted. Radiological impacts from two potential pathways for radionuclide transport in ground water to the environment are discussed in this report. The pathways are: (1) human consumption of ground water from onsite wells, and (2) seepage of ground water into the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium in spring samples that were collected and analyzed in 1983, and in wells sampled adjacent to the Columbia River in 1984 confirmed that constituents in the ground water are entering the river via springs and subsurface flow. The primary areas where radionuclides enter the Columbia River via ground-water flow are the 100-N and 300 Areas and the shoreline adjacent to the Hanford Townsite. 44 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Mound_2000_Risk_Management.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  5. S1147500-Mound_Parcels.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  6. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  7. Nevada Site Office News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSA/NSO Office of Public Affairs http://www.nv.doe.gov P.O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, NV 89193-8518 News Media Contact: For Immediate Release: Darwin J. Morgan December 13, 2011 morgan@nv.doe.gov Kelly J. Snyder snyderk@nv.doe.gov 702-295-3521 New Support Services Contract Awarded for Nevada Site Office A new support services contract has been awarded at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Site Office. J.G. Management Systems, Inc., of Grand Junction, Colorado, will provide office

  8. Princeton Site Ofice

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Princeton Site Ofice P.O. Box 102 Princeton, New Jersey 08542-0102 TO: Gregory H. Woods, General Counsel JA N Z Q= LMN N= SUBJECT: PRINCETON SITE OFFICE (PSO) 2013 ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY Section 5(a)(7) of DOE Order 451.1B Change 3, NEPA Compliance Program, requires each Secretarial Oficer and Head of Field Organization to submit an Annual NEPA Planning Summary to the General Coun. s el. We have reviewed your associated December 7, 2012, memorandum and

  9. Manhattan Project: Site Map

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SITE MAP Resources > Site Map THE MANHATTAN PROJECT Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 1939-1942: Early Government Support Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942

  10. Oak Ridge Site Specific

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Specific adviSORy BOaRd fy 2014 annual RepORt OctOBeR 2013 - SeptemBeR 2014 ORSSAB FY 2014 ANNUAL REPORT FY 2014 was my first term as chair of the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board. I thank the members of the board for putting their confidence in me for the year and again for FY 2015. It is an honor and a privilege to represent this important organization. The board's primary mission is to provide independent advice and recommendations to the Department of Energy on its environmental

  11. [SITE NAME] Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada Location of the Central Nevada Test Area Site Description and History The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is in the Hot Creek Valley of south-central Nevada, approximately 70 miles northeast of Tonopah. The CNTA consists of three parcels totaling 2,560 acres. The parcels are spaced approximately 3 miles apart along a roughly north-south line. The

  12. PPPL Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virginia Finley, Robeert Sheneman and Jerry Levine

    2012-12-21

    Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on?site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non?radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non?radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories – QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the “Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011,” are documented and certified to be correct.

  13. Former Sites Restoration. Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    @j&s* **$r* :. .+:., II' .,.. I .&i. , :"': T.1 . i *&+t&&., @i i -:.+; L I. * . . .p.isit-!'..r'ir~i _, +.&.., . I. :?I,?.* .L,! j?' aa&* pi 4 L', ..b,- ., .e /w.1( ,v_.c ~A&$?>*:, ,..:.' .1 > . . . . . *. ,.. .I., .( j .~.~:,;;,.".,Certificafion ,Dockef for The ;,il' t:i~>$:+-.. ~~y:Remeciial Action. Performed "' . ::;:cxcgt the @+zb Gate Site in . ;' ! ,Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 7.99 7- 7 992 -.. Department .of Energy Former Sites

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ohio

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ohio Ohio Ohio Sites Columbus East Site Columbus Sites Fairfield Site Fernald Preserve Hamilton Site Mound Site Oxford Site Painesville Site Piqua Decommissioned Reactor Site Toledo Site Last Updated: 1/14/2016

  15. AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

  16. Small Wind Site Assessment Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Tim; Preus, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Site assessment for small wind energy systems is one of the key factors in the successful installation, operation, and performance of a small wind turbine. A proper site assessment is a difficult process that includes wind resource assessment and the evaluation of site characteristics. These guidelines address many of the relevant parts of a site assessment with an emphasis on wind resource assessment, using methods other than on-site data collection and creating a small wind site assessment report.

  17. Oxnard, California, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Oxnard, California, Site This fact sheet provides information about the Oxnard, California, Site. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management manages historical records of work performed for the federal government at the Oxnard site. Location of the Oxnard, California, Site Site Description and History The Oxnard site occupies 13.75 acres in an industrial section of Oxnard, California, about 50 miles northwest of Los Angeles. Allis-Chalmers, a farm implement manufacturing company,

  18. Savannah River Site Robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  19. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  20. Proposed Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

  1. Presentations - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Workers Compensation Presentations About Us Hanford Workers Compensation PENSER Representatives Hanford Workers Compensation Flow Compensation Claim Process Presentations Related Information Vocational Rehabilitation Presentations Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size 2015 Workers Compensation 101 (PDF) The Unique World of Workers' Compensation (PPTX) - *When opening please select the Read Only button. No

  2. Ecological Monitoring - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Safety and Resource Protection (PSRP) Ecological Monitoring Public Safety and Resource Protection (PSRP) Public Safety and Resource Protection Home Cultural Resource Program and Curation Services Ecological Monitoring Environmental Surveillance Meteorology and Climatology Services Seismic Monitoring Ecological Monitoring Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Ecological Monitoring Ecological Monitoring The Hanford site encompasses 586 square miles

  3. Beryllium Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs Beryllium Related Links Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program Feedback Beryllium Health Advocates Primary Contractors/Employers Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities General Resources Contact Us Beryllium

  4. Solar Site Survey Toolkit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After a couple outings, a principal technologist at Sandia National Laboratories saw a need for a travel kit that would have the necessary tools to make the task of site surveys more manageable and safer. They have had great success using the kit in the field already.

  5. Proposed Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

  6. 2014 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, Douglas; Remien, Jason; Foley, Brian; Burke, John; Dorsch, William; Ratel, Karen; Howe, Robert; Welty, Tim; Williams, Jeffrey; Pohlpt, Peter; Lagattolla, Richard; Metz, Robert; Milligan, James; Lettieri, Lawrence

    2015-10-01

    BNL prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance during the calendar year in review.

  7. Shoal, Nevada, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shoal, Nevada, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Shoal, Nevada, Site Location of the Shoal, Nevada, Site Site Description and History The Shoal site is situated on 2,560 acres of withdrawn federal lands within the north-central portion of the Sand Springs Range in Churchill County, Nevada. The town of Fallon is the largest populated area in the region and is about 30 miles northwest of the site. The region around the Shoal site is sparsely

  8. Listing of Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mound Facility Fernald Environmental Management Project Site Pantex Plant Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, including the Oxnard Facility Savannah River Site Los...

  9. Paducah Site Modernizes Equipment to Treat Off-Site Groundwater

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contamination | Department of Energy Paducah Site Modernizes Equipment to Treat Off-Site Groundwater Contamination Paducah Site Modernizes Equipment to Treat Off-Site Groundwater Contamination February 25, 2016 - 12:15pm Addthis New groundwater contamination treatment equipment sits outside the C-612 Northwest Pump-and-Treat facility. New groundwater contamination treatment equipment sits outside the C-612 Northwest Pump-and-Treat facility. A computer-modeled illustration shows the off-site

  10. Program Update: 1st Quarter 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inside this update: Successful Transition from Mound Site to Mound Business Park Continues; Second Five-Year Plan to Address Uranium Contamination in the Navajo Nation; Nuclear Weapons Program...

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6-Cluxton_Energy Presentation - 5 20 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Goal 3 - Provide economic benefits by leveraging Mound assets to develop jobs. The overall goal at Mound is to redevelop the former nuclear weapons site and return it to productive ...

  12. Siting and Barrier Mitigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siting and Barrier Mitigation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  13. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oliktok Point, AlaskaInstruments Oliktok Deployment AMF Home Oliktok Home Deployment Operations Baseline Instruments and Data Plots at the Archive Outreach News & Press New Sites Fact Sheet (PDF, 1.6MB) Images Contacts Fred Helsel, AMF Operations Gijs de Boer, Principal Investigator Instruments : Oliktok Point, Alaska Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through the ARM Aerial Facility. AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance

  14. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary FacilityInstruments SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Boundary Facilities Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available

  15. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central FacilityInstruments SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available

  16. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended FacilityInstruments SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Extended Facilities Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available

  17. Mission Support - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mission Support Richland Operations Office Richland Operations Office River Corridor Central Plateau Groundwater Mission Support Long-Term Stewardship HAMMER Newsroom Mission Support Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size MissionSupportCollage The Richland Operations Office's Mission Support organization provides both DOE offices and the entire Hanford Site with quality, cost-effective infrastructure and support services to enable the cleanup mission to

  18. RL Contractors - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richland Operations Office RL Contractors Richland Operations Office Richland Operations Office RL Cleanup Vision RL Contractors CH2M Mission Support Alliance Washington Closure Hanford HPM Corporation RL Contracts and Procurements Hanford Site Tours River Corridor Central Plateau Groundwater Mission Support Newsroom RL Contractors Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The Richland Operations Office uses contractors to complete environmental cleanup,

  19. Budget Presentations - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Budget Presentations Hanford Site Budget Budget Presentations Budget Presentations Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Each year the Office of River Protection and Richland Operations Office are required to prepare an annual budget submittal that is consistent with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), and meets regulatory requirements. The TPA is the regulatory framework between DOE,

  20. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AtlanticInstruments ENA Related Links Facilities and Instruments ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site ENA Fact Sheet (PDF, 512KB) Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Eastern North Atlantic Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through the ARM Aerial Facility. ACSM Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Aerosols Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] AOS

  1. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AlaskaInstruments NSA Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk Oliktok Point (AMF3) ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site NSA Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : North Slope Alaska Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through the ARM Aerial Facility. AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots

  2. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PlainsInstruments SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Southern Great Plains Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through

  3. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InactiveInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Tropical Western Pacific Active Retired Active instruments are currently deployed at fixed or mobile facilities or are available through the ARM Aerial Facility. MFRSR Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer

  4. About ORP - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORP Office of River Protection About ORP ORP Mission ORP Team Message from the Manager ORP Projects & Facilities Newsroom Contracts & Procurements Contact ORP About ORP Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size 'Office of River Protection' U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State is home to 56 million gallons of chemical and radioactive waste stored in

  5. Acceptance Process - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Becoming a new Hanford Customer Annual Waste Forecast and Funding Arrangements Waste Stream Approval Waste Shipment Approval Waste Receipt Quality Assurance Program Waste Specification Records Tools Points of Contact Acceptance Process Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size How Do I Get My Waste Approved for Shipment to Hanford? For detail on

  6. Action Plan - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agreement Action Plan Tri-Party Agreement The Agreement Action Plan Announcements List of Approved Changes TPA Project Manager's Lists Modifications for Public Comment Data Management MP-14 WIDS Information Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report Hanford Public Involvement Plan Administrative Record (AR) Related Links Action Plan Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Executive Summary 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Purpose 1.2 Regulatory Authorities 1.3

  7. Contacts / Hours - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts / Hours Hanford Meteorological Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current and Past 48 Hours HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts / Hours Current NWS Forecast for the Tri-Cities NWS Windchill Chart Contacts / Hours Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Note: Using the telephone is the ONLY way to get up to the minute information. On duty Forecaster (509) 373-2716 Current

  8. Princeton Site Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TO: Anne Harkavy, Acting General Counsel JAN 3 0 2014 SUBJECT: PRINCETON SITE OFFICE (PSO) 2013 ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY Section 5(a)(7) ofDOE Order 451.1B Change 3, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Program, requires each Secretarial Officer and Head ofField Organization to submit an annual NEP A Planning Summary to the General Counsel. In response to your December 12, 2013, reminder, no Environmental Assessments (EAs) or Environmental

  9. Princeton Site Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    JAN 18 2012 To: Timothy G. Lynch , Acting General Counsel Subject: Princeton Site Office (PSO) 2012 Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summary Section 5(a)(7) of DOE Order 451 .1 B Change 2, NEPA Compliance Program , requires each Secretarial Officer and Head of Field Organization to submit an annual NEPA Planning Summary to the General Counsel. We have reviewed your associated December 5, 2011 , memorandum and in consultation with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

  10. Contact ORP - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact ORP Office of River Protection About ORP ORP Projects & Facilities Newsroom Contracts & Procurements Contact ORP Contact ORP Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Do you have a question? Contact the Office of River Protection DOE Logo Street Address: DOE ORP 2440 Stevens Center Place, H660 Richland, WA, 99354 Mailing Address: DOE ORP PO Box 450 Richland, WA 99352 Phone Contact: Hanford Site Operator 509-376-7411 ORP Office of

  11. SRNL Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spacer 11/22/2013 SEARCH SRNL GO SRNL Home SRNL Site Map About SRNL From the Director Operational Excellence Leadership Our History Visiting SRNL Science & Innovation National Security Enviromental Stewardship Clean Energy Innovations Fact Sheets PDRD / LDRD Working with SRNL Technology Transfer Technology Partnerships Our Facilities Main Campus ACTL - Aiken County Technology Laboratory HTRL - Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory EMRL - Energy Materials Research Laboratory F / H Lab

  12. INSIDE: ITER Site Progress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Continued on page 8 INSIDE: ITER Site Progress View from DOE US Systems Update Engaging Industry, Universities and Labs Upcoming Events Disruption Mitigation Researchers Investigate Design Options ITER, the world's first reactor-scale fusion machine, will have a plasma volume more than 10 times that of the next largest tokamak, JET. Plasma disruptions that can occur in a tokamak when the plasma becomes unstable can potentially damage plasma-facing surfaces of the machine. To lessen the impact of

  13. Transmission Siting_071508.indd

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Coordinating Interstate Electric Transmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate The National Council on Electricity Policy 2 DISCLAIMER: The National Council on Electricity Policy is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The views and opinions expressed herein are strictly those of the authors and may not necessarily agree with the positions of the National Council on Electricity Policy, its committ ee members or the organizations they

  14. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SITE NAME: /+%&'&&c /-i-QS~,~~-L ALTERNATE ------------ -------------------------- NAME: - -------------------___ C 1 T-f: -~~~~~L--~-----_--___,TATE: '"' y-/ OWNER ('=I B-----Z- Past: L?!lc~i&~~~~-~-~ Cut-rent: - Owner cnntacted q yes q:no; i,f yes, dats-c~~Fact,d------------- TYPE OF OPESATION ---------m-L----- @Research & Develapment & Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale a bnch scale ~~~~~~~ 0 Theoretical Studies G Sample 84 Analysis 0

  15. Annual Site Environmental Report

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    support this mission include the U1a Facility, Big Explosives Experimental Facility (BEEF), and Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility. Other NTS activities include demilitarization activities, controlled spills of hazardous material at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center (HSC), remediation of industrial sites, processing of waste destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), disposal of radioactive and mixed waste, and environmental research. In addition

  16. Sites Pending Transfer to LM | Department of Energy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site Iowa Middletown Site Kentucky Paducah Site Massachusetts Attleboro Site Maryland Curtis Bay Site Missouri Berkeley Site Berkeley Site Vicinity Properties Hazelwood Site St....

  17. Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D&D D&D Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site This fact sheet provides information about the Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under the Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program. Location of the Hallam Decommissioned Reactor Site Description and History The Hallam decommissioned reactor site is in southeastern Nebraska, approximately 19 miles south of Lincoln. The

  18. JV Task 104 - Risk Reduction Using Innovative Vacuum-Enhanced Plume Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc; Barry Botnen

    2009-03-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater at the Vining Oil site in Carrington, North Dakota. The primary technological synergies included (1) contaminant recovery using simultaneous operation of multiphase recovery and high-vacuum soil vapor extraction (SVE) and (2) vacuum-controlled air and ozone sparging on the periphery of an induced hydraulic and pneumatic depression. Final risk reduction steps included design and retrofit for the municipal well. The successful remediation effort resulted in the reduction of long-term health risks associated with rate-limited contaminant release within the capture zone for the municipal well and allowed for its reintegration into the water supply system. Contaminant recovery for the remediation period of September 2006 to June 2008 totaled over 12,653 lb (5,740 kg) of hydrocarbons, an equivalent to 2022 gallons (7653 l) of product. Integration of the air-sparging subsystem operated simultaneously with multiphase extraction and SVE systems resulted in accelerated volatile organic contaminant transport from the saturated zone and increased contaminants of concern recovery. Delivery of over 7.7 million ft{sup 3} of oxygen (219.8 thousand m{sup 3}) into the contaminated aquifer would translate into in situ biodegradation of 2007 kg (4424 lb) of benzene and provide for long term stimulation of the natural attenuation process.

  19. 2016 Site Sustainability Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Site Sustainability Plan 2016 Site Sustainability Plan The purpose of this Site ... PDF icon 2016 Site Sustainability Plan, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy ...

  20. Paducah Site Historical Timeline | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Background Paducah Site Historical Timeline Paducah Site Historical Timeline This site works best with JavaScript Enabled (click to enlarge)...

  1. Site Management Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Management Guide Site Management Guide Site Management Guide (Blue Book) (Revision 17, January 2015) PDF icon Site Management Guide More Documents & Publications 2014 ANNUAL ...

  2. T Plant - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T Plant About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H

  3. Tank Farms - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Projects & Facilities Tank Farms About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental

  4. PNNL: Site index

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Index # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # # 3-D Body Holographic Scanner # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Advanced Computing, Mathematics, and Data Alerts - PNNL Staff Information Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Asymmetric Resilient Cybersecurity (External website) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change Division Available Technologies Awards Awards - Science and Engineering External

  5. Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    144 December 2014 Page 1 Activity Specific Categorical Exclusion for U.S. Army Training Exercises and Simulations at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 1.0 BACKGROUND Title 10, Part 1021 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 1021), "National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures," establishes procedures that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) uses to comply with section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 [42 U.S.C. 4332(2)] and the

  6. H Reactor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Projects & Facilities H Reactor About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental

  7. B Plant - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H Reactor

  8. 100 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    00 Area About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H

  9. 200 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    00 Area About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H

  10. Canyon Facilities - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Projects & Facilities Canyon Facilities About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental

  11. Contact Us - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us Contact Us Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Contact Us Do you have a question? Contact Hanford DOE Logo Street Address: Federal Bldg: 825 Jadwin Ave., Suite 1 Richland, WA 99352 Map Mailing Address: DOE RL PO Box 550 Richland, WA 99352 Street Address: DOE ORP 2440 Stevens Center Place, H660 Richland, WA, 99354 Mailing Address: DOE ORP PO Box 450 Richland,

  12. Na onal Security Site?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mul ple Choice (circle the correct answer) 1. How many diff erent animal species can be found at the Nevada Na onal Security Site? a. Less than 500 b. Exactly 1,325 c. More than 1,500 d. Exactly 2,303 2. Nuclear research, development and tes ng caused radioac ve contamina on of: a. Buildings b. Clothes and tools c. Soil and water d. All of the above 3. One method used to check soil for the presence of radioac ve contamina on is: a. Use a black light to see if the soil glows b. Send soil samples

  13. 300 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H

  14. 324 Building - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Building About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H

  15. 325 Building - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    325 Building About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H

  16. 700 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    700 Area About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility F Reactor H

  17. 1994 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  18. Annual Site Environmental Report

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sun 2-2 Figure 2.1 Nevada Test Site Location in Nevada INTRODUCTION 2-3 and the NTS is one of the larger unpopulated land areas in the United States, comprising some 14,200 km 2 (5,470 mi 2 ). Figure 2.2 shows the general layout of the NTS, including the location of major facilities and the NTS Area numbers referred to in this report. The geographical areas previously used for nuclear testing are also indicated in Figure 2.2. Mercury, located at the southern end of the NTS, is the main base camp

  19. Rulison, Colorado, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Fact Sheet This fact sheet provides information about the Rulison, Colorado, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Rulison, Colorado, Site Location of the Rulison, Colorado, Site Site Description and History The Rulison site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on the north fank of Battlement Mesa in western Colorado, approximately 12 miles southwest of the town of Rife and 8 miles southeast of the town of Parachute. On September 10, 1969,

  20. Chariot, Alaska, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chariot, Alaska, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Chariot, Alaska, Site Location of the Chariot Site Site Description and History The Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. This region is about 125 miles north of (inside) the Arctic Circle and is bounded on the southwest by the Chukchi Sea. The closest populated areas are the Inupiat villages of Point Hope, 32 miles northwest of the

  1. 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

    2004-10-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

  2. Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.L. Linden

    2000-06-28

    The purpose of this analysis is to develop a Subsurface Facility layout that is capable of accommodating the statutory capacity of 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU), as well as an option to expand the inventory capacity, if authorized, to 97,000 MTU. The layout configuration also requires a degree of flexibility to accommodate potential changes in site conditions or program requirements. The objective of this analysis is to provide a conceptual design of the Subsurface Facility sufficient to support the development of the Subsurface Facility System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000e) and the ''Emplacement Drift System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 2000i). As well, this analysis provides input to the Site Recommendation Consideration Report. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Evaluation of the existing facilities and their integration into the Subsurface Facility design. (2) Identification and incorporation of factors influencing Subsurface Facility design, such as geological constraints, thermal loading, constructibility, subsurface ventilation, drainage control, radiological considerations, and the Test and Evaluation Facilities. (3) Development of a layout showing an available area in the primary area sufficient to support both the waste inventories and individual layouts showing the emplacement area required for 70,000 MTU and, if authorized, 97,000 MTU.

  3. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Tools Points of Contact Contact Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The Hanford Site operates waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities for the various types of radioactive waste onsite and from elsewhere in the U.S.

  4. Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Second Quarter Calendar Year 2013 October 2013 LMS/RFS/S10694 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFS/S10694 Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Second Quarter Calendar Year 2013 October 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities-2nd Quarter CY 2013 October 2013 Doc. No. S10694 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  5. Evaluation of a permeable reactive barrier technology for use at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DWYER,BRIAN P.

    2000-01-01

    Three reactive materials were evaluated at laboratory scale to identify the optimum treatment reagent for use in a Permeable Reactive Barrier Treatment System at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). The contaminants of concern (COCS) are uranium, TCE, PCE, carbon tetrachloride, americium, and vinyl chloride. The three reactive media evaluated included high carbon steel iron filings, an iron-silica alloy in the form of a foam aggregate, and a peculiar humic acid based sorbent (Humasorb from Arctech) mixed with sand. Each material was tested in the laboratory at column scale using simulated site water. All three materials showed promise for the 903 Mound Site however, the iron filings were determined to be the least expensive media. In order to validate the laboratory results, the iron filings were further tested at a pilot scale (field columns) using actual site water. Pilot test results were similar to laboratory results; consequently, the iron filings were chosen for the fill-scale demonstration of the reactive barrier technology. Additional design parameters including saturated hydraulic conductivity, treatment residence time, and head loss across the media were also determined and provided to the design team in support of the final design. The final design was completed by the Corps of Engineers in 1997 and the system was constructed in the summer of 1998. The treatment system began fill operation in December, 1998 and despite a few problems has been operational since. Results to date are consistent with the lab and pilot scale findings, i.e., complete removal of the contaminants of concern (COCs) prior to discharge to meet RFETS cleanup requirements. Furthermore, it is fair to say at this point in time that laboratory developed design parameters for the reactive barrier technology are sufficient for fuel scale design; however,the treatment system longevity and the long-term fate of the contaminants are questions that remain unanswered. This project along with others such as the Durango, CO and Monticello, UT reactive barriers will provide the data to determine the long-term effectiveness and return on investment (ROI) for this technology for comparison to the baseline pump and treat.

  6. Hanford Blog Archive - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2013 October 31, 2013 FACT SHEET: Hanford Site Cleanup Progress This fact sheet has been updated with statistics on Hanford Site cleanup progress through the end of September 2013.

  7. Assessment of Hexavalent Chromium Natural Attenuation for the Hanford Site 100 Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Sahajpal, Rahul; Zhong, Lirong; Lawter, Amanda R.; Lee, Brady D.

    2015-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) plumes are present in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site. Remediation efforts are under way with objectives of restoring the groundwater to meet the drinking-water standard (48 ”g/L) and protecting the Columbia River by ensuring that discharge of groundwater to the river is below the surface-water quality standard (10 ”g/L). Current remedies include application of Pump-and-Treat (P&T) at the 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K Areas and Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) at the 100-F/IU Area. Remedy selection is still under way at the other 100 Areas. Additional information about the natural attenuation processes for Cr(VI) is important in all of these cases. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to demonstrate and quantify natural attenuation mechanisms using 100 Area sediments and groundwater conditions.

  8. Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

    2008-11-01

    We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying that the risks of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites are below agreed-upon thresholds. The CF is based on effective trapping of CO2, the proposed concept that takes into account both the probability and impact of CO2 leakage. The CF uses probability estimates of the intersection of conductive faults and wells with the CO2 plume along with modeled fluxes or concentrations of CO2 as proxies for impacts to compartments (such as potable groundwater) to calculate CO2 leakage risk. In order to test and refine the approach, we applied the CF to (1) a hypothetical large-scale GCS project in the Texas Gulf Coast, and (2) WESTCARB's Phase III GCS pilot in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California.

  9. Paducah Site Annual Site Environmental Report PAD-REG-1021

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Paducah Site Annual Site Environmental Report PAD-REG-1021 This report is intended to fulfill the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Order (DOE) 231.1B. The data and information contained in this report were collected in accordance with the Paducah Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (LATA Kentucky 2012; LATA Kentucky 2013a) approved by DOE. This report is not intended to provide the results of all sampling conducted at the Paducah Site. Additional data collected for other site purposes,

  10. The New Test Site 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Site 1 Energetic staff supports Northrop Grumman tour 2 Educational outreach 2 DAF and seismic activity 3 Pollution prevention 4 Emergency training 6 collaborative effort among both federal and contractor staff is designed to transform the way business is conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Dubbed the New Test Site, this ongoing initiative will transform operations in numerous ways. One key element of the New Test Site is the proposed transition of large scale hydrodynamic (hydro)

  11. Portsmouth Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portsmouth Site Portsmouth Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Environmental Cleanup Program at Portsmouth supports site investigations, environmental response actions, and facility decontamination and decommissioning. Read more Portsmouth SSAB tours a disposal cell Portsmouth SSAB tours a disposal cell The Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board works with the Department of Energy to make recommendations that reflect the communities concerns. Read more

  12. NREL: Wind Research - Site Tours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Tours Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This is a simulated tour of the National Wind Technology Center showing its location in the state, elevation, and its facilities. Two site simulation tours of the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) illustrate the NWTC's location, facilities, and wind resource. Site Simulation Showing Elevation This 40-second simulation begins with an overview of the entire state of Colorado, zooms in on the NWTC, and then flies around the site. This

  13. Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site This fact sheet provides information about the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under the DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program. Location of the Piqua Decommissioned Reactor Site Description and History The Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor site is located in southwestern Ohio in the city of Piqua on the east bank of the Great Miami River,

  14. LTS Information Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site maintenance information Community relations and public involvement information Health and safety information Permits Waste management and disposal information Technical...

  15. LIQUEFACTION EVALUATIONS AT DOE SITES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liquefaction Evaluations at DOE Sites M. Lewis, M. McHood, R. Williams, B. Gutierrez October 25, 2011

  16. Portsmouth Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Portsmouth Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant The Environmental Cleanup Program at Portsmouth supports site investigations, environmental response actions, and facility decontamination and decommissioning. Read more Portsmouth SSAB tours a disposal cell Portsmouth SSAB tours a disposal cell The Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board works with the Department of Energy to make recommendations that reflect the communities concerns. Read more Demolition

  17. Liquefaction Evaluations at DOE Sites

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LIQUEFACTION EVALUATIONS AT DOE SITES M. Lewis, M. McHood, R. Williams, B. Gutierrez October 25, 2011 Agenda  Background  Purpose and Objective  Liquefaction Methods  Site Evaluations  Aging  Conclusions 2 Background 3 Liquefaction at DOE Sites Background  Liquefaction evaluations are required at all DOE sites  Methods have evolved over the years, but there is currently only one consensus methodology;  Youd et al., 2001  Two other methods have emerged in the last

  18. LM Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LM Sites LM Sites Alaska Puerto Rico Continental US Click on a site for more information. The Energy Department is committed to managing its responsibilities associated with the environmental legacy of World War II and the Cold War. This legacy includes radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous material at sites across the country. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for ensuring that Energy's post-closure responsibilities are met and for providing

  19. 2009 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2010-09-30

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  20. 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-10-01

    The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

  1. 2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

    2007-10-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  2. 2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2006-08-29

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  3. OFF-SITE S

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    S e T B ~ I L L ~ C E ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L R E S E A R C H CENTER from July through December 197C / t i o n a l Environmental Research Centeq U. S. ~ ~ I R O N M E L S T P ~ TR~ECTIQN AGENCY e Unders tancling No. 23 (26-1)-539 for the U. S o ATOMIC ENERGY COlQ4ISSION OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L RESEARCH CENTER from July through December 197C by Monitoring Operations Laboratory National Environmental Research Center U.

  4. In situ radiation measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, during the period of July 21-30, 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at selected areas on the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. The survey was part of a cooperative effort between the United States team and teams of radiation scientists from the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition to in situ radiation measurements made by the United States and Russian teams, soil samples were collected and analyzed by the Russian and Kazakhstani teams. All teams conducted their measurements at ten locations within the test site. The United States team also made a number of additional measurements to locate and verify the positions of three potential fallout plumes containing plutonium contamination from nonnuclear tests. In addition, the United States team made several measurements in Kurchatov City, the housing area used by personnel and their families who work(ed) at the test sites. Comparisons between the United States and Russian in situ measurements and the soil sample results are presented as well as comparisons with a Soviet aerial survey conducted in 1990-1991. The agreement between the different types of measurements made by all three countries was quite good.

  5. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for January through June 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1989-05-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality at the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Work undertaken between January and June 1988 included monitoring ground-water elevations across the Site, and monitoring hazardous chemicals and radionuclides in ground water. Water levels continued to rise in areas receiving increased recharge (e.g., beneath B Pond) and decline in areas where the release of water to disposal facilities has been terminated (e.g., U Pond). The major areas of ground-water contamination defined by monitoring activities are (1) carbon tetrachloride in the 200-West Area; (2) cyanide in and north of the 200-East and 200-West Areas; (3) hexavalent chromium contamination in the 100-B, 100-D, 100-F, 100-H, 100-K, and 200-West Areas; (4) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vicinity of the Solid Waste Landfill and 300 Area; (5) uranium in the 100-F, 100-H, 200-West, and 300 Areas; and (6) tritium and nitrate across the Site. In addition, several new analytical initiatives were undertaken during this period. These include cyanide speciation in the BY Cribs plume, inductively coupled argon plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) measurements on a broad selection of samples from the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas, and high sensitivity gas chromatography measurements performed at the Solid Waste Landfill-Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 23 figs., 25 tabs.

  6. 88-Inch Site Visit - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    88-Inch Site Visit For information regarding the 88-Inch Cyclotron Site Visit, please click here.

  7. EM Active Sites (large) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Active Sites (large) EM Active Sites (large) Center Map View All Maps Addthis

  8. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT RIVERTON PROCESSING SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2014-05-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) manages the legacy contamination at the Riverton, WY, Processing Site – a former uranium milling site that operated from 1958 to 1963. The tailings and associated materials were removed in 1988-1989 and contaminants are currently flushing from the groundwater. DOE-LM commissioned an independent technical team to assess the status of the contaminant flushing, identify any issues or opportunities for DOE-LM, and provide key recommendations. The team applied a range of technical frameworks – spatial, temporal, hydrological and geochemical – in performing the evaluation. In each topic area, an in depth evaluation was performed using DOE-LM site data (e.g., chemical measurements in groundwater, surface water and soil, water levels, and historical records) along with information collected during the December 2013 site visit (e.g., plant type survey, geomorphology, and minerals that were observed, collected and evaluated). A few of the key findings include: ? Physical removal of the tailings and associated materials reduced contaminant discharges to groundwater and reduced contaminant concentrations in the near-field plume. ? In the mid-field and far-field areas, residual contaminants are present in the vadose zone as a result of a variety of factors (e.g., evaporation/evapotranspiration from the capillary fringe and water table, higher water levels during tailings disposal, and geochemical processes). ? Vadose zone contaminants are widely distributed above the plume and are expected to be present as solid phase minerals that can serve as “secondary sources” to the underlying groundwater. The mineral sample collected at the site is consistent with thermodynamic predictions. ? Water table fluctuations, irrigation, infiltration and flooding will episodically solubilize some of the vadose zone secondary source materials and release contaminants to the groundwater for continued down gradient migration – extending the overall timeframe for flushing. ? Vertical contaminant stratification in the vadose zone and surficial aquifer will vary from location to location. Soil and water sampling strategies and monitoring well construction details will influence characterization and monitoring data. ? Water flows from the Wind River, beneath the Riverton Processing Site and through the plume toward the Little Wind River. This base flow pattern is influenced by seasonal irrigation and other anthropogenic activities, and by natural perturbations (e.g., flooding). ? Erosion and reworking of the sediments adjacent to the Little Wind River results in high heterogeneity and complex flow and geochemistry. Water flowing into oxbow lakes (or through areas where oxbow lakes were present in the past) will be exposed to localized geochemical conditions that favor chemical reduction (i.e., “naturally reduced zones”) and other attenuation processes. This attenuation is not sufficient to fully stabilize the plume or to reduce contaminant concentrations in the groundwater to target levels. Consistent with these observations, the team recommended increased emphasis on collecting data in the zones where secondary source minerals are projected to accumulate (e.g., just above the water table) using low cost methods such as x-ray fluorescence. The team also suggested several low cost nontraditional sources of data that have the potential to provide supplemental data (e.g., multispectral satellite imagery) to inform and improve legacy management decisions. There are a range of strategies for management of the legacy contamination in the groundwater and vadose zone near the Riverton Processing Site. These range from the current strategy, natural flushing, to intrusive remedies such as plume scale excavation of the vadose zone and pump & treat. Each option relates to the site specific conditions, issues and opportunities in a unique way. Further, each option has advantages and disadvantages that need to be weighed. Scoping evaluation was performed for three major classes of technologies – contaminant removal technologies, contaminant stabilization technologies, and natural flushing. The intent of the scoping evaluation is to provide an initial set of options for consideration by LM as they finalize plans to address the Riverton groundwater plume. Three technologies were conditionally recommended: 1) continued natural flushing, 2) groundwater pump and treat with plume scale irrigation to help flush out vadose zone contamination, or 3) in situ stabilization using structured geochemical zones to supplement the naturally reduced zones already present at the site.

  9. Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleanup Sites Cleanup Sites Center Map As the largest environmental cleanup program in the world, EM has been charged with the responsibility of cleaning up 107 sites across the country whose area is equal to the combined area of Rhode Island and Delaware. To date, EM has made substantial progress in nearly every area of nuclear waste cleanup and completed cleanup at 91 of these sites. The "active" sites continue to have ongoing cleanup projects under EM's purview. Use the interactive

  10. Amchitka, Alaska, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Amchitka, Alaska, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Amchitka, Alaska, Site Location of the Amchitka, Alaska, Site Site Description and History Amchitka Island is near the western end of the Aleutian Island chain and is the largest island in the Rat Island Group that is located about 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, and 870 miles east of the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The island is 42 miles long and 1 to 4 miles

  11. Geochemical Evaluation of Uranium Fate and Transport Guterl Specialty Steel Site, New York - 12077

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, Bill; Tandon, Vikas

    2012-07-01

    Between 1948 and 1952, up to 15,875 metric tons (35 million pounds) of natural uranium metal (U) were processed at the former Guterl Specialty Steel Corporation site in Lockport, New York. The resulting dust, thermal scale, mill shavings and associated land disposal contaminated both the facility and on-site soils. Uranium subsequently impacted groundwater and a fully developed plume exists below the site. Site soils are composed of anthropogenic fill and re-worked, glacially-derived native soil. This overburden is underlain by the weathered and fractured Lockport Dolostone bedrock. Shallow groundwater levels fluctuate seasonally and allow groundwater to contact U contaminated soil, which promotes transport. This condition is exemplified through coincident increases in specific conductivity and groundwater levels, which flush soluble constituents in the fill/soil to groundwater during recharge events. In addition, water-level fluctuations affect reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions at the site. The U in soils is subject to wetting and drying cycles that promote oxidation more than stable redox conditions (e.g., dry soil or fully saturated conditions). This oxidizing mechanism increases uranium solubility and mobility. Site groundwater also receives uranium via leaching from near-surface contaminated fill. The strong correlation between nitrate and uranium in groundwater indicates that uranium is mobile where oxidizing conditions occur. Analytical models of contaminant leaching determined that multiple pathways and transport mechanisms govern site risk. Uranium transport to groundwater involves three mechanisms: 1) direct contact of contaminated soil with groundwater, 2) the oxidation-state or chemical valence of uranium, and 3) the leaching of near-surface contamination to groundwater. These mechanisms require an integrated remedial solution that is sustainable and cost effective. (authors)

  12. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M. Koleva, E. G.; Belenkiy, V. Ya. Varushkin, S. V.

    2014-04-15

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup ?3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup ?2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  13. Site Management Guide (Blue Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department’s postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE’s postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site cleanup is complete, LM accepts title to these sites on behalf of the United States and assumes long-term management.

  14. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-30

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 366 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 11 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 · CAS 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 · CAS 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A · CAS 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B · CAS 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C · CAS 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D Site characterization activities were performed in 2011 and 2012, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 366 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2012a). The following closure alternatives were recommended in the CADD: · No further action for CAS 11-23-01 · Closure in place for CASs 11-08-01, 11-08-02, 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives includes the following: · Non-engineered soil covers approximately 3 feet thick will be constructed at CAS 11-08-01 over contaminated waste dump (CWD) #1 and at CAS 11-08-02 over CWD #2. · FFACO use restrictions (URs) will be implemented for the areas where the total effective dose (TED) exceeds the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per Occasional Use Area year (mrem/OU-yr). The FAL is based on an assumption that the future use of the site includes occasional work activities and that workers will not be assigned to the area on a regular basis. A site worker under this scenario is assumed to be on site for a maximum of 80 hours per year for 5 years. The FFACO UR boundaries will encompass the areas where a worker would be exposed to 25 millirems of radioactivity per year if they are present for 80 hours per year. These boundaries will be defined as follows: – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-08-01 and CAS 11-08-02 within CWDs #1 and #2 at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the soil covers that will be constructed at CWD #1 and CWD #2. A geophysical survey revealed buried metallic debris outside the fence and adjacent to CWD #1. Therefore, the UR boundary for CWD #1 will be expanded to include the mound containing buried material. – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-23-02, CAS 11-23-03, and CAS 11-23-04, within the three High Contamination Area (HCA) boundaries associated with the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the HCAs. The TED at an area of soil impacted by radiological debris outside the fence and adjacent to the 11c test area HCA exceeds the FAL of 25 mrem/OU-yr. Because the radiological impact from the debris at this location is visible on the aerial flyover radiological survey, all other areas within this isopleth of the flyover survey are conservatively also assumed to exceed the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries for the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas will be expanded to include the areas within this isopleth. · The FFACO URs will all be located within the large Contamination Area (CA) that encompasses Plutonium Valley. Because access to the CA is limited and entry into the CA for post-closure inspections and maintenance would be impractical, UR warning signs will be posted along the existing CA fence. In accordance with the Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process (NNSA/NSO, 2012b), an administrative UR will be implemented as a best management practice for the areas where the TED exceeds 25 millirems per Industrial Area year. This limit is based on continuous industrial use of the site and addresses exposure to industrial workers who would regularly be assigned to the work area for an entire career (250 days

  15. 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; SER TEAM; ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES GROUP; ENVIROMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION FIELD SAMPLING TEAM

    2005-08-22

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform the public, regulators, Laboratory employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The report summarizes BNL's environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The SER is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/esd/SER.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD version of the full report. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

  16. 2007 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratel,K.

    2008-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the-length report.

  17. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Attachment A: Site Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Attachment A: Site Description DOE/NV/25946--790-ATT A Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Disclaimer Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National

  18. IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 7, 2008 IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES Plan won't impact DOE commitment to removing all stored waste from Idaho Site Idaho's Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility offers state of the art waste characterization, treatment and packaging capabilities. Click on image to enlarge The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision for the Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste, originally issued in 1998. The amendment

  19. FTCP Site Specific Information - Pacific Northwest Site Office |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Pacific Northwest Site Office FTCP Site Specific Information - Pacific Northwest Site Office FTCP Agent Organization Name Phone E-Mail PNSO Ted Pietrok 509-372-4546 Theodore.pietrok@pnso.science.doe.gov Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Reports Calendar Year 2015 Calendar Year 2014 Calendar Year 2013 Calendar Year 2012 Calendar Year 2011 Calendar Year 2010 TQP Self-Assessment TQP Self-Assessment, May

  20. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.