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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Mound, Ohio, Site A CERCLA andor RCRA Site MoundMap DOE has completed all remediation activities at the Mound site in accordance with applicable Comprehensive Environmental...

2

Excavator Mound Spacing on Restocking Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a tallgrass-prairie plant com- munity. We predicted that soil mounds and burrows would provide sites. Moreover, the species found locally on mounds and burrows were a subset of the dominant plants present that perennial grami- noids predominate in the rapid recovery of vegetation on pocket gopher mounds and bur- rows

3

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ohio Ohio Mound, Ohio, Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet Annual Institutional Controls Report Long-Term Stewardship Site Transition Plan Site Sales Agreement Internal Links Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Administrative Records External Links Mound Development Corporation (MDC) Ohio Environmental Protection Agency U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Please be green. Do not print these documents unless absolutely necessary. Request a paper copy of any document by submitting a Document Request. All Site Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Fact Sheet Community Involvement General Site Documents

4

Microsoft Word - S02885_2012 CIP Mound Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mound Site Mound Site Community Involvement Plan January 2012 LMS/MND/S02885 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MND/S02885 Office of Legacy Management Mound Site Community Involvement Plan January 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Mound Community Involvement Plan January 2012 Doc. No. S02885 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1 2.0 Site Description and Background ...........................................................................................1

5

Dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume at Mound Laboratory, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dig-face monitoring system consists of onsite hardware for collecting information on changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface soil during the hazardous site excavation. A prototype dig-face system was take to Mount Laboratory for a first trial. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of {sup 232}Th, {sup 227}Ac, and assorted debris. The system was used to monitor a deep excavation aimed at removing {sup 227}Ac-contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were used to scan across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed. A 3-D image of the contamination plumes was developed; the radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the {sup 227}Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate {sup 232}Th plume.

Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.J.; Carpenter, M.V.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Mound site environmental report for calendar year 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound operations on the population and the environment. Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG&G Mound Applied Technologies for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE`s weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear and energy technologies.

Bauer, L.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

8

Analysis of Subsidence Data for the Bryan Mound Site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The elevation change data measured at the Bryan Mound Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site over the last 16+ years has been studied and a model utilized to project elevation changes into the future. The subsidence rate at Bryan Mound is low in comparison with other Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites and has decreased with time due to the maintenance of higher operating pressures and the normal decrease in creep closure rate of caverns with time. However, the subsidence at the site is projected to continue. A model was developed to project subsidence values 20 years into the future; no subsidence related issues are apparent from these projections.

Bauer, Stephen J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Microsoft Word - LEGAL NOTICE for Mound Site 2011 CERCLA Five.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LEGAL NOTICE for Mound Site 2011 CERCLA Five-Year Review Page 1 of 2 LEGAL NOTICE for Mound Site 2011 CERCLA Five-Year Review Page 1 of 2 LEGAL NOTICE for Mound Site 2011 CERCLA Five-Year Review The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is conducting the third Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Five-Year Review of the Mound Site in Miamisburg, Ohio. The Five-Year Review process ensures that the selected CERCLA remedies remain protective of human health and the environment. After the Mound Plant Site was placed on the CERCLA National Priority List in 1989, DOE signed a CERCLA Section 120 Federal Facility Agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1990 and a tripartite agreement among the DOE, EPA, and Ohio EPA (OEPA) in 1993. The

10

Microsoft Word - S02885_2012 CIP Mound Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Corporation (see MDC) MSEM Mound Science and Energy Museum (formerly MMA) NCP National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan NPL National Priorities List PRS...

11

Transition and Closeout of the Former DOE Mound Plant Site: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) manages the Miamisburg Closure Project (MCP) by cleaning up the Mound site, located in Miamisburg, Ohio, to specific environmental standards, conveying all excess land parcels to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation, and transferring all continuing DOE post-closure responsibilities to the Office of Legacy Management (LM). Presently, the EM cleanup contract of the Mound site with CH2M Hill Mound Inc. is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2006. LM manages the Mound transition efforts and also post-closure responsibilities at other DOE sites via a contract with the S.M. Stoller Corporation. The programmatic transfer from EM to LM is scheduled to take place on October 1, 2006. The transition of the Mound site has required substantial integration and coordination between the EM and LM. Several project management principles have been implemented to help facilitate the transfer of programmatic responsibility. As a result, several lessons learned have been identified to help streamline and improve integration and coordination of the transfer process. Lessons learned from the Mound site transition project are considered a work in progress and have been summarized according to a work breakdown structure for specific functional areas in the transition schedule. The functional areas include program management, environmental, records management, information technology, property management, stakeholder and regulatory relations, procurement, worker pension and benefits, and project closeout. Specific improvements or best practices have been recognized and documented by the Mound transition team. The Mound site is one of three major cleanup sites within the EM organization scheduled for completion in 2006. EM, EM cleanup contractor, LM, and LM post-closure contractor have identified lessons learned during the transition and closure of the Mound site. The transition effort from environmental cleanup to post-closure operations is complex and requires creative and innovative solutions. Future environmental cleanups can benefit from the lessons learned gained by DOE and contractor organizations. (authors)

Carpenter, C. P. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Research Ridge 4, MS-K09, 3600 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26507 (United States); Marks, M. L.; Smiley, S.L. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Chiquita Building, 250 E. 5 th Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States); Gallaher, D. M. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, 955 Mound Road, Miamisburg, OH 45342 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Concentration of Actinides in Plant Mounds at Safety Test Nuclear Sites in Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Plant mounds or blow-sand mounds are accumulations of soil particles and plant debris around large shrubs and are common features in deserts in the southwestern United States. Believed to be an important factor in their formation, the shrubs create surface roughness that causes wind-suspended particles to be deposited and resist further suspension. Shrub mounds occur in some plant communities on the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR), including areas of surface soil contamination from past nuclear testing. In the 1970s as part of early studies to understand properties of actinides in the environment, the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) examined the accumulation of isotopes of Pu, {sup 241}Am, and U in plant mounds at safety test sites. The NAEG studies found concentrations of these contaminants to be greater in shrub mounds than in the surrounding areas of desert pavement. For example, at Project 57 on the NTTR, it was estimated that 15 percent of the radionuclide inventory of the site was associated with shrub mounds, which accounted for 17 percent of the surface area of the site, a ratio of inventory to area of 0.85. At Clean Slate III at the TTR, 29 percent of the inventory was associated with approximately 32 percent of the site covered by shrub mounds, a ratio of 0.91. While the total inventory of radionuclides in intershrub areas was greater, the ratio of radionuclide inventory to area was 0.40 and 0.38, respectively, at the two sites. The comparison between the shrub mounds and adjacent desert pavement areas was made for only the top 5 cm since radionuclides at safety test sites are concentrated in the top 5 cm of intershrub areas. Not accounting for radionuclides associated with the shrub mounds would cause the inventory of contaminants and potential exposure to be underestimated. As part of its Environmental Restoration Soils Subproject, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has proposed that the majority of its contaminated soil 'Corrective Action Units', including the safety test sites, be closed by fencing and posting with administrative controls. The concentration of actinides in the shrub mounds has important implications for postclosure management of the safety test sites. Because resuspension factors at safety test sites can be three to four orders-of-magnitude higher than soil sites associated with atmospheric tests where criticality occurred, the shrub mounds are an important factor in stabilization of actinide contaminants. Loss of shrubs associated with mounds from fire or plant die-back from drought could cause radionuclides at these sites to become more prone to suspension and water erosion until the sites are stabilized. Alternatively, although shrub mounds are usually composed of predominantly fine sand size particles, smaller silt and clay size particles in them are often high in CaCO{sub 3} content. The CaCO{sub 3} may act as a cementing agent to limit erosion of the shrub mounds even if the vegetation cover is temporarily lost.

David S. Shafer; Jenna Gommes

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Conversion of the Bryan Mound geological site characterization reports to a three-dimensional model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bryan Mound salt dome, located near Freeport, Texas, is home to one of four underground crude oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Bryan Mound site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 20 oil-storage caverns at the site. This work provides an internally consistent geologic model of the Bryan Mound site that can be used in support of future work.

Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Mound History and Information  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mound Site History and Information Mound Site History and Information The Mound site, formerly known as the Mound Plant or Facility, takes its name from a nearby Na- tive American burial mound. The 306 acre facility is sited on a hill in the center of Miamisburg, Ohio. Construction of the Mound Plant began in 1946, and the site became operational in 1949. Mound, the nation's first post-war U.S. Atomic Energy Commission site to be constructed, was established to consolidate and continue the work conducted at the Dayton Units for the Manhattan Project. Much of the work at the Mound Plant during the Cold War involved production of the polonium- beryllium initiators used in early atomic weapons and the manufacture of and research related to ra- dionuclides. In the 1950s, the facility began to

15

mound.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mound Site, in Miamisburg, Ohio. Mound Site, in Miamisburg, Ohio. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Description and History The Mound site, named for a nearby Native American burial ground, is located in Miamisburg, Ohio, approxi- mately 10 miles southwest of Dayton. The Great Miami River flows southwest through Miamisburg and domi- nates the geography of the region surrounding the Mound site. The river valley is highly industrialized; the rest of the region is a mix of farmland, residential area, small communities, and light industry. Many residential developments, five schools, the Miamisburg downtown area, and six city parks are located within a mile of the Mound site. The Mound site sits atop an elevated area overlooking the city of Miamisburg, the Great Miami River, and the

16

Mound Laboratory Plutonium-238 Study Off-Site Analytical Data May-December 1974  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary samples collected from off-site sediment in the Miami-Erie Canal Area near Mound Laboratory indicated that plutonium-238 concentrations are substantially above baseline levels. As a result an extensive sampling and analysis program was performed to determine the plutonium-238 concentrations as a function of depth and location in a drainage ditch, the canal, two ponds, a run-off hollow, a canal overflow creek and the Great Miami River. The plutonium-238 concentration data was used to estimate the total inventory of 238Pu deposited in these waterways, to determine the extent of the contamination, and to evaluate the potential health hazards to the general population of the area. The scope of this report is to present the data collected during this study. Detailed interpretation of the data will be presented in subsequent reports.

Robinson, Bob; Rogers, D. R.; Westendorf, W. H.; Black, H. A.

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

MOUND Environmental Restoration Program  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MOUND MOUND Environmental Restoration Program ._. I s ! I " ' Al /. i i : MOUND Environmental Restoration Program VlOUND I MOUND PLANT POTENTIAL RELEASE SITE PACKAGE Notice of Public Review Period hgram The following potential release site (PRS) packages will be available for public review ir he CERCLA Public Reading Room, 305 E. Central Ave., Miamisburg, Ohio beginning lune 17, 1997. Public comment will be accepted on these packages from June 17, 1997, .hrough July 18, 1997. PRS 30: Building 27 Propane Tank PRS 129/130: Former Solvent Storage Sites PRS 241: Soil Con@mination- - Main Hill Parking Lot Area PRS 307: Soil Contamination -.Buil.ding 29 PRS 318: PCB Tramformer and Capacitor Locations PRS 320-325: Former Sites -:Dayton Uqits 1-4/Dayton WarehousYScioto Facility

18

Deactivation Of Mound's Tritium Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deactivation of Mound? s tritium complex is on the critical path for the site exit plan. Under the site exit plan, the DOE Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, is undergoing significant effort to transition the former weapons facilities to commercial use. Mound will demolish, decontaminate, or transfer more than 100 facilities and 300 acres of land to a non-commercial organization, Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corp. (MMCIC) for the city's industrial site development. Among these facilities, deactivation of three tritium facilities presents the most challenge. These laboratory buildings were among some of the original buildings built at Mound in the late 1940s or early 1950s. Through the years, those buildings were used for tritium recovery, testing, research and development and are heavily contaminated with tritium and other radionuclides. The Mound Plant combined safe shutdown of these facilities into a single project. The first deactivation project of this magnitude in the...

Sam Cheng And

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Laboratory - OH 19  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mound Laboratory - OH 19 Mound Laboratory - OH 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mound Laboratory (OH.19) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Mound, Ohio, Site Documents Related to Mound Laboratory LEGAL NOTICE for Mound Site 2011 CERCLA Five-Year Review Third Five-Year Review for the Mound, Ohio, Site Miamisburg, Ohio. LMS/MND/S07963. September 2011 5-Year OU-1 Remedy Five-Year Review Report Second Five-Year Review for the Mound, Ohio, Site Miamisburg, Ohio September 2006 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls Applied to the Former DOE Mound Site Property. LMS/MND/S06401.

20

THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

JEWETT MA

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Deep soil mixing at the Paducah site will involve a large-diameter auger like this one. Deep soil mixing at the Paducah site will involve a large-diameter auger like this one. Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (right) and Paducah Site Lead Reinhard Knerr look at a three-dimensional model of the Paducah site’s groundwater system. University of Kentucky College of Design students assembled the model for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Citizens Advisory Board. The model was displayed at the April 18 Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs Meeting in Paducah, where Huizenga spoke before taking his first tour of the Paducah site.

22

Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 Southwest Plume Cleanup at Paducah Site to Start by Summer 2013 April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Deep soil mixing at the Paducah site will involve a large-diameter auger like this one. Deep soil mixing at the Paducah site will involve a large-diameter auger like this one. Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (right) and Paducah Site Lead Reinhard Knerr look at a three-dimensional model of the Paducah site’s groundwater system. University of Kentucky College of Design students assembled the model for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Citizens Advisory Board. The model was displayed at the April 18 Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs Meeting in Paducah, where Huizenga spoke before taking his first tour of the Paducah site.

23

Mound facility physical characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Mound Facility. 1978 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For Mound Facility, the year 1978 was one of progress marked by enhanced mission assignments and significant milestones. The thirtieth anniversary of the site was celebrated, and Monsanto Research Corporation began a new 5 year contract to operate the Mound Facility. Long-standing production assignments were strengthened, and were were given a new responsibility: to develop and produce all ceramic parts used in Mound-build products. progress toward US energy objectives was bolstered by Mound programs supporting the development of nuclear fusion poser, unlocking previously us attainable fossil fuels, ensuring the safety and security of nuclear material handling operations, and exploring the real promise of energy form the sun. In 1978, we focused our attention on many efforts aimed at a brighter, more secure future.

NONE

1979-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy April 17, 2013 - 11:39am Addthis Ray Seiler, Mound Science and Energy Museum President, is one of the many museum volunteers who routinely talks to visitors, such as this group from Iowa who are interested in the history of the Mound site. Ray Seiler, Mound Science and Energy Museum President, is one of the many museum volunteers who routinely talks to visitors, such as this group from Iowa who are interested in the history of the Mound site. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The Mound Science and Energy Museum (MSEM) owes its success to dedicated volunteers and supporters. The MSEM currently has 40 active volunteers and

26

Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy April 17, 2013 - 11:39am Addthis Ray Seiler, Mound Science and Energy Museum President, is one of the many museum volunteers who routinely talks to visitors, such as this group from Iowa who are interested in the history of the Mound site. Ray Seiler, Mound Science and Energy Museum President, is one of the many museum volunteers who routinely talks to visitors, such as this group from Iowa who are interested in the history of the Mound site. What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The Mound Science and Energy Museum (MSEM) owes its success to dedicated volunteers and supporters. The MSEM currently has 40 active volunteers and

27

Mound Laboratory: Analytical Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Laboratory Analytical Capability report is intended to fulfill a customer need for basic information concerning Mound Laboratory's analytical instrumentation and techniques.

Hendrickson, E. L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Mound Former Construction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Mound Worker Population...

29

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Mound Former Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Mound Worker Population Served: Production Workers...

30

Microsoft Word - MoundImprovementGrant20030522.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE: 202-586-5806 DOE: 202-586-5806 Tuesday, May 22, 2003 Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation To Receive $1.3 Million Grant WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will award $1.3 million to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation (MMCIC) to transition the Mound site from a former weapons production facility to the economically viable Mound Advanced Technology Center. MMCIC is the community reuse organization (CRO) for the department's Mound Site in Ohio. "The Energy Department is a good neighbor to the communities surrounding our sites," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "We will continue to work with the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation and other community reuse organizations around

31

Microsoft Word - Mound19990322.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jane Greenwalt, DOE/Ohio (937)865-3116 Jane Greenwalt, DOE/Ohio (937)865-3116 (937)885-2556 Pager (888)207-4149 Mark Becker, BWO (937) 865-4450 March 22, 1999 ENERGY SECRETARY BILL RICHARDSON TO VISIT MIAMISBURG ON MONDAY To Present $5 Million to Community Reuse Organization MIAMISBURG, OH - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Bill Richardson will visit the Mound site in Miamisburg on Monday, March 22, to tour the facility and meet with employees, neighbors and civic leaders. At 2:00 p.m., he will join U.S. Congressman Tony Hall, Miamisburg Mayor Dick Church, state and local community reuse organization the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation (MMCIC). During the ceremony, Secretary Richardson will present the MMCIC a $5 million check from the Energy Department to help fund capital

32

Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter.

Hranac, K.C. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Chromec, F.W.; Fiehweg, R. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Hopkins, J. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

entire site from the south. Figure 3 shows the parcel boundaries laid over a March 2011 aerial photograph of the Mound Site. The actual photographs were taken at a low altitude,...

34

Mound Supports Galileo  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This video describes the invention of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at Mound Laboratory, and radioisotope heat source production from 1 watt-thermal to 2400 watts-thermal. RTGs have been used in many space vehicles, but the RTG built for the Galileo mission to orbit Jupiter is the largest. This RTG unit will produce 4400 watts-thermal and convert to 300 watts-electric. The plutonium-238 heat source assembly and test at Mound is described. The RTGs are tested under simulated mission conditions. The RTG leakage radiation is carefully measured for background compensation for on-board radiation monitoring instruments.

Monsanto Research Corporation

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA  

SciTech Connect

Contaminated groundwater associated with Building 100 at the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center, formerly the DOE Pinellas plant, is the primary remedial challenge that remains to be addressed at the site. Currently, Building 100 is an active industrial facility that is now owned and operated by the Pinellas county government. Groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells recently installed near the southern boundary of the site suggest that contaminated groundwater has migrated off the plant site. In response to the challenges presented by the Building 100 plume, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) requested assistance from the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) to provide a review team to make technical recommendations so that they can efficiently and effectively address characterization and remediation of the plume. The review team was unanimous in the conclusion that a dynamic strategy that combines a phased implementation of direct push samplers, sensors, and tools can be used to better delineate the extent of contamination, control plume migration, and rapidly remediate the contaminated groundwater at the site. The initial efforts of the team focused on reviewing the site history and data, organizing the information into a conceptual model, identifying appropriate technologies, and recommending an integrated strategy. The current groundwater data from the site indicate a two-lobed plume extending to the east and south. To the east vinyl chloride is the primary contaminant of concern, to the south, vinyl chloride and cis1, 2-DCE are the primary contaminants. The limited data that are available suggest that reductive dechlorination of the TCE is already occurring but is not sufficient to prevent offsite migration of low concentrations of TCE daughter products. The team recommends that DOE pursue a strategy that builds on the natural cleansing capacity of the subsurface with reductive methods including biostimulation and/or bioaugmentation to provide a sustainable remediation system within the flow path of the plume. Additional data will be required to implement this approach and will include: (1) Better delineation of the nature and extent of contamination; (2) Demonstration the plume is currently stable or shrinking; and (3) Demonstration the full reductive dechlorination is occurring. The technical team recommends that DOE use a phased approach to identify residual contamination and to provide rapid installation of remedies. Matrices of characterization and remediation sensors, technologies, and tools were developed by the team in order to match the specific conditions and requirements of the site. The team provides a specific example of remedy that includes the incorporation of a dynamic characterization strategy moving from minimally invasive to more aggressive field techniques, the consideration of multiple complementary remediation approaches based on a spatiotemporally phased approach keyed to the different demands of different parts of the plume, and the integration and sequencing of the characterization and remediation activities.

Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Environmental assessment for commercialization of the Mound Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In November 1993 US DOE decided to phase out operations at the Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, with the goal of releasing the site for commercial use. The broad concept is to transform the plant into an advanced manufacturing center with the main focus on commercializing products and other technology. DOE proposes to lease portions of the Mound Plant to commercial enterprises. This Environmental Impact statement has a finding of no significant impact in reference to such action.

Not Available

1994-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Independent technical review of the Mound Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the facilities, organizations, plans, and activities required to transition particular elements of the Mound Plant from Defense Program (DP) funded operation as appropriate either to community developed reuse or safe deactivation leading to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The review was conducted at the request of the Dr. Willis Bixby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy EM-60, Office of Facility Transition and Management and is a consensus of the nine member ITR Team. Information for the review was drawn from documents provided to the ITR Team by the Miamisburg Area Office (MB) of the DOE, EG&G, the City of Miamisburg, and others; and from presentations, discussions, interviews, and facility inspections at the Mound Plant during the weeks of March 14 and March 28, 1994. During the week of April 25, 1994, the ITR Team met at Los Alamos, New Mexico to develop consensus recommendations. A presentation of the core recommendations was made at the Mound Plant on May 5, 1994. This is an independent assessment of information available to, and used by, the Mound Plant personnel. Repetition of the information is not meant to imply discovery by the ITR Team. Team members, however, acting as independent reviewers, frequently assess the information from a perspective that differs significantly from that of the Mound Plant personnel. The report is based on information obtained and conditions observed during the March 1994 review interval. The ITR process and normal site work often initiate rapid, beneficial changes in understanding and organization immediately following the review. These changes frequently alter conditions observed during the review, but the report does not address changes subsequent to the review interval.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

Tullis, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Plant Mounds as Concentration and Stabilization Agents for Actinide Soil Contaminants in Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Plant mounds or blow-sand mounds are accumulations of soil particles and plant debris around the base of shrubs and are common features in deserts in the southwestern United States. An important factor in their formation is that shrubs create surface roughness that causes wind-suspended particles to be deposited and resist further suspension. Shrub mounds occur in some plant communities on the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR), including areas of surface soil contamination from past nuclear testing. In the 1970s as part of early studies to understand properties of actinides in the environment, the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) examined the accumulation of isotopes of Pu, 241Am, and U in plant mounds at safety experiment and storage-transportation test sites of nuclear devices. Although aerial concentrations of these contaminants were highest in the intershrub or desert pavement areas, the concentration in mounds were higher than in equal volumes of intershrub or desert pavement soil. The NAEG studies found the ratio of contaminant concentration of actinides in soil to be greater (1.6 to 2.0) in shrub mounds than in the surrounding areas of desert pavement. At Project 57 on the NTTR, 17 percent of the area was covered in mounds while at Clean Slate III on the TTR, 32 percent of the area was covered in mounds. If equivalent volumes of contaminated soil were compared between mounds and desert pavement areas at these sites, then the former might contain as much as 34 and 62 percent of the contaminant inventory, respectively. Not accounting for radionuclides associated with shrub mounds would cause the inventory of contaminants and potential exposure to be underestimated. In addition, preservation of shrub mounds could be important part of long-term stewardship if these sites are closed by fencing and posting with administrative controls.

D.S. Shafer; J. Gommes

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

40

CERCLA - Site Selector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(LEHR) Fernald Preserve Monticello Site Mound Site - Miamisburg Closure Project Rocky Flats Site Weldon Spring Search the Administrative Record The White House USA.gov E-Gov...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CERCLA - Site Selector  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Site Mound Site - Miamisburg Closure Project Rocky Flats Site Weldon Spring Search the Administrative Record The White House USA.gov E-Gov Information Quality FOIA...

42

Dzhanybek Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DZH-1: Termite mound at the Dzhanybek grassland site, Kazakhstan. (Prof. Roman Zlotin is demonstrating the internal structure of the mound, which has been cut open with a shovel....

43

Assessment of the AWC TRUclean process for use on Mound soils and sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AWC TRUclean System has been proposed as a method to reduce the volume of LSA waste during D&D excavation of Pu-238 contaminated soils on the Mound Site and Pu-238 contaminated sediments in the Miami-Erie Canal. Following test runs with Mound soil, AWC suggested that the TRUclean Process could reduce the amount of LSA waste by greater than 90% if a machine could be built and used to process the Mound soil. The cost savings which could potentially be realized by assuming this magnitude of volume reduction were thought to be significant on large projects. These preliminary results suggested that a review of the TRUclean Process and the 1987 test results should be performed to determine a course of action. The AWC TRUclean Process and the test data have been evaluated and the potential effectiveness of the process determined for use on Mound soils and/or on the sediments in the Miami-Erie Canal.

Rogers, D.R.

1989-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

44

Enforcement Letter-Mound-08/22/1996  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mr. Michael T. Sullivan Mr. Michael T. Sullivan [ ] EG&G Mound Applied Technologies P.O. Box 3000 Miamisburg, OH 45343-3000 Re: Noncompliance Number NTS-OH-MB-EGGM-EGGMAT01-1996-0001 Dear Mr. Sullivan: On April 17, 1996, the Office of Enforcement and Investigation conducted an onsite evaluation of the referenced potential noncompliance reported to Department of Energy (DOE) by EG&G Mound (EG&G) in the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). This potential noncompliance, which occurred on January 11, 1996, and was reported on January 24, 1996, involved the inadvertent transfer of contamination, resulting in low level contamination of individuals, equipment and locations outside designated radiological areas. The April 17, 1996, site visit evaluated the adequacy of and progress

45

Mound, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Projects Production Workers Screening Projects Mound, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Mound Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: 1-877-866-6802 Local Outreach Office Eric Parker, Paige Gibson and Mike Ball 113 East Central Avenue W. Carrollton, OH 45449 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is being conducted by the United Steelworkers, in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

46

Office of Inspector General report on audit of shutdown and transition of the Mound Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the end of the Cold War, the Department of Energy (Department) has greatly reduced the production of nuclear weapons and redirected the capabilities and focus of the weapons complex. As part of this redirection, the Mound Plant was transferred from a Defense Program site to an Environmental Management site with emphasis on accelerated cleanup and transition of facilities and personal property to the local community. This audit was initiated to determine if the shutdown and transition of the Mound Plant was progressing effectively and efficiently. The Department prepared a Nonnuclear Consolidation Plan (NCP) designed to reduce its costs of operation by closing and consolidating facilities. In contrast to the goal of the NCP, the Department plans to keep a portion of the Mound Plant open solely to perform work for other Federal agencies. Specifically, the Department has decided to continue assembling and testing isotopic heat sources and radioisotope thermoelectric generators (HS/RTG) at the Mound Plant despite the transfer or planned transfer of all other production operations.The Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology decided to continue its HS/RTG operations at the Mound Plant without adequately considering the overall economic goals of the Department. As a result, the Department may not achieve the savings envisioned by the NCP. Also, the Department may incur between $4 million and $8.5 million more than necessary each year to continue its HS/RTG operations at the Mound Plant. Additionally, if the HS/RTG operations stay at the Mound Plant, the Department will spend more than $3 million to consolidate these operations into one location.

NONE

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

47

Delineation of Coal Tar Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid and Groundwater Plumes at a Former Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a field investigation at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site in the Midwest. The focus of the investigation was delineating the distribution of coal tar (a dense nonaqueous phase liquid) and the associated dissolved-phase constituents in groundwater using a combination of analysis methodologies. The results will be used to determine remediation needs at the site.

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Enforcement Letter, EG&G Mound Applied Technologies- August 22, 1996  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to EG&G Mound Applied Technologies related to the Inadvertent Transfer of Radiological Contamination at the Mound Plant

49

LiDAR Data Applications Monitoring Illinois Prehistoric Burial Mounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kangaroo rat mounds. The ants may have benefited from altered soil texture and seed composition and reduced mounds and selectively harvesting seeds (Brown and Heske 1990, Valone and Brown 1995, Whitford and Kay mounds within each treatment type in order to control for rodent activity (i.e. densities) across

Frank, Thomas D.

50

Accelerated Clean-up of the United States Department of Energy, Mound Nuclear Weapons Facility in Miamisburg, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL is executing a performance-based contract with the United States Department of Energy to accelerate the safe closure of the nuclear facilities at the former Mound plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. The contract started in January 2003 with a target completion date of March 31, 2006. Our accelerated baseline targets completion of the project 2 years ahead of the previous baseline schedule, by spring 2006, and for $200 million less than previous estimates. This unique decommissioning and remediation project is located within the City of Miamisburg proper and is designed for transfer of the property to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse. The project is being performed with the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation and their tenants co-located on the site creating significant logistical, safety and stakeholder challenges. The project is also being performed in conjunction with the United States Department of Energy, United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency under the Mound 2000 regulatory cleanup process. The project is currently over 95% complete. To achieve cleanup and closure of the Mound site, CH2M HILL's scope includes: - Demolition of 64 nuclear, radiological and commercial facilities - Preparation for Transfer of 9 facilities (including a Category 2 nuclear facility) to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse - Removal of all above ground utility structures and components, and preparation for transfer of 9 utility systems to Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation - Investigation, remediation, closure, and documentation of all known Potential Release Sites contaminated with radiological and chemical contamination (73 identified in original contract) - Storage, characterization, processing, packaging and shipment of all waste and excess nuclear materials - Preparation for Transfer of the 306 acre site to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse In the first two and a half years the project has successfully completed more demolition work, more environmental remediation work and more waste shipping than any other period in site history while improving the safety statistics of the site significantly. CH2M HILL Mound established a safety culture to promote line management safety responsibility and continues to place a high emphasis on safety performance even in an accelerated closure environment. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Time Restricted Case (TRC) and Days Away and Restricted Time (DART) rates improved 76% and 90%, respectively, since contract start from 2002 to 2005. These rates are the lowest the site has ever seen. The site has also gone over 1 million hours without a Lost Workday Case accident. Covered below are the key strategies for safety improvement and project delivery that have been successful at the Miamisburg Closure Project are presented. (authors)

Lehew, J.G.; Bradford, J.D.; Cabbil, C.C. [CH2M Hill / CH2M Hill Mound, Inc., 1075 Mound Road, Miamisburg, OH 45343 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IC Assessment Checklist IC Assessment Checklist This page intentionally left blank CHECKLIST WORKSHEET - COMBINED - ALL PARCELS Review of Effectiveness of Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page A-1 Scope: Entire Mound Site Preliminary inspections performed on: April 5 and 7, 2011 Physical Inspection Walk around on: April 12, 2011 Review led by: Art Kleinrath, DOE LM Phone #: 937-227-2237 Participants in Physical Inspection Walk Around on April 12, 2011: See attached sign-in sheet. Summary of property improvements since the previous Review. For example, have buildings been demolished or erected? Has surface water flow been modified? Has landscaping been

52

Mound Plant Federal Facility Agreement, July 15, 1993 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Environmental Protection Agency Region V United States Environmental Protection Agency Region V and the State of Ohio Federal Facility Agreement State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary DOE shall identify Interim Remedial Actions (IRAs) alternatives and implement US EPA and OEPA approved remedies for the site in accordance with CERCLA Parties EPA; Ohio EPA (OEPA); DOE Date 07/15/1993 SCOPE * Identify Interim Remedial Action (IRA) alternatives which include Remedial Investigations (RI) and Feasibility Studies (FS); design and implement US EPA and OEPA approved remedies for the Mound site in accordance with CERCLA. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * After approval of remedial design and action plans, DOE shall prepare and provide to U.S. EPA and OEPA written monthly progress reports.

53

EG G Mound Applied Technologies payroll system  

SciTech Connect

EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., manages and operates the Mound Facility, Miamisburg, Ohio, under a cost-plus-award-fee contract administered by the Department of Energy's Albuquerque Field Office. The contractor's Payroll Department is responsible for prompt payment in the proper amount to all persons entitled to be paid, in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and legal decisions. The objective was to determine whether controls were in place to avoid erroneous payroll payments. EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., did not have all the internal controls required by General Accounting Office Title 6, Pay, Leave, and Allowances.'' Specifically, they did not have computerized edits, separation of duties and responsibilities, and restricted access to payroll data files. This condition occurred because its managers were not aware of Title 6 requirements. As a result, the contractor could not assure the Department of Energy that payroll costs were processes accurately; and fraud, waste, or abuse of Department of Energy funds could go undetected. Our sample of 212 payroll transactions from a population of 66,000 in FY 1991 disclosed only two minor processing errors and no instances of fraud, waste or abuse.

Not Available

1992-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Chemical Plume Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the ... Keywords: Autonomous vehicles, Bayesian inference methods, chemical plume tracing, online mapping, online planning, plume source localization

Shuo Pang; J. A. Farrell

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Porcupine Bank Canyon coral mounds: oceanographic and topographic steering of deep-water carbonate mound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with increasing proximity to S. invicta mounds, suggesting that mealybugs benefit as well. Mutual benefits derived benefit from association with S. invicta. We found that mealybug occurrence increases sig- nificantly colony. While it appears clear that S. invicta benefits from association with these mealybugs, whether

Mazzini, Adriano

56

Mound Laboratory's Reclamation and Recycling Program  

SciTech Connect

In keeping with Mound Laboratory's tradition for innovation and forward-looking action, several studies were recently conducted to seek out alternatives to incineration and landfill of all nonradioactive solid waste. Efforts were directed towards reclamation, reuse, and recycling of solid wastes. These efforts resulted in a reclamation and recycling program which is being implemented in three separate phases: 1. Phase I provides for reclamation and recycling of IBM cards, printouts, and white paper. 2. Phase II is designed for reclamation, recycling, or off-site disposal of all wastes generated in buildings and areas where radioactive or explosive wastes are not contained. 3. Phase III provides for reclamation, recycling, or off-site disposal of the remaining wastes not included in Phases I and II. Implementatin would follow successful operation of Phases I and II and would only be implemented after a complete analysis of monitoring and segregation techniques have been established to assure against any possibility of off-site contamination.

Garbe, Yvonne M.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mound Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mound Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Page 1 of 16 Mound Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Page 1 of 16 EM Home | Regulatory Compliance | Environmental Compliance Agreements Mound Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 BEFORE THE OHIO ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY In the Matter Of: United States Department of Energy : Director's Final Mound Facility : Findings and Order P.O. Box 66 : Miamisburg, Ohio 45343-0066 : Respondent It is hereby agreed by and among the parties hereto as follows: Table of Contents I. Jurisdiction II. Parties Bound III. Definitions IV. Findings of Fact V. Orders VI. Limitations of Director's Approval VII. Notice VIII. Project Managers IX. Dispute Resolution X. Funding XI. Other Applicable Laws XII. Reservation of Rights XIII. Modification

59

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound_Benefits  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ohio > Mound_Benefits Ohio > Mound_Benefits Employment Verification Mercer, Mound Benefits Center (866) 296-5036 Worker and Community Transition Program (Section 3161) Direct all education, training, preference in hiring, relocation, and outplacement inquiries to: Professional Services of America, Inc. 601 Avery Street, Suite 500, Parkersburg, WV 26101 Phone: (866) 562-7482 Fax: (304) 485-1280 E-mail: jsheppard@psa-inc.com Medical and Life Insurance for Former EG&G, BWXTO, and CH2M HILL Employees For questions about health insurance coverage and/or dependent information, life insurance and/or beneficiaries, etc.: Mercer, Mound Benefits Center P.O. Box 9735, Providence, RI 02940 (866) 296-5036 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. EST, Monday-Friday For questions about insurance claims:

60

Audit of Mound Plant`s reduction in force  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective of this audit was to determine whether the Mound Plant`s Fiscal Year 1992 reduction in force (RIF) was effectively managed and implemented properly by DOE. DOE established policy to encourage contractors to reduce staffing by voluntary separations without unreasonable separation costs. EG&G Mound`s FY 1992 RIF was accomplished by voluntary separations; however, its implementation unreasonably increased costs because DOE did not have adequate criteria or guidelines for evaluating contractors` RIF proposals, and because EG&G Mound furnished inaccurate cost data to DOE evaluators. The unreasonable costs amounted to at least $21 million. Recommendations are made that DOE develop and implement guidelines to impose limitations on voluntary separation allowances, early retirement incentive payments, and inclusion of crucial employee classifications in voluntary RIFs.

Not Available

1993-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EA-1001: Commercialization of the Mound Plant, Golden, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to commercialize surplus facilities such as the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. Commercialization will make...

62

Source Remediation vs. Plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This summary paper reviews just some of the extensive scientific literature from the past 20 years on the various aspects of contaminant source remediation and plume management. Some of the major findings of the numerous research projects are presented.

Management Critical Factors; G. Teutsch; H. Rgner; D. Zamfirescu; M. Finkel; M. Bittens

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Mounded LPG storage - Experience and developments  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is stored after production, and for distribution and use, in pressure vessels which vary in size from a few kilogrammes to many thousands of tons. The types of LPG under consideration are commercial butane, commercial propane, or mixtures of the two gases in varying proportions. Mounded storage systems are becoming popular as an alternative to the better-known traditional systems. The most widely used and therefore best-known of the traditional systems are the above-ground pressure-vessel designs. These more commonly comprise factory-made cylinders which are installed horizontally, being supported on saddles at each end of the vessel. When such vessels are installed in an LPG terminal, depot, or filling plant, they are required in multiple units to facilitate the storage of more than one grade of product and to enable regular maintenance and inspection to be carried out. Today's safety regulations require such installations to be divided into sub-groups of six tanks, with all the tanks located at a safe distance from one another, and from other facilities in the immediate area. These safety distances are being increased as a result of experience, which means terminals now require large areas of land.

Barber, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Microsoft Word - N01535_B100 Plume Delin Rpt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Building 100 Building 100 Off-Site Plume Delineation South of Bryan Dairy Road Data Report for Rally Stores Property November 2010 LMS/PIN/N01535 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01535 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Building 100 Area Off-Site Plume Delineation South of Bryan Dairy Road Data Report for Rally Stores Property November 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Building 100 Area Off-Site Plume Delineation South of Bryan Dairy Road November 2010 Doc. No. N01535 Page i Contents Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 5

65

Estimating Plume Dispersion-A Comparison of Several Sigma Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lateral and vertical Gaussian plume dispersion parameters are estimated and compared with fieldtracer data collected at II sites. The dispersion parameter schemes used in this analysis include Cramer'sscheme, suggested for tall stack ...

John S. Irwin

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Mound, Inc - December 22, 2004...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letter, CH2M Hill Mound, Inc - December 22, 2004 December 22, 2004 Issued to CH2M Hill Mound, Inc. related to a Radioactive Contamination Event during Remediation Activities at...

67

Cimbebasia 16: 143-175, 2000 143 Architecture and morphogenesis in the mound of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial community composition and biogeochemical processes in cold-water coral carbonate mounds carbonate mound gradient gel-electrophoresis seafloor biosphere microbial community structure sulfate of Bacteria and Archaea in a cluster of carbonate mounds located in the Gulf of Cadiz on the Moroccan margin

Turner, Scott

68

Biological control of Striga hermonthica by Cubitermes termite mound powder amendment in sorghum culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is provided by Elsevier for the author's benefit and for the benefit of the author's institution, for non, ant mounds, and bulk soil from an agricultural field. Mound soil was most enriched in inorganic N than burrow, mound and bulk soil for most substrates. Casts also had the highest MPNs for particular

Thioulouse, Jean

69

Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corp Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corp Address 965 Capstone Dr, Suite 480 Place Miamisburg, Ohio Zip 45342-6714 Sector Buildings, Efficiency, Geothermal energy, Services, Solar, Wind energy Product Business and legal services; Energy audits/weatherization; Energy provider: power production; Engineering/architectural/design;Installation;Investment/finances; Manufacturing; Research and development; Trainining and education;Other:Economic Development Phone number 937-865-4462 Website http://www.mound.com Coordinates 39.6304472°, -84.2903471° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6304472,"lon":-84.2903471,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Placing Refuge: Shell Mounds and the Archaeology of Colonial Encounters in the San Francisco Bay Area, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mounds by hunter-gatherers and ensuing currency as foundations for cultural continuity following the closure

Schneider, Tsim Duncan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Mound-ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} feasibility study. Phase 2: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portion of the abandoned Miami-Erie Canal paralleling the Greater Miami River receives the runoff and storm-water discharge from Mound Laboratory. In 1969, a low-level plutonium leak contaminated sediment as far away as 1.5 mi from the Mound site along the old canal system. An estimated one million cubic feet of sediment requires remediation. The technology being evaluated for the remediation of the low-level plutonium-238 contamination of the sediment involves two processes: washing the sediments with ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} solution to dissolve the contaminant, followed by extraction of the solution and processing with the MAG*SEP{sup SM} process to concentrate the contaminant and allow reuse of the ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} solution. The processes are being optimized for pilot-scale and field demonstration. Phase 2 of the project primarily involved identification at the laboratory scale of the optimal ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} formulation, identification of the ion-exchanger and MAG*SEP{sup SM} particles, verification of the plutonium mobility in the treated soil, and evaluation of other process parameters according to a series of tasks.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Focused risk assessment: Mound Plant, Miami-Erie Canal Operable Unit 4  

SciTech Connect

In 1969, an underground waste line at Mound Plant ruptured and released plutonium-238 in a dilute nitric acid solution to the surrounding soils. Most of the acid was neutralized by the native soils. The plutonium, which in a neutral solution is tightly sorbed onto clay particles, remained within the spill area. During remediation, a severe storm eroded some of the contaminated soil. Fine grained plutonium-contaminated clay particles were carried away through the natural drainage courses to the remnants of the Miami-Erie Canal adjacent to Mound Plant, and then into the Great Miami River. This focused risk assessment considers exposure pathways relevant to site conditions, including incidental ingestion of contaminated soils, ingestion of drinking water and fish, and inhalation of resuspended soils and sediments. For each potential exposure pathway, a simplified conceptual model and exposure scenarios have been used to develop conservative estimates of potential radiation dose equivalents and health risks. The conservatism of the dose and risk estimates provides a substantive margin of safety in assuring that the public health is protected.

Rogers, D.R.; Dunning, D.F.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

73

DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume  

SciTech Connect

The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Blue Mounds, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mounds, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Mounds, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0174968°, -89.8323454° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0174968,"lon":-89.8323454,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

76

Flower Mound, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flower Mound, Texas: Energy Resources Flower Mound, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.0145673°, -97.0969552° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0145673,"lon":-97.0969552,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

EG&G Mound Applied Technologies payroll system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EG&G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., manages and operates the Mound Facility, Miamisburg, Ohio, under a cost-plus-award-fee contract administered by the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Field Office. The contractor`s Payroll Department is responsible for prompt payment in the proper amount to all persons entitled to be paid, in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and legal decisions. The objective was to determine whether controls were in place to avoid erroneous payroll payments. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., did not have all the internal controls required by General Accounting Office Title 6, ``Pay, Leave, and Allowances.`` Specifically, they did not have computerized edits, separation of duties and responsibilities, and restricted access to payroll data files. This condition occurred because its managers were not aware of Title 6 requirements. As a result, the contractor could not assure the Department of Energy that payroll costs were processes accurately; and fraud, waste, or abuse of Department of Energy funds could go undetected. Our sample of 212 payroll transactions from a population of 66,000 in FY 1991 disclosed only two minor processing errors and no instances of fraud, waste or abuse.

Not Available

1992-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Relating River Plume Structure to Vertical Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of a river plume is related to the vertical mixing using an isohaline-based coordinate system. Salinity coordinates offer the advantage of translating with the plume as it moves or expanding as the plume grows. This coordinate ...

Robert D. Hetland

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

River-Forced Estuarine Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development, maintenance, and dissipation of river-forced estuarine plumes with and without seaward sloping bottom are studied by use of a three-dimensional, primitive-equation model. Inside the estuary, discussion is focused on how the ...

Shenn-Yu Chao

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Structure and composition of organic reefs and carbonate mud mounds: concepts and categories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their large numbers and biomass. Their depredation on defoliating insects benefits trees (Karhu & Neuvonen; Mabelis, 2007; Dekoninck et al., 2010). The domed nest mounds of red wood ants are conspicu- ous; some can: Formicidae) nest mounds over an extensive area: Trialing a novel method KERRY M. BORKIN1 , RON W. SUMMERS2

Riding, Robert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

STRUCTURE OF A CARBONATE/HYDRATE MOUND IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRUCTURE OF A CARBONATE/HYDRATE MOUND IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO T. McGee1* , J. R. Woolsey1 of Mississippi Canyon Block 118 (MC118) This mound has been chosen by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research

Gerstoft, Peter

82

Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main concerns of storage in saline aquifers is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available for these aquifers. This necessitates a method using available fault data to estimate the probability of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault. The probability of encounter can be calculated from areal fault density statistics from available data, and carbon dioxide plume dimensions from numerical simulation. Given a number of assumptions, the dimension of the plume perpendicular to a fault times the areal density of faults with offsets greater than some threshold of interest provides probability of the plume encountering such a fault. Application of this result to a previously planned large-scale pilot injection in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin yielded a 3% and 7% chance of the plume encountering a fully and half seal offsetting fault, respectively. Subsequently available data indicated a half seal-offsetting fault at a distance from the injection well that implied a 20% probability of encounter for a plume sufficiently large to reach it.

Jordan, P.D.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Audit of the transfer of government-owned property at the Mound and Pinellas Plants  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the audit of the transfer of government-owned property at the Mound and Pinellas Plants. The end of the Cold War brought many changes to the Department of Energy (Department), including the reconfiguration of defense program activities and the closure of some operations. Public Law 103-160 allows the Department to transfer or lease, under specified conditions, Department-owned personal property to economic development initiatives. By encouraging economic development, the Department hopes to mitigate adverse impacts that plant closures would have on local economies. The objective of the audit was to determine whether the Department's interests were properly protected with regard to the transfer of equipment from weapons production use to economic development initiatives. The Mound Plant (Mound) and the Pinellas Plant (Pinellas) did not have property disposition plans that would properly protect Departmental interests. Specifically, Mound planned to make about $13.2 million of Government-owned property available to private businesses even through the property was needed by Defense Programs at other facilities and would cost less than $1 million to relocate. In addition, Mound and Pinellas planned to make available to economic development initiatives several hundred million dollars of Government-owned property without first determining whether it was needed by other Departmental elements. These conditions existed because neither Headquarters nor the Albuquerque Operations Office provided Mound and Pinellas adequate guidance, and Mound and Pinellas management believed that economic development initiatives could take precedence over some Departmental programs.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Decommissioning of the Special Metallurgical Building at Mound Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Special Metallurgical Building at Mound Laboratory, a building of 18,515 sq ft of floor space, was decommissioned. This decommissioned facility formerly housed 238PU processes for the fabrication of radioisotopic fueled heat sources. The 238PU work was conducted in 585 linear ft of gloveboxes occupying approximately 12,600 sq ft of the building. All of the gloveboxes, process services, building services, interior walls, and ceilings were removed to the point of exit at the roof. Eighty-five percent of the filter banks occupying 700 sq ft of floor space was also removed. Special procedures and special equipment were used to reduce the amount of 238PU in the building from approximately 100,000 Ci at the start of the effort to less than 0.3 Ci without a significant release to the environment.

Harris, W. R.; Kokenge, B. R.; Marsh, G. C.

1965-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Audit of Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant, IG-0408  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 24, 1997 June 24, 1997 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: John C. Layton Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: "Audit of Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant" BACKGROUND: The end of the Cold War has allowed the Department of Energy (Department) to reduce weapons production and consolidate operations throughout the nuclear weapons complex. As part of this consolidation, the Department has either transferred or is planning to transfer all weapons-related and production activities at the Mound Plant to other Departmental facilities. The objective of this audit was to determine if the shutdown and transition of the Mound Plant was progressing efficiently and effectively. More

86

Plasma plume MHD power generator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

Hammer, J.H.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Mound bridge-wire welding, testing and corrosion seminar, Miamisburg, OH, May 7-8, 1968  

SciTech Connect

Brief summaries are presented on the following presentations: welding for low voltage operation, welding techniques at Mound, welding/joining at Sandia, Ultrasonic`s plastic assemblies of detonator components, laser welding bridge-wires, laser safety in the Biorad industrial environment, nondestructive testing at Mound, thermal cycle data and evaluation, thermal cycle nondestructive testing, corrosion of detonator electrode and bridge-wire, and corrosion studies and fabrication of bridge-wire at Sigmund Cohn.

Richards, M.A.

1968-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Plasma plume MHD power generator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

Hammer, James H. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Cost estimate for muddy water palladium production facility at Mound  

SciTech Connect

An economic feasibility study was performed on the ''Muddy Water'' low-chlorine content palladium powder production process developed by Mound. The total capital investment and total operating costs (dollars per gram) were determined for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg in 1-kg increments. The report includes a brief description of the Muddy Water process, the process flow diagram, and material balances for the various production batch sizes. Two types of facilities were evaluated--one for production of new, ''virgin'' palladium powder, and one for recycling existing material. The total capital investment for virgin facilities ranged from $600,000 --$1.3 million for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg, respectively. The range for recycle facilities was $1--$2.3 million. The total operating cost for 100% acceptable powder production in the virgin facilities ranged from $23 per gram for a 1-kg production batch size to $8 per gram for a 10-kg batch size. Similarly for recycle facilities, the total operating cost ranged from $34 per gram to $5 per gram. The total operating cost versus product acceptability (ranging from 50%--100% acceptability) was also evaluated for both virgin and recycle facilities. Because production sizes studied vary widely and because scale-up factors are unknown for batch sizes greater than 1 kg, all costs are ''order-of-magnitude'' estimates. All costs reported are in 1987 dollars.

McAdams, R.K.

1988-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NETL: Emissions Characterization - TVA Cumberland Plant Plume...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumberland Power Plant Plume Study Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission reductions at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Cumberland fossil plant (CUF) at Cumberland City, Tennessee will...

93

Monsanto/Mound Laboratory Engineering Development of Tritium-Handling Systems  

SciTech Connect

Mound Laboratory (Mound) has, during the past four years, been actively involved in the development of methods to contain and control tritium during its processing and to recover it from waste streams. Initial bench-scale research was directed mainly toward removal of tritium from gaseous effluent streams and from laboratory liquid wastes. The gaseous effluent investigation has progressed through the developmental stage and has been implemented in routine operations. A test laboratory embodying many of the results of the research phase has been designed and construction has been completed. As the program at Mound has progressed, the scope of the effort has been expanded to include research concerned with handling not only gaseous tritium but also tritiated liquids. A program is presently under way to investigate the detritiation of aqueous wastes encountered in the fuel cycle of the commercial power reactor industry.

Bixel, J. C.; Lamberger, P. H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Spatial Trends and Factors of Pimple Mound Formation in East-Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pimple mounds are circular to elliptical domes with basal diameters ranging from 3 to more than 30 m, and heights of 30 cm to more than 2 m above intermound levels. For almost two centuries, the origin of these features has been speculated upon by scientists without general consensus as to one of over 30 different mechanisms suggested for their origin. These soil microfeatures can be observed throughout portions of East Texas as well as Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri. Pimple mounds have been extensively mapped throughout East Texas as complexes covering over 1.0 million ha in 47 soil survey areas. About 600,000 ha are on Pleistocene-age geological formations. This study focused on 5,500 ha in Leon County, Texas, mapped as Rader-Derly complex and Derly-Rader complex. Rader (Aquic Paleustalfs) is on mounds and Derly (Typic Glossaqualfs) in the low intermounds. These soils are mapped primarily on terraces of the Trinity River system within the survey area. Using elevation levels published for the various fluviatile terrace deposits of the Trinity River, six groups (five terrace level groups and an upland group) were identified for analysis of mounds within the study area. Processes and factors of soil formation during the life of these features were considered using two methods ? remotely sensed elevation data and sampling data collected in the field. Size, shape, and relief of mounds were analyzed using airborne-based, remotely sensed LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation data. Particle size distributions and pedon descriptions of mounds formed on materials of various ages were compared across the study area with special emphasis given to spatial trends. Analyses indicate a fluvial origin with pimple mound orientation corresponding to surrounding ridge and swale features of the paleoriver. Pimple mounds within the study area formed in the presence of sandy to loamy alluvial sediments and require the presence of accretionary ridge microtopography over point bar deposits. This alluvial parent material and topography were further developed by fluctuations in climate and vegetation over time. The erosional influence of bioturbation by animals and the intense rainfall and flood events which frequent the study area provided an environment in which these soil microfeatures have developed and over time exhibit increased levels of pedogenesis.

Robinson, Chance

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Microbial community composition and biogeochemical processes in cold-water coral carbonate mounds in the Gulf of Cadiz, on the Moroccan margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bait Compared to an Individual Mound Treatment Engler 19 Evaluation of AllectusTM and Talstar Formulations and Diatomaceous Earth as Individual Mound Treatments for Red Imported Fire Ants Engler, Drees, Nester 32 Preliminary Assessment of 80% Spinosad (Entrust®) as an Individual Mound Drench Treatment

Gilli, Adrian

96

Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

Shackson, R.H.

1991-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

Mound Laboratory's Air Surveillance System  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive air surveillance system was developed. The system includes surveillance of the source, transport conditions, and concentration at the receptor sites. An unusual aspect of the system is the implementation of off-site sampling programs through local governmental agencies. Background levels of radioactivity are routinely determined.

Carfagno, D. G.

1974-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Simplified scheme or radioactive plume calculations  

SciTech Connect

A simplified mathematical scheme to estimate external whole-body $gamma$ radiation exposure rates from gaseous radioactive plumes was developed for the Rio Blanco Gas Field Nuclear Stimulation Experiment. The method enables one to calculate swiftly, in the field, downwind exposure rates knowing the meteorological conditions and $gamma$ radiation exposure rates measured by detectors positioned near the plume source. The method is straightforward and easy to use under field conditions without the help of mini-computers. It is applicable to a wide range of radioactive plume situations. It should be noted that the Rio Blanco experiment was detonated on May 17, 1973, and no seep or release of radioactive material occurred. (auth)

Gibson, T.A.; Montan, D.N.

1976-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

99

Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page C-1 Figure 1. T Building Rooms with Special ICs Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S07757 June 2011 Page C-2 T Building Rooms with Special ICs In addition to the ICs for the entire site, T Building has the following additional IC restrictions as described in the Parcel 6, 7, and 8 Record of Decision. 1. Prohibit the removal of concrete floor material in specified rooms of T Building (Figure 1) to off-site locations without prior approval from EPA, OEPA, and ODH. 2. Prohibit the penetration of concrete floors in specified rooms of T Building (Figure 1)

100

On the Transport of Buoyant Coastal Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of discharge conditions and shelf geometry on the transport of coastal plumes is studied with a fully nonlinear, primitive equation hydrodynamic model. The physical setting is an estuarine channel with a small discharge Rossby number. By ...

Felipe M. Pimenta; A. D. Kirwan Jr.; Pablo Huq

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

OZONE PRODUCTION IN URBAN PLUMES.  

SciTech Connect

Ozone levels observed during a field campaign in Houston were significantly higher than that observed in Phoenix or Philadelphia. An examination of the slope of O{sub x} versus NO{sub z} in the urban plumes shows that NO{sub x} is used 2 to 3 times more efficiently in Houston as compared with Phoenix and Philadelphia. Representative values of OPEx are 7-12, 3, and 4, in Houston, Phoenix, and Philadelphia. Aircraft observations have been used to calculate P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}). Values in Houston are significantly higher than in Phoenix and Philadelphia. We show that P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) is proportional to a VOC/NO{sub 2}-OH reactivity ratio. High values of P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) in Houston are due to emissions of reactive olefins from the ship channel region. It is significant that high values of P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) occur at NO{sub x} levels up to several 10's of ppb. Not only is the chemistry efficient but it will be long lasting. The occurrence of high NO{sub x} and high OPEx is fostered by the co-location of VOC and NO{sub x} sources in the Houston industrial areas.

KLEINMAN,L.

2001-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

FILES- COOLING TOWER PLUME MODELING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ladies and Gentlemen:? In the referenced letter, Progress Energy Carolinas, Inc. (PEC) noted that the input and output' files for the modeling analysis for cooling tower plumes would be provided under a separate cover. due to the requirements for native file submittal (see NRC RAI # 5.3.3.1-1 and PGN RAI # H-295). The purpose of this letter is to submit these calculation native files. The supplemental information contained in the files on the attached CD is provided to support the NRC's review of the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant Units 2 and 3 (HAR) Environmental Report (ER), but does not comply with the requirements for electronic submission in the NRC Guidance Document. The NRC staff requested the files be submitted in their native formats, required for utilization in the software employed to support the ER development. As discussed with the NRC's environmental project manager responsible for review of the HAR ER, the data provided on the attached CD are of a nature that is not easily convertible to PDF output files. Furthermore, PEC understands that converting the information to PDF output files; would not serve the underlying purpose of the submittal; i.e., to provide the raw, unprocessed data to enable reviewers to evaluate software used in the HAR application. Enclosure 1 provides a list of folders with the requested data files that are included on the attached CD (Attachment 5.3.3.1-1 SACTI Native Files). If you have any further questions, or need additional information, please contact Bob Kitchen at

Garry D. Mi Er

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

PlumeSat: A Micro-Satellite Based Plume Imagery Collection Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a technical approach to cost-effectively collect plume imagery of boosting targets using a novel micro-satellite based platform operating in low earth orbit (LEO). The plume collection Micro-satellite or PlueSat for short, will be capable of carrying an array of multi-spectral (UV through LWIR) passive and active (Imaging LADAR) sensors and maneuvering with a lateral divert propulsion system to different observation altitudes (100 to 300 km) and different closing geometries to achieve a range of aspect angles (15 to 60 degrees) in order to simulate a variety of boost phase intercept missions. The PlumeSat will be a cost effective platform to collect boost phase plume imagery from within 1 to 10 km ranges, resulting in 0.1 to 1 meter resolution imagery of a variety of potential target missiles with a goal of demonstrating reliable plume-to-hardbody handover algorithms for future boost phase intercept missions. Once deployed on orbit, the PlumeSat would perform a series phenomenology collection experiments until expends its on-board propellants. The baseline PlumeSat concept is sized to provide from 5 to 7 separate fly by data collects of boosting targets. The total number of data collects will depend on the orbital basing altitude and the accuracy in delivering the boosting target vehicle to the nominal PlumeSat fly-by volume.

Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Listings and Photos of Monitoring Wells and Seeps Listings and Photos of Monitoring Wells and Seeps This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page D-i Contents 1.0 Parcel 6, 7, and 8 Remedy Wells and Seeps ..................................................................... D-1 2.0 OU-1 (Parcel 9) Wells ....................................................................................................... D-6 3.0 Phase I Remedy Wells and Seeps ................................................................................... D-11 Figures Figure 1. Parcel 6, 7, and 8 Groundwater and Seep Monitoring Locations ............................... D-2 Figure 2. OU-1 wells.................................................................................................................. D-7

105

Analysis of Concentration Fluctuations from Lidar Observations of Atmospheric Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of nearly instantaneous vertical cross sections of power-plant plume concentrations obtained by both airborne and ground-based lidar systems for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Plume Model Validation and Development Project ...

W. S. Lewellen; R. I. Sykes

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hybrid Plume Dispersion Model (HPDM) Development and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hybrid Plume Dispersion Model (HPDM) was developed for application to tall stack plumes dispersing over nearly flat terrain. Emphasis is on convective and high-wind conditions. The meteorological component is based on observational and ...

Steven R. Hanna; Robert J. Paine

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Aerosol nucleation in coal-fired power-plant plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New-particle nucleation within coal-fired power-plant plumes can have large effects on particle number concentrations

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Spindown of Bottom-Trapped Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note considers the decay of a bottom-trapped freshwater plume after the causative freshwater inflow has ceased. It is shown that shortly after the low-density inflow stops, the barotropic pressure field that it created radiates away and the ...

Ricardo P. Matano; Elbio D. Palma

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Lidar Observations of Ship Spray Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Monterey Area Ship Track experiment, which was designed to study ship-generated cloud tracks, ship-based measurements were made by a gyroscopically stabilized scanning lidar system. This paper focuses on the spray plume observed by ...

William P. Hooper; Jeffrey E. James

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Lidar Observations of Aircraft Exhaust Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of field campaigns has been made at British airports using a rapid-scanning lidar and other instrumentation in order to measure the dispersion of exhaust plumes from commercial aircraft. The lidar operated at a wavelength of 355 nm and ...

Michael Bennett; Simon Christie; Angus Graham; David Raper

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Wind-Driven Motion of Estuarine Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of wind forcing on existing estuarine plumes in a coupled estuary-shelf environment is studied here using a three-dimensional primitive-equation model. The emphasis is on wide estuaries so that the Coriolis force cannot be ignored. ...

Shenn-Yu Chao

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Experimental Study of an Artificial Thermal Plume in the Boundary Layer. Part II: Some Aspects of the Plume Thermodynamical Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some aspects of the mean and turbulent structures of artificial thermal plumes in the boundary layer (BL) are presented. This analysis is based mainly on measurements with an instrumented aircraft. As initial conditions for plume rise, the ...

J. Noilhan; B. Bnech; G. Letrenne; A. Druilhet; A. Saab

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Plume Dispersion Simulation in Low-Wind Conditions Using Coupled Plume Segment and Gaussian Puff Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short-range diffusion experiments conducted at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in light-wind stable conditions have been simulated using a mathematical model that combines plume segment and Gaussian puff approaches. The model is shown to ...

Maithili Sharan; Anil Kumar Yadav; M. P. Singh

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Technical Review Report for the Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Addendum No. 1, through Revision b  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Review Report (TRR) documents the review, performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), on the 'Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Addendum No. 1, Revision b', dated May 2007 (Addendum 1). The Mound 1KW Package is certified by DOE Certificate of Compliance (CoC) number USA/9516/B(U)F-85 for the transportation of Type B quantities of plutonium heat source material. The safety analysis of the package is documented in the 'Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Mound 1KW Package' (i.e., the Mound 1KW SARP, or the SARP). Addendum 1 incorporates a new fueled capsule assembly payload. The following changes have been made to add this payload: (1) The primary containment vessel (PCV) will be of the same design, but will increase in height to 11.16 in.; (2) A new graphite support block will be added to support up to three fueled capsule assemblies per package; (3) The cutting groove height on the secondary containment vessel (SCV) will be heightened to accommodate the taller PCV; and (4) A 3.38 in. high graphite filler block will be placed on top of the PCV. All other packaging features, as described in the Mound 1KW SARP [3], remain unchanged. This report documents the LLNL review of Addendum 1[1]. The specific review for each SARP Chapter is documented herein.

DiSabatino, A; West, M; Hafner, R; Russell, E

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

Closure Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Closure Sites Closure Sites Closure Sites View a list of the compliance agreements for the many EM closure sites, such as Mound and Rocky Flats, below. Associated summaries are also included. Pinellas Remediation Agreement Pinellas Remediation Agreement Summary Maxey Flats Consent Decree -Part 1, April 18, 1996 Maxey Flats Consent Decree -Part 2, April 18, 1996 Maxey Flats Consent Decree April 18, 1996 Summary Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988 Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988 Summary Battelle Columbus Laboratories Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Battelle Columbus Laboratories Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary Fernald Environmental Management Project Consent Agreement and Final Order,

116

A Summary Review of Mound Laboratory's Experience in D & D of Radioactive Facilities 1949-1973  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Mound Laboratory's Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) projects has been the effective termination of radioactive material processing facilities with no significant personnel exposures or environmental releases. This objective must be met with available resources and manpower. Mound has effectively decontaminated and/or decommissioned four major facilities in the 1949 through 1973 time period. Many minor areas were also decontaminated and/or decommissioned during this period. The major D & D projects involved the following isotopes: polonium-210, radium-226, actinium-227, and plutonium-238. To achieve a D & D status, Mound has employed several control and decontamination techniques such as: "Navy Cocooning", entombment, removal, foaming, bagging, tents, chutes, portable exhausters, dry ice, vents, bubble suits, three-zones, fire watches, painting and sealing, in-line cleaning, high pressure water blaster, and chemical cleaning.

Garner, J. M.; Davis, W. P.

1974-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

NSA-Beaver Pond Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) The storage tent and gas collectors NSA-BP site looking to the east. Visible is the investigator hut on drier land to the west and the boardwalk leading out to the tower site in the right portion of the image with the mounded beaver lodge visible in the middle of the image. The bridge and the 3 meter flux tower The beaver lodge The bridge from the flux tower This is the floating bridge leading from the flux tower back to the shore. The large tent for holding equipment is clearly visible on the shore. The TGB gas collectors on the beaver pond Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos

118

Mounds Builders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of stone -- axes, war clubs, spearheads, arrowheads and pipes -- there were small brass kettles, iron tomahawks, steel knives and silver ornaments that Indians did not have...

119

Studies on Mathematical Models for Characterizing Plume and Drift Behavior from Cooling Towers, Volume 2: Mathematical Model for Sin gle Source (Single Tower) Cooling Tower Plume Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presents an improved model for plumes from single natural-draft cooling towers. This model is expanded to treat multiple tower plumes in Volume 4.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Audit of the Department of Energy's Grant for Economic Development at the Mound Plant, ER-B-97-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL AUDIT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S GRANT FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AT THE MOUND PLANT The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the Internet at the following alternative addresses:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mixing and Plume Penetration Depth at the Groundwater Table  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of the near-source physical behavior of contaminant plumes is crucial in estimating the effects of contaminant releases on a groundwater resource. This report provides a literature review of near-source plume mixing, which results from land disposal of wastes, accidental spills, or chemical leaks. Both solute and nonaqueous phase liquid plumes are reviewed to provide utilities with information pertinent to their waste disposal operations.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Infrared Imagery Applied to A Large Buoyant Plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of applying infrared imagery to the study of a large, hot plume materialized by carbon particles resulting from the incomplete combustion of fuel oil is investigated.

J-M. Brustet; B. Benech; P. Waldteufel

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Change Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage,Probability of Injected Carbon Dioxide Plumes Encounteringthe probability of injected carbon dioxide encountering and

Jordan, P.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Algorithms and analysis for underwater vehicle plume tracing.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research was to develop and demonstrate cooperative 3-D plume tracing algorithms for miniature autonomous underwater vehicles. Applications for this technology include Lost Asset and Survivor Location Systems (L-SALS) and Ship-in-Port Patrol and Protection (SP3). This research was a joint effort that included Nekton Research, LLC, Sandia National Laboratories, and Texas A&M University. Nekton Research developed the miniature autonomous underwater vehicles while Sandia and Texas A&M developed the 3-D plume tracing algorithms. This report describes the plume tracing algorithm and presents test results from successful underwater testing with pseudo-plume sources.

Byrne, Raymond Harry; Savage, Elizabeth L. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Hurtado, John Edward (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Eskridge, Steven E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

EVALUATION OF NATURAL AND IN-SITU REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR A COAL-RELATED METALS PLUME  

SciTech Connect

Metals contamination exceeding drinking water standards (MCLs) is associated with acidic leachate generated from a coal pile runoff basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The metals plume extends over 100 acres with its' distal boundary about onehalf mile from the Savannah River. Based on the large plume extent and high dissolved iron and aluminum concentrations, conventional treatment technologies are likely to be ineffective and cost prohibitive. In-situ bioremediation using existing groundwater microbes is being evaluated as a promising alternative technology for effective treatment, along with consideration of natural attenuation of the lower concentration portions of the plume to meet remedial goals. Treatment of the high concentration portion of the groundwater plume by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is being evaluated through laboratory microcosm testing and a field-scale demonstration. Organic substrates are added to promote SRB growth. These bacteria use dissolved sulfate as an electron acceptor and ultimately precipitate dissolved metals as metal sulfides. Laboratory microcosm testing indicate SRB are present in groundwater despite low pH conditions, and that their growth can be stimulated by soybean oil and sodium lactate. The field demonstration consists of substrate injection into a 30-foot deep by 240-foot long permeable trench. Microbial activity is demonstrated by an increase in pH from 3 to 6 within the trench. Downgradient monitoring will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of SRB in reducing metal concentrations. Natural attenuation (NA) is being evaluated for the low concentration portion of the plume. A decrease in metal mobility can occur through a variety of abiotically and/or biotically mediated mechanisms. Quantification of these mechanisms is necessary to more accurately predict contaminant attenuation using groundwater transport models that have historically relied on simplified conservative assumptions. Result s from matched soil/porewater samples indicate higher soil/water partition coefficients (Kds) with increasing distance from the source. In addition, site-specific metals availability is being assessed using sequential extraction techniques, which more accurately represent environmental conditions as compared to default EPA extraction methods. Due to elevated sulfate levels in the plume, SRB are most likely to be the dominant biotic contributor to NA processes.

Ross, Jeffrey A.; Bayer, Cassandra L.; Socha, Ronald P.; Sochor,Cynthia S.; Fliermans, Carl B.; McKinsey, Pamela C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Phifer, Mark A.; Powell, Kimberly R.; Serkiz, Steven M.; Sappington, Frank C.; Turick, Charles E.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Infrared optical properties of diesel smoke plumes  

SciTech Connect

Far IR optical properties have been measured for smoke from diesel fires. Concentrations of both gaseous and particulate combustion products have been measured and chemical species contributing to the optical effects identified. To obtain these results, a variety of sampling instruments were lofted into large plumes on a mobile and open structure. The smoke plumes of diesel fires have been found to consist largely of carbonaceous material (in fibrous form) and heavy liquid hydrocarbons infused with the expected gaseous products of the combustion process. Strong attenuation at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m is found to be due largely to the carbonaceous aerosol. The absorption coefficient is typically {similar to}500 km{sup {minus}1} at 10 m from the source with a variable but often comparable total scattering coefficient. The extinction coefficient, normalized to the mass density of the aerosol in a unit volume of space, is found to be 1.2 m{sup 2}-g{sup {minus}1} with an estimated variance of 20%. Fluctuational spectra of the attenuation follow a form similar to turbulence spectra.

Bruce, C.W.; Crow, S.B.; Yee, Y.P.; Hinds, B.D. (U.S. Army Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory, White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico 88002 (US)); Marlin, D. (New Mexico State University, Physical Science Department, University Park, New Mexico 88003); Jelinek, A. (Optimetrics, Inc., 106 E. Idaho, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88001)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Plume Rise from Stacks with Scrubbers: A State-of-the-Art Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of the art of predicting plume rise from stacks with scrubbers is evaluated critically. The significant moisture content of the scrubbed plume upon exit leads to important thermodynamic effects during plume rise that are unaccounted for ...

Michael Schatzman; Anthony J. Policastro

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

SCICHEM: A New Generation Plume-in-Grid Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If plume dispersion and chemistry in air quality models are not accurately simulated, those models may over-predict both ozone produced by large elevated point source NOx emissions and ozone reduction when those emissions are decreased. The plume-in-grid (PiG) model developed in this project succeeds in simulating these processes more realistically than in existing regulatory models.

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

Analysis of Plume Rise Data from Five TVA Steam Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large data set containing the measurements of the rise of plumes emitted by five TVA steam plants was examined. Particular attention was paid to the problem of the merging of the plumes emitted by adjacent stacks and to the role played by the ...

Domenico Anfossi

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Simulation of a mannequin's thermal plume in a small room  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation results are presented for the buoyancy-driven flow in a small room containing a seated mannequin that is maintained at a constant temperature. The study was motivated, in part, by a published experimental study of the thermal plume around ... Keywords: Heated mannequin, Lattice Boltzmann method, Particle trajectories, Small room, Thermal plume

Xinli Jia; John B. Mclaughlin; Jos Derksen; Goodarz Ahmadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes Speaker(s): Pierre S. Farrugia Date: November 18, 2010 - 12:05pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Lorenzetti Thermal plumes have been widely investigated in a variety of scenarios, including natural convection and stratified environments. The resulting theory may be used to predict ventilation flow rates in, for example, natural and displacement ventilation, and under-floor air distribution (UFAD) systems. However, there has been little effort in investigating how uniform upward flows affect the plume velocity, rate of growth, and thermal profile. Such situations can arise if, for example, the diffusers of a UFAD system are evenly distributed. In order to study such situations, analytical expressions for the velocity and temperature profiles of a plume

132

Stochastic mapping for chemical plume source localization with application to autonomous hydrothermal vent discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a stochastic mapping framework for autonomous robotic chemical plume source localization in environments with multiple sources. Potential applications for robotic chemical plume source localization ...

Jakuba, Michael Vavrousek, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, 625 Indiana Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20004-2901 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Baseline review of three groundwater plumes  

SciTech Connect

During the closeout session, members of the technical assistance team conveyed to the site how impressed they were at the thoroughness of the site's investigation and attempts at remediation. Team members were uniformly pleased at the skilled detection work to identify sources, make quick remediation decisions, and change course when a strategy did not work well. The technical assistance team also noted that, to their knowledge, this is the only DOE site at which a world-class scientist has had primary responsibility for the environmental restoration activities. This has undoubtedly contributed to the successes observed and DOE should take careful note. The following overall recommendations were agreed upon: (1) The site has done a phenomenal job of characterization and identifying and removing source terms. (2) Technologies selected to date are appropriate and high impact, e.g. collection trenches are an effective remedial strategy for this complicated geology. The site should continue using technology that is adapted to the site's unique geology, such as the collection trenches. (3) The site should develop a better way to determine the basis of cleanup for all sites. (4) The sentinel well system should be evaluated and modified, if needed, to assure that the sentinel wells provide coverage to the current site boundary. Potential modifications could include installation, abandonment or relocation of wells based on the large amount of data collected since the original sentinel well system was designed. (5) Modeling to assist in remedial design and communication should continue. (6) The site should develop a plan to ensure institutional memory. (7) The most likely possibility for improving closure to 2006 is by removing the residual source of the Old Town plume and establishing the efficacy of remediation for the 51/64 plume.

Hazen, Terry; et al.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Toy to the World: Savannah River Site Celebrates 21 Years of Bringing Joy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Toy to the World: Savannah River Site Celebrates 21 Years of Toy to the World: Savannah River Site Celebrates 21 Years of Bringing Joy to Kids Toy to the World: Savannah River Site Celebrates 21 Years of Bringing Joy to Kids December 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis An elf from DOE's Savannah River Site poses with Santa Claus, who holds a bike, one of the more than 14,200 toys federal employees and contractors donated to the U.S. Marine Toys for Tots Program. Mounds of bikes and other donated toys for the program can be seen in the background. An elf from DOE's Savannah River Site poses with Santa Claus, who holds a bike, one of the more than 14,200 toys federal employees and contractors donated to the U.S. Marine Toys for Tots Program. Mounds of bikes and other donated toys for the program can be seen in the background.

136

MLM-462 Contract Number AT-33-l-GtiN-53 MOUND LABORATCRY Operatsd By  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

This Doeumr;t Consists of 116 ?zges This Doeumr;t Consists of 116 ?zges This is COPY of i.3 k MLM-462 Contract Number AT-33-l-GtiN-53 MOUND LABORATCRY Operatsd By MONSAmOC~ALGoMPANY MIAMISBURG, OHIO REPORT NO. 3 OF STIEUING CaW'M'B FOR DISPUSAL CF UNITS 111 AND IV (Completion Report for Disposal of UrLt IV, Runnymeade Road sr,d Dixon live. Dayton, Ohlo) . Date: April 17, 1950 Prepared By: -36L254- F. L. Halbach Chairnan., St33ricg Gcicmittes 1ssue.d: DISTRIHJTION copy 1. - Dr. Carroll A. Hochwalt copy 2. - Dr. M. M. Haring copy 3. - Dr. J. J. Ehmbage COPY 4. - Mr. F. L. Halbach . - Copy 5. - 5 '3 . . ., I Copy 6. - Area Ahmger COPY 7. - Area Y@mger CWY 8. - Area Qinagsr copy 9. - Area Ydager CT -Files&?& d3i' V.-u c 4. copy 11. - Central Files i copy 12. - Central Files

137

Composite Structure of Plumes in Stratus-topped Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of convective plumes within the clear convective boundary layer (CBL) is quite advanced owing to direct measurements, tank experiments, and large-eddy simulation studies. As a result, modeling of the CBL is relatively successful. ...

Chin-Hoh Moeng; Ulrich Schumann

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Behavior of buoyant moist plumes in turbulent atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A widely applicable computational model of buoyant moist plumes in turbulent atmospheres has been constructed. To achieve this a one dimensional Planetary Boundary Layer (P.B.L.) model has been developed to account for ...

Hamza, Redouane

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Agent-based chemical plume tracing using fluid dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a rigorous evaluation of a novel, distributed chemical plume tracing algorithm. The algorithm is a combination of the best aspects of the two most popular predecessors for this task. Furthermore, it is based on solid, formal principles ...

Dimitri Zarzhitsky; Diana Spears; David Thayer; William Spears

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Effects of Rotation on Convective Plumes from Line Segment Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of rotation on finite-length line plumes are studied with a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic numerical model. Geophysical convection with this source geometry occurs, for example, as the result of fissure releases of hot hydrothermal ...

J. W. Lavelle; D. C. Smith IV

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Instantaneous Spread of Plumes in the Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data are presented from two recent tracer campaigns regarding relative diffusion of surface-level plumes. One study consists of tests performed amid flat, rural terrain near Galen, Montana, while other experiments were conducted above a poplar ...

Holly Peterson; Dione Mazzolini; Susan ONeill; Brian Lamb

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

User's Manual: Cooling-Tower-Plume Prediction Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities planning to build generating plants that use evaporative cooling are required to estimate potential seasonal and annual environmental effects of cooling-tower plumes. An easy-to-use computerized method is now available for making such estimates.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Impact of offshore winds on a buoyant river plume system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Idealized numerical simulations utilizing the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) are carried out to examine the response of buoyant river plume systems to offshore directed wind stresses. It is found that after a few inertial periods of wind ...

Joseph T. Jurisa; Robert J. Chant

144

Fractal Geometry of Isoconcentration Surfaces in a Smoke Plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fractal properties of isoconcentration surfaces in a smoke plume are studied in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel. Instantaneous high-resolution two-dimensional images of the fine particle concentration at Schmidt number Sc ? ? were ...

Alexander A. Praskovsky; Walter F. Dabberdt; Eleanor A. Praskovskaya; Walter G. Hoydysh; Oleh Holynskyj

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Dynamic balances within tropical plumes in a global barotropic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tropical plumes are a common synoptic scale feature over the Eastern Pacific associated with subtropical jet and ITCZ intensifications. Because of data sparseness, operational analysis has yielded little information of the details of the tropical plume formation process. Tropical plumes have been simulated in a global 200 mb shallow water model with a realistic basic state (Blackwell 1990). Diagnostic budgets were calculated based on model output for absolute vorticity, divergence, and kinetic energy. Also, the movement of the zero absolute vorticity isopleth during plume formation is examined. This information is compared for cases with plume formation, without plume formation, and the basic state. Budget results indicate the convergent forcing center, when located near a strong absolute vorticity gradient, creates an equatorial Rossby wave source. This source generates a large scale, quasi-stationary equatorial Rossby wave which, if located near the ambient eastern Pacific trough, strengthens this trough into the tropics. As the trough strengthens, it displaces the vorticity gradient equatorward into the cmvergence forcing region. This vorticity gradient encroaches upon the forcing region and creates a second Rossby wave source. This generates a second, smaller scale Rossby wave which propagates to the northeast along the axis of strong vorticity gradient. This Rossby wave is highly divergent in nature, due to the model's small Rossby radius of deformation. The accompanying train of convergence/divergence centers distorts the potential trough to create significant cross contour flow, which accelerates the subtropical jet to the east of the trough, resulting in a tropical plume. This study indicates the Rossby wave and accompanying cross contour and ageostrophic flow adequately explain the formation of all three key tropical plume features.

Vest, Gerry Wilson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

State of Knowledge on Mercury Chemistry in Power Plant Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical transformations may occur in the flue gas plume of coal-fired power plants (CFPP) that convert reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) into gaseous elemental mercury (GEM). Since the chemical form of inorganic Hg determines its solubility in water and therefore its deposition rate, understanding this chemistry has important implications for emission control. This fact sheet summarizes the state-of-knowledge of mercury chemistry, kinetics, and thermodynamics in CFPP plumes.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

Propulsion research on the hybrid plume rocket  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the construction of a tandem mirror plasma propulsion facility, the numerical modelling of the hybrid plume exhaust, and rf heating of the plasma. A preliminary experiment of the ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) heating of plasma ions was carried out. For 2.0 kW ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) power injected into the central cell and 10 kW ICRH power into the end cell, the results obtained from the probe in the central cell are: n{sub e} = 2.5 {times} 10{sup 16} m{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} = 80 eV (928,000 K) in the central cell. The estimated values in the end cell are: n{sub I} = 1.25 {times} 10{sup 17} m{sup {minus}3} and T{sub I} = 500 eV (5,797,000 K). The power conversion efficiency was about 80%. The results from time dependent 3-D three fluid numerical modeling indicate that a boundary layer can be formed. The formation of this layer is strongly dependent on neutral jet geometry and injection angle. The ICRH heating of plasma was modeled numerically and power absorption efficiency is about 50%. Analytical analyses was done on slab geometry. 12 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

Chang-Diaz, F.R. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (USA). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center); Yang, T.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Plasma Fusion Center)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Integration of Predicted Atmospheric Contaminant Plumes into ArcView GIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) plays a key role in emergency response scenarios in which there may be a release of atmospheric chemical or radiological contamination at the DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). Meteorologists at SRNL use a variety of tools to predict the path of the plume and levels of contamination along the path. These predictions are used to guide field teams that take sample measurements for verification. Integration of these predicted plumes as well as field measurements into existing Geographic Information System (GIS) interactive maps provides key additional information for decision makers during an emergency. In addition, having this information in GIS format facilitates sharing the information with other agencies that use GIS. In order to be useful during an emergency, an application for converting predictions or measurements into GIS format must be automated and simple to use. Thus, a key design goal in developing such applications is ease of use. Simple menu selections and intuitive forms with graphical user interfaces are used to accomplish this goal. Applications have been written to convert two different predictive code results into ArcView GIS. Meteorologists at SRNL use the Puff/Plume code, which is tied to real-time wind data, to predict the direction and spread of the atmospheric plume for early assessment. The calculated circular puffs are converted into an ArcView polygon shapefile with attributes for predicted time, dose, and radius of the puff. The meteorologists use the more sophisticated Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) to predict particle dispersion and deposition. The calculational grid is brought into ArcView as a point shapefile and then interpolated to ARC GRID format using Spatial Analyst. This GRID can then be contoured into a line shapefile, which is easily shared with other agencies. The deposition grid is also automatically contoured for values that correspond to FDA Derived Intervention Levels for beef, produce, and dairy products. Decision makers at SRS routinely use these predicted plumes to direct field teams. In the case of a strong release, this information can be used to decide whether to evacuate a particular area. Having this information in GIS format may aid the decision maker because other infrastructure information can be overlaid with geographic reference.

Koffman, Larry D.

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

Oppenheim, Antoni K. (Kensington, CA); Maxson, James A. (Berkeley, CA); Hensinger, David M. (Albany, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

Oppenheim, A.K.; Maxson, J.A.; Hensinger, D.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure. 24 figures.

Oppenheim, A.K.; Maxson, J.A.; Hensinger, D.M.

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Doppler lidar observations of Russian forest fire plumes over Helsinki  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Russia led to elevated concentrations of fine particles reducing air quality in southern Finland over a number of weeks. Predominately easterly and south-easterly winds resulted in smoke plumes extending over the Gulf of Finland and affecting eastern and southern Finland during 714 August 2006 and 2123 August 2006. This article describes observations using Doppler lidar of two episodes where smoke plumes from the Russian forest fires were evident over the Helsinki area on 7 and 9 August 2006. The observations were made during a convective field campaign, part of the Helsinki Testbed, an international mesoscale meteorology research project running from

K E Bozier; G N Pearson; C G Collier; Halo Photonics

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A 10-Year Climatology of Northern Hemisphere Tropical Cloud Plumes and Their Composite Flow Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-year cool season climatology of tropical cloud plumes in the Northern Hemisphere was generated by visual inspection of infrared satellite imagery. The sample included 1062 plume events during the months of October to May for the years 1974 ...

Haig Iskenderian

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Some Turbulence and Diffusion Parameter Estimates within Cooling Tower Plumes Derived from Sodar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature and velocity fluctuations within a cooling tower plume in stable conditions at the Keystone power plant in Pennsylvania have been measured by use of a calibrated sodar. Monostatic and bistatic systems probed the plume at several ...

R. L. Coulter; K. H. Underwood

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Wednesday, 24 November 2010...

157

Observations of Silver Iodide Plumes over the Grand Mesa of Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of wintertime airborne tracing experiments was examined to determine some characteristics of the plumes of silver iodide smoke released either from the ground or from an aircraft over the Grand Mesa of Colorado. The plumes were ...

Edmond W. Holroyd III; Jack T. McPartland; Arlin B. Super

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Comparison of Results from a Meandering-Plume Model with Measured Atmospheric Tracer Concentration Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured wind-azimuth data are used in a simple meandering-plume model to predict observed SF6 concentration fluctuations measured downwind of a point source during a range of stability conditions. The meander component of plume diffusion is ...

Holly Peterson; Brian Lamb

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Stress on the Mediterranean Outflow Plume: Part II. Turbulent Dissipation and Shear Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom and interfacial stresses on the Mediterranean outflow plume are estimated using vertical profiles of turbulent dissipation and velocity collected in the Gulf of Cadiz. Turbulent dissipation is high throughout the plume, with a local ...

Gregory C. Johnson; Rolf G. Lueck; Thomas B. Sanford

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Application of a Mini Unmanned Aircraft System for In Situ Monitoring of Fire Plume Thermodynamic Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct measurements of wildland fire plume properties are rare because of difficult access to regions near the fire front and plume. Moisture released from combustion, in addition to added heat, can enhance buoyancy and convection, influencing ...

Caroline M. Kiefer; Craig B. Clements; Brian E. Potter

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 15 detected in the non-oil contaminated samples. The alkBappeared to be dominant in all oil plume samples (Fig. S2).signal intensities. All oil plume samples clustered together

Lu, Z.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-22 CHARACTERISTICS OF THE OSWECO RIVER PLUME AND ITS INFLUENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Mohawk Steam Station flow and sampling periods during 1972. Configuration of plume and specific conductance of plume and specific conductance at surface, 22 June. Surface temperature distribution, 22 June to the thermocline, 22 June. Mean area1 distribution of plume. Results based on specific conductance and expressed

163

Electrical resistivity imaging of conductive plume dilution in fractured rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was injected into an injection well for 34 days to dilute a pre-existing potassium chloride (KCl) plume was conducted between the injection well and each of seven surrounding monitoring wells. Polar plots of the injection-well resistivity data in the direction of each monitoring well delineate specific locations where

Binley, Andrew

164

Dependence of a Plume Heat Budget upon Lateral Advection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure and heat budget of a plume created by a linear heat source is investigated, demonstrating their dependence upon the larger-scale cross-source flow. A large-eddy model simulates individual thermal eddies produced by a source 200 m ...

John W. Glendening

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Starting laminar plumes: Comparison of laboratory and numerical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, F-91405 Orsay, France Peter E. van Keken Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1005, USA (keken@umich.edu) Angela Limare Institut de Physique du Globe, UMR. In the laboratory experiments the plumes are started in a nearly isoviscous silicone oil with heat supplied through

van Keken, Peter

166

Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale Zero-valent Iron Angela Athey Advisers: Dr. Reyes Undergraduate Student Fellowship Program April 15, 2011 #12;Main Sources of Uranium Natural · Leaching from(IV) (UO2[s], uraninite) Anthropogenic · Release of mill tailings during uranium mining - Mobilization

Cushing, Jim. M.

167

--No Title--  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mound Advanced Technology Center (MATC) is a business and scientific technology park at the Mound Site. MATC site - http:mound.com More Information on Economic Development at...

168

Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

170

Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

Cassini detection of Enceladus's cold water-group plume ionosphere  

SciTech Connect

This study reports direct detection by the Cassini plasma spectrometer of freshly-produced water-group ions (O{sup +}, OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}) and heavier water dimer ions (H{sub x}O{sub 2}{sup +}) very close to Enceladus and where the plasma begins to emerge from the Enceladus plume The data wcre obtained during two close (52 and 25 km) flybys of Enceladus in 2008, and are similar to ion data in cometary comas. The ions are observed in detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction at energies consistent with the Cassini speed, indicating a nearly stagnant plasma flow in the plume. North of Enceladus the plasma slowing commences about 4 to 6 Enceladus radii away, while south of Enccladus signatures ofthe interaction are detected as far as 22 Enceladus radii away.

Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomsen, Michelle F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Robert J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, R E [UNIV OF VIRGINIA; Young, D T [SWRI; Crary, F J [SWRI; Coates, A J [MSSL; Jones, G H [MSSL; Paty, C S [GIT

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system is provided. The laser weld plume control device includes a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity; the upper surface of the body circumscribes the base of the cone cavity, and the vertex of the cone cavity forms an orifice concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. According to the method of the invention, gas is directed radially inward through inlets in the upper surface of the body into and through channels in the wall of the body and finally through the orifice of the body, and downward onto the surface of the weldment. The gas flow is then converted by the orifice of the device from radial flow to an axisymmetric gas jet flowing away from the weldment surface in a direction perpendicular to the surface and opposite to that of the laser.

Fuerschbach, Phillip W. (Tijeras, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Oberkampf, William L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system is provided. The laser weld plume control device is provided as a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity, the upper surface of the body circumscribing the base of the cone cavity, the vertex of the cavity forming an orifice which converts the flow of gas, directed through inlets in the upper surface of the body through channels in the wall of the body, from radial flow to an axisymmetric gas jet perpendicular to the surface of the weldment in a direction opposite to the direction of the laser beam. The orifice of the control device is concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. 6 figs.

Fuerschbach, P.W.; Jellison, J.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Oberkampf, W.L.

1989-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

174

Laboratory-Scale Simulation of Spiral Plumes in Fluid with Hight Ptandtl Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally investigated the appearance of a plumes from local hot spot and study its interaction with cellular flow in closed cavity filled by silicon oil with Prandtl number Pr ~2*10^3 . Convective plume is generated by a local heat source, located on the top of the small rubber cylinder, which is located in the center of the bottom of the rectangular cell. Green laser has been used to simulate the hot-spot. Roll-type large-scale convective flow is generated by heating of the one vertical sides of cavity. Influence of power of hot point on the shape of plume has been investigated. It is shown that the presence of cellular convective motion may lead to the formation of a strange spiral convective plume. This plume looks like Archimedes spiral replaced on vertical plane. Physical mechanism of the formation of strange spiral plume and application of obtained results for mantle convection problems are discussed.

Sharifulin, A N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Project Trinidad: explosive excavation of railroad cuts 2 and 3 by mounding and directed blasting. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives, design, and results of two explosive excavation experiments performed as the final phase of Project Trinidad, a comprehensive series of tests to determine the cratering properties of interbedded sandstones and shales, are summarized. The experiments were performed in September 1971 by the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Explosive Excavation Research Laboratory. These final experiments were designed to excavate through- cuts for relocation of the Colorado and Wyoming Railroad at the Trinidad Dam and Lake Project. The first of the two experiments tested a charge array designed to break up material within a 19,000-yd/sup 3/ cut to facilitate later removal of the material by mechanical means. The concept tested was mounding, a blasting technique in which charges are positioned with respect to the horizontal ground surface rather than a vertical bench face. The results from this experiment confirmed the applicability of empirical scaling methods to the design of an array of deeply buried charges. The second experiment was a directed blasting detonation that was designed to produce a 30.000-yd/sup 3/ throughcut by cratering. This experiment tested a charge array design that had been developed by a combination of empirical scaling and kinematical methods. (auth)

Lattery, J.E.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mercury Reactions in Power Plant Plumes: Pleasant Prairie Experiment and Compliance Scenario Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent technical results indicate that divalent mercury emitted from power plants may rapidly transform to elemental mercury within power plant plumes. Simulations of mercury plume reduction based on these results have improved regional model fits with wet deposition data for particular years, while maintaining model-data fits for remaining archive years. Determining speciation changes occurring in a dispersing stack plume is essential for properly estimating atmospheric mercury fate and deposition patte...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Research on the Flow Pattern of Bubble Plume in an Aeration Tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow pattern of gas?liquid two?phase flow in an aeration tank is of critical effect upon mass transfer by the convection. Bubble plume provides unsteadily fluctuating two?phase flow during the aeration. This paper the study on the unsteady structure of bubble plume is dealt with from experiment. The time?serial bubble plume images of different cases in tank have been analyzed. The RCC?PIV has been employed to calculate the velocities in those cases

W. H. Liu; T. Wan; W. Cheng; Yuichi Murai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

180

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Low Impact Soil Sites' and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Closure activities were conducted from February through April 2009 according to the FFACO (1996; as amended February 2008) and Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 107 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2009). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities are summarized.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

Lindley, R.A. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Spout Formation in a Gas-Stirred LadleThe Key to Plume ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... TMS Student Member price: 10.00 ... The model reveals that, beyond the vicinity of the gas injector, various plume parameters in different...

183

Remedial evaluation of a UST site impacted with chlorinated hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During assessment and remedial planning of an underground storage tank (UST) site, it was discovered that chlorinated hydrocarbons were present. A network of selected wells were sampled for analysis of halogenated volatile organics and volatile organic compounds to determine the extent of constituents not traditionally associated with refined petroleum motor fuel products. The constituents detected included vinyl chloride, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), bromodichloromethane, and 2-chloroethylvinyl ether. These analytical data were evaluated as to what effect the nonpetroleum hydrocarbon constituents may have on the remedial approach utilized the site hydrogeologic properties to its advantage and took into consideration the residential nature of the impacted area. The geometry of the dissolved plume is very flat and broad, emanating from the site and extending downgradient under a residential area situated in a transmissive sand unit. Ground-water pumping was proposed from two areas of the dissolved plume including five wells pumping at a combined rate of 55 gallons per minute (gpm) at a downgradient position, and two wells on-site to remove free product and highly impacted ground water. Also, to assist in remediation of the dissolved plume and to control vapors, a bioventing system was proposed throughout the plume area.

Ilgner, B.; Rainey, E. (Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Ball, M.; Schutt, M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effect of a plume reduction in segmented electrode Hall thruster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A segmented electrode, which is placed at the thruster exit, is shown to affect thruster operation in several ways, whether the electrode produce low emission current or no emission current, although there appear to be advantages to the more emissive segmented electrode. Measured by plume divergence, the performance of Hall thruster operation, even with only one power supply, can approach or surpass that of non segmented operation over a range of parameter regimes, including the low gas rate regime. This allows the flexibility in operation of segmented electrode thrusters in variable thrust regimes.

Raitses, Y.; Dorf, L.A.; Livak, A.A.; Fisch, N.J.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

185

Measuring and Modeling Fault Density for Plume-Fault Encounter Probability Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission of carbon dioxide from fossil-fueled power generation stations contributes to global climate change. Storage of this carbon dioxide within the pores of geologic strata (geologic carbon storage) is one approach to mitigating the climate change that would otherwise occur. The large storage volume needed for this mitigation requires injection into brine-filled pore space in reservoir strata overlain by cap rocks. One of the main concerns of storage in such rocks is leakage via faults. In the early stages of site selection, site-specific fault coverages are often not available. This necessitates a method for using available fault data to develop an estimate of the likelihood of injected carbon dioxide encountering and migrating up a fault, primarily due to buoyancy. Fault population statistics provide one of the main inputs to calculate the encounter probability. Previous fault population statistics work is shown to be applicable to areal fault density statistics. This result is applied to a case study in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Basin with the result that the probability of a carbon dioxide plume from a previously planned injection had a 3% chance of encountering a fully seal offsetting fault.

Jordan, P.D.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Nicot, J.-P.

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

GIS and plume dispersion modeling for population exposure assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Pollutant Plume Dispersion Models is widespread in the evaluation of point sources of air pollution. These models provide valuable insight into the concentration and dispersion of hazardous materials throughout the atmosphere. Traditional methods of dispersion modeling for the permitting of new sources and the monitoring of existing sources have allowed much room for error in terms of the effect of the pollutants on nearby populations (Hardikar, 1995). The capabilities of GIS technology offer an improved method of conducting air quality modeling for permitting, remediation studies, and environmental monitoring. GIS has the ability to develop and manage a comprehensive database of model output, map layers, and demographic data that can prove extremely valuable in the modeling process. This data can serve to extend the capabilities of air pollution dispersion modeling from mere estimation of concentrations to comprehensive exposure assessment of neighboring populations (Lowry, et al. 1995, Maslia, et al. 1994). A study of the Monticello power plant in northeast Texas was conducted using the SCREEN3 mathematical plume dispersion model, US Census Bureau demographic data, and a GIS to examine the effects of the plant output on the people living in the seven county area surrounding the plant.

Archer, Jeffrey Keith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ebb-Tide Dynamics and Spreading of a Large River Plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Momentum balances in the near-field region of a large, tidally pulsed river plume are examined. The authors concentrate on a single ebb tide of the Columbia River plume, using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) configured to hindcast flow ...

Ryan M. McCabe; Parker MacCready; Barbara M. Hickey

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Biological Ocean Margins Program. Active Microbes Responding to Inputs from the Orinoco River Plume. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of the proposed work is to identify the active members of the heterotrophic community involved in C and N cycling in the perimeter of the Orinoco River Plume (ORP), assess their spatial distribution, quantify their metabolic activity, and correlate these parameters to plume properties such as salinity, organic matter content and phytoplankton biomass.

Jorge E. Corredor

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum Seeps Near Coal Oil Point, CA C distribution of oil forms a plume along the continental shelf that we suggest represents a chronic fallout the distribution of the fallout over a period of 0.4-5 days. The extent of hydrocarbon loss is consistent for all

Fabrikant, Sara Irina

192

Subtidal Variability of Estuarine Outflow, Plume, and Coastal Current: A Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time evolution of an estuary plume and its coastal front over a continental shelf is numerically calculated here using a three-dimensional model with eddy mixing based on the turbulence kinetic energy closure. The plume and front system is ...

Lie-Yauw Oey; G. L. Mellor

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia), Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia, J in Indonesia occur more frequently during El Niño droughts, when farmers take advantage of drier fuels

Zender, Charles

194

Installation of reactive metals groundwater collection and treatment systems  

SciTech Connect

Three groundwater plumes contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site are scheduled for remediation by 1999 based on the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) (DOE, 1996). These three plumes are among the top 20 environmental cleanup sites at Rocky Flats. One of these plumes, the Mound Site Plume, is derived from a previous drum storage area, and daylights as seeps near the South Walnut Creek drainage. Final design for remediation of the Mound Site Plume has been completed based on use of reactive metals to treat the contaminated groundwater, and construction is scheduled for early 1998. The two other plumes, the 903 Pad/Ryan`s Pit and the East Trenches Plumes, are derived from VOCs either from drums that leaked or that were disposed of in trenches. These two plumes are undergoing characterization and conceptual design in 1998 and construction is scheduled in 1999. The contaminants of concern in these plumes are tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride and low levels of uranium and americium.

Hopkins, J.K.; Primrose, A.L. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Vogan, J. [EnviroMetal Technologies, Inc., Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Uhland, J. [Kaiser-Hill, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Turbulent Atmospheric Plumes above Line Sources with an Application to Volcanic Fissure Eruptions on the Terrestrial Planets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of turbulent plumes maintained above steady fine sources of buoyancy is worked out in detail within the limitations of Taylor's entrainment assumption. It is applied to the structure of a pure plume injected into a stably stratified ...

Richard B. Stothers

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Dynamics of freshwater plumes: observations and numerical modeling of the wind-forced response and alongshore freshwater transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A freshwater plume often forms when a river or an estuary discharges water onto the continental shelf. Freshwater plumes are ubiquitous features of the coastal ocean and usually leave a striking signature in the coastal ...

Fong, Derek Allen

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and means are disclosed for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived. 15 figs.

Yeung, E.S.; Chen, G.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser-generated plumes based on density gradients  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and means for a spatial and temporal probe for laser generated plumes based on density gradients includes generation of a plume of vaporized material from a surface by an energy source. The probe laser beam is positioned so that the plume passes through the probe laser beam. Movement of the probe laser beam caused by refraction from the density gradient of the plume is monitored. Spatial and temporal information, correlated to one another, is then derived.

Yeung, Edward S. (Ames, IA); Chen, Guoying (Laramie, WY)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Studies on Mathematical Models for Characterizing Plume and Drift Behavior From Cooling Towers, Volume 1: Review of European Researc h  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results to date of an effort to develop, improve, and validate mathematical models of plume dispersion from individual and clustered mechanical- and natural-draft cooling towers. This effort is focusing on prediction of visible plume trajectory and deposition of saline droplet drift. The goal is to provide useful tools for assessing the environmental impact of cooling tower plumes. Volume 1 summarizes European research on cooling-tower-plume dispersion.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dissolved dense nonaqueous-phase liquid plumes are persistent, widespread problems in the DOE complex. At the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) is disappearing from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) by natural attenuation, a finding that saves significant site restoration costs. Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation as a preferred treatment technology requires direct evidence of the processes and rates of the degradation. Our proposal aims to provide that evidence for one such site by testing two hypotheses. First, we believe that realistic values for in situ rates of TCE cometabolism can be obtained by sustaining the putative microorganisms at the low catabolic activities consistent with aquifer conditions. Second, the patterns of functional gene expression evident in these communities under starvation conditions while carrying out TCE cometabolism can be used to diagnose the cometabolic activity in the aquifer itself. Using the cometabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained at this location and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Realistic terms for cometabolism of TCE will provide marked improvements in DOE's ability to predict and monitor natural attenuation of chlorinated organics at other sites, increase the acceptability of this solution, and provide significant economic and health benefits through this noninvasive remediation strategy. Finally, this project aims to derive valuable genomic information about the functional attributes of subsurface microbial communities upon which DOE must depend to resolve some of its most difficult contamination issues.

Colwell, F. S.; Crawford, R. L.; Sorenson, K.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Experimental and computational study of complex shockwave dynamics in laser ablation plumes in argon atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

We investigated spatio-temporal evolution of ns laser ablation plumes at atmospheric pressure, a favored condition for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. The 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser were focused on to an Al target and the generated plasma was allowed to expand in 1 atm Ar. The hydrodynamic expansion features were studied using focused shadowgraphy and gated 2 ns self-emission visible imaging. Shadowgram images showed material ejection and generation of shock fronts. A secondary shock is observed behind the primary shock during the time window of 100-500 ns with instabilities near the laser cone angle. By comparing the self-emission images obtained using fast photography, it is concluded that the secondary shocks observed in the shadowgraphy were generated by fast moving target material. The plume front estimates using fast photography exhibited reasonable agreement with data obtained from shadowgraphy at early times {<=}400 ns. However, at later times, fast photography images showed plume confinement while the shadowgraphic images showed propagation of the plume front even at greater times. The structure and dynamics of the plume obtained from optical diagnostic tools were compared to numerical simulations. We have shown that the main features of plume expansion in ambient Ar observed in the experiments can be reproduced using a continuum hydrodynamics model which provided valuable insight into the expansion dynamics and shock structure of the plasma plume.

Harilal, S. S.; Miloshevsky, G. V.; Diwakar, P. K.; LaHaye, N. L.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, and School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Initial parametric study of the flammability of plume releases in Hanford waste tanks  

SciTech Connect

This study comprised systematic analyses of waste tank headspace flammability following a plume-type of gas release from the waste. First, critical parameters affecting plume flammability were selected, evaluated, and refined. As part of the evaluation the effect of ventilation (breathing) air inflow on the convective flow field inside the tank headspace was assessed, and the magnitude of the so-called {open_quotes}numerical diffusion{close_quotes} on numerical simulation accuracy was investigated. Both issues were concluded to be negligible influences on predicted flammable gas concentrations in the tank headspace. Previous validation of the TEMPEST code against experimental data is also discussed, with calculated results in good agreements with experimental data. Twelve plume release simulations were then run, using release volumes and flow rates that were thought to cover the range of actual release volumes and rates. The results indicate that most plume-type releases remain flammable only during the actual release ends. Only for very large releases representing a significant fraction of the volume necessary to make the entire mixed headspace flammable (many thousands of cubic feet) can flammable concentrations persist for several hours after the release ends. However, as in the smaller plumes, only a fraction of the total release volume is flammable at any one time. The transient evolution of several plume sizes is illustrated in a number of color contour plots that provide insight into plume mixing behavior.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Recknagle, K.P.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Pantex Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pantex Site Pantex Site The primary mission of the Pantex Plant is the assembly, disassembly, testing, and evaluation of nuclear wespons in support of the NNSA stockpile...

205

Plume splitting and rebounding in a high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced air plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of plasma plume formed by high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The laser wavelength is 10.6 {mu}m. Measurements were made using 3 ns gated fast photography as well as space and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The behavior of the plasma plume was studied with a laser energy of 3 J and 10 J. The results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is very complicated. The splitting and rebounding of the plasma plume is observed to occur early in the plumes history.

Chen Anmin; Jiang Yuanfei; Liu Hang; Jin Mingxing; Ding Dajun [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Transfer of the Heat Source / Radioisotope Themoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

031 031 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 191 / Friday, October 2, 1998 / Notices SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The package listing contains the following information: (1) Title of the information collection package; (2) current OMB control number; (3) type of respondents; (4) estimated number of responses annually; (5) estimated total burden hours, annually, including recordkeeping hours required to provide the information; (6) purpose; and (7) number of collections. Package Title: Legal. Current OMB No.: 1910-0800. Type of Respondents: DOE management and operating contractors, and offsite contractors. Estimated Number of Responses: 2,719. Estimated Total Burden Hours: 21,052. Purpose: This information is required by the Department to ensure that legal resources and requirements are

207

Monsanto MOUND FACILITY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Romulus, New York per your request. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact me. Sincerely, WGY:mls Enclosure cc: R. Barber wencl J. Counts wencl G....

208

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tracer plume detection-LANL(Fessenden).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer Testing of Plume Movement Tracer Testing of Plume Movement Julianna Fessenden and Paul Reimus, Los Alamos National Laboratory Plume modeling (atmosphere, reservoir, groundwater) Purpose of Tracing Plumes Monitor species of interest within reservoir Monitor species of interest outside reservoir Monitor Flow paths Capture zones Monitor Breaches Extent of movement Desirable Tracer Characteristics (1) Inexpensive (measurement, analytical) (2) Low detection limits, no analytical interferences (3) Quick, easy to sample and measure (4) Non toxic, readily permitted (5) Both sorbing/non-sorbing tracer use Perflorocarbon Tracer deployment NETL facilities Classes of Tracers (1) Gas Phase (2) Liquid Phase (3) Organic, inorganic, aqueous (4) Conservative/nonreacting (5) Reactive with mineral surfaces or soluble in non-carrier phase

210

Geochemical heterogeneity in the Hawaiian plume : constraints from Hawaiian volcanoes and Emperor seamounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 6000-km long, age-progressive linear Hawaii-Emperor Chain is one of the best defined hotspot tracks. This hotspot track plays an important role in the plume hypothesis. In this research, geochemical data on the ...

Huang, Shichun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Idealized Numerical Simulations of the Interactions between Buoyant Plumes and Density Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Idealized numerical experiments using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model are performed to examine the fundamental dynamical processes associated with the interactions between buoyant plumes and density currents. The aim of these simulations is ...

Philip Cunningham

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Breaking Surface Wave Effects on River Plume Dynamics during Upwelling-Favorable Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the dynamics of a buoyant river plume in upwelling-favorable winds, concentrating on the time after separation from the coast. A set of idealized numerical simulations is used to examine the effects of breaking surface gravity ...

Gregory P. Gerbi; Robert J. Chant; John L. Wilkin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Response of Buoyant Coastal Plumes to Upwelling-Favorable Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better understand the response of a buoyant coastal plume to wind-induced upwelling, a two-dimensional theory is developed that includes entrainment. The primary assumption is that competition between wind-driven vertical mixing and lateral ...

Steven Lentz

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Interactions between mantle plumes and mid-ocean ridges : constraints from geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies interactions between mid-ocean ridges and mantle plumes using geophysics, geochemistry, and geodynamical modeling. Chapter 1 investigates the effects of the Marion and Bouvet hotspots on the ultra-slow ...

Georgen, Jennifer E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Framework for multi-vehicle adaptive sampling of jets and plumes in coastal zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a framework for the sampling of thermal and effluent jets and plumes using multiple autonomous surface vehicles. The framework was developed with the goal of achieving rapid and accurate in-situ ...

Gildner, Matthew Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Expansion of the laser ablation vapor plume into a background gas: Part A, Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x ] = 1 y 2 y 4 dy The thermal energy stored in the vaporet + E ek (subscript t=thermal energy and k=kinetic energy)Also, the kinetic and thermal energies in the vapor plume

Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Lidar Sensing of Plume Dispersion: Analysis Methods and Product Quality for Light-Scattering Tracer Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis procedures are described for retrieving accurate plume information from lidar data on light-scattering particles during atmospheric dispersion experiments. Interactive computer graphics aided in the solution of the lidar equation for ...

W. L. Eberhard; G. T. McNice; S. W. Troxel

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Effects of Micro- and Macroscale Turbulent Mixing on the Chemical Processes in Engine Exhaust Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent mixing and chemical reactions in the near field of an engine exhaust jet plume have been investigated using a mixing model that explicitly incorporates both large- and small-scale turbulent mixing and the molecular diffusion effects. A ...

S. Menon; J. Wu

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nocturnal Wind Structure and Plume Growth Rates Due to Inertial Oscillations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical plume growth rates depend upon the atmospheric spatial energy spectrum. Current grid-based numerical models generally resolve large-scale (synoptic) energy, while planetary boundary layer turbulence is parameterized. Energy at ...

Shekhar Gupta; R. T. McNider; Michael Trainer; Robert J. Zamora; Kevin Knupp; M. P. Singh

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Source Inversion for Contaminant Plume Dispersion in Urban Environments Using Building-Resolving Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to determine the source of a contaminant plume in urban environments is crucial for emergency-response applications. Locating the source and determining its strength based on downwind concentration measurements, however, are ...

Fotini Katopodes Chow; Branko Kosovi?; Stevens Chan

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Breaking Surface Wave Effects on River Plume Dynamics during Upwelling-Favorable Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the dynamics of a buoyant river plume in upwelling favorable winds, concentrating on the time after separation from the coast. A set of idealized numerical simulations is used to examine the effects of breaking surface gravity ...

Gregory P. Gerbi; Robert J. Chant; John L. Wilkin

222

The Rhine Outflow Plume Studied by the Analysis of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data and Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of the Rhine outflow plume in the proximity of the river mouth is investigated by using remote sensing data and numerical simulations. The remote sensing data consist of 41 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired by the First ...

Katrin Hessner; Angelo Rubino; Peter Brandt; Werner Alpers

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the deepest and largest offshore spill in U.S. history and its impacts on marine ecosystems are largely unknown. Here, we showed that the microbial community functional composition and structure were dramatically altered in a deep-sea oil plume resulting from the spill. A variety of metabolic genes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in the plume compared to outside the plume, indicating a great potential for intrinsic bioremediation or natural attenuation in the deep-sea. Various other microbial functional genes relevant to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur and iron cycling, metal resistance, and bacteriophage replication were also enriched in the plume. Together, these results suggest that the indigenous marine microbial communities could play a significant role in biodegradation of oil spills in deep-sea environments.

Lu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; He, Z.; Voordeckers, J.; Zhou, A.; Lee, Y.-J.; Mason, O.U.; Dubinsky, E.; Chavarria, K.; Tom, L.; Fortney, J.; Lamendella, R.; Jansson, J.K.; D?haeseleer, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Retrieval of Optical Depth for Heavy Smoke Aerosol Plumes: Uncertainties and Sensitivities to the Optical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with uncertainties in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-based retrieval of optical depth for heavy smoke aerosol plumes generated from forest fires that occurred in Canada due to a lack of knowledge on ...

Jeff Wong; Zhanqing Li

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Major Cloud Plumes in the Arctic and Their Relation to Fronts and Ice Movement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the movement of orographic cloud plumes from one island to another in the Svalbard-Novaya Zemlya region of the Barents Sea revealed a close association with similar movements of arctic fronts. Strong northerly winds behind arctic ...

Robert W. Fett

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Inertial Available Kinetic Energy and the Dynamics of Tropical Plume Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical plumes are identified in satellite data as elongated cloud bands originating from convective activity along the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), often extending far into the subtropics and middle latitudes. Many previous studies ...

John R. Mecikalski; Gregory J. Tripoli

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Tropical Plumes over Eastern North Africa as a Source of Rain in the Middle East  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical plumes (TPs) reflect tropicalextratropical interaction associated with the transport of moisture from the Tropics to extratropical latitudes. They are observed in satellite images as continuous narrow cloud bands ahead of upper-level ...

Shira Rubin; Baruch Ziv; Nathan Paldor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Multifractal Analysis of Line-Source Plume Concentration Fluctuations in Surface-Layer Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A codimension multifractal methodology was used to analyze and to model scalar concentration fluctuations within sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas plumes from a line source in atmospheric surface-layer flows. Correspondence was exhibited between the ...

D. Finn; B. Lamb; M. Y. Leclerc; S. Lovejoy; S. Pecknold; D. Schertzer

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Gaussian Plume Model of Atmospheric Dispersion Based on Second-Order Closure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A practical model of atmospheric dispersion of a passive tracer based on systematic reduction of the second-order closure transport equations using Gaussian shape assumptions is presented. The model is comparable with conventional Gaussian plume ...

R. I. Sykes; W. S. Lewellen; S. F. Parker

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Formation and Fate of a River Plume: A Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model that describes the formation and dilution of a frontally bounded river plume is presented. Such features were first studied at the mouth of the Connecticut River during periods of high discharge and have subsequently been ...

James O'Donnell

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Studies on Mathematical Models for Characterizing Plume and Drift Behavior From Cooling Towers, Executive Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the contents of a five-volume work on new models for predicting plume rise and drift deposition from single and multiple natural-draft and mechanical-draft cooling towers.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Effects of buoyancy source composition on multiphase plume behavior in stratification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments are performed where a dense multiphase plume is released vertically in a salinity stratified ambient. The constituent phase composition of the initial buoyancy flux can be dense brine, particles, or a mixture ...

Chow, Aaron C. (Aaron Chunghin), 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Plume Dispersion Anomalies in a Nocturnal Urban Boundary Layer in Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The URBAN 2000 experiments were conducted in the complex urban and topographical terrain in Salt Lake City, Utah, in stable nighttime conditions. Unexpected plume dispersion often arose because of the interaction of complex terrain and mountain...

Dennis Finn; Kirk L. Clawson; Roger G. Carter; Jason D. Rich; K. Jerry Allwine

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

On the Response of a Buoyant Plume to Downwelling-Favorable Wind Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here, the response of a coastally trapped buoyant plume to downwelling-favorable wind forcing is explored using a simplified two-dimensional numerical model and a prognostic theory for the resulting width, depth, and density anomaly and along-...

Carlos Moffat; Steven Lentz

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Formation of seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California. Marof seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field Irameasurement system in the Coal Oil Point seep field in the

Leifer, Ira; Culling, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Airship Measurements of Ships Exhaust Plumes and Their Effect on Marine Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution aerosol, trace gas, and cloud microphysical measurements were made from an airship during transects across ships exhaust plumes advecting downwind of ships in the marine boundary layer (MBL). This study was part of the Office of ...

G. M. Frick; W. A. Hoppel

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Tracer Transport in Deep Convective Updrafts: Plume Ensemble versus Bulk Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two widely used approaches for parameterizing tracer transport based on convective mass fluxes are the plume ensemble formulation (PEF) and the bulk formulation (BF). Here the behavior of these two is contrasted for the specific case in which the ...

Mark G. Lawrence; Philip J. Rasch

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Interaction between Multiple Line Plumes: A Model Study with Applications to Leads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the aggregate behavior of two identical parallel line turbulent plumes that were discharged to either a homogeneous water column or a two-layer fluid. These studies were motivated by the ...

C. Y. Ching; H. J. S. Fernando; L. A. Mofor; P. A. Davies

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Descent and Modification of the Overflow Plume in the Denmark Strait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk properties of the Denmark Strait overflow (DSO) plume observed in velocity and hydrography surveys undertaken in 1997 and 1998 are described. Despite the presence of considerable short-term variability, it is found that the pathway and ...

James B. Girton; Thomas B. Sanford

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Lidar Measurement of Ammonia Concentrations and Fluxes in a Plume from a Point Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field experiment was performed that demonstrated the ability of a scanning carbon dioxide (CO2) coherent lidar system to measure the concentration distribution of ammonia in a plume from a point source. This application of the differential ...

Yanzeng Zhao; W. Alan Brewer; Wynn L. Eberhard; Raul J. Alvarez

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A PDF Dispersion Model for Buoyant Plumes in the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A probability density function (PDF) dispersion model is presented for buoyant plumes in the convective boundary layer (CBL), where the mean concentration field C is obtained from the PDFs py and pz of tracer particle position in the lateral y ...

J. C. Weil; L. A. Corio; R. P. Brower

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Lightning in wildfire smoke plumes observed in Colorado during summer 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrocumulus clouds above three Colorado wildfires (Hewlett Gulch, High Park, and Waldo Canyon; all in summer 2012) electrified and produced localized intracloud discharges whenever the smoke plumes grew above 10 km MSL (above mean sea level; ...

Timothy J. Lang; Steven A. Rutledge; Brenda Dolan; Paul Krehbiel; William Rison; Daniel T. Lindsey

243

Plume Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer. Part I: CONDORS Field Experiment and Example Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project CONDORS (CONvective Diffusion Observed by Remote Sensors) measured the dispersion of a nonbuoyant plume in the highly convective boundary layer. Laboratory and numerical models have predicted vertical profiles of a passive tracer that are ...

W. L. Eberhard; W. R. Moninger; G. A. Briggs

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comparative Evaluation of an Eulerian CFD and Gaussian Plume Models Based on Prairie Grass Dispersion Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical and statistical comparison of a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with two Gaussian plume models is proposed on the Prairie Grass data field experiment for neutral conditions, using both maximum arcwise ...

E. Demael; B. Carissimo

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT-THE ECOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF CO2 FIXATIION IN OCEANIC RIVER PLUMES  

SciTech Connect

Oceanic river plumes represent some of the most productive environments on Earth. As major conduits for freshwater and nutrients into the coastal ocean, their impact on water column ecosystems extend for up to a thousand km into oligotrophic oceans. Upon entry into the oceans rivers are tremendous sources of CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Yet owing to increased light transmissivity from sediment deposition coupled with the influx of nutrients, dramatic CO2 drawdown occurs, and plumes rapidly become sinks for CO2. Using state-of-the-art gene expression technology, we have examined the molecular biodiversity of CO2 fixation in the Mississippi River Plume (MRP; two research cruises) and the Orinoco River Plume (ORP; one cruise). When the MRP extends far into the Gulf because of entrainment with the Loop Current, MRP production (carbon fixation) can account for up to 41% of the surface production in the Gulf of Mexico. Nearer-shore plume stations (high plume, salinity< 32 ppt) had tremendous CO2 drawdown that was correlated to heterokont (principally diatom) carbon fixation gene expression. The principal form of nitrogen for this production based upon 15N studies was urea, believed to be from anthropogenic origin (fertilizer) from the MRP watershed. Intermediate plume environments (salinity 34 ppt) were characterized by high levels of Synechococcuus carbon fixation that was fueled by regenerated ammonium. Non-plume stations were characterized by high light Prochlorococcus carbon fixation gene expression that was positively correlated with dissolved CO2 concentrations. Although data from the ORP cruise is still being analyzed, some similarities and striking differences were found between the ORP and MRP. High levels of heterokont carbon fixation gene expression that correlated with CO2 drawdown were observed in the high plume, yet the magnitude of this phenomenon was far below that of the MRP, most likely due to the lower levels of anthropogenic nutrient input. The offshore ORP was characterized by haptophyte and in places Prochlorococcus carbon fixation gene expression in surface water, with greater heterokont rbcL RNA at SCM depths. MODIS satellite chlorophyll-a data implied a plume of high chlorophyll water far into the eastern Caribbean, yet field observations did not support this, most likely because of high levels of colored dissolved organic matter (cDOM) in the ORP. The presence of pelagic nitrogen fixers (Trichodesmium and cyanobacterial diatom endosymbionts) most likely provided N for the offshore MRP production. The results underscore the importance of oceanic river plumes as sinks for CO2 and the need for their incorporation in global carbon models as well as estimates of CO2 sequestration.

PAUL, JOHN H

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hamiltonian surface shaping with information theory and exergy#47;entropy control for collective plume tracing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to design and analyse distributed decentralised control laws for a team of robots performing collective plume tracing based on Hamiltonian surface shaping, information theory, and exergy/entropy control. The process ... Keywords: Fisher information, Hamiltonian systems, collective plume tracing, collective systems, decentralised control, distributed control, entropy control, exergy control, information theory, kinetic control, robot collaboration, robot control, robot kinematics, robots, surface shaping

Rush D. Robinett, III; David G. Wilson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose of this upgrade to nine components was to provide additional shear wave component data that might prove useful in delineating internal mound reservoir attributes. Also, Red Willow extended the P-wave portion of the survey to the northwest of the original 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) 3D9C area in order to extend coverage further to the northwest to the Marble Wash area. In order to accomplish this scope of work, 3D9C seismic data set covering two known reservoirs was acquired and processed. Three-dimensional, zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data was acquired to determine the shear wave velocities for processing the sh3Dseismic data. Anisotropic velocity, and azimuthal AVO processing was carried out in addition to the conventional 3D P-wave data processing. All P-, PS- and S-wave volumes of the seismic data were interpreted to map the seismic response. The interpretation consisted of conventional cross-plots of seismic attributes vs. geological and reservoir engineering data, as well as multivariate and neural net analyses to assess whether additional resolution on exploration and engineering parameters could be achieved through the combined use of several seismic variables. Engineering data in the two reservoirs was used to develop a combined lithology, structure and permeability map. On the basis of the seismic data, a well was drilled into the northern mound trend in the project area. This well, Roadrunner No.9-2, was brought into production in late April 2006 and continues to produce modest amounts of oil and gas. As of the end of August 2007, the well has produced approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and 32,000 mcf of gas. A static reservoir model was created from the seismic data interpretations and well data. The seismic data was tied to various markers identified in the well logs, which in turn were related to lithostratigraphy. The tops and thicknesses of the various units were extrapolated from well control based upon the seismic data that was calibrated to the well picks. The reservoir engineering properties were available from a number of wel

Joe Hachey

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

EFFICIENCY OF OZONE PRODUCTION IN THE HOUSTON PLUME.  

SciTech Connect

Ozone levels observed during a field campaign in Houston were significantly higher than that observed in Phoenix or Philadelphia. An examination of the slope of O{sub x} versus NO{sub z} in the urban plumes shows that NO{sub x} is used 2 to 3 times more efficiently in Houston as compared with Phoenix and Philadelphia. Representative values of OPEx are 7-12, 3, and 4, in Houston, Phoenix, and Philadelphia. Aircraft observations have been used to calculate P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}). Values in Houston are significantly higher than in Phoenix and Philadelphia. We show that P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) is proportional to a VOC/NO{sub 2}-OH reactivity ratio. High values of P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) in Houston are due to emissions of reactive olefins from the ship channel region. It is significant that high values of P(O{sub 3})/P(NO{sub z}) occur at NO{sub x} levels up to several 10's of ppb. Not only is the chemistry efficient but it will be long lasting. The occurrence of high NO{sub x} and high OPEx is fostered by the co-location of VOC and NO{sub x} sources in the Houston industrial areas.

KLEINMAN,L.I.; DAUM,P.H.; BRECHTEL,F.; LEE,Y.N.; NUNNERMACKER,L.J.; SPRINGSTON,S.R.; WEINSTEIN-LLOYD,J.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

MULTICOMPONENT SEISMIC ANALYSIS AND CALIBRATION TO IMPROVE RECOVERY FROM ALGAL MOUNDS: APPLICATION TO THE ROADRUNNER/TOWAOC AREA OF THE PARADOX BASIN, UTE MOUNTAIN UTE RESERVATION, COLORADO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado'', for the Second Biennial Report covering the time period May 1, 2003 through October 31, 2003. During this period, the project achieved two significant objectives: completion of the acquisition and processing design and specifications 3D9C seismic acquisition and the 3D VSP log; and completion of the permitting process involving State, Tribal and Federal authorities. Successful completion of these two major milestones pave the way for field acquisition as soon as weather permits in the Spring of 2004. This report primarily describes the design and specifications for the VSP and 3D9C surveys.

Paul La Pointe; Claudia Rebne; Steve Dobbs

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Biogeochemical Considerations Related To The Remediation Of I-129 Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this report were to: provide a current state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport at the Hanford Site; conduct a review of Hanford Site data dealing with groundwater {sup 129}I; and identify critical knowledge gaps necessary for successful selection, implementation, and technical defensibility in support of remediation decisions.

Kaplan, D. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Yeager, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory , Los Alamos, NM (United States); Denham, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Zhang, S. [Texas A& M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Xu, C. [Texas A& M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Schwehr, K. A. [Texas A& M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Li, H. P. [Texas A& M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Brinkmeyer, R. [Texas A& M University, Galveston, TX (United States); Santschi, P. H. [Texas A& M University, Galveston, TX (United States)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

252

BIOGEOCHEMICAL CONSIDERATIONS RELATED TO THE REMEDIATION OF I-129 PLUMES  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report were to: provide a current state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport at the Hanford Site; conduct a review of Hanford Site data dealing with groundwater {sup 129}I; and identify critical knowledge gaps necessary for successful selection, implementation, and technical defensibility in support of remediation decisions.

Kaplan, D.; Yeager, C.; Denham, M.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwehr, K.; Li, H.; Brinkmeyer, R.; Santschi, P.

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

Plume-in-Grid Modeling in Central California Using CMAQ-APT (Comprehensive Multiscale Air Quality Model with Advanced Plume Treatmen t)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CMAQ-APT, a state-of-the-science plume-in-grid (PiG) air quality model, has been updated and applied to the ten largest nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitting facilities in central California. This report discusses the results of that modeling study.

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Microsoft Word - Groundwater_Booklet-2008-v5 final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acronyms ........................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Introduction......................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Plume Map Function........................................................................................................................................................... 5 Plume Assessment Function .............................................................................................................................................. 6 Hanford Site: Plume Map ...........................................................................................................................................

255

Strategic Petroleum Reserve site environmental report for calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The SER, provided annually in accordance with DOE order 5400.1, serves the public by summarizing monitoring data collected to assess how the SPR impacts the environment. The SER provides a balanced synopsis of non-radiological monitoring and regulatory compliance data and affirms that the SPR has been operating within acceptable regulatory limits. Included in this report is a describe of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1997. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of the Weeks Island site, involving the disposition of 11.6 million m{sup 3} (73 million barrels) of crude oil inventory, as well as the degasification of over 12.6 million m{sup 3} (79.3 million barrels) of crude oil inventory at the Big Hill and Bryan Mound facilities.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Microsoft Word - SPR Site Subsidence Surveys 2013-2017.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsidence Surveys, 2013-2017 Subsidence Surveys, 2013-2017 Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, supervision, materials, equipment, transportation, and services necessary to perform a subsidence survey of the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound and West Hackberry SPR sites. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following: (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A or B of Subpart D;

257

External Mass Injection to Reduce Energetic Ion Production in the Discharge Plume of High Current Hollow Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plume of a Hall effect space propulsion system," Ph.D.the primary method of in-space propulsion [1], [2], [3], new

Chu, Emily

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT-THE ECOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF CO2 FIXATIION IN OCEANIC RIVER PLUMES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oceanic river plumes represent some of the most productive environments on Earth. As major conduits for freshwater and nutrients into the coastal ocean, their impact on water column ecosystems extend for up to a thousand km into oligotrophic oceans. Upon entry into the oceans rivers are tremendous sources of CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Yet owing to increased light transmissivity from sediment deposition coupled with the influx of nutrients, dramatic CO2 drawdown occurs, and plumes rapidly become sinks for CO2. Using state-of-the-art gene expression technology, we have examined the molecular biodiversity of CO2 fixation in the Mississippi River Plume (MRP; two research cruises) and the Orinoco River Plume (ORP; one cruise). When the MRP extends far into the Gulf because of entrainment with the Loop Current, MRP production (carbon fixation) can account for up to 41% of the surface production in the Gulf of Mexico. Nearer-shore plume stations (high plume, salinityORP cruise is still being analyzed, some similarities and striking differences were found between the ORP and MRP. High levels of heterokont carbon fixation gene expression that correlated with CO2 drawdown were observed in the high plume, yet the magnitude of this phenomenon was far below that of the MRP, most likely due to the lower levels of anthropogenic nutrient input. The offshore ORP was characterized by haptophyte and in places Prochlorococcus carbon fixation gene expression in surface water, with greater heterokont rbcL RNA at SCM depths. MODIS satellite chlorophyll-a data implied a plume of high chlorophyll water far into the eastern Caribbean, yet field observations did not support this, most likely because of high levels of colored dissolved organic matter (cDOM) in the ORP. The presence of pelagic nitrogen fixers (Trichodesmium and cyanobacterial diatom endosymbionts) most likely provided N for the offshore MRP production. The results underscore the importance of oceanic river plumes as sinks for CO2 and the need for their incorporation in global carbon models as well as estimates of CO2 sequestration.

PAUL, JOHN H

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

Remotely operated excavator needs assessment/site visit summary  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration requested an assessment of soil excavation needs relative to soil remediation. The following list identifies the DOE sites assessed: Mound Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, and Fernald Site. The reviewed sites fall into one or more of the following three categories: production, EPA National Priorities List, or CERCLA (superfund) designation. Only three of the sites appear to have the need for a remotely operated excavator rope. Hanford and Idaho Falls have areas of high-level radioactive contamination either buried or in/under buildings. The Fernald site has a need for remote operated equipment of different types. It is their feeling that remote equipment can be used to remove the health dangers to humans by removing them from the area. Most interviewees stated that characterization technologies needs are more immediate concern over excavation. In addition, the sites do not have similar geographic conditions which would aid in the development of a generic precision excavator. The sites visited were not ready to utilize or provide the required design information necessary to draft a performance specification. This creates a strong case against the development of one type of ROPE for use at these sites. Assuming soil characterization technology/methodology is improved sufficiently to allow accurate and real time field characterization then development of a precision excavator might be pursued based on FEMP needs, since the FEMP`s sole scope of work is remediation. The excavator could then be used/tested and then later modified for other sites as warranted.

Straub, J.; Haller, S.; Worsley, R. [Westinghouse Environmental Management Co. of Ohio, Cincinnati, OH (United States); King, M. [THETA Technology Inc. (United States)

1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

260

Idaho site completes demolition of Cold War-era nuclear fuel reprocessing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

doe logo CH2M-WG logo Joint News Release For Immediate Release Date: December 22, 2011 Media Contact: Erik Simpson, (208) 360-0426 Idaho site completes demolition of Cold War-era nuclear fuel reprocessing facility A gravel mound, larger than half a city block and several feet thick, is the only visible feature that remains at the site of a Cold War-era spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Idaho site. About $44 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds helped Idaho Cleanup Project crews accelerate the demolition of the facility that during its 40 years of operation recovered more than $1 billion worth of uranium. �The ability to retain our highly skilled workforce was a huge contributor to the success of this project,� said Idaho Cleanup Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility December 22, 2011 - 11:12am Addthis Media Contact Erik Simpson (208) 360-0426 A gravel mound, larger than half a city block and several feet thick, is the only visible feature that remains at the site of a Cold War-era spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho site. About $44 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds helped Idaho Cleanup Project crews accelerate the demolition of the facility that during its 40 years of operation recovered more than $1 billion worth of uranium. "The ability to retain our highly skilled workforce was a huge contributor to the success of this project," said Idaho Cleanup Project

262

Particle Formation and Growth in Power Plant Plumes, Volume 1: Field Observations and Theoretical Studies of the Evolution of Partic les in the Plumes from Coal-Fired Electric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 1 of this report describes parallel field and theoretical studies of particle-size distributions in the plumes of coal-fired power plants.Volume 2 presents measurements of concentration of particulate sulfur, sulfate, nitrate, total particulate volume.Aitken nuclei, and various trace gases in the plumes of six coal-fired power plants.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Cost  

SciTech Connect

A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. A robust suite of relatively inexpensive tools is commercially available to measure these variables. Traditional plume/contaminant variables are various measures of contaminant concentration including traditional analysis of chemicals in groundwater samples. An innovative long term monitoring strategy has been developed for acidic or caustic groundwater plumes contaminated with metals and/or radionuclides. Not only should the proposed strategy be more effective at early identification of potential risks, this strategy should be significantly more cost effective because measurement of controlling boundary conditions and master variables is relatively simple. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate significant cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Effect of a Change of Atmospheric Stability on the Growth Rate of Puffs Used in Plume Simulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dependence of plume growth rate on plume size is discussed. It is shown that the growth rates estimated by techniques used in some widely distributed puff models can be in error by as much as two orders of magnitude, although the errors are ...

F. L. Ludwig

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. (1) CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; (2) CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); (3) CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; (4) CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; (5) CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; (6) CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; (7) CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; (8) CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; (9) CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; (10) CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; (11) CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; (12) CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; (13) CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; (14) CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and (15) CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107. CAU 107 closure activities will consist of verifying that the current postings required under Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835 are in place and implementing use restrictions (URs) at two sites, CAS 03-23-29 and CAS 18-23-02. The current radiological postings combined with the URs are adequate administrative controls to limit site access and worker dose.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Medical Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Sites Name: Jenielle Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I started itching Aug. 1999. Diagnosed with ITP Oct.1999. I am in remission With a platelet count in...

269

Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts Hours Current NWS Forecast for the Tri-Cities NWS...

270

QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DYNAMICS OBSERVED WITH THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE. I. TURBULENT UPFLOW PLUMES  

SciTech Connect

Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) observations reveal two new dynamic modes in quiescent solar prominences: large-scale (20-50 Mm) 'arches' or 'bubbles' that 'inflate' from below into prominences, and smaller-scale (2-6 Mm) dark turbulent upflows. These novel dynamics are related in that they are always dark in visible-light spectral bands, they rise through the bright prominence emission with approximately constant speeds, and the small-scale upflows are sometimes observed to emanate from the top of the larger bubbles. Here we present detailed kinematic measurements of the small-scale turbulent upflows seen in several prominences in the SOT database. The dark upflows typically initiate vertically from 5 to 10 Mm wide dark cavities between the bottom of the prominence and the top of the chromospheric spicule layer. Small perturbations on the order of 1 Mm or less in size grow on the upper boundaries of cavities to generate plumes up to 4-6 Mm across at their largest widths. All plumes develop highly turbulent profiles, including occasional Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex 'roll-up' of the leading edge. The flows typically rise 10-15 Mm before decelerating to equilibrium. We measure the flowfield characteristics with a manual tracing method and with the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) 'optical flow' code to derive velocity, acceleration, lifetime, and height data for several representative plumes. Maximum initial speeds are in the range of 20-30 km s{sup -1}, which is supersonic for a {approx}10,000 K plasma. The plumes decelerate in the final few Mm of their trajectories resulting in mean ascent speeds of 13-17 km s{sup -1}. Typical lifetimes range from 300 to 1000 s ({approx}5-15 minutes). The area growth rate of the plumes (observed as two-dimensional objects in the plane of the sky) is initially linear and ranges from 20,000 to 30,000 km{sup 2} s{sup -1} reaching maximum projected areas from 2 to 15 Mm{sup 2}. Maximum contrast of the dark flows relative to the bright prominence plasma in SOT images is negative and ranges from -10% for smaller flows to -50% for larger flows. Passive scalar 'cork movies' derived from NAVE measurements show that prominence plasma is entrained by the upflows, helping to counter the ubiquitous downflow streams in the prominence. Plume formation shows no clear temporal periodicity. However, it is common to find 'active cavities' beneath prominences that can spawn many upflows in succession before going dormant. The mean flow recurrence time in these active locations is roughly 300-500 s (5-8 minutes). Locations remain active on timescales of tens of minutes up to several hours. Using a column density ratio measurement and reasonable assumptions on plume and prominence geometries, we estimate that the mass density in the dark cavities is at most 20% of the visible prominence density, implying that a single large plume could supply up to 1% of the mass of a typical quiescent prominence. We hypothesize that the plumes are generated from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability taking place on the boundary between the buoyant cavities and the overlying prominence. Characteristics, such as plume size and frequency, may be modulated by the strength and direction of the cavity magnetic field relative to the prominence magnetic field. We conclude that buoyant plumes are a source of quiescent prominence mass as well as a mechanism by which prominence plasma is advected upward, countering constant gravitational drainage.

Berger, Thomas E.; Slater, Gregory; Hurlburt, Neal; Shine, Richard; Tarbell, Theodore; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Lites, Bruce W. [High Altitude Observatory, University Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Okamoto, Takenori J.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Magara, Tetsuya; Suematsu, Yoshinori [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shimizu, Toshifumi, E-mail: berger@lmsal.co [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

A multilayer groundwater sampler for characterizing contaminant plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes activities related to the design and initial demonstration of a passive multilayer groundwater sampling system. The apparatus consists of remotely controlled cylinders filled with deionized water which are connected in tandem. Vertical fine structure of contaminants are easily defined. Using the apparatus in several wells may lead to three dimensional depictions of groundwater contamination, thereby providing the information necessary for site characterization and remediation.

Kaplan, E.; Heiser, J.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

272

A multilayer groundwater sampler for characterizing contaminant plumes. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes activities related to the design and initial demonstration of a passive multilayer groundwater sampling system. The apparatus consists of remotely controlled cylinders filled with deionized water which are connected in tandem. Vertical fine structure of contaminants are easily defined. Using the apparatus in several wells may lead to three dimensional depictions of groundwater contamination, thereby providing the information necessary for site characterization and remediation.

Kaplan, E.; Heiser, J.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

Radar Observations of a Plume from an Elevated Continuous Point Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on radar observations of a plume of microwave-reflecting chaff. The chaff was released from the top of a 300 m tower and observed as it was blown 18 km downwind through the growing boundary layer. We present the following: 1) a ...

W. R. Moninger; R. A. Kropfli

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Effect of Wind on the Dispersal of the Hudson River Plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dispersal of the Hudson River plume in response to idealized wind forcing is studied using a three-dimensional model. The model domain includes the Hudson River and its estuary, with a realistic coastline and bottom topography of the New York ...

Byoung-Ju Choi; John L. Wilkin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Numerical studies on the transient behaviour of a fire plume and ceiling jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient behaviour of a thermally induced fire plume and ceiling jet is predicted using the field modelling technique. In the field model, the k-@e model is used to simulate the turbulent air flow. The traditional wall-function approach is applied to ...

W.K Chow

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Plume Downwash with a k? Turbulence Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plume downwash at a large oil-gathering facility in the Prudhoe Bay, Alaska oil-field reservation was simulated in a series of numerical experiments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of the numerical model as a means of ...

Alex Guenther; Brian Lamb; David Stock

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Formation of Sulfate Particles in the Plume of the Four Corners Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 6 June 1978, the Four Corners coal-fired power plant plume near Farmington, New Mexico, was sampled with an instrumented twin-engine Aero-commander 680E, up to 90 km downwind from the source. Measurements consisted of aerosol size distribution,...

Yaacov Mamane; Rudolf F. Pueschel

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Atmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 34313443 Chemical evolution of an isolated power plant plume during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Texas 2000 Air Quality Study; Aerosol growth; Airborne measurements 1. Introduction Power plantsAtmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 3431­3443 Chemical evolution of an isolated power plant plume from a coal-burning power plant were measured during a research flight of the DOE G-1 during the Texas

279

Showmaker-Levy 9 and plume-forming collisions on Earth  

SciTech Connect

Computational models for the July, 1994 collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter have provided a framework for interpreting the observational data. Imaging, photometry, and spectroscopy data from ground-based, Hubble Space Telescope, and Galileo spacecraft instruments are consistent with phenomena that were dominated by the generation of incandescent fireballs that were ballistically ejected to high altitudes, where they formed plumes that subsequently collapsed over large areas of Jupiter`s atmosphere. Applications of similar computational models to collisions into Earth`s atmosphere show that a very similar sequence of events should take place for NEO impacts with energies as low as 3 megatons, recurring on 100 year timescales or less. This result suggests that the 1908 Tunguska event was a plume-forming atmospheric explosion, and that some of the phenomena associated with it might be related to the ejection and collapse of a high plume. Hazards associated with plume growth and collapse should be included in the evaluation of the impact threat to Earth, and opportunities should be sought for observational validation of atmospheric impact models by exploiting data already being collected from the natural flux of multi-kiloton to megaton sized objects that constantly enter Earth`s atmosphere on annual to decadal timescales.

Boslough, M.B.E.; Crawford, D.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Versatile Lidar for Atmospheric Studies, Including Plume Dispersion, Clouds, and Stratospheric Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transportable scanning lidar for studying clouds, plume dispersion, and stratospheric aerosal at any of three wavelengths is described. A ruby laser transmits linearly polarized light of 694.3 nm wavelength at a maximum 0.8 s?1 pulse rate. The ...

W. L. Eberhard; G. T. Mcnice

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Penetration of buoyancy driven current due to a wind forced river plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long term response of a plume associated with freshwater penetration into ambient, ocean water under upwelling favorable winds is studied using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) in an idealized domain. Three different cases were examined, including a shore perpendicular source and shore parallel source with steady winds, and a shore perpendicular source with oscillating alongshore winds. Freshwater flux is used to define plume penetration. Alongshore penetration of buoyant currents is proportional to freshwater input and inversely proportional to upwelling wind stress strength. Strong wind more quickly prevents fresh waters penetration. Under upwelling favorable winds, the plume is advected offshore by Ekman transport as well as upcoast by the mean flow. This causes the bulge to detach from the coast and move to upcoast and offshore with a 45 degree angle. The path of the bulge is roughly linear, and is independent of wind strength. The bulge speed has a linear relationship with the wind stress strength, and it matches the expected speed based on Ekman theory. Sinusoidal wind leads to sequential upwelling and downwelling events. The plume has an asymmetric response to upwelling and downwelling and fresh water flux is changed immediately by wind. During downwelling, the downcoast fresh water transport is greatest, while it is reduced during upwelling. Background mean flow in the downcoast direction substantially increases alongshore freshwater transport.

Baek, Seong-Ho

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Wind Tunnel Experiment for Predicting a Visible Plume Region from a Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paper introduces a wind tunnel experiment to study the effect of the cooling tower of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) on the flow and the characteristics of visible plume regions. The relevant characteristics of the flow field near the ...

Guo Dong-peng; Yao Ren-tai; Fan Dan

283

Linear Wind-Forced Beta Plumes with Application to the Hawaiian Lee Countercurrent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two numerical ocean models are used to study the baroclinic response to forcing by localized wind stress curl (i.e., a wind-forced ? plume, which is a circulation cell developing to the west of the source region and composed of a set of zonal jets)...

Ali Belmadani; Nikolai A. Maximenko; Julian P. Mccreary; Ryo Furue; Oleg V. Melnichenko; Niklas Schneider; Emanuele Di Lorenzo

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume, Clifton, Karachi 75600, Pakistan A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 28 October

Clift, Peter

285

Application of a Cloud Model to Cooling Tower Plumes and Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A steady-state, one-dimensional cloud model has been modified to simulate the growth of plumes (both wet and dry) and clouds from natural and forced draft cooling towers. The modifications to the cloud model are discussed and comparisons are made ...

Harold D. Orville; John H. Hirsch; Laurence E. May

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

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287

The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies.

David Watson

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

288

Carbon flow and ecosystem dynamics in the Mississippi River plume described by inverse analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planktonic ecosystem dynamics in the buoyant Mississippi River plume were investigated using inverse analysis, a technique that incorporates data describing ecosystem processes and calculates rates of unknown trophic flows and sedimentation in the plume ecosystem. The waters receiving the Mississippi River were divided into four subregions connected by water flow to discretize the gradient of ecosystem properties as river water mixed with ocean water. Each subregion was represented by eight interconnected compartments that were linked to adjacent subregions by advective carbon flow. Models were produced for 4 seasons. Solutions for three seasons (spring, summer, and fall) showed a small region of net autotrophy associated with mid-salinity waters (15-29 psu), surrounded by a larger region of net heterotrophic waters where production did not meet respiratory carbon demand. In addition to moving more than 20% of total plume primary productivity out of the study region, westward water flow moved excess organic carbon from autotrophic regions to heterotrophic regions. In contrast, the winter result indicated a plume that was net-heterotrophic in all 4 subregions with high aerobic bacterial respiration and relatively low primary production that did not meet respiratory demand. Inputs of riverine DOC and carbon from resuspended sediments were required to make up the deficit. Sedimentation of organic carbon was linked to primary production in the mid-salinity regions of the plume, with strongest sedimentation from the productive mid-salinity regions during most of the year. Sedimentation was enhanced beneath less productive, higher salinity areas, due to inputs of organic carbon advected from mid-salinity regions. During winter organic carbon sedimentation was calculated to be zero. The models indicated that a dynamic relationship between primary production and sedimentation exists and provide a good starting point for future development of models which directly address the relationships between nutrient inputs, primary production, sedimentation, and hypoxia in the economically and environmental important regions of the Louisiana Shelf.

Breed, Greg Allen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Microsoft Word - N01669_East Plume data rpt  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Data Report for Pinellas Board of Data Report for Pinellas Board of Public Instruction Property November 2011 LMS/PIN/N01669 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01669 Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Data Report for Pinellas Board of Public Instruction Property November 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Data Report for Pinellas Board of Public Instruction Property November 2011 Doc. No. N01669 Page i Contents Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

291

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan covers activities associated with Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996 [as amended February 2008]). CAU 107 consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site. {sm_bullet} CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2){sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area{sm_bullet} CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a{sm_bullet} CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site{sm_bullet} CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil{sm_bullet} CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10{sm_bullet} CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky) Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, engineering drawings, field screening, analytical results, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), closure in place with administrative controls or no further action will be implemented for CAU 107.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Radiological status of the ground water beneath the Hanford Site, January-December 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1981, 299 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radionuclide chemical contaminants. This report is one of a series prepared annually to document and evaluate the status of ground water at the Hanford Site. Two substances, tritium and nonradioactive nitrate, are easily transported in ground water; therefore, these substances are used as primary tracers to monitor the movement of contaminated ground water. Data collected during 1981 describe the movement of tritium and the nonradioactive nitrate plumes as well as their response to the influences of ground-water flow, ionic dispersion, and radioactive decay. The gross beta (/sup 106/Ru) levels have become so low that it will no longer be considered a major radionuclide contaminant. The tritium plume continues to show increasing concentrations near the Columbia River. While it is mapped as having reached the Columbia River, its contribution to the river has not been distinguished from other sources at this time. This plume shows much the same configuration as in 1977, 1978, 1979, and 1980. The size of the nitrate plume appears stable. Concentrations of nitrate in the vicinity of the 100-H Area continue to be high as a result of past leaks from the evaporation facility. The overall quality of the ground water at the Hanford Site is generally comparable to that of other ground waters in eastern Washington. Any exceptions to this statement will be noted in this report.

Eddy, P.A.; Cline, C.S.; Prater, L.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Site C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' u. s. A r my Corps or Engineers Kurfal.. Ilisfr ifl om« 1776 N1 . ~lI rll Sfred , lIu fflll" , New v ur k. 14207 Site C loseout Report for th e Ashland I (Includlng Seaway Arca D), Ashland 2 and Rattlesnake Creek FUS RAP Sites To nawanda . New Yor k F ina l - Octo ber 2006 Formerl y Ut ilized Sites Remedi al Actiun Program Dt:CLAlUlfiO lO OF RF ~ I'O""" A <:n o .. ('oMnLflOI'O '" 1 S-~1 1 A "n· nvnn: S Ill: C'lO'iU 'U l RtrUlIT f OR A SlIu x u l (I "ICLU I ING S t:A" ·,H A RU D j, AS H I .A ~O 2 A."n RAnU:M'AKf eRU" ~ rn~ I!d'on at A.hland 1 (Ind udonl Seaway Area DJ. Ashland 2 and kan~snak c Creek is Wi,...... 1c in acwr.hnu willi ~ Rcconl or Oecisim (ROD) . igned 00> April 20. 1998 and l'.1pbIWlOII <;If

295

US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE`s mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modeling of Plume Downwash and Enhanced Diffusion near Buildings: Comparison to Wind Tunnel Observations for in Arctic Industrial Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of a modified Industrial Source Complex model to simulate concentration distributions resulting from high wind speeds (neutral conditions) has been evaluated by comparison to data from a wind tunnel study of a Prudhoe Bay, AK oil-...

Alex Guenther; Brian Lamb; Ronald Petersen

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Formation of ozone and growth of aerosols in young smoke plumes from biomass burning: 1. Lagrangian parcel studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a new model of the gas- and aerosol-phase chemistry of biomass burning smoke plumes called Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP). Here we use ASP combined with a Lagrangian parcel model to simulate the chemistry ...

Alvarado, Matthew James

298

Some Effects of the Yellowstone Fire Smoke Plume on Northeast Colorado at the End of Summer 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive fires in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, during the summer of 1988 resulted in considerable smoke transport to surrounding states. The present note provides an observational evaluation of the effects of this plume on (i) surface ...

M. Segal; J. Weaver; J. F. W. Purdom

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Aircraft Measurements of Power Plant Plumes During CCOS and Their Use for the Evaluation of the SCICHEM Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes aircraft measurements of power plant plumes during the Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) in July and August 2002 and use of those measurements to evaluate the Second-order Closure Integrated puff model (SCIPUFF) with CHEMistry (SCICHEM).

2003-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

300

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Case study analysis of biomass burning plumes observed over Brazil during SAMBBA, September 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a huge source of atmospheric aerosols and is poorly understood leading to large uncertainties in estimates of radiative forcing of climate. Aerosols have both a direct effect on climate by reflecting and absorbing solar radiation and an indirect effect by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN). Biomass burning aerosols are produced from burning of vegetation with the vast majority occurring in the tropics. This research presents data collected during the aircraft campaign of the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) project during September and October 2012. A smouldering rainforest fire and a flaming savannah-like fire were selected for in-depth case studies of the atmospheric plume constituents and provide a comparison between the two fire types. The physiochemical characterization of the two plumes are identified

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

303

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

304

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

305

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to circulate over long distance and bioavailability to sea life as an essential nutrient. Now, a collaboration led by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has reported that the hydrothermal plumes emerging from the vents actually contain iron in both Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states associated with organic material from nearby flora and fauna. The collaboration suggests that the organic matrices prevent oxidation and precipitation of the Fe(II), perhaps increasing both its circulation through the world's oceans and its bioavailability as a deep-sea nutrient.

306

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Wednesday, 24 November 2010 00:00 Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

307

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

308

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the wellhead (1544 m below the sea surface). Indigenous deep-sea microorganisms that degrade oil could represent a significant natural attenuation mechanism; but this would depend on how native microorganisms respond to an increased concentration of hydrocarbons and/or dispersant at such extreme depths and temperatures (~4°C). A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab researchers here reports that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated the growth of a type of bacteria that thrives in cold temperatures and at great depths. Infrared spectroscopy at the ALS, with the ability to study microbial processes at the molecular level, provided key pieces of the puzzle.

309

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the considerable amount of iron that enters the oceans from the continents and from hydrothermal vents at mid-ocean ridges on the seafloor, there are large regions of the global ocean where iron availability is so low that it limits life. Oceanographers have long explained this anomaly by assuming that the iron in the sea is primarily incorporated as Fe(III) into inorganic minerals that lack both the mobility to circulate over long distance and bioavailability to sea life as an essential nutrient. Now, a collaboration led by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has reported that the hydrothermal plumes emerging from the vents actually contain iron in both Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxidation states associated with organic material from nearby flora and fauna. The collaboration suggests that the organic matrices prevent oxidation and precipitation of the Fe(II), perhaps increasing both its circulation through the world's oceans and its bioavailability as a deep-sea nutrient.

310

The Office of Site Closure: Progress in the Face of Challenges  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Site Closure (OSC) was formed in November 1999 when the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) reorganized to focus specifically on site cleanup and closure. OSC's objective is to achieve safe and cost-effective cleanups and closures that are protective of our workers, the public, and the environment, now and in the future. Since its inception, OSC has focused on implementing a culture of safe closure, with emphasis in three primary areas: complete our responsibility for the Closure Sites Rocky Flats, Mound, Fernald, Ashtabula, and Weldon Spring; complete our responsibility for cleanup at sites where the DOE mission has been completed (examples include Battelle King Avenue and Battelle West Jefferson in Columbus, and General Atomics) or where other Departmental organizations have an ongoing mission (examples include the Brookhaven, Livermore, or Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the Nevada Test Site); and create a framework a nd develop specific business closure tools that will help sites close, such as guidance for and decisions on post-contract benefit liabilities, records retention, and Federal employee incentives for site closure. This paper discusses OSC's 2001 progress in achieving site cleanups, moving towards site closure, and developing specific business closure tools to support site closure. It describes the tools used to achieve progress towards cleanup and closure, such as the application of new technologies, changes in contracting approaches, and the development of agreements between sites and with host states. The paper also identifies upcoming challenges and explores options for how Headquarters and the sites can work together to address these challenges. Finally, it articulates OSC's new focus on oversight of Field Offices to ensure they have the systems in place to oversee contractor activities resulting in site cleanups and closures.

Fiore, J. J.; Murphie, W. E.; Meador, S. W.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

311

Division Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Our research program is directed toward developing and understanding metal complexes that catalyze reactions relevant to renewable energy, particularly those that reduce carbon dioxide to fuels or fuel precursors. Carbon dioxide reduction catalysts are important targets because they could enable "recycling" of hydrocarbon fuels, thus lowering their carbon footprint. Our research addresses two key challenges in this area. First, we aim to improve the lifetimes, activity, and selectivity of homogeneous catalysts by incorporating them into porous heterogeneous frameworks derived from structurally persistent organic polymers. These frameworks allow isolation of the catalytic centers, which inhibits reaction pathways that lead to catalyst decomposition, and enable the spatially controlled deployment of ancillary functional groups that bind and concentrate substrate near the active site and/or assist with its activation. Second, we are developing homogeneous dual-catalyst systems and assemblies that couple CO2 reduction catalysis to a parallel catalytic reaction that provides the reducing equivalents. We are especially interested in proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions involving activation of H2 and of organic dehydrogenation substrates, wherein the proton pathway also participates in the conversion of CO2 to CO. In both of these research thrusts we are studying catalysts that may be activated under thermal, electrochemical, or photochemical conditions.

312

Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. The SER, provided annually in accordance with Department of Energy DOE Order 5400.1, serves the public by summarizing monitoring data collected to assess how the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) impacts the environment. This report (SER) provides a balanced synopsis of non-radiological monitoring and regulatory compliance data and affirms that the SPR has been operating within acceptable regulatory limits. Included in this report is a description of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1994. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of the Weeks Island facility (disposition of 73 million barrels of crude oil inventory) as well as the degasification of up to 144 million barrels of crude oil inventory at the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry facilities. The decision to decommission the Weeks Island facility is a result of diminishing mine integrity from ground water intrusion. Degasifying the crude oil is required to reduce potentially harmful emissions that would occur during oil movements. With regard to still another major environmental action, 43 of the original 84 environmental findings from the 1992 DOE Tiger Team Assessment were closed by the end of 1994. Spills to the environment, another major topic, indicates a positive trend. Total volume of oil spilled in 1994 was only 39 barrels, down from 232 barrels in 1993, and the total volume of brine spilled was only 90 barrels, down from 370 barrels in 1993. The longer term trend for oil and brine spills has declined substantially from 27 in 1990 down to nine in 1994.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

A Little Here, A Little There, A Fairly Big Problem Everywhere: Small Quantity Site Transuranic Waste Disposition Alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

Luke, Dale Elden; Parker, Douglas Wayne; Moss, J.; Monk, Thomas Hugh; Fritz, Lori Lee; Daugherty, B.; Hladek, K.; Kosiewicx, S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A little here, a little there, a fairly big problem everywhere: Small quantity site transuranic waste disposition alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound Laboratory. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

D. Luke; D. Parker; J. Moss; T. Monk (INEEL); L. Fritz (DOE-ID); B. Daugherty (SRS); K. Hladek (WM Federal Services Hanford); S. Kosiewicx (LANL)

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

22 Quest 3(3) 2007 umans began to practise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). At the site, small mounds of soil accumulate at the base of each shrub, and the shrub mounds tend to be more activi- ties at shrub mounds, and erosion between mounds (Charley and West 1975; Schlesinger et al. 1996 more frequently on the more shaded northern side of soil mounds associated with semi-shrubs than

317

CX-009511: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Bryan Mound site firewater from an alternate source when the Bryan Mound raw water intake is out of service for repair. CX-009511.pdf More Documents & Publications...

318

Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

Doughty, Christine

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

319

ORNL DAAC Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map ORNL DAAC Site Map About Us About ORNL DAAC Who We Are User Working Group Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Citation Policy News Newsletters Workshops Site Map Products...

320

Savannah River Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Application of neural networks to waste site screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste site screening requires knowledge of the actual concentrations of hazardous materials and rates of flow around and below the site with time. The present approach consists primarily of drilling boreholes near contaminated sites and chemically analyzing the extracted physical samples and processing the data. This is expensive and time consuming. The feasibility of using neural network techniques to reduce the cost of waste site screening was investigated. Two neural network techniques, gradient descent back propagation and fully recurrent back propagation were utilized. The networks were trained with data received from Westinghouse Hanford Corporation. The results indicate that the network trained with the fully recurrent technique shows satisfactory generalization capability. The predicted results are close to the results obtained from a mathematical flow prediction model. It is possible to develop a new tool to predict the waste plume, thus substantially reducing the number of the bore sites and samplings. There are a variety of applications for this technique in environmental site screening and remediation. One of the obvious applications would be for optimum well siting. A neural network trained from the existing sampling data could be utilized to decide where would be the best position for the next bore site. Other applications are discussed in the report.

Dabiri, A.E.; Garrett, M.; Kraft, T.; Hilton, J.; VanHammersveld, M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot  

SciTech Connect

Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Formation of sheet plumes, current coils, and helical magnetic fields in a spherical magnetohydrodynamic dynamo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at understanding of magnetic field generation process in rapidly rotating stars and planets represented by the Earth, computer simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo were performed in a rotating spherical shell geometry. Thermal convection and dynamo process with Ekman number of the order of 10{sup -7} were studied. New structures of convection motion, dynamo-generated electrical current, and magnetic field are found. The flow is organized as a set of thin, sheet-like plumes. The current is made of small-scale coil structure with magnetic flux tubes within each of the coil. These flux tubes are connected each other to form a large scale helical magnetic field structure.

Miyagoshi, Takehiro [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama 236-0001 (Japan); Kageyama, Akira [Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Sato, Tetsuya [Graduate School of Simulation Studies, University of Hyogo, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

SSA Young Aspen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site (SSA-YA) The pole-tower at the YA site Closer look at the pole-tower at the YA site Solar panels powering the site, mounted on a folding ladder The young aspen canopy...

325

Chapter 3: Building Siting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Building Siting : Building Siting Site Issues at LANL Site Inventory and Analysis Site Design Transportation and Parking LANL | Chapter 3 Site Issues at LANL Definitions and related documents Building Siting Laboratory site-wide issues include transportation and travel distances for building occupants, impacts on wildlife corridors and hydrology, and energy supply and distribution limitations. Decisions made during site selec- tion and planning impact the surrounding natural habitat, architectural design integration, building energy con- sumption, occupant comfort, and occupant productivity. Significant opportunities for creating greener facilities arise during the site selection and site planning stages of design. Because LANL development zones are pre- determined, identify the various factors affecting devel-

326

Indiana Web Sites  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indiana Web Sites Other Links : Indiana Electricity Profile: Indiana Energy Profile: Indiana Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

327

Florida Web Sites  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Web Sites Other Links : Florida Electricity Profile: Florida Energy Profile: Florida Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

328

MIDC: Web Site Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDC Web Site Search Enter words or phrases: Search Clear Help Also see the site directory. NREL MIDC...

329

The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanfords 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Quantitative measurement of atomic sodium in the plume of a single burning coal particle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of volatile sodium during coal combustion is a significant factor in the fouling and corrosion of heat transfer surfaces within industrial coal-fired boilers. A method for measuring the temporal release of atomic sodium from a single coal particle is described. Laser absorption was used to calibrate laser-induced fluorescence measurements of atomic sodium utilising the sodium D1 line (589.59 nm) in a purpose-designed flat flame environment. The calibration was then applied to planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of sodium atoms in the plume from a single Victorian brown coal particle (53 mg) suspended within the flat flame. The peak concentration of atomic sodium was approximately 64.1 ppb after 1080.5 s, which appears to correspond to the end of char combustion. To our knowledge this is the first in situ quantitative measurement of the concentration field of atomic sodium in the plume above a burning particle. A simple kinetic model has been used to estimate the rate of sodium decay in the post-flame gases. Comparison of the estimated and measured decay rates showed reasonable agreement. (author)

van Eyk, P.J.; Ashman, P.J.; Alwahabi, Z.T. [Cooperative Research Centre for Clean Power from Lignite, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Dynamics of femto- and nanosecond laser ablation plumes investigated using optical emission spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and electron density associated with femto- and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas (LPP) from brass under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, brass targets were ablated in vacuum employing pulses either from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) or from a Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). Optical emission spectroscopy is used to infer the density and temperature of the plasmas. The electron density (n{sub e}) was estimated using Stark broadened profiles of isolated lines while the excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) was estimated using the Boltzmann plot method. At similar fluence levels, continuum and ion emission are dominant in ns LPP at early times (<50 ns) followed by atomic emission, while the fs LPP provided an atomic plume throughout its visible emission lifetime. Though both ns and fs laser-plasmas showed similar temperatures ({approx}1 eV), the fs LPP is found to be significantly denser at shorter distances from the target surface as well as at early phases of its evolution compared to ns LPP. Moreover, the spatial extension of the plume emission in the visible region along the target normal is larger for fs LPP in comparison with ns LPP.

Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Freeman, J. R.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment and School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Preservation of iron(II) by carbon-rich matrices in a hydrothermal plume  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal venting associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism is globally widespread. This venting is responsible for a dissolved iron flux to the ocean that is approximately equal to that associated with continental riverine runoff. For hydrothermal fluxes, it has long been assumed that most of the iron entering the oceans is precipitated in inorganic forms. However, the possibility of globally significant fluxes of iron escaping these mass precipitation events and entering open-ocean cycles is now being debated, and two recent studies suggest that dissolved organic ligands might influence the fate of hydrothermally vented metals. Here we present spectromicroscopic measurements of iron and carbon in hydrothermal plume particles at the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We show that organic carbon-rich matrices, containing evenly dispersed iron(II)-rich materials, are pervasive in hydrothermal plume particles. The absence of discrete iron(II) particles suggests that the carbon and iron associate through sorption or complexation. We suggest that these carbon matrices stabilize iron(II) released from hydrothermal vents in the region, preventing its oxidation and/or precipitation as insoluble minerals. Our findings have implications for deep-sea biogeochemical cycling of iron, a widely recognized limiting nutrient in the oceans.

Toner, Brandy M.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Manganini, Steven J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moffett, James W.; Rouxel, Olivier; German, Christopher R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

333

Pacific Northwest Laboratory Gulfstream I measurements of the Kuwait oil-fire plume, July--August 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of aircraft measurements to determine pollutant and radiative properties of the smoke plume from oil fires in Kuwait. This work was sponsored by the US Department emanating of Energy, in cooperation with several other agencies as part of an extensive effort coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization, to obtain a comprehensive data set to assess the characteristics of the plume and its environmental impact. This report describes field measurement activities and introduces the various data collected, but provides only limited analyses of these data. Results of further data analyses will be presented in subsequent open-literature publications.

Busness, K M; Hales, J M; Hannigan, R V; Thorp, J M; Tomich, S D; Warren, M J [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Al-Sunaid, A A [Saudi ARAMCO, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Daum, P H; Mazurek, M [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Quarterly Progress Report, 4.5 Acre Site April through June 2003  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

plume (Figure 3). The western plume has a small area added at its northern edge (shown in green on the figure). This small addition to the plume is a result of DPT samples that...

335

Microsoft Word - Groundwater_Booklet-2008-v7 weblinks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acronyms ...............................................................................................................................................................................3 Introduction.............................................................................................................................................................................4 Plume Map Function ..............................................................................................................................................................5 Plume Assessment Function..................................................................................................................................................6 Hanford Site: Plume Map ..............................................................................................................................................8

336

GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

On the Meandering and Dispersion of a Plume of Floating Particles Caused by Langmuir Circulation and a Mean Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple analytical models are devised to describe the dispersion of a plume of buoyant material from a fixed source on the sea surface under the action of both mean current and the spatially variable flows induced by Langmuir circulation. A free ...

S. A. Thorpe

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Dissolved methane distributions and air-sea flux in the plume of a massive seep field, Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved methane distributions and air-sea flux in the plume of a massive seep field, Coal Oil coastal ocean near Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara Channel, California. Methane was quantified in the down originating from Coal Oil Point enters the atmosphere within the study area. Most of it appears

California at Santa Barbara, University of

339

Particle Physics Education Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Physics Education Sites quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites -...

340

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

web site A web site is now available for the Land Validation project. It was created with the purpose of facilitating communication among MODIS Land Validation Principal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of specific site safety functions. C. Must have the ability to provide an overall systematic assessment of site safety performance and to characterize the major issues and...

342

Geothermal: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Site Map Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

343

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Plug & Play Sensors Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Documents. Plug & Play Sensors Sites. ... Plug & Play Sensors Sites. By selecting some of the links below, you will be leaving NIST webspace. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

345

Career Site FAQs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Careers Working at ORNL Diversity Postdocs Internships and Postgrad Opportunities Fellowships Career Site FAQs Events and Conferences Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Career Site...

346

Characterization Activities Conducted at the 183-DR Site in Support of an In Situ Gaseous Reduction Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) is a technology developed by DOE for the remediation of soil waste sites contaminated with hexavalent chromium. This document presents information associated with characterization activities conducted at the 183-DR site at Hanford, which is associated with a significant groundwater contaminant plume and was formerly a water treatment facility that utilized chromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Geotechnical and chemical data were collected during the excavation of trenches and the drilling of two vadose zone boreholes to support a possible ISGR demonstration at 183-DR. Although elevated total chromium and trace levels of hexavalent chromium were identified from one of the trenches and one of the boreholes, it appears that the boreholes missed the vadose zone contaminant source responsible for the chromium groundwater plume located downgradient of the 183-DR site. Recommendations are provided, however, for future work at 183-DR that may serve to identify the source for the groundwater plume and possibly provide an opportunity for an ISGR demonstration.

Thornton, Edward C.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Olsen, Khris B.; Schalla, Ronald; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Withdrawal of Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Transfer of Certain Operations From the Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Site, May 17, 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

54 54 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 95 / Tuesday, May 18, 1999 / Notices available from Patrick J. Sherrill at the address specified above. Dated: May 12, 1999. William E. Burrow, Acting Leader, Information Management Group, Office of the Chief Information Officer. Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs Type of Review: Extension. Title: Applications for Grants under Emergency Immigrant Education Program. Frequency: Annually. Affected Public: State, local or Tribal Gov't, SEAs or LEAs. Reporting and Recordkeeping Burden: Responses: 57. Burden Hours: 9,177. Abstract: This application is used by State educational agencies to apply for formula grants authorized under the Emergency Immigrant Education Act (Title VI of Pub. L. 98-511 as amended by Pub. L. 103-382).

348

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

Hartman, M.J. [and others

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration, Reporting Period: April 2008 - February 2009 [re: "Survival and Growth in the Columbia River Plume and north California Current"].  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have made substantial progress toward our objectives outlined in our BPA supported proposal entitled 'Columbia River Basin Juvenile Salmonids: Survival and Growth in the Columbia River Plume and northern California Current' which we report on herein. During 2008, we were able to successfully conduct 3 mesoscale cruises. We also were able to conduct 7 biweekly predator cruises, along with substantial shore-based visual observations of seabirds. Detailed results of the mesoscale cruises are available in the Cruise Reports and summarized in the next section. We have taken a proactive approach to getting the results of our research to fisheries managers and the general public. We have begun to make annual predictions based on ocean conditions of the relative survival of juvenile coho and Chinook salmon well before they return as adults. This is based on both biological and physical indicators that we measure during our surveys or collect from outside data sources. Examples of our predictions for 2009 and 2010 are available on the following web site: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/research/divisions/fed/oeip/a-ecinhome.cfm.

Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries; Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies, Oregon State University; OGI School of Science & Engineering, Oregon Health Sciences University.

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 To operate the Hanford Site (Site),...

353

Retrieval Group Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information Retrieval Tools and Systems: ... currently unavailable. Other sites with extensive information retrieval (IR) links: ...

354

ELSEVIER SurfaceScience369 (1996) 393-402 surface science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-rich layers below this depth. Activity at Challenger Mound, Porcupine Seabight (Site 1317) was one to two), and was higher in the mound than below the mound base. Consistent with the in- terpretation of hydrogenase, and specific activity of the tritiated headspace. Samples from Challenger Mound (Site 1317) were assayed

Rost, Martin

355

The Footprint of the CO[subscript 2] Plume during Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Aquifers: Storage Efficiency for Capillary Trapping at the Basin Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a sharp-interface mathematical model of CO[subscript 2] migration in deep saline aquifers, which accounts for gravity override, capillary trapping, natural groundwater flow, and the shape of the plume during the ...

Juanes, Ruben

356

POLLUTION-CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS AND THEIR IMPACT ON AEROSOL NUCLEATION AND GROWTH IN EMISSIONS PLUMES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nucleation and growth of particles in coal-fired power-plant plumes can greatly contribute to particle concentrations near source regions. Pollution-control technologies have been added to coal-fired (more)

Lonsdale, Chantelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Experimental Measurements of Concentration Fluctuations and Scales in a Dispersing Plume in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Obtained Using a Very Fast Response Concentration Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-frequency fluctuations of concentration in a plume dispersing in the atmospheric surface layer have been measured with high-resolution concentration detectors (approximately 270 Hz at the ?6-dB point) to extract various concentration ...

Eugene Yee; R. Chan; P. R. Kosteniuk; G. M. Chandler; C. A. Biltoft; J. F. Bowers

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Oklahoma Dispersion Model: Using the Gaussian Plume Model as an Operational Management Tool for Determining Near-Surface Dispersion Conditions across Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Dispersion Model (ODM) represents a current innovative application of the classic Gaussian plume model in an operational setting. Utilizing a statewide mesoscale automated weather station network (the Oklahoma Mesonet) for current ...

J. D. Carlson; Derek S. Arndt

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan: Site planning  

SciTech Connect

This plan revises the Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan submitted by Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988. It separates the Hanford Site facilities into two categories: ''strategically required'' facilities and ''marginal'' facilities. It provides a comparison of future facility requirements against existing capacities and proposed projects to eliminate or consolidate marginal facilities (i.e., those facilities that are not fully utilized or are no longer required to accomplish programmatic missions). The objective is to enhance the operating efficiency of the Hanford Site by maximizing facility use and minimizing unnecessary facility operating and maintenance costs. 11 refs.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Decision document for performing a long-term pumping test at the S-3 Site, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal problems confronting the remediation of Bear Creek Valley is the cleanup of contaminated groundwater. The S-3 Site is one of the locations in the valley where groundwater is most contaminated, and contamination from the S-3 Site has also caused extensive contamination of downgradient groundwater. This groundwater plume, therefore, has a high priority in the Bear Creek Valley remedial process. Pumping and treating groundwater was identified early in the feasibility study as a likely remedial alternative for the S-3 Site groundwater plume. The hydrology and geochemistry of the plume are extremely complex. There is a high degree of uncertainty in the current understanding of how the aquifer will react physically and chemically to pumping, making evaluation of a pump-and-treat alternative impractical at the present time. Before a pump-and-treat alternative can be evaluated, its technical practicability, effectiveness, and projected cost must be determined. A long-term pumping test (LTPT) at the S-3 Site has been proposed so that the information necessary to carry out this evaluation can be collected. This document constitutes the first phase in the planning process for this test.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Site Manager Kansas City Site Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kansas City Site Office (KCSO) Workforce Diversity FY 2010 NNSA Service Center EEO and Diversity Program Office PO Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 (505) 845-5517 TTY (800)...

362

Waste tank 241-SY-101 dome airspace and ventilation system response to a flammable gas plume burn  

SciTech Connect

A series of flammable gas plume burn and transient pressure analyses have been completed for a nuclear waste tank (241-SY-101) and associated tank farm ventilation system at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford facility. The subject analyses were performed to address issues concerning the effects of transient pressures resulting from igniting a small volume of concentrated flammable gas just released from the surface of the waste as a plume and before the flammable gas concentration could be reduced by mixing with the dome airspace by local convection and turbulent diffusion. Such a condition may exist as part of an in progress episode gas release (EGR) or gas plume event. The analysis goal was to determine the volume of flammable gas that if burned within the dome airspace would result in a differential pressure, after propagating through the ventilation system, greater than the current High Efficiency Particulate Filter (HEPA) limit of 2.49 KPa (10 inches of water or 0. 36 psi). Such a pressure wave could rupture the tank ventilation system inlet and outlet HEPA filters leading to a potential release of contaminants to the environment

Heard, F.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Nonlinear Bayesian Algorithms for Gas Plume Detection and Estimation from Hyper-spectral Thermal Image Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a nonlinear Bayesian regression algorithm for the purpose of detecting and estimating gas plume content from hyper-spectral data. Remote sensing data, by its very nature, is collected under less controlled conditions than laboratory data. As a result, the physics-based model that is used to describe the relationship between the observed remotesensing spectra, and the terrestrial (or atmospheric) parameters that we desire to estimate, is typically littered with many unknown "nuisance" parameters (parameters that we are not interested in estimating, but also appear in the model). Bayesian methods are well-suited for this context as they automatically incorporate the uncertainties associated with all nuisance parameters into the error estimates of the parameters of interest. The nonlinear Bayesian regression methodology is illustrated on realistic simulated data from a three-layer model for longwave infrared (LWIR) measurements from a passive instrument. This shows that this approach should permit more accurate estimation as well as a more reasonable description of estimate uncertainty.

Heasler, Patrick G.; Posse, Christian; Hylden, Jeff L.; Anderson, Kevin K.

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

364

Joint reconstructions of CO2 plumes using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach  

SciTech Connect

We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where CO{sub 2} saturation is changing. The technique combines prior information with measurements of injected CO{sub 2} volume, reservoir deformation and electrical resistivity. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The method can (a) jointly reconstruct disparate data types such as surface or subsurface tilt, electrical resistivity, and injected CO{sub 2} volume measurements, (b) provide quantitative measures of the result uncertainty, (c) identify competing models when the available data are insufficient to definitively identify a single optimal model and (d) rank the alternative models based on how well they fit available data. We use measurements collected during CO{sub 2} injection for enhanced oil recovery to illustrate the method's performance. The stochastic inversions provide estimates of the most probable location, shape, volume of the plume and most likely CO{sub 2} saturation. The results suggest that the method can reconstruct data with poor signal to noise ratio.

Ramirez, A; Friedmann, S J; Foxall, W; Dyer, K; Kirkendall, B; Aines, R; Daily, W

2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

Redesigned Web Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Redesigned Web Sites In an ongoing effort to improve services to our customers, the ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce that it has released a major revision to its Web site. The new...

366

Web Site Metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International World Wide Web Conference, pages 11231124,Erik Wilde. Site Metadata on the Web. In Proceedings of theUCB ISchool Report 2009-028 Web Site Metadata [4] David R.

Wilde, Erik; Roy, Anuradha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

SSA Fen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-Fen site. A general view of the Fen The flux tower at the Fen The huts at the Fen Pink flamingos, fen hens at the SSA-Fen site. Aerial...

368

Towoomba Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphs Image TWM-1: General view of the Towoomba savanna grassland site, South Africa. (Photograph by Dr. R.J. Scholes, Forestek, CSIR, Pretoria, South Africa). Go to Site...

369

2012 Site Visit Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... before the first day on-site, all team members meet at their hotel to finalize ... All of the prework done above will save you much time and energy on-site ...

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

ORNL Site Ofice  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORNL Site Ofice ORNL Site Ofice P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6269 January 28, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR GREGORY H. WOODS GENERAL COUNSEL GC-1 FROM: SUBJECT: ��MK = MOORE, MANAGER lF �NL SITE OFFICE ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY FOR 2013- OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY (ORNL) SITE OFFICE (OSO) This correspondence transmits the Annual NEPA Planning Summary for 2013 for OSO.

371

Completed Sites Listing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As of fiscal year 2012, EM (and its predecessor organization UMTRA) completed cleanup and closed 90 sites in 24 states.

372

Idaho Site Nuclear Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Nuclear Facilities Idaho Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Idaho Closure Project (ICP) This page was last updated on May 16...

373

The application of borehole logging to characterize the hydrogeology of the Faultless site, Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect

The Central Nevada Test Area was the site of the Faultless underground nuclear test that could be a source of radionuclide contamination to aquifers in Hot Creek Valley, Nevada. Field studies in 1992 and 1993 have used hydrologic logging and water sampling to determine the adequacy of the current groundwater monitoring network and the status of water-level recovery to pre-shot levels in the nuclear chimney. The field studies have determined that there is a possibility for contaminant migration away from the Faultless event though the pre-event water level has not been attained, while new data raise questions about the ability of the current monitoring network to detect migration. Hydrologic logs from the postshot hole (drilled into the chimney created by the nuclear detonation) reveal inflow around 485 m below land surface. The physical and chemical characteristics of the inflow water indicate that its source is much deeper in the chimney, perhaps driven upward in a convection cell generated by heat near the nuclear cavity. Logging and sampling at monitoring wells HTH-1 and HTH-2 revealed that the completion of HTH-1 may be responsible for its elevated water level (as compared to pre-nuclear test levels) and may have also created a local mound in the water table in the alluvium that accounts for higher post-test water levels at HTH-2. This mound would serve to divert flow around the monitoring wells, so that only migration of contaminants through the underlying, higher pressure, volcanic units is currently monitored. A hydraulic high found in an abandoned hole located between the nuclear chimney and the monitoring wells further reduces the likelihood of HTH-1 or HTH-2 intercepting contaminant migration.

Chapman, J.B.; Mihevc, T.M.; Lyles, B.F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

375

Subsidence monitoring and evaluation plan for strategic petroleum reserve storage sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsidence is occurring at all six Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) sites. It results from a combination of cavern closure, Frasch-process sulphur extraction, fluid withdrawal, and from natural causes. Of these, cavern closure resulting from slat creep is the predominant source. A subsidence monitoring program is recommended that includes: (a) continuation of annual releveling; (b) quadrennial determination of horizontal drift; (c) triennial measurement of gravity values to determine elevation change and to validate releveling data; (d) 1/2400 air photos quadrennially; (e) coordination of other subsidence monitoring efforts, especially involving regional subsidence; (f) continuation of cavern creep modeling; (g) engineering evaluation of observed and predicted subsidence effects; (h) information dissemination in the form of an annual review and report. A priority sequence is suggested that considers observed subsidence and operational factors such as oil inventories and risk appraisal. First (highest) priority is assigned to Weeks Island and West Hackberry. Second (intermediate) priority is given to Bayou Choctaw and Bryan Mound. Third, (lowest) priority is assigned to Sulphur Mines and Big Hill. The priority strategy can be used as a management tool in allocating resources and in determining relative attention that is required at the six sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

Neal, J.T.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WORK PLAN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND RESTORATION OF THE DOE MOUND SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH SITE, THE MOUND 2000 APPROACH FEBRUARY 1999 Final (Revision 0) Department of Energy Babcock & Wilcox of Ohio Mr. Daniel Bird AICP, Planning Manager Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation 720 Mound Road Miamisburg, Ohio 45342-6714 Dear Mr. Bird: The Core Team, consisting of the U.S. Department of Energy Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (DOE-MEMP), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA), appreciates your comments on the Work

377

DOE Site List  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Links Links Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner DOE Site List Site Geo Site Code State Operations Office1 DOE Programs Generating Streams at Site DOE Programs Managing Facilities Associated Data2 Acid/Pueblo Canyons ACPC NM Oak Ridge Waste/Media, Facilities Airport Substation CA Western Area Power Administration Facilities Akron Hill Communication Site CO Western Area Power Administration Facilities Akron Substation CO Western Area Power Administration Facilities AL Complex NM Albuquerque DP Facilities Alba Craft ALCL OH Oak Ridge Facilities Albany Research Center AMRC OR Oak Ridge Facilities Alcova Switchyard WY Western Area Power Administration Facilities Aliquippa Forge ALFO PA Oak Ridge Facilities

378

Site Environmental Report, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Potential Release Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRS PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and the town of Los Alamos at which hazardous materials from past activities have been found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators sumps firing ranges

380

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanfords 300 Area Uranium Plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Investigation of CO2 plume behavior for a large-scale pilot test of geologic carbon storage in a saline formation  

SciTech Connect

The hydrodynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on trapping mechanisms that lead to CO{sub 2} plume stabilization. A numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture is developed to simulate a planned pilot test, in which 1,000,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} is injected over a four-year period, and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume for hundreds of years. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of the partitioning of CO{sub 2} between dissolved, immobile free-phase, and mobile free-phase forms. Model results indicate that the injected CO{sub 2} plume is effectively immobilized at 25 years. At that time, 38% of the CO{sub 2} is in dissolved form, 59% is immobile free phase, and 3% is mobile free phase. The plume footprint is roughly elliptical, and extends much farther up-dip of the injection well than down-dip. The pressure increase extends far beyond the plume footprint, but the pressure response decreases rapidly with distance from the injection well, and decays rapidly in time once injection ceases. Sensitivity studies that were carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual CO{sub 2} saturation indicate that small changes in properties can have a large impact on plume evolution, causing significant trade-offs between different trapping mechanisms.

Doughty, C.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Siting Handbook WIND ENERGY SITING HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Wind Energy Siting Handbook (the "Handbook") presents general information about regulatory and environmental issues associated with the development and siting of wind energy projects in the United States. It is intended to be a general guidance document providing technical information and tools for identifying potential issues that may arise with wind energy projects. The Handbook contains links to resources on the Internet. Those links are provided solely as aids to assist you in locating other Internet resources that may be of interest. They are not intended to state or imply that AWEA or the Contributors endorse, approve, sponsor, or are affiliated or associated with those linked sites. The Handbook is not intended as a comprehensive discussion of all wind energy project issues and should be used in conjunction with other available resources. The Handbook also is not intended as legal or environmental advice or as a best practices manual, nor should it be considered as such. Because the Handbook is only a general guidance document, independent legal counsel and/or environmental consulting services should be obtained to further explore any wind energy siting issue, matter, or project. In reviewing all or any part of the Handbook, you acknowledge and understand that the Handbook is only a general guidance document and does not constitute a best practices manual, legal or environmental advice, or a legal or other relationship with the American Wind Energy Association ("AWEA") or any of the persons or entities

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Journal of Insect Behavior, Vol. 18, No. 6, November 2005 ( C 2005) DOI: 10.1007/s10905-005-8745-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mounds, while burial ritual shifted from Colonial/Sedentary practices to inhumation. Similarly (or "mounds") most famously at Hohokam sites but also at Chaco Canyon (Anasazi/Pueblo). Both regions conical or pyramidal platforms/mounds, and quite remarkably, effigy mounds one of a headless bird

Tschinkel, Walter R.

384

Weeks Island brine diffuser site study: baseline conditions and environmental assessment technical report  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the results of a study conducted at two alternative brine diffuser sites (A and B) proposed for the Weeks Island salt dome, together with an analysis of the potential physical, chemical, and biological effects of brine disposal for this area of the Gulf of Mexico. Brine would result from either the leaching of salt domes to form or enlarge oil storage caverns, or the subsequent use of these caverns for crude oil storage in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program. Brine leached from the Weeks Island salt dome would be transported through a pipeline which would extend from the salt dome either 27 nautical miles (32 statute miles) for Site A, or 41 nautical miles (47 statute miles) for Site B, into Gulf waters. The brine would be discharged at these sites through an offshore diffuser at a sustained peak rate of 39 ft/sup 3//sec. The disposal of large quantities of brine in the Gulf could have a significant impact on the biology and water quality of the area. Physical and chemical measurements of the marine environment at Sites A and B were taken between September 1977 and July 1978 to correlate the existing environmental conditions with the estimated physical extent of tthe brine discharge as predicted by the MIT model (US Dept. of Commerce, 1977a). Measurements of wind, tide, waves, currents, and stratification (water column structure) were also obtained since the diffusion and dispersion of the brine plume are a function of the local circulation regime. These data were used to calculate both near- and far-field concentrations of brine, and may also be used in the design criteria for diffuser port configuration and verification of the plume model. Biological samples were taken to characterize the sites and to predict potential areas of impact with regard to the discharge. This sampling focused on benthic organisms and demersal fish. (DMC)

None

1980-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

385

NETL: Site Environmental Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Quality Site Environmental Quality About NETL Site Environmental Quality - Certified to ISO 14001:2004 Questions about NETL's Environment, Safety and Health Management System may be directed to Michael Monahan, 304-285-4408, michael.monahan@netl.doe.gov. NETL has implemented an Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Management System, based on DOE's Integrated Safety Management System, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14000 series, and the Occupational Health and Safety Assessment (OHSAS) 18000 series. While the original scope of the ES&H Management System included the Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites, in fiscal year 2010, the Albany site was incorporated into the existing ES&H Management System. In addition, all three sites underwent ISO 14001:2004 recertification audits and Morgantown and

386

WCI | Site 300 CORS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CORS : CORS Weather Site Access Contained Firing Facility (CFF) Continuosly Operating Reference Station (CORS) CORS logo How to access GPS satellite data The National Geodetic Survey(NGS) Home Page for the S300 CORS base station is: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/CORS/ Type S300 into "enter SiteID" To get user-friendly data: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/UFCORS/ The GPS data will be in "receiver independent exchange" (RINEX) format, version 2.10. CORS Proxy Data Availability Details: NGS Reference Position Information Site 300 CORS Reference Position RTK Transmission Frequency NGS s300 Site Log NGS s300 Site Map Links to other GPS sites Last modified: July 27, 2011 UCRL-MI-134143 | Privacy & Legal Notice Contact: wci-webteam@llnl.gov NNSA Logo DOE Logo

387

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.. ' \ MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 -December 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Dayvault JR 7CJ7 This report summarizes current project status and activities implemented during October tiU'ough December 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities for the Monticello MIII Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection repmis, site meteorological data, and monitoring summary for tlw ex situ ground water treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 · * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities (see attached repmis). .

388

ColumbusSites.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Columbus, Ohio, Sites consist of two geographically Columbus, Ohio, Sites consist of two geographically separate properties owned by the Battelle Memorial Institute: the King Avenue site, located in the city of Columbus, and the West Jefferson site, located approx- imately 15 miles west of Columbus. Battelle conducted extensive nuclear research at both locations for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies between 1943 and 1986. The research resulted in contamination of soil, buildings, and equipment with radioactive and mixed waste materials. Environmental cleanup of the sites began in 1986. The 6-acre King Avenue site, which was historically a part of the federal government's fuel and target fab- rication program, consisted of 9 buildings and the surrounding grounds. Nuclear research conducted at the

389

Site environmental report summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Nairobi Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRB-1: Canopy reflectance measurement within the Nairobi grassland site, Kenya. (Prof. Jenesio Kinyamario, University of Nairobi, is using a rednear-infrared spectral ratio meter....

391

CPER Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CPR-1: Weather stationexclosure within the CPER grassland site, Colorado, USA. (Mark Lindquist, Colorado State University, is checking a wetdry deposition gauge. Photograph taken...

392

1994 Site environmental report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Site Transition Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Transition Guidance March 2010 Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington D. C. 20585 Standard Review Plan (SRP) Technical Framework for EM...

394

Badkhyz Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BDK-1: Experiment to study the effect of UV-b solar radiation on litter decomposition at the Badkhyz grassland site, Turkmenistan. (Prof. Leonid Rodin, Komarov Botanical Institute,...

395

historic site award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Honors 'Historic Site' of NBS Physics Discovery. ... The American Physical Society (APS) has named ... revealed that in certain nuclear processes pairs ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

396

RMOTC RMOTC -Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Home About Us About Us Staff Field Info History Photo Gallery Awards & Testimonials Safety Initiatives Outreach & Community News Latest News Newsletters Press Releases...

397

2004 Environmental Site Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

phenolic compounds. Tests of underground coal gasification and tests of in-situ oil shale retorting resulted in contamination at these sites. The largest cleanup activity...

398

SITE LIGHTING FOUNDATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Site Lighting. This analysis is in support of design drawing BABBDF000-01717-2100-23016.

M. Gomez

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

399

Site Lead TQP Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and...

400

2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2003. However, seven SWMUs could not be remediated to No Further Action (NFA) status. The long- term monitoring of these inactive waste sites has been incorporated into...

402

Kursk Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphs Image KRS-1: Clipping above-ground biomass at the Kursk grassland site, Russia. (Dr. Kira Khodashova and student Nina N., Moscow State University, are estimating monthly...

403

SRS Site Needs  

SRS Site Needs Neil R. Davis Program Manager Technology Development and Tank Closure Projects Washington Savannah River Company Aluminum/Chromium Leaching Technical ...

404

Calabozo Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLB-1: General view of the Trachypogon savanna at the Calabozo grassland site, Venezuela. (Trees include Curatella americana, Bowdichia virgilioides and Byrsonima crassifolia....

405

1999 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Historical Photographs: Idaho Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Sites Small Image 1. Measuring intentional radiation release at the Idaho experimental dairy farm (1964). (195Kbytes) Small Image 2. Measuring intentional radiation...

407

Pantex Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Pantex Site Activity Reports 2013 Pantex Plant Operational Awareness Oversight, May 2013 Review Reports 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant,...

408

LM Sites | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LM Sites LM Sites Alaska Puerto Rico Continental US Search Search Legacy Management Site Documents > Additional Information Guidance and Reports InspectionSampling Schedule...

409

Interpretation of Measured Tracer Concentration Fluctuations Using a Sinusoidal Meandering Plume Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous instantaneous concentration and wind velocity fluctuations were measured 100 to 752 m downwind of a point source release of SF6 tracer during two field studies conducted amid rolling wheat fields and at a flat desert site in eastern ...

Holly Peterson; Brian Lamb; David Stock

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hanford Site Video Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Video Library currently makes 30 videos related to the sites history and the clean-up available for online viewing. The Video Library (also referred to as the Broadcast Archive) can be searched by keywords in the title or description. They can also be browsed in a complete list.

411

Site characterization handbook  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanfords 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanfords 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

414

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

April 1 - June 30, 2008 April 1 - June 30, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during April through June 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities. * Shrub seedlings planted last fall had a poor survival rate. * New damage to shrubs and vole infestation is not evident. * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no abnormalities.

415

site_transition.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legacy Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF This fact sheet explains the process for transferring a site to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion Introduction Transition Process After environmental remediation is completed at a site and there is no continuing mission, responsibility for the site and the associated records are transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management for post-closure management. Where residual hazards (e.g., disposal cells, ground water contamination) remain, active long-term surveillance and maintenance will be required to ensure protection of human health and the environment. The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) established transition guidance for remediated sites that will transfer to LM for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The

416

Web Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help » Web Site Map Help » Web Site Map Web Site Map The links listed below include all pages on the site except document topic pages. Home Privacy/Security Help Web Site Map Mailing Services Remove me from the List Contact Us About Us News and Events News Archives News/Media FAQs Internet Resources Documents DUF6 EIS Historical Context What is an EIS? Why EIS is Needed Who is Responsible? EIS Process EIS Topics EIS Alternatives EIS Schedule Public Involvement Opportunities Public Comment Form For More Info DUF6 Management and Uses Management Responsibilities DUF6 Storage How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored Cylinder Leakage DUF6 Storage Safety DUF6 PEIS Cylinder Surveillance and Maintenance Conversion Potential DU Uses "Business Case" for R&D on Beneficial Uses of DU Catalysts for Destruction of Air Pollutants

417

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January 1 - March 31, 2008 January 1 - March 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during January through March 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. The first semi-annual FFA meeting of 2008 was held at UDEQ in Salt Lake City, Utah, March 26 and 27, 2008. Minutes and action items resulting from that meeting will be prepared under separate cover pending review and concurrence by EPA and UDEQ. Draft minutes and action items are scheduled for submittal by May 1, 2008.

418

Site decommissioning management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Related Data Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Data Sites Related Data Sites CDIAC has listed the following Web sites because these sites offer high-quality data sets (not available through CDIAC) from a variety of global-change themes. These links will take you outside of CDIAC, therefore, we are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. This list is not intended to be comprehensive, but we do hope you find it useful if you cannot find what you are looking for here at CDIAC. Multi-Agency Sites Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS) GCDIS is a collection of distributed information systems operated by government agencies involved in global change research. GCDIS provides global change data to scientists and researchers, policy makers, educators, industry, and the public at large and includes multidisciplinary data from

420

Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Other Sites Summary Other Sites Summary Search Other Sites Considered Sites Other Sites All LM Quick Search All Other Sites 11 E (2) Disposal Cell - 037 ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 Argonne National Laboratory - West - 014 Bodo Canyon Cell - 006 Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 Chevron Panna Maria Site - 030 Clive Disposal Cell - 036 Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 Conoco Conquista Site - 031 Cotter Canon City Site - 009 Dawn Ford Site - 038 EFB White Mesa Site - 033 Energy Technology Engineering Center - 044 Estes Gulch Disposal Cell - 010 Exxon Ray Point Site - 032 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory - 016 Fernald Environmental Management Project - 027 Fort St Vrain - 011 Geothermal Test Facility - 001 Hecla Durita Site - 012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MONTICELLO NPL SITES MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 - December 31, 2007 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no problems that have not been addressed. (inspection checklists attached). * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no unacceptable conditions. * Pond 4 leachate detection and removal systems continue to operate at normal levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Repository leachate collection and removal system (LCRS) and leachate collection system (LDS) continue to operate at normal and acceptable levels (leachate pumping summary attached). * Portions of repository cover were planted with rabbitbrush seedlings to repair areas

422

Site Map - Pantex Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Site Map Site Map Page Content Pantex.com Mission & Strategies Mission National Security Nuclear Explosive Operations Nuclear Material Operations HE Operations Strategies Advance HE Center of Excellence Exemplify a High Reliability Organization Health & Safety Safety Training Occupational Medicine Contractor Safety Environment Environmental Projects & Operations Regulatory Compliance Waste Operations Environmental Management System Environmental Document Library Public Meetings Doing Business With Pantex Procurement How We Buy Subcontracting Opportunities Supplier Information Profile Suspect/Counterfiet Items Business Definitions Documents and Forms Accounts Payable Work for Others Our Capabilities How to do Business with the Pantex eXMC Employee Information Benefits

423

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin SiteInstruments Darwin SiteInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility, Darwin, Australia [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] CSPHOT Cimel Sunphotometer Aerosols, Radiometric Browse Data [ Single installation ] DISDROMETER Impact Disdrometer Surface Meteorology Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] DL Doppler Lidar Cloud Properties Browse Data [ Single installation ] GNDRAD Ground Radiometers on Stand for Upwelling Radiation Radiometric Browse Plots

424

The DOD Siting Clearinghouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The DoD Siting Clearinghouse The DoD Siting Clearinghouse Dave Belote Director, Siting Clearinghouse Office of the Secretary of Defense The Nexus of National Security & Renewable Energy * Unintended Consequences - Rapid development of renewable technologies - Rapidly changing military technology research & development * Existing Policy and Processes - Not up to date with changing technologies - Land use decision-making authorities fragmented across all levels of government 2 From Nellis to Shepherds Flat: Congressional Push for Action 3 Congressional Response - FY2011 NDAA, Section 358 * Section 358 "Study Of Effects Of New Construction Of Obstructions On Military Installations And Operations" - Integrated review process - 180-day backlog assessment

425

Princeton Site Ofice  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Princeton Site Ofice Princeton Site Ofice P.O. Box 102 Princeton, New Jersey 08542-0102 TO: Gregory H. Woods, General Counsel JA N Z Q= LMN N= SUBJECT: PRINCETON SITE OFFICE (PSO) 2013 ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY Section 5(a)(7) of DOE Order 451.1B Change 3, NEPA Compliance Program, requires each Secretarial Oficer and Head of Field Organization to submit an Annual NEPA Planning Summary to the General Coun. s el. We have reviewed

426

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard for the Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy 1 Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program A Site Lead is an individual, normally at a senior General Schedule (GS) level or Excepted Service, who is assigned the responsibility to assess and evaluate management systems, safety and health programs, and technical activities associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. Typically, a Site Lead has previously qualified as a Nuclear Safety Specialist or a Senior Technical Safety Manager. For exceptionally qualified individuals,

427

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

428

ARM - TWP Nauru Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Site Nauru Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Nauru Site Location: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Altitude: 7.1 meters The Nauru facility was established in November 1998 as the second TWP climate research station. It is situated in the Denigomodu district on Nauru Island, the Republic of Nauru, which is located in the western South Pacific, approximately 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea. The ARM Program selected this location because it is on the eastern edge of the Pacific warm pool under La Niña conditions, which affect weather patterns

429

TWP Darwin Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin Site Darwin Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Darwin Site Location: 12° 25' 28.56" S, 130° 53' 29.75" E Altitude: 29.9 meters The third TWP climate research facility was established in April 2002 in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. The facility is situated adjacent to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Meteorological Office near Darwin International Airport. Darwin was chosen because it meets the scientific goal of the ARM Program, providing a unique set of climate regimes that are not seen at the other TWP facilities. Annually, Darwin

430

TWP Nauru Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Site Nauru Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Nauru Site Location: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Altitude: 7.1 meters The Nauru facility was established in November 1998 as the second TWP climate research station. It is situated in the Denigomodu district on Nauru Island, the Republic of Nauru, which is located in the western South Pacific, approximately 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea. The ARM Program selected this location because it is on the eastern edge of the Pacific warm pool under La Niña conditions, which affect weather patterns

431

Maryland Web Site Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Website M a r y l a n d Web site Introduction The University Of Maryland 2005 Solar Decathlon Team has created a website to inform the public about solar living, establish an...

432

Moss Web Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moss Web Sites Name: Barbara Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I would like some on-line information about using various mosses in gardens - or pointers to other...

433

EERE: Web Site Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy (EERE) has developed this page to detail its compliance with the Office of Management and Budget Policies for Federal Public Web Sites. To learn more about EERE, visit...

434

Nylsvley Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image NLS-1: Typical view of fine-leaved savanna at the Nylsvley study site, South Africa. (Dominant trees are Acacia tortilis. Photograph taken 1997 by Dr. R.J. Scholes, CSIR,...

435

EERE: Web Site Policies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Web Site Policies The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has developed this page to detail its compliance with the Office of Management and Budget Policies for...

436

Kade Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

growth at the Kade tropical forest site, Ghana. (typically, the area would now be ready for burning and planting. Photograph taken 1958 by Dr. P.H. Nye, Beckley, Oxon., UK...

437

Site Energy Reduction Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DuPonts Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU/LB basis. By 2004, overall progress had slowed, energy consumption increased slightly, and area results were mixed. It was time to shake things up with a new perspective. A coordinated site energy program was launched. In 2005, the first full year of the unified program, the site saved $6.9 MM from energy reduction projects. The rate of improvement is accelerating in 2006 with $3.6 MM in energy projects being implemented in the first four months.

Jagen, P. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Matador Site Image #1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTD-1: Field work in progress at the Matador grassland site, Saskatchewan, Canada. (The sample plots were located between 1.0 and 2.4 km from this point, on flat topography....

439

ParaSITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

paraSITE proposes the appropriation of exterior ventilation systems on existing architecture to inflate pneumatic shelters that are designed for homeless people. This project involves the production of a series of inflatable ...

Rakowitz, Michael

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

SSA Old Aspen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SSA-OA) SSA-OA) View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-OA site The two huts and boardwalk The scaffold flux tower The base of the scaffold flux tower One of the canopy access towers The SRC meteorology tower The truss tower and cables from the flux tower Cabled tethersonde above the SSA Old Aspen (SSA-OA) site The tethersonde about to be launched (tethered balloon and radiosonde) Picture of the SRC meteorological tower at the SSA-OA site taken from the flux tower. Improved road into the SSA-OA site within the Prince Albert National Park. Aerial of SSA-OA tower during the winter IFC. SSA-OA flux tower about 40 meters in height, approximately 20 meters above canopy. Photograph of investigator hut and boardwalk at the SSA-OA site. Andy Black and associate within the hut at the SSA-OA site showing the various recording and data display instruments from the tower.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mound site plume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

TREATABILITY STUDY FOR EDIBLE OIL DEPLOYMENT FOR ENHANCED CVOC ATTENUATION FOR T-AREA, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater beneath T-Area, a former laboratory and semiworks operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS), is contaminated by chlorinated solvents (cVOCs). Since the contamination was detected in the 1980s, the cVOCs at T-Area have been treated by a combination of soil vapor extraction and groundwater pump and treat. The site received approval to temporarily discontinue the active groundwater treatment and implement a treatability study of enhanced attenuation - an engineering and regulatory strategy that has recently been developed by DOE and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC 2007). Enhanced attenuation uses active engineering solutions to alter the target site in such a way that the contaminant plume will passively stabilize and shrink and to document that the action will be effective, timely, and sustainable. The paradigm recognizes that attenuation remedies are fundamentally based on a mass balance. Thus, long-term plume dynamics can be altered either by reducing the contaminant loading from the source or by increasing the rate of natural attenuation processes within all, or part of, the plume volume. The combination of technologies that emerged for T-Area included: (1) neat (pure) vegetable oil deployment in the deep vadose zone in the former source area, (2) emulsified vegetable oil deployment within the footprint of the groundwater plume, and (3) identification of attenuation mechanisms and rates for the distal portion of the plume. In the first part, neat oil spreads laterally forming a thin layer on the water table to intercept and reduce future cVOC loading (via partitioning) and reduce oxygen inputs (via biostimulation). In the second and third parts, emulsified oil forms active bioremediation reactor zones within the plume footprint to degrade existing groundwater contamination (via reductive dechlorination and/or cometabolism) and stimulates long-term attenuation capacity in the distal plume (via cometabolism). For TArea, the enhanced attenuation development process proved to be a powerful tool in developing a strategy that provides a high degree of performance while minimizing adverse collateral impacts of the remediation (e.g., energy use and wetland damage) and minimizing life-cycle costs. As depicted in Figure 1, Edible oil deployment results in the development of structured geochemical zones and serves to decrease chlorinated compound concentrations in two ways: (1) physical sequestration, which reduces effective aqueous concentration and mobility; and (2) stimulation of anaerobic, abiotic and cometabolic degradation processes. In the central deployment area, contaminant initially partitions into the added oil phase. Biodegradation of the added organic substrate depletes the aquifer of oxygen and other terminal electron acceptors and creates conditions conducive to anaerobic degradation processes. The organic substrate is fermented to produce hydrogen, which is used as an electron donor for anaerobic dechlorination by organisms such as Dehalococcoides. Daughter products leaving the central treatment zone are amenable to aerobic oxidation. Further, the organic compounds leaving the central deployment zone (e.g., methane and propane) stimulate and enhance down gradient aerobic cometabolism which degrades both daughter compounds and several parent cVOCs. Figure 1 depicts TCE concentration reduction processes (labeled in green) along with their corresponding breakdown products in a structured geochemical zone scenario. A consortium of bacteria with the same net effect of Dehalococcoides may be present in the structured geochemical zones leading to the degradation of TCE and daughter products. Figure 2 shows a schematic of the documented cVOC degradation processes in both the anaerobic and aerobic structured geochemical zones. Specific aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and their degradation pathways are also listed in the diagram and have either been confirmed in the field or the laboratory. See references in the bibliography in Section 11.

Riha, B.; Looney, B.; Noonkester, J.; Hyde, W.; Walker, R.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Considered Sites | Department of Energy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sites » Considered Sites Sites » Considered Sites Considered Sites View Considered Sites View Other Sites DOE maintains the Considered Sites Database to provide information to the public about sites that were formerly used in the nation's nuclear weapons and early atomic energy programs and that had the potential for residual radioactive contamination on site. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in March 1974 under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to identify, investigate, and take appropriate cleanup action at sites where work was performed in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and early AEC programs. Site activities included uranium ore storage and processing, uranium metal

443

Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites  

SciTech Connect

Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

Freshley, Mark D.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Site Characterization Plan: Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial feasibility study of options to treat the uranium plume at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit considered hydraulic containment, slurry wall containment, and groundwater extraction as potential remedial action technologies. None were selected for interim action, and reduction of contamination levels by natural processes was considered a viable alternative while source removal actions continued. Subsequent planning for a Phase III feasibility study focused on methods that would reduce the concentration of uranium in the aquifer, including multiple methods to immobilize uranium using chemical-based technologies. Based on an initial technology screening, the polyphosphate technology was identified as the best candidate to treat the for further evaluation and selected for treatability testing. The overall objective of the polyphosphate treatability test is to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium contaminated groundwater in situ. The objective of the work elements included in this site characterization plan is to collect site-specific characterization data that will be needed to design and implement a field-scale demonstration of the technology.

Vermeul, Vince R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Bruce A.; Williams, Mark D.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Evaluation of fall chinook salmon spawning adjacent to the In-Situ Redox Manipulation treatability test site, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) experiment is being evaluated as a potential method to remove contaminants from groundwater adjacent to the Columbia River near the 100-D Area. The ISRM experiment involves using sodium dithionate (Na{sub 2}O{sub 6}S{sub 2}) to precipitate chromate from the groundwater. The treatment will likely create anoxic conditions in the groundwater down-gradient of the ISRM treatability test site; however, the spatial extent of this anoxic plume is not exactly known. Surveys were conducted in November 1997, following the peak spawning of fall chinook salmon. Aerial surveys documented 210 redds (spawning nests) near the downstream island in locations consistent with previous surveys. Neither aerial nor underwater surveys documented fall chinook spawning in the vicinity of the ISRM treatability test site. Based on measurements of depth, velocity, and substrate, less than 1% of the study area contained suitable fall chinook salmon spawning habitat, indicating low potential for fall chinook salmon to spawn in the vicinity of the ISRM experiment.

Mueller, R.P.; Geist, D.R.

1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

447

SSA Mixed Canopy Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Canopy Site (SSA-Mix) Mixed Canopy Site (SSA-Mix) The TE canopy tower The mixed trees Terrestrial Ecology canopy access tower at the SSA mixed coniferous/deciduous site. A picture taken looking down from the TE canopy access tower at the SSA mixed auxiliary site, showing the aspen and spruce canopies. Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos SSA Photos || SSA-Airport Photos | SSA-Fen Photos | SSA-Mix Photos | SSA-OA Photos | SSA-OBS Photos | SSA-OJP Photos | SSA-YA Photos | SSA-YJP Photos | SSA-Ops Photos | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data Citation || Rate Us || Help | User Services - Tel: +1 (865) 241-3952 or E-mail: uso@daac.ornl.gov

448

NSA-Fen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSA-Fen) NSA-Fen) The Fen from the air, looking North. You can see the boardwalk, the hut, and the size of the bog. The road (Highway 391) is visible at the top. The round "crater" near the base of the boardwalk on the right is a collapsed palsa. View an aerial photo-map of the NSA-Fen site. The ground cover on the Fen itself The hut and flux tower The Fen site from the shore looking toward the hut The Fen site flux tower The boardwalk in the Fen, looking back at the shore The generator shed and the storage tent The NSA-Fen site from the air during IFC-2. Top of image is to Southeast. The NSA-Fen site in September (IFC-3) 1994 looking to the southeast. The tower is at the end of the boardwalk in right center of image with the hut near the center. The boardwalk connects to the far border at left center of the slide. Note that the tamarack (deciduous evergreen) within the fen has its fall colors.

449

IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 7, 2008 IDAHO SITE TO PROVIDE WASTE TREATMENT FOR OTHER DOE SITES Plan won't impact DOE commitment to removing all stored waste from Idaho Site Idaho's Advanced Mixed Waste...

450

Princeton Site Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Princeton Site Office Princeton Site Office P.O. Box 102 Princeton, New Jersey 08542-0102 JAN 18 2012 To: Timothy G. Lynch , Acting General Counsel Subject: Princeton Site Office (PSO) 2012 Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summary Section 5(a)(7) of DOE Order 451 .1 B Change 2, NEPA Compliance Program , requires each Secretarial Officer and Head of Field Organization to submit an annual NEPA Planning Summary to the General Counsel. We have reviewed your associated December 5, 2011 , memorandum and in consultation with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) staff determined that we have no Environmental Impacts Statements or Environmental Assessments either ongoing or forecast for the next 12 to 24 months. If you have any questions or need additional information

451

Particle Physics Education Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

쭺-¶ 쭺-¶ Particle Physics Education Sites ¡]¥H¤U¬°¥~¤åºô¯¸¡^ quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites - Physics Alliance - Accelerators at National Laboratories icon Particle Physics Education and Information sites: top Introduction: The Particle Adventure - an interactive tour of particle physics for everyone: the basics of theory and experiment. Virtual Visitor Center of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Guided Tour of Fermilab, - overviews of several aspects of Particle Physics. Also check out Particle Physics concepts. Probing Particles - a comprehensive and straight-forward introduction to particle physics. Big Bang Science - approaches particle physics starting from the theoretical origin of the universe.

452

Microsoft Word - Site Selection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selection Selection One of the very first tasks of General Leslie Groves and the Manhattan Project in early 1943 was to locate and acquire sites in the United States where uranium and plutonium could be produced, as well as a site where the atomic bomb actually would be constructed. Production of uranium and plutonium required vast amounts of power. Thus, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington, were chosen because of proximity to major rivers. Oak Ridge could draw on the power of the hydroelectric plants on the Tennessee River. Hanford could use the power from the Columbia River. The cold waters of the Columbia also could be used to cool the plutonium production reactors at Hanford. A third site, with

453

ARM - Site Index  

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govSite Index govSite Index Expand | Collapse Site Index Videos Image Library About ARM About ARM (home) ARM and the Recovery Act ARM and the Recovery Act (home) ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Recovery Act Instruments ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) (home) ARM Education and Outreach Efforts Support IPY Research Support for International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Organization ARM Organization (home) Laboratory Partners ARM Safety Policy ARM Science Board ARM Science Board (home) Board Business Become a User Comments and Questions Contacts Contacts (home) ARM Engineering and Operations Contacts Facility Statistics Facility Statistics (home) Historical Field Campaign Statistics

454

Site Energy Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating improvements and selected investments have already improved US refining and petrochemical energy utilization efficiency by about 20%, compared to 1972 operating efficiencies. This is equivalent to saving well over 250,000 B/D of crude; which is equal to the output of several major synthetic fuels projects! Site Energy Surveys can be an important technique for achieving the next major increment (1520%) in energy savings, even when using existing technology. These surveys encompass the total site, all associated plants, and investigate all aspects of energy requirements, heat integration configurations, steam/power cogeneration possibilities and inefficient practices. After potential energy conservation opportunities have been identified, screening is conducted to develop their economic attractiveness. This presentation reviews factors leading to the need for Site Energy Surveys, the objectives for conducting surveys, the approach utilized, considerations given to values of energy and concludes with overall improvements achieved.

Lockett, W., Jr.; Guide, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Former Sites Restoration. Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

@j&s* **$r* :. .+:., @j&s* **$r* :. .+:., II' .,.. I .&i. , :"': T.1 . i *&+t&&., @i i -:.+; L I. * . . .p.isit-!'..r'ir~i _, +.&.., . I. :?I,?.* .L,! j?' aa&* pi 4 L', ..b,- ., .e /w.1( ,v_.c ~A&$?>*:, ,..:.' .1 > . . . . . *. ,.. .I., .( j .~.~:,;;,.".,Certificafion ,Dockef for The ;,il' t:i~>$:+-.. ~~y:Remeciial Action. Performed "' . ::;:cxcgt the @+zb Gate Site in . ;' ! ,Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 7.99 7- 7 992 -.. Department .of Energy Former Sites Restoration. Division . ,Oak Ridge Operations .Office _. February 7 994 @ Printed on recycledhcy&ble paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE ELZA GAP SITE IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE, 1991-1992 FEBRUARY 1994 I Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

456

Manhattan Project: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SITE MAP SITE MAP Resources > Site Map THE MANHATTAN PROJECT Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 1939-1942: Early Government Support Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 1942: Difficult Choices More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 1942-1944: The Uranium Path to the Bomb Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943

457

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

459

Berkeley Lab: Educational Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Sites Educational Sites The Center for Science & Engineering Education (CSEE) Berkeley Lab's Center for Science & Engineering Education (CSEE) carries out the Department of Energy's education mission to train the next generation of scientists, as well as helping them to gain an understanding of the relationships among frontier science, technology, and society. CSEE supports science literacy in the community and nationally through a broad range of programs from elementary school to undergraduate and graduate education, including internships, mentoring, school workshops and summer research programs for teachers. Through its broad range of programs, CSEE serves as the center for Berkeley Lab's science education efforts, developing partnerships with schools, government agencies, and non-profit

460

Summary Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Report Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011 ANL-12/02 (Summary) Environment, Safety, and Quality Assurance Division Argonne National Laboratory Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,