Sample records for motors roofs led

  1. Metal roofing Shingle roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Metal roofing panel Shingle roofing Water & ice barrier Thermal Barrier Plywood Student: Arpit between the roof and the attic. · Apply modifications to traditional roofing assembly and roofing roof with only a water barrier between the plywood and the roofing panels. Metal roofing panel Shingle

  2. Roof Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The roof of a Federal building is a common placement for a number of renewable energy technologies, so they should be addressed anytime a roof renovation is undertaken, including roof-mounted...

  3. White Roofs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary Steven Chu discusses the benefits of switching to white roofs and light colored pavements.

  4. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e l Atmosphere ceiling, back panel roof, exposed roof insideSAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A Thesis submitted i no n Convection Exposed Roof Temperature Seasonal Temperature

  5. Using Green Roofs to Minimize Roof Runoff Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    10/31/2008 1 Using Green Roofs to Minimize Roof Runoff Pollution Brett LongBrett Long Shirley Clark Courtesy Penn State Center for Green Roof Research Green Roofs:Green Roofs: The New BMP (at least in the US)The New BMP (at least in the US) Green roofs = vegetated roof coversGreen roofs = vegetated roof covers Pl

  6. Cool Roofs Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar presented by Blaise Stoltenberg and Kosol Kiatreungwattana of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory about roofs designed to maintain a lower roof temperature than traditional roofs in order to reduce energy bills.

  7. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature between the solar panel and the roof would havedirectly underneath the solar panel, and the temperatures ofsensor between the solar panel and the roof for the flush

  8. Advanced Energy Efficient Roof System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane Davidson

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumption in buildings represents 40 percent of primary U.S. energy consumption, split almost equally between residential (22%) and commercial (18%) buildings.1 Space heating (31%) and cooling (12%) account for approximately 9 quadrillion Btu. Improvements in the building envelope can have a significant impact on reducing energy consumption. Thermal losses (or gains) from the roof make up 14 percent of the building component energy load. Infiltration through the building envelope, including the roof, accounts for an additional 28 percent of the heating loads and 16 percent of the cooling loads. These figures provide a strong incentive to develop and implement more energy efficient roof systems. The roof is perhaps the most challenging component of the building envelope to change for many reasons. The engineered roof truss, which has been around since 1956, is relatively low cost and is the industry standard. The roof has multiple functions. A typical wood frame home lasts a long time. Building codes vary across the country. Customer and trade acceptance of new building products and materials may impede market penetration. The energy savings of a new roof system must be balanced with other requirements such as first and life-cycle costs, durability, appearance, and ease of construction. Conventional residential roof construction utilizes closely spaced roof trusses supporting a layer of sheathing and roofing materials. Gypsum board is typically attached to the lower chord of the trusses forming the finished ceiling for the occupied space. Often in warmer climates, the HVAC system and ducts are placed in the unconditioned and otherwise unusable attic. High temperature differentials and leaky ducts result in thermal losses. Penetrations through the ceilings are notoriously difficult to seal and lead to moisture and air infiltration. These issues all contribute to greater energy use and have led builders to consider construction of a conditioned attic. The options considered to date are not ideal. One approach is to insulate between the trusses at the roof plane. The construction process is time consuming and costs more than conventional attic construction. Moreover, the problems of air infiltration and thermal bridges across the insulation remain. Another approach is to use structurally insulated panels (SIPs), but conventional SIPs are unlikely to be the ultimate solution because an additional underlying support structure is required except for short spans. In addition, wood spline and metal locking joints can result in thermal bridges and gaps in the foam. This study undertook a more innovative approach to roof construction. The goal was to design and evaluate a modular energy efficient panelized roof system with the following attributes: (1) a conditioned and clear attic space for HVAC equipment and additional finished area in the attic; (2) manufactured panels that provide structure, insulation, and accommodate a variety of roofing materials; (3) panels that require support only at the ends; (4) optimal energy performance by minimizing thermal bridging and air infiltration; (5) minimal risk of moisture problems; (6) minimum 50-year life; (7) applicable to a range of house styles, climates and conditions; (8) easy erection in the field; (9) the option to incorporate factory-installed solar systems into the panel; and (10) lowest possible cost. A nationwide market study shows there is a defined market opportunity for such a panelized roof system with production and semi-custom builders in the United States. Senior personnel at top builders expressed interest in the performance attributes and indicate long-term opportunity exists if the system can deliver a clear value proposition. Specifically, builders are interested in (1) reducing construction cycle time (cost) and (2) offering increased energy efficiency to the homebuyer. Additional living space under the roof panels is another low-cost asset identified as part of the study. The market potential is enhanced through construction activity levels in target marke

  9. Roof bolting improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Suppliers partner with mine operators to offer safer, more productive tools for roof bolting. 4 figs.

  10. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

  11. Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons O. Richoux, C of the effect of open roof on acoustic propagation along a 3D urban canyon. The experimental study is led Domain approach adapted to take into account the acoustic radiation losses due to the street open roof

  12. B.4 ROOF SYSTEMS B.4 Roof System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    B.4 ROOF SYSTEMS B.4 Roof System Page 1 of 4 Attachment C 05/07/09 SYSTEM AUDIT INSPECTION REPORT SUMMARY B4-Roof System Facility Name: Facility #: Audit By: Audit Date: SYSTEM CONDITION RATING WORK ORDER/CIP # #12;B.4 ROOF SYSTEMS B.4 Roof System Page 2 of 4 Attachment C 05/07/09 Sub

  13. IMPROVED ROOF STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites have performed roof repair and roof replacement to stabilize facilities prior to performing deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. This project will review the decision criteria used by these DOE sites, along with the type of repair system used for each different roof type. Based on this information, along with that compiled from roofing experts, a decision-making tool will be generated to aid in selecting the proper roof repair systems. Where appropriate, innovative technologies will be reviewed and applied to the decision-making tool to determine their applicability. Based on the results, applied research and development will be conducted to develop a method to repair these existing roofing systems, while providing protection for the D and D worker in a cost-efficient manner.

  14. Energy 101: Cool Roofs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment.

  15. Energy 101: Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment.

  16. Why Cool Roofs?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  17. Why Cool Roofs?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  18. Roof bolting equipment & technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology provides an evaluator path to improvement for roof bolting machines. Bucyrus offers three different roof bolts models for various mining conditions. The LRB-15 AR is a single-arm boiler recommended for ranges of 32 inches and above; the dual-arm RB2-52A for ranges of 42 inches and above; and the dual-arm RB2-88A for ranges of 54 inches and above. Design features are discussed in the article. Developments in roof bolting technology by Joy Mining Machinery are reported. 4 photos.

  19. Why Cool Roofs?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple,...

  20. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under the offset unit's solar panel, the hf formula (16) wasdrop below the angle unit's solar panel at night time. D u rfor both the units, the solar panel covered roof was a heat

  1. Rain on the Roof-Evaporative Spray Roof Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachman, L. R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -air principles are covered and a simplified method of evaluation presented. A life cycle energy savings example is discussed. Benefits of roof life and roof top equipment efficiency and maintenance are covered as well as water consumption and performance trade...

  2. LED Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Mark L.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article, which will appear in RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING MAGAZINE, interviews PNNL's Kelly Gordon and presents the interview in question and answer format. The topic is a light emitting diode (LED) lighting also known as solid state lighting. Solid state lighting will be a new category in an energy efficient lighting fixture design competition called Lighting for Tomorrow sponsored by the US Department of Energy Emerging Technologies Office, the American Institute for Lighting, and the Consortium for Energy Efficiency. LED technology has been around since the ’60s, but it has been used mostly for indicator lights on electronics equipment. The big breakthrough was the development in the 1990s of blue LEDs which can be combined with the red and green LEDs that already existed to make white light. LEDs produce 25 to 40 lumens of light per watt of energy used, almost as much as a CFL (50 lumens per watt) and much more efficient than incandescent sources, which are around 15 lumens per watt. They are much longer lived and practical in harsh environments unsuitable for incandescent lighting. They are ready for niche applications now, like under-counter lighting and may be practical for additional applications as technological challenges are worked out and the technology is advancing in leaps and bounds.

  3. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaporation is nature's way of cooling. By the application of a thin film of water, in the form of a mist, on the roof of the building, roof temperatures can be reduced from as high as 165o to a cool 86oF. Thus, under-roof temperatures are reduced...

  4. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Roof air conditioning load is reduced by 85% to 90%. The cooler roof also protects and extends roof life. My presentation today will cover an old, square foot, and generally speaking, it will old technique -- one that has been gaining in show a...

  5. LED lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galvez, Miguel; Grossman, Kenneth; Betts, David

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There is herein described a lamp for providing white light comprising a plurality of light sources positioned on a substrate. Each of said light sources comprises a blue light emitting diode (LED) and a dome that substantially covers said LED. A first portion of said blue light from said LEDs is transmitted through said domes and a second portion of said blue light is converted into a red light by a first phosphor contained in said domes. A cover is disposed over all of said light sources that transmits at least a portion of said red and blue light emitted by said light sources. The cover contains a second phosphor that emits a yellow light in response to said blue light. The red, blue and yellow light combining to form the white light and the white light having a color rendering index (CRI) of at least about 80.

  6. Roofs and Convexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armin Uhlmann

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Convex roof extensions are widely used to create entanglement measures in quantum information theory. The aim of the article is to present some tools which could be helpful for their treatment. Sections 2 and 3 introduce into the subject. It follows descriptions of Wootter's method, of the "subtraction procedure", and examples on how to use symmetries.

  7. Roofs and Convexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlmann, Armin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convex roof extensions are widely used to create entanglement measures in quantum information theory. The aim of the article is to present some tools which could be helpful for their treatment. Sections 2 and 3 introduce into the subject. It follows descriptions of Wootter's method, of the "subtraction procedure", and examples on how to use symmetries.

  8. \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments DEPARTMENT: Andrew Wiles March 2015 Brief description of area and location Roof tops, walkways, and Fire Route. Sedum' Roof Area

  9. Runoff Quality From Roofing Materials During Early Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    State Harrisburg #12;3 Green Roof vs. Traditional Roof Design Conventional gravel-ballasted roof Green

  10. Mine roof geology information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.; Sasaoka, T.; Tang, D.X.; Wilson, Y.; Wilson, G.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A project sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Industry of Future (Mining) program was initiated five years ago. In this project a patented drill control unit (DCU) installed DIN. the J.H. Flecher & Co.'s roof bolter was used to record the drilling parameter for experiments conducted in the mines and laboratory. Today, the drilling parameters have been recorded for more than 1,000 roof bolt holes. This article summarizes the results to date including the methods for determining quantitatively the location of voids/fractures and estimation of roof rock strength from the recorded roof bolter drilling parameters. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Demonstration of Energy Savings of Cool Roofs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savings of High-Albedo Roofs. Energy and Buildings, vol. 25,Cooling Savings of Light Colored Roof Surfacing in FloridaInfra-red photograph of roof-coating edge at Gilroy. This

  12. Energy saving potential of various roof technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unconventional roof technologies such as cool roofs and green roofs have been shown to reduce building heating and cooling load. Although previous studies suggest potential for energy savings through such technologies, ...

  13. Roofs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio:RockwallRolling Hills|Romoland,Roofs Jump

  14. One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce...

  15. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally recognized that as much as 60% of the air conditioning load in a building is generated by solar heat from the roof. This paper on SOLAR ROOF COOLING BY EVAPORATION is presented in slide form, tracing the history of 'nature's way...

  16. Measuring mine roof bolt strains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steblay, Bernard J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mine roof bolt and a method of measuring the strain in mine roof bolts of this type are disclosed. According to the method, a flat portion on the head of the mine roof bolt is first machined. Next, a hole is drilled radially through the bolt at a predetermined distance from the bolt head. After installation of the mine roof bolt and loading, the strain of the mine roof bolt is measured by generating an ultrasonic pulse at the flat portion. The time of travel of the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the hole is measured. This time of travel is a function of the distance from the flat portion to the hole and increases as the bolt is loaded. Consequently, the time measurement is correlated to the strain in the bolt. Compensation for various factors affecting the travel time are also provided.

  17. Green roofs: potential at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, Elena M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green roofs, roof systems that support vegetation, are rapidly becoming one of the most popular sustainable methods to combat urban environmental problems in North America. An extensive list of literature has been published in the past three decades recording the ecological benefits of green roofs; and now those benefits have been measured in enumerated data as a means to analyze the costs and returns of green roof technology. Most recently several studies have made substantial progress quantifying the monetary savings associated with storm water mitigation, the lessoning of the Urban Heat Island, and reduction of building cooling demands due to the implementation of green roof systems. Like any natural vegetation, a green roof is capable of absorbing the precipitation that falls on it. This capability has shown to significantly decrease the amount of storm water runoff produced by buildings as well as slow the rate at which runoff is dispensed. As a result of this reduction in volume and velocity, storm drains and sewage systems are relieved of any excess stress they might experience in a storm. For many municipalities and private building owners, any increase in storm water mitigation can result in major tax incentives and revenue that does not have to be spent on extra water treatments. Along with absorption of water, vegetation on green roofs is also capable of transpiration, the process by which moisture is evaporated into the air to cool ambient temperatures. This natural process aims to minimize the Urban Heat Island Effect, a phenomenon brought on by the dark and paved surfaces that increases air temperatures in urban cores. As the sun distributes solar radiation over a city's area, dark surfaces such as bitumen rooftops absorb solar rays and their heat. That heat is later released during the evening hours and the ambient temperatures do not cool as they normally would, creating an island of constant heat. Such excessively high temperatures induce heat strokes, heat exhaustion, and pollution that can agitate the respiratory system. The most significant savings associated with green roofs is in the reduction of cooling demands due to the green roof's thermal mass and their insulating properties. Unlike a conventional roof system, a green roof does not absorb solar radiation and transfer that heat into the interior of a building. Instead the vegetation acts as a shade barrier and stabilizes the roof temperature so that interior temperatures remain comfortable for the occupants. Consequently there is less of a demand for air conditioning, and thus less money spent on energy. At LANL the potential of green roof systems has already been realized with the construction of the accessible green roof on the Otowi building. To further explore the possibilities and prospective benefits of green roofs though, the initial capital costs must be invested. Three buildings, TA-03-1698, TA-03-0502, and TA-53-0031 have all been identified as sound candidates for a green roof retrofit project. It is recommended that LANL proceed with further analysis of these projects and implementation of the green roofs. Furthermore, it is recommended that an urban forestry program be initiated to provide supplemental support to the environmental goals of green roofs. The obstacles barring green roof construction are most often budgetary and structural concerns. Given proper resources, however, the engineers and design professionals at LANL would surely succeed in the proper implementation of green roof systems so as to optimize their ecological and monetary benefits for the entire organization.

  18. Roof control strategies for underground coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.C. (Bureau of Mines, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof support, an important aspect of ground control, involves maintaining roof competency to ensure a safe and efficient mining environment. Wide variability in rock quality and stress distributions requires a systematic approach to roof support design that satisfies specific goals. The success of past roof support in reducing the incidence of roof falls has been primarily attributed to safer roof bolting practices. However, roof falls continue to be the number one occupational hazard in underground coal mines. This US Bureau of Mines report presents a general overview of roof bolting and other roof support methods used in the United States. Characteristics of bad roof and associated roof failure theories are briefly presented as background to roof support. Methods of detecting and monitoring roof behavior and/or bolt performance provide essential feedback on roof support requirements. A discussion follows on roof bolt design that assimilates roof and support parameters into useful equations or nomographs to help decide what bolt types to use and how they should be installed under different roof conditions. 35 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Sustainable roofs with real energy savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Petrie, T.W.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the general concept of sustainability and relates it to the building owner`s selection of a low-slope roof. It offers a list of performance features of sustainable roofs. Experiences and data relevant to these features for four unique roofs are then presented which include: self-drying systems, low total equivalent warming foam insulation, roof coatings and green roofs. The paper concludes with a list of sustainable roofing features worth considering for a low-slope roof investment. Building owners and community developers are showing more interest in investing in sustainability. The potential exists to design, construct, and maintain roofs that last twice as long and reduce the building space heating and cooling energy loads resulting from the roof by 50% (based on the current predominant design of a 10-year life and a single layer of 1 to 2 in. (2.5 to 5.1 cm) of insulation). The opportunity to provide better low-slope roofs and sell more roof maintenance service is escalating. The general trend of outsourcing services could lead to roofing companies` owning the roofs they install while the traditional building owner owns the rest of the building. Such a situation would have a very desirable potential to internalize the costs of poor roof maintenance practices and high roof waste disposal costs, and to offer a profit for installing roofs that are more sustainable. 14 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Cool Roofs: Your Questions Answered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When Secretary Chu announced that the Department of Energy had installed a “cool roof” atop the west building of our Washington, DC headquarters, it elicited a fair number of questions from his Facebook fans. We decided to reach out to the people behind the project for their insight on the specific benefits of switching to a cool roof, and the process that went into making that choice.

  1. Green Roof Media Selection forGreen Roof Media Selection for the Minimization of Pollutantthe Minimization of Pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Green Roof Media Selection forGreen Roof Media Selection for the Minimization of Pollutantthe Minimization of Pollutant Loadings in Roof RunoffLoadings in Roof Runoff Brett LongBrett Long Shirley Clark for Green Roof Research Green Roofs:Green Roofs: The New BMP (at least in the US)The New BMP (at least

  2. Roof screening for underground coal mines: recent developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, C.S.; Gallagher, S.; Molinda, G.M.; Mark, C.; Wilson, G.

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of screens to control falls of the immediate roof or roof skin (that is between the installed primary and secondary roof supports) is described. 5 figs.

  3. Theory vs. Practice in Direct Evaporative Roof Spray Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J. L.; Smith, J. C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by sprayheads through varying their orifice sizes and spray angles, by various forms of tempera- ture and climate sensors, and by the controller's sequence control panel. During the installation of the piping system, the roof membrane should.../thermostat mechanism, which typica1.l~ sprayed either too much or too little water. These findings led to the development of a "punched pipe" system. With punched pipe systems, holes are punched or milled into "sticks" of copper or pvc pipe. These holes generally...

  4. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. More field tests have been performed. A trendline analysis method has been developed. This method would improve the accuracy in detecting the locations of fractures and in determining the rock strength.

  5. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. Additional field tests have been performed in this quarter. The development of the data interpretation methodology and other related tasks are still continuing.

  6. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. Additional field tests have been performed. It is found that the drilling power can be used as a supplementary method for detecting voids/fractures and rock interfaces.

  7. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance of  photovoltaic roofs, ASHRAE Trans 107 (absorption of solar radiation.   roof cooling load [Wm ] a) exposed roof PV covered roof b) GHI [W m ] Time [PST

  8. Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns Stormwater Treatment Practices for Low site planning and engineer- pavements, green roofs, and cisterns, are ing to reduce or prevent cooperating. #12;Permeable Pavements What are they? Permeable pavements provide alternatives to standard

  9. STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE ­ INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION CEC-CF-6R-ENV-01 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope ­ Insulation; Roofing:__________________________________ Brand Name:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal

  10. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K. [NDE Lab, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187-8795 (United States)

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  11. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by oxidation. b) Wind Wind exerts forces on roofing. Tallermore force. Since the kinetic energy of wind and the

  12. SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER THE SKY'S THE LIMIT: BERNADETTE MOKE SITS ON THE ROOF, ARE 160 SOLAR PANELS, SOME OF WHICH AUTOMATICALLY FOLLOW THE PATH OF THE SUN. 10 NJITMAGAZINE COVER STORY'S THE LIMIT: SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER "The solar panels even move a little at night," says

  13. A ROOFING TILE FOR NATURAL COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUNGUARD: A ROOFING TILE FOR NATURAL COOLING Prepared For: California Energy Commission Energy (FAR) SUNGUARD: A ROOFING TILE FOR NATURAL COOLING EISG AWARDEE PowerLight Corporation 2954 San Pablo://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Sunguard: A Roofing Tile For Natural Cooling EISG Grant # 99-07 Awardee: Power

  14. ROOFING PROJECT ODORS How Can EHS Help?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    ROOFING PROJECT ODORS How Can EHS Help? We can work with occupants to act as a liaison with Facili- ties Management and the contractor to identify ways to reduce odors. Contact us at 491­ 6745. Roof work is a necessary part of building preservation. Roofing odors are generated during these projects when hot asphalt

  15. Generalized Roof Duality Fredrik Kahl, Petter Strandmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet

    Generalized Roof Duality Fredrik Kahl, Petter Strandmark Centre for Mathematical Sciences Lund University, Sweden Abstract The roof dual bound for quadratic unconstrained binary optimization is the basis by introducing auxiliary variables and then apply the quadratic roof dual bound, but this may lead to loose

  16. Fall Protection for Roof Workers Before working on roofs above 7 feet,1 Physical Plant staff should implement an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Fall Protection for Roof Workers Before working on roofs above 7 ˝ feet,1 Physical Plant staff practical fall protection method. Most roofs at CSUF qualify as monolithic roofing systems. It may involve a single layer of sealed rubber. Multiple unit roofing systems utilize shingles or tiles. The two roofing

  17. Evaluation of Roof Bolting Requirements Based on In-Mine Roof Bolter Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on this information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. For the prediction of roof geology and stability condition in real time, a micro processor was used and a program developed to monitor and record the drilling parameters of roof bolter. These parameters include feed pressure, feed flow (penetration rate), rotation pressure, rotation rate, vacuum pressure, oil temperature of hydraulic circuit, and signals for controlling machine. From the results of a series of laboratory and underground tests so far, feed pressure is found to be a good indicator for identifying the voids/fractures and estimating the roof rock strength. The method for determining quantitatively the location and the size of void/fracture and estimating the roof rock strength from the drilling parameters of roof bolter was developed. Also, a set of computational rules has been developed for in-mine roof using measured roof drilling parameters and implemented in MRGIS (Mine Roof Geology Information System), a software package developed to allow mine engineers to make use of the large amount of roof drilling parameters for predicting roof geology properties automatically. For the development of roof bolting criteria, finite element models were developed for tensioned and fully grouted bolting designs. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the mechanisms of modern roof bolting systems including both the tension and fully grouted bolts. Parameters to be studied are: bolt length, bolt spacing, bolt size/strength, grout annulus, in-situ stress condition, overburden depth, and roof geology (massive strata, fractured, and laminated or thinly-bedded). Based on the analysis of the mechanisms of both bolting systems and failure modes of the bolted strata, roof bolting design criteria and programs for modern roof bolting systems were developed. These criterion and/or programs were combined with the MRGIS for use in conjunction with roof bolt installation.

  18. LED Market Intelligence Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    early adopters of LED technologies, particularly around dimming capabilities. 16 LED Market Intelligence Report Home Depot Walmart Cree Philips TCP GE LSG Osram Feit Costco...

  19. Self drying roofs: What! No dripping!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many roofs are replaced because water accumulates in portions of the roofing system.These accumulations can cause dripping, accelerated membrane failure, poor thermal performance, the threat of structural decay, and the depreciation of building assets. Traditionally, the roofing industry has been concerned with controlling the inflow of water into the roof. An example of this strategy would be the development of a more reliable membrane. However, roof membranes inevitably leak. For this reason, the roof design strategy of the future must be concerned with controlling water outflow. The requirements of this type of roof system are described. Under normal operating conditions (no leaks), the total moisture content of a self-drying roof system shall not increase with time and condensation shall not occur under the membrane during winter uptake. Moisture vapor movement by convection must be eliminated and the flow of water by gravity through imperfections in the roof system must be controlled. After a leak has occurred, no condensation on the upper surface of the deck shall be tolerated and the water introduced by the leak must be dissipated to the building interior in a minimum amount of time. Finite difference computer modeling is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the design. The impact of deck and insulation permeance, climate, leaks, and wintertime water uptake are simulated. A database of simulations is qualitatively described; this database will be used in future work to produce a simplified means of assessing the design parameters of a self-drying roof system.

  20. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. The retrofitting works for a dedicated roof bolter for this research has been completed. The laboratory tests performed using this machine on simulated roof blocks have been conducted. The analysis performed on the testing data showed promising signs to detect the rock interface, fractures, as well as the rock types. The other tasks were progressing as planned.

  1. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. In this quarter, retrofitting work to build a dedicated roof bolter for this research has been started. A number of numerical methods have been developed to improve the quality of and to analyze the collected drilling parameters. Finite element modeling of roof bolting mechanism is continuing.

  2. Green Roof Effect on Arthropod Biodiversity By Caitlin Race

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Green Roof Effect on Arthropod Biodiversity By Caitlin Race A green roof is a roof. Green roof technology has become increasingly popular due to several benefits including, insulation, runoff protection, and aesthetic value. This project was designed to see if a green roof would benefit

  3. Thermal performance measurements of insulated roof systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courville, G.E.; Childs, K.W.; Walukas, D.J.; Childs, P.W.; Griggs, E.I.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Roof Thermal Researcch Apparatus for carrying out thermal and hygric experiments on sections of low-sloped roofs. Test panels are exposed to a controlled temperature interior space and to the prevailing East Tennessee exterior environment. They are well instrumented and all data are stored and aided in the analysis by computer systems. Current experiments include studies of the effect of wet insulation on membrane temperature, thermal storage phenomena in built-up roof insulation, and the effects of varying surface reflectance on roof thermal performance.

  4. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The selected site and the field testing plan enabled us to test all three aspects of roof geological features. The development of the data interpretation methodologies and the geology mapping computer program have also been preceding well.

  5. The Effects of Roof Membrane Color on Moisture Accumulation in Low-slope Commercial Roof Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of highly reflective roof membrane systems is being promoted and in some cases required in energy codes and green building codes and standards. Highly reflective membranes, which typically are light in color, have demonstrated reduced overall energy consumption in cooling dominated climate. These membranes also are theorized to reduce the heat island effect. Concern has been expressed about using highly reflective roof membrane systems in cool to cold climate zones because they potentially increase moisture accumulation in roof systems. Roof membranes are vapor retarders. The theory is that highly reflective membranes reflect the heat that could enter the roof assembly, potentially providing a condensing surface on the cold side of the roof assembly during winter months. The other concern is that roof systems using highly reflective membranes will not get hot enough during the summer months to dry out moisture that may have condensed or otherwise entered the roof assembly. This study focuses on mechanically attached, highly reflective, single-ply roof systems installed on low-slope (less than 2:12) structures in cool to cold climate zones. Three sources of data are considered when determining the moisture accumulation potential of these systems. 1.Test roof cuts taken during the winter months 2.Modeling data from a building envelope model specifically designed to evaluate moisture accumulation 3.Data from previous studies to determine the effects of roof membrane color on the drying rate of low-slope roof assemblies

  6. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for steep-sloped nonresidential roofs in Title 24. Online atof SSP90.1 for Reflective Roofs. ASHRAE Transactions, 104(pp. 984-995. Evolution of cool roof standards in the United

  7. Status of cool roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requirements for residential roofs in Title 24. Online atAkbari, H. 1998. Cool roofs save energy. ASHRAE Transactionsfor steep-sloped nonresidential roofs in Title 24. Online at

  8. LEDs_3LEDs_3 current efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    efficiencySec. 8.2 From our toolbox Current efficiency #12;4 Light extraction efficiencyLight extraction extraction efficiencyDesign to improve extraction efficiencySec. 8.4 What are the features of this LED from;6 Various efficienciesVarious efficienciesSecs. 8.4, 8.5 Present record is 56%Wall-plug efficiency Wall

  9. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated aging of roofing surfaces Hugo Destaillats, Ph.D.

  10. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

  11. affect green roof: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early green roof cooling and energy reduction research in North America took place in Canada and the northern latitudes of the United States, where green roofs reduced rooftop...

  12. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the energy performance of  photovoltaic roofs, ASHRAE Trans A thermal model for photovoltaic systems, Solar Energy, Effects of Solar Photovoltaic Panels on Roof Heat Transfer 

  13. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. A new mechanical approach to estimate rock strengths using the acquired drilling parameters has been proposed. This approach takes a number of important factors, that have never been studied in the previous researches, into the considerations. Good results have been shown using the new approach on the testing data.

  14. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. More laboratory tests have been performed in this quarter. The analysis performed on the testing data showed: (1) abnormal rotational accelerations can be used as the indicator of the rock interfaces, and (2) the sharp drops of drilling thrust and torque agree well with the locations of fractures.

  15. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the pre-formed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  16. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  17. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, T.L.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  18. LED Lighting Retrofit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw-Meadow, N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Municipal Street Lighting Consortium ? American Public Power Association (APPA) ? Demonstration in Energy Efficiency Development (DEED) ? Source of funding and database of completed LED roadway projects 6 Rules of the Road ESL-KT-11-11-57 CATEE 2011..., 2011 ? 9 Solar-Assisted LED Case Study LaQuinta Hotel, Cedar Park, Texas ? Utilizes 18 - ActiveLED Solar-Assisted Parking Lot Lights ? Utilizes ?power management? to extend battery life while handling light output ? Reduces load which reduces PV...

  19. LED Lighting Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light-Emitting diodes (LEDs) efficiently produce light in a fundamentally different way than any legacy or traditional source of light.

  20. Decision guide for roof slope selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, T.R.; Wendt, R.L.; McCorkle, J.E.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision guide has been written for personnel who are responsible for the design, construction, and replacement of Air Force roofs. It provides the necessary information and analytical tools for making prudent and cost-effective decisions regarding the amount of slope to provide in various roofing situations. Because the expertise and experience of the decision makers will vary, the guide contains both basic slope-related concepts as well as more sophisticated technical data. This breadth of information enables the less experienced user to develop an understanding of roof slope issues before applying the more sophisticated analytical tools, while the experienced user can proceed directly to the technical sections. Although much of this guide is devoted to the analysis of costs, it is not a cost-estimating document. It does, however, provide the reader with the relative costs of a variety of roof slope options; and it shows how to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of different options. The selection of the proper roof slope coupled with good roof design, a quality installation, periodic inspection, and appropriate maintenance and repair will achieve the Air Force's objective of obtaining the best possible roofing value for its buildings. 21 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. ROOF CHARACTERISATION RELATED TO FIRE PROPAGATION RISK BY A NUMERICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ROOF CHARACTERISATION RELATED TO FIRE PROPAGATION RISK BY A NUMERICAL APPROACH L. Fournier1 , A by thé roof: - one is thé use of intumescent strips on thé roof, - thé other consists of extending thé fire walls (typically 70 cm or 1 m) above thé roof levé1 in order to prevent thé flame from being blown

  2. RIS-M-2471 RUN-OFF FROM ROOFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISŘ-M-2471 RUN-OFF FROM ROOFS Jřrn Roed Abstract. In order to find the run-off from roof material a roof has been constructed with two different slopes (30° and 45°). Beryllium-7 and caesium-137 has been used as tracers. Considering new roof material the pollution removed by runoff processes has been shown

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: LED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electroluminescence was first reported by H.J. Round in 1907, and the first light-emitting diode (LED) was reported by O.V. Losev in 1927. Not until the birth of semiconductor...

  4. Design considerations for retractable-roof stadia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazer, Andrew H., 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As existing open-air or fully enclosed stadia are reaching their life expectancies, cities are choosing to replace them with structures with moving roofs. This kind of facility provides protection from weather for spectators, ...

  5. Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof Coating Procedures and their Productivity Gains John Bonaby and Dr. Diane Schaub, University of Florida As building envelope improvements are realized in organizations as ways to insulate businesses from high energy costs, the relative... benefit of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially...

  6. Re-roofing slashes chain's cooling costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, J.

    1984-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A re-roofing program to install single-ply synthetic rubber coated with hypalon, a white synthetic rubber, will save each Hardee restaurant an average of $25,000 over a 10-year period. The savings will come from reduced air conditioning costs, which will vary by location. The new roof system tolerates temperatures from -40 to over 150/sup 0/F. Reflection from the white surface makes the material more energy efficient than conventional hot asphalt.

  7. Next Generation Roofs and Attics for Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prototype residential roof and attic assemblies were constructed and field tested in a mixed-humid U.S. climate. Summer field data showed that at peak day irradiance the heat transfer penetrating the roof deck dropped almost 90% compared with heat transfer for a conventional roof and attic assembly. The prototype assemblies use a combination of strategies: infrared reflective cool roofs, radiant barriers, above-sheathing ventilation, low-emittance surfaces, insulation, and thermal mass to reduce the attic air temperature and thus the heat transfer into the home. The prototype assemblies exhibited attic air temperatures that did not exceed the peak day outdoor air temperature. Field results were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for the densely populated, hot and dry southeastern and central-basin regions of California. New construction in the central basin could realize a 12% drop in ceiling and air-conditioning annual load compared with a code-compliant roof and attic having solar reflectance of 0.25 and thermal emittance of 0.75. In the hot, dry southeastern region of California, the combined ceiling and duct annual load drops by 23% of that computed for a code-compliant roof and attic assembly. Eliminating air leakage from ducts placed in unconditioned attics yielded savings comparable to the best simulated roof and attic systems. Retrofitting an infrared reflective clay tile roof with 1 -in (0.032-m) of EPS foam above the sheathing and improving existing ductwork by reducing air leakage and wrapping ducts with insulation can yield annual savings of about $200 compared with energy costs for pre-1980 construction.

  8. Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefit of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially... available roof coatings, and productivity gains associated with these energy saving strategies. This type of situation is evidenced in the justification of energy rebates distributed by Florida Power & Light in exchange for the application of Energy Star...

  9. Raising the Roof: California Housing Development Projections and Constraints, 1997-2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, John D.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000-01 Raising the Roof: California Housing Developmentreport, “Raising the Roof: California Housing Developmentat Berkeley Raising the Roof: California Housing Development

  10. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance Lucheng Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance ......................................................................................................................... 2 2. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof .............................................................................. 13 4. Methods of Storm Analysis and Green Roof Performance Analysis

  11. LED MR16 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following CALiPER report provides detailed analysis of LED MR16 lamp performance, covering basic performance characteristics as well as subjective evaluation of beam, shadow, and color quality. Pending reports will offer analysis on performance attributes that are not captured by LM-79 testing. These reports are intended to educate the industry on market trends, potential issues, and important areas for improvement.

  12. Global LED Manufacturing

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0.20.5W 5630 PPA 0.51.0W 7030 PCT XVGA HDMI UHD 4K2K UHD 8K4K 0.81.2W 3030 EMC 1.22.0W 3535 EMC w Flip-Chip 0.50.8W 2835 PCT ? 1.01.5 W ???? Revolution of LED...

  13. Building Energy Efficiency Standards Approved Default Cool Roof Performance Values for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building Energy Efficiency Standards Approved Default Cool Roof Performance Values for Low-Sloped Roofs That Use Aggregate As the Surface Layer Aggregate used as the surface layer of low-sloped roofs shall have the default cool roof properties

  14. LED Price Tracking Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE intends to update the SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning report on an annual basis, but doing so requires that we have sufficient product and purchase data including acquisition date, purchase price, product category, and rated initial lumens. Those interested in helping collect this data are asked to use the LED Price Tracking FormMicrosoft Excel and follow the instructions for submitting data.

  15. LED PAR38 Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following CALiPER reports provide detailed analysis of LED PAR38 lamp performance, covering basic performance characteristics as well as subjective evaluation of beam, shadow, and color quality. Pending reports will offer analysis on flicker, dimming and power quality characteristics; stress testing; and lumen and chromaticity maintenance. These reports are intended to educate the industry on market trends, potential issues, and important areas for improvement.

  16. In-situ aging of roof systems containing polyisocyanurate roof insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.; Graves, R.S.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam roof insulations with permeable facers were installed in roofing systems and continuously monitored for thermal performance for four years. The foams were produced using a specific formulation that represented current technology in 1989 and were blown with CFC-11, HCFC-123, and HCFC-141b. These foams were installed in roof systems comprised of loosely-laid insulation boards covered by either a loosely-laid single ply white or black membrane. The in-situ testing was carried out on an outdoor test facility, the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). Additional specimens of these foams were aged in the laboratory and periodically evaluated using laboratory measurement equipment. This paper summarizes the in-situ data compiled to date, compares these data with the laboratory results, and examines whether the proposed laboratory procedure for accelerating the aging of foams by the slicing and scaling method accurately predicts the aging characteristics of these materials installed in roof systems. These experiments are part of a joint industry/government project established to evaluate the technical viability of alternative HCFC blowing agents for rigid closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam roof insulations. Members of the project are the US Department of Energy (DOE)/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Society of the Plastics Industry-Polyurethane Division (SPI), the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), and the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA).

  17. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.

  18. Energy Performance Aspects of a Florida Green Roof Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J.; Parker, D.

    Green roof installation in the United States is growing at a significant rate. There are a number of reasons for this growth including rainwater runoff reduction and aesthetic benefits. Energy performance evaluations of green roofs, the subject...

  19. Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San Jos Convention Center Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a...

  20. Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12 | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12 Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12...

  1. Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 The...

  2. PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES Fabien FouiHen, INERIS, Parc initiating event of the fire ball observed. In concrete terms, when a fixed roof storage tank is surrounded

  3. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the underside of the tilted solar panels and the surface of the roof under the solar panel (Fig.  2).  An air temperature of the  solar panel is similar to the roof 

  4. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than solar reflectance, thermal emittance, or Energy- Star™solar absorptance and roof-assembly thermal transmittance that yield equal annual energysolar absorptance ? and roof-assembly thermal transmittance U that yield equal annual energy

  5. Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWaterCool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs Addthis An error

  6. Effect of Surface Mass on Roof Thermal Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, K. E.; Shipp, P. H.; Sanders, J. P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF SURFACE MASS ON ROOF THERMAL PERFORMANCE KENNETH E. WILKES, PAUL H. SHIPP, AND JOHN P. SANDERS Staff Members Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee ABSTRACT The roof of a building is exposed to the most severe... of guidelines for the use of surface mass are presented. The experiment on surface mass was carried out at the U.S. Department of Energy Roof Research Center using the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) .4...

  7. Cool Roof Resource Guide for Federal Agencies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resource guide containing information and links for the evaluation and installation of cool roofs within the Federal Government

  8. Energy Performance Aspects of a Florida Green Roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the University of Central Florida’s Stormwater Management Academy under a grant from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). While the primary purpose of the project is to evaluate rainwater runoff benefits of the green roof, FDEP.... The roof geometry and drainage were designed to allow both the conventional and green roofs to have similar “mirror image” insulation levels and corresponding temperature sensor locations as shown in the roof surface and building section diagrams...

  9. Poster No.: 169 Sulci and Curvature: Detection of the Roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Poster No.: 169 Sulci and Curvature: Detection of the Roof Christophe Renault, Michel Desvignes] used the superficial trace of sulci, we detect the roof of the sulci, which presents less intersection the curvature K1 et K2 are equal. Results We have presented a method to extract roof of sulci with a sub

  10. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Water Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    1 Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Water Monitoring System Plans and Specifications Created By: David Carothers Date: 2/17/05 #12;2 Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Date: 2/14/05 Created By: David and the flumes shall be water tight. (Figures 1&2) · The connection between the flume and the green roof membrane

  11. Practical Approach to Designing Wood Roof Truss Assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rakesh

    Practical Approach to Designing Wood Roof Truss Assemblies Rakesh Gupta, M.ASCE1 ; and Pranueng to evaluate "system effects" in light-frame roof truss assemblies. The goal of this study was to develop an improved and practical design method for 3D roof truss assemblies used in residential construction. A truss

  12. Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    ://www.eng.ua.edu/~rpitt Shifting to a more local focus... #12;2 Map courtesy of U.S. Geological Website on Acid Rain Roof Runoff-up roof (plywood + roofing paper/tar) Total: 166 Dissolved: 128 Methodology · Summer 2002: Laboratory exposure to simulated acid rain. · Spring 2003 ­ Fall 2004: Long

  13. Secrets of the Motor That Drives Archaea Revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secrets of the Motor That Drives Archaea Revealed Secrets of the Motor That Drives Archaea Revealed Print Thursday, 14 February 2013 00:00 An international team led by John Tainer...

  14. 38 CHAPTER 1. ASSEMBLY MANUAL BiDirectional Motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    38 CHAPTER 1. ASSEMBLY MANUAL Bi­Directional Motor and Infrared Beacon Uni­Directional Motor, LED, Incandescent Lamp Sensor, Polarized Sensor, Non­polarized Figure 1.26: Standard Connector Plug Configurations

  15. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

  16. Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  17. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation, and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA.

  18. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of thermal mass, ceiling insulation and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate energy/cost savings between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft Irwin, CA.

  19. Thrust bolting: roof bolt support apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tadolini, Stephen C. (Lakewood, CO); Dolinar, Dennis R. (Golden, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of installing a tensioned roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads by applying thrust to the bolt (19) as the bonding material (7') is curing to compress the strata (3) surrounding the borehole (1), and then relieving the thrust when the bonding material (7') has cured.

  20. Update on the Million Solar Roofs Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herig, C.

    1999-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Million Solar Roofs Initiative, announced by the President in June of 1997, spans a period of twelve years and intends to increase domestic deployment of solar technologies. This paper presents an overview of the development of the initiative and significant activities to date.

  1. Status of cool roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1999, several widely used building energy efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool roof credits or requirements. We review the technical development of cool roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discuss the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy standards worldwide.

  2. LED Record Efficacy and Brightness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Designed for general lighting applications such as street, industrial, and parking garage lighting, the Cree XLamp® power LED sets new records for LED brightness and efficacy, up to 85 lm/W at 350 mA. The XLamp utilizes Cree's performance breakthrough EZBright™ LED chip; both products include technology that was developed in part with R&D funding support from DOE.

  3. Evaluation of convex roof entanglement measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geza Toth; Tobias Moroder; Otfried Gühne

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show a powerful method to compute entanglement measures based on convex roof constructions. In particular, our method is applicable to measures that, for pure states, can be written as low order polynomials of operator expectation values. We show how to compute the linear entropy of entanglement, the linear entanglement of assistance, and a bound on the dimension of the entanglement for bipartite systems. We discuss how to obtain the convex roof of the three-tangle for three-qubit states. We also show how to calculate the linear entropy of entanglement and the quantum Fisher information based on partial information or device independent information. We demonstrate the usefulness of our method by concrete examples

  4. Aging and weathering of cool roofing membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Levinson, Ronnen; Graveline,Stanley; Foley, Kevin; Delgado, Ana H.; Paroli, Ralph M.

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Aging and weathering can reduce the solar reflectance of cool roofing materials. This paper summarizes laboratory measurements of the solar spectral reflectance of unweathered, weathered, and cleaned samples collected from single-ply roofing membranes at various sites across the United States. Fifteen samples were examined in each of the following six conditions: unweathered; weathered; weathered and brushed; weathered, brushed and then rinsed with water; weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, and then washed with soap and water; and weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, washed with soap and water, and then washed with an algaecide. Another 25 samples from 25 roofs across the United States and Canada were measured in their unweathered state, weathered, and weathered and wiped. We document reduction in reflectivity resulted from various soiling mechanisms and provide data on the effectiveness of various cleaning approaches. Results indicate that although the majority of samples after being washed with detergent could be brought to within 90% of their unweathered reflectivity, in some instances an algaecide was required to restore this level of reflectivity.

  5. Generalized roof duality and bisubmodular functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolmogorov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consider a convex relaxation $\\hat f$ of a pseudo-boolean function $f$. We say that the relaxation is {\\em totally half-integral} if $\\hat f(\\bx)$ is a polyhedral function with half-integral extreme points $\\bx$, and this property is preserved after adding an arbitrary combination of constraints of the form $x_i=x_j$, $x_i=1-x_j$, and $x_i=\\gamma$ where $\\gamma\\in\\{0, 1, 1/2}$ is a constant. A well-known example is the {\\em roof duality} relaxation for quadratic pseudo-boolean functions $f$. We argue that total half-integrality is a natural requirement for generalizations of roof duality to arbitrary pseudo-boolean functions. Our contributions are as follows. First, we provide a complete characterization of totally half-integral relaxations $\\hat f$ by establishing a one-to-one correspondence with {\\em bisubmodular functions}. Second, we give a new characterization of bisubmodular functions. Finally, we show some relationships between general totally half-integral relaxations and relaxations based on the roof...

  6. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The main accomplishments in this quarter included: (1) one more field test has been conducted in an underground coal mine, (2) optimization studies of the control parameters have been conducted, (3) method to use torque to thrust ratio as indicator of rock relative hardness has also been explored, and (4) about 98% of the development work for the roof geology mapping program, MRGIS, has completed, (5) A real time roof geology mapping system for roof bolters in limestone mine, including a special version of the geology mapping program and hardware, has already been verified to perform very well in underground production condition.

  7. Green Roofs: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Federal Technology Alert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholz-Barth, K.; Tanner, S.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a ''green roof,'' a layer of vegetation (e.g., a roof garden) covers the surface of a roof to provide shade, cooler indoor and outdoor temperatures, and effective storm-water management to reduce runoff. The main components are waterproofing, soil, and plants. There are two basic kinds: intensive and extensive. An intensive green roof often features large shrubs and trees, and it can be expensive to install and maintain. An extensive green roof features shallow soil and low-growing, horizontally spreading plants that can thrive in the alpine conditions of many rooftops. These plants do not require a lot of water or soil, and they can tolerate a significant amount of exposure to the sun and wind. This Federal Technology Alert focuses on the benefits, design, and implementation of extensive green roofs and includes criteria for their use on federal facilities.

  8. Transcranial LED therapy for cognitive dysfunction in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: Two case reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases are presented, where cognitive function improved following treatment with transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs). At age 59, P1 had closed-head injury from a motor vehicle ...

  9. Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richoux, Olivier; Pelat, Adrien; Félix, Simon; Lihoreau, Bertrand

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an experimental, numerical and analytical study of the effect of open roof on acoustic propagation along a 3D urban canyon. The experimental study is led by means of a street scale model. The numerical results are performed with a 2D Finite Difference in Time Domain approach adapted to take into account the acoustic radiation losses due to the street open roof. An analytical model, based on the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a horizontal plane mixed with a 2D image sources model to describe the attenuation along the street, is also proposed. Results are given for several frequencies in the low frequency domain (1000-2500 Hz). The comparison of the three approaches shows a good agreement until f=100 Hz at full scale, the analytical model and the 2D numerical simulation adapted to 3D permit to modelize the acoustic propagation along a street. For higher frequency, experimental results show that the leakeage, due to the street open roof, is not anymore uniformly distributed on a...

  10. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and faade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG Industries 2...

  11. Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and faade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG Industries 2...

  12. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CEC. 2006. 2005 Building Energy Efficiency Standards foraddress cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standardsin its “Title 24” Building Energy Efficiency Standards for

  13. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006. Inclusion of solar reflectance and thermal emittanceuse photovoltaic, solar- thermal, or roof-garden systems2006. Inclusion of solar reflectance and thermal emittance

  14. asphalt roofing shingles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and could increase the life of the roof product. However, determining the effects of climate and solar exposure on reflectance and color variability over time is of...

  15. Cool Roof Systems; What is the Condensation Risk?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Pallin, Simon B [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A white roof, or cool roof, is constructed to decrease thermal loads from solar radiation, therefore saving energy by decreasing the cooling demands. Unfortunately, cool roofs with a mechanically attached membrane have shown a higher risk of intermediate condensation in the materials below the membrane in certain climates (Ennis & Kehrer, 2011) and in comparison with similar constructions with a darker exterior surface (Bludau, Zirkelbach, & Kuenzel, 2009). As a consequence, questions have been raised regarding the sustainability and reliability of using cool roof membranes in northern U.S. climate zones.

  16. Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    50 degrees cooler. A study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help...

  17. Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement Cool Roofs at DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    emissions. A recent study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help...

  18. Cool roofs as an energy conservation measure for federal buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Akbari, Hashem

    2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed initial estimates of the potential benefits of cool roofs on federal buildings and facilities (building scale) as well as extrapolated the results to all national facilities under the administration of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). In addition, a spreadsheet ''calculator'' is devised to help FEMP estimate potential energy and cost savings of cool roof projects. Based on calculations for an average insulation level of R-11 for roofs, it is estimated that nationwide annual savings in energy costs will amount to $16M and $32M for two scenarios of increased roof albedo (moderate and high increases), respectively. These savings, corresponding to about 3.8 percent and 7.5 percent of the base energy costs for FEMP facilities, include the increased heating energy use (penalties) in winter. To keep the cost of conserved energy (CCE) under $0.08 kWh-1 as a nationwide average, the calculations suggest that the incremental cost for cool roofs should not exceed $0.06 ft-2, assuming that cool roofs have the same life span as their non-cool counterparts. However, cool roofs usually have extended life spans, e.g., 15-30 years versus 10 years for conventional roofs, and if the costs of re-roofing are also factored in, the cutoff incremental cost to keep CCE under $0.08 kWh-1 can be much higher. In between these two ends, there is of course a range of various combinations and options.

  19. aboveground roofed design: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M. 2002-01-01 4 Promoting sustainable green roofs through Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). Open Access...

  20. Cool Roofs Will Revolutionize the Building Industry Adoption of infrared-reflective paints is one of the major advances in roofing in our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    . Cool Roofs Will Revolutionize the Building Industry Adoption of infrared-reflective paints is one of the major advances in roofing in our century. ORNL's Building Envelopes Program has conducted research for many roofing consortiums and their affiliates to help them develop cool roof products. Based

  1. A few words about intermodulation dynamic range and roofing filters: "Roofing filter" is the current buzzword in high-end radios. Just what does it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gale

    A few words about intermodulation dynamic range and roofing filters: "Roofing filter" is the current buzzword in high-end radios. Just what does it mean? Basically, a roofing filter is simply to be effective. The term "roofing" stems from the fact that it protects the rest of the radio following it from

  2. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  3. Rooftop Membrane Temperature Reductions with Green Roof Technology in South-Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvorak, B.

    Early green roof cooling and energy reduction research in North America took place in Canada and the northern latitudes of the United States, where green roofs reduced rooftop temperatures by 70% to 90%. Less is known about green roof technology...

  4. A SIMULATION MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROOF POND SYSTEMS FOR HEATING AND COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavana, Medhi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Heating Performance of Roof Pond XSL803-6664 Fig. 4.on Heating Performance of Roof Pond Phoenix, Arizona Auguston Cooling Performance of Roof Pond HOur of the doy (solar

  5. Ethnography of Cool Roof Retrofits: The Role of Rebates in the Materials Selection Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur-Stommen, Susan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mind  when  I  say  ‘cool  roof’?   “Light  color.  Long  the  idea  for  a  cool  roof?   What  kind  of  research  the  idea  for  a  cool  roof?   Where  did  you  first  

  6. Procedure for measuring the solar reflectance of flat or curved roofing assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy-use effects of cool roofs on California commercialfrom the application of reflective roofs in two small non-saving potentials of light-colored roofs for residential and

  7. Cool roof Q+A 011.doc 29 July 2009 Cool Roof Q & A (draft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal radiation. Thus, a cool roof should have both high "solar reflectance" (ability to reflect, also measured on a scale of 0 to 1). The solar reflectance and thermal emittance of a surface sunlight, measured on a scale of 0 to 1) and high "thermal emittance" (ability to emit thermal radiation

  8. High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

  9. Cool Roofs | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCool Magnetic Molecules CoolCool Roofs

  10. Cool Roof Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Exploration Technique:Illinois: EnergyRoof Calculator

  11. Lafarge Roofing Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKorea PartsLLNL EnergyLafarge Roofing Ltd Jump

  12. Motor primitives in vertebrates and invertebrates Tamar Flash1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochner, Binyamin

    Motor primitives in vertebrates and invertebrates Tamar Flash1 and Binyamin Hochner2 In recent years different lines of evidence have led to the idea that motor actions and movements in both vertebrates and invertebrates are composed of elementary building blocks. The entire motor repertoire can

  13. Above the Roof, Beneath the Law: Perceived Justice behind Disruptive Tactics of Migrant Wage Claimants in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, X; Wang, L; Su, Y

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bs_bs_banner Above the Roof, Beneath the Law: Perceivedmigrant workers perch on roof tops or towering construction

  14. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah [Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Nor Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  15. Hygrothermal Performance of West Coast Wood Deck Roofing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B [ORNL; Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of roofing assemblies are necessary in order to understand and adequately predict actual the hygrothermal performance. At the request of GAF, simulations have been setup to verify the difference in performance between white and black roofing membrane colors in relation to critical moisture accumulation for traditional low slope wood deck roofing systems typically deployed in various western U.S. Climate Zones. The performance of these roof assemblies has been simulated in the hygrothermal calculation tool of WUFI, from which the result was evaluated based on a defined criterion for moisture safety. The criterion was defined as the maximum accepted water content for wood materials and the highest acceptable moisture accumulation rate in relation to the risk of rot. Based on the criterion, the roof assemblies were certified as being either safe, risky or assumed to fail. The roof assemblies were simulated in different western climates, with varying insulation thicknesses, two different types of wooden decking, applied with varying interior moisture load and with either a high or low solar absorptivity at the roof surface (black or white surface color). The results show that the performance of the studied roof assemblies differs with regard to all of the varying parameters, especially the climate and the indoor moisture load.

  16. Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    ://www.eng.ua.edu/~rpitt #12;2 Map courtesy of U.S. Geological Website on Acid Rain Roof Runoff Concentrations: Western + roofing paper/tar) Total: 166 Dissolved: 128 : Laboratory exposure to simulated acid rain. · Spring 2003 ­ Fall 2004: Long-term, outdoor investigation from

  17. Ongoing LED RD Challenges (LED droop still challenge)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Nonpolar GaN Semi polar GaN SOLUTION New GaN Crystal Planes * Semipolar planes for blue, green and yellow LEDs A. Romanov et al. : J. Appl. Phys. 100 (2006) 023533. (1122)...

  18. Visual Analytics for Roof Savings Calculator Ensembles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Chad [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Kwan-Liu [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for DOE as an industry-consensus, web-based tool for easily running complex building energy simulations. These simulations allow both homeowners and experts to determine building-specific cost and energy savings for modern roof and attic technologies. Using a database of over 3 million RSC simulations for different combinations of parameters, we have built a visual analytics tool to assist in the exploration and identification of features in the data. Since the database contains multiple variables, both categorical and continuous, we employ a coordinated multi-view approach that allows coordinated feature exploration through multiple visualizations at once. The main component of our system, a parallel coordinates view, has been adapted to handle large-scale, mixed data types as are found in RSC simulations. Other visualizations include map coordinated plots, high dynamic range (HDR) line plot rendering, and an intuitive user interface. We demonstrate these techniques with several use cases that have helped identify software and parametric simulation issues.

  19. Electric Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 313 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 raised Federal minimum efficiency standards for general-purpose, single-speed, polyphase induction motors of 1 to 500 horsepower (hp). This new standard took effect in December 2010. The new minimum efficiency levels match FEMP's performance requirement for these motors.

  20. Metacapacitors for LED Lighting: Metacapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: The CUNY Energy Institute is developing less expensive, more efficient, smaller, and longer-lasting power converters for energy-efficient LED lights. LEDs produce light more efficiently than incandescent lights and last significantly longer than compact fluorescent bulbs, but they require more sophisticated power converter technology, which increases their cost. LEDs need more sophisticated converters because they require a different type of power (low voltage direct current, or DC) than what's generally supplied by power outlets. The CUNY Energy Institute is developing sophisticated power converters for LEDs that contain capacitors made from new, nanoscale materials. Capacitors are electrical components that are used to store energy. CUNY's unique capacitors are configured with advanced power circuits to more efficiently control and convert power to the LED lighting source. They also eliminate the need for large magnetic components, instead relying on networks of capacitors that can be easily printed on plastic substrate. CUNY's prototype LED power converter already meets DOE's 2020 projections for the energy efficiency of LED power converters.

  1. Effectiveness of Cool Roof Coatings with Ceramic Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brehob, Ellen G [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid applied coatings promoted as cool roof coatings, including several with ceramic particles, were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn., for the purpose of quantifying their thermal performances. Solar reflectance measurements were made for new samples and aged samples using a portable reflectometer (ASTM C1549, Standard Test Method for Determination of Solar Reflectance Near Ambient Temperature Using a Portable Solar Reflectometer) and for new samples using the integrating spheres method (ASTM E903, Standard Test Method for Solar Absorptance, Reflectance, and Transmittance of Materials Using Integrating Spheres). Thermal emittance was measured for the new samples using a portable emissometer (ASTM C1371, Standard Test Method for Determination of Emittance of Materials Near Room 1 Proceedings of the 2011 International Roofing Symposium Temperature Using Portable Emissometers). Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured using a FOX 304 heat flow meter (ASTM C518, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The surface properties of the cool roof coatings had higher solar reflectance than the reference black and white material, but there were no significant differences among coatings with and without ceramics. The coatings were applied to EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) membranes and installed on the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA), an instrumented facility at ORNL for testing roofs. Roof temperatures and heat flux through the roof were obtained for a year of exposure in east Tennessee. The field tests showed significant reduction in cooling required compared with the black reference roof (~80 percent) and a modest reduction in cooling compared with the white reference roof (~33 percent). The coating material with the highest solar reflectivity (no ceramic particles) demonstrated the best overall thermal performance (combination of reducing the cooling load cost and not incurring a large heating penalty cost) and suggests solar reflectivity is the significant characteristic for selecting cool roof coatings.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: white LED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electroluminescence was first reported by H.J. Round in 1907, and the first light-emitting diode (LED) was reported by O.V. Losev in 1927. Not until the birth of semiconductor...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Red LED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electroluminescence was first reported by H.J. Round in 1907, and the first light-emitting diode (LED) was reported by O.V. Losev in 1927. Not until the birth of semiconductor...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Blue LED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electroluminescence was first reported by H.J. Round in 1907, and the first light-emitting diode (LED) was reported by O.V. Losev in 1927. Not until the birth of semiconductor...

  5. Maintenance Practices for LED Streetlights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This April 14, 2014 webinar answered important questions about the maintenance and reliability of LED streetlights, and how to take these issues into account when planning and preparing for a...

  6. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The main accomplishments in this quarter included: (1) one more field test has been conducted in an underground coal mine, (2) optimization studies of the control parameters have been conducted, (3) the relationship among feed pressure, penetration rate and rotation rate seems to be a good indicator for estimating rock strength when both penetration rate and rotation rate are controlled or kept constant, (4) the empirical equations for eliminating the machine effect on drilling parameters were developed and verified, and (5) a real time roof geology mapping system for roof bolters in limestone mine, including a special version of the geology mapping program and hardware, performs very well in underground production condition.

  7. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2001-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this quarter, the research effort is to develop the drill control unit (DCU) that acquire, store drilling parameters and control the drilling operation. The relevant publications have been reviewed and the methodology developed by previous researchers has been evaluated using the collected data in our laboratory and field tests conducted prior to the start of this project. Numerical modeling for exploring roof bolting mechanism has been started.

  8. Flexible shaft and roof drilling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blanz, John H. (Carlisle, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for drilling holes in the roof of a mine has a flexible shaft with a pair of oppositely wound, coaxial flat bands. One of the flat bands defines an inner spring that is wound right handed into a helical configuration, adjacent convolutions being in nesting relationship to one another. The other flat band defines an outer spring that is wound left handed into a helical configuration about the inner band, adjacent convolutions being nesting relationship with one another. A transition member that is configured to hold a rock bit is mounted to one end of the flexible shaft. When torque and thrust are applied to the flexible shaft by a driver, the inner spring expands outwardly and the outer spring contracts inwardly to form a relatively rigid shaft.

  9. Roof Replacement and Related Work February 17, 2000 DSR # 0000-00 XXX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roof Replacement and Related Work February 17, 2000 DSR # 0000-00 XXX SECTION 02072 - REMOVAL OF INTACT INCIDENTAL ASBESTOS CONTAINING ROOFING MATERIAL (Rev.9/00) PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS Roof System Components Chart" for location of asbestos containing roofing materials. 1.2 SUMMARY A

  10. RESEARCH ARTICLE An experimental study of flow fields and wind loads on gable-roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    RESEARCH ARTICLE An experimental study of flow fields and wind loads on gable-roof building models the resultant wind loads acting on low-rise, gable-roof buildings induced by violent microburst-like winds State University. Two gable-roof building models with the same base plan and mean roof height

  11. Generalized Roof Duality for Pseudo-Boolean Optimization Fredrik Kahl Petter Strandmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet

    Generalized Roof Duality for Pseudo-Boolean Optimization Fredrik Kahl Petter Strandmark Centre to a quadratic pseudo-boolean function, and then use roof duality for ob- taining a lower bound. Roof duality to polynomials of higher degree, where quadratic roof duality appears as a special case. Op- timal relaxations

  12. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A. Atchley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A purposes. #12;ABSTRACT Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have

  13. LED Lighting Facts®

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED Lighting Facts LEDLED

  14. LED lamp power management system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A. M.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED lamp power management system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 reduces power loss in one of the channel switch 62 and the shunt switch 68 when LED lamp electronics power loss (P.sub.loss) exceeds an LED lamp electronics power loss limit (P.sub.lim); and each of the channel switches 62 receives a channel switch control signal 63 from the LED controller 58 and each of the shunt switches 68 receives a shunt switch control signal 69 from the LED controller 58.

  15. LED lamp color control system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A.M.

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED lamp color control system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; and a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 determines whether the LED source 80 is in a feedback controllable range, stores measured optical flux for the LED source 80 when the LED source 80 is in the feedback controllable range, and bypasses storing the measured optical flux when the LED source 80 is not in the feedback controllable range.

  16. Impact of Reflective Roofing on Cooling Electrical Use and Peak Demand in a Florida Retail Mall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sonne, J. K.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Experimental Plan To isolate the impact of adding a reflective roof surface, a before-and-after experimental protocol was used. With this experimental approach, a period of base line data is collected on the space cooling performance at the facility... roof resurfacing. Firstly, a potential utility program would want to target facilities for a light colored roof that were involved in re-roofing. Whereas discretionary change to a white roof costs approximately $0.50/ft2, the incremental cost...

  17. Evaporative Roof Cooling- A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernethy, D.

    Since the “Energy Crisis” Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retro-fit installations show direct energy savings...

  18. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comes from both the solar panel and the sky weighted by the underside of the tilted solar panels and the surface of of a roof  underneath a solar panel compared to that of an 

  19. Multicolor, High Efficiency, Nanotextured LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung Han; Arto Nurmikko

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and green for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the duration of the contract period include (i) heteroepitaxy of nitrogen-polar LEDs on sapphire, (ii) heteroepitaxy of semipolar (11{bar 2}2) green LEDs on sapphire, (iii) synthesis of quantum-dot loaded nanoporous GaN that emits white light without phosphor conversion, (iv) demonstration of the highest quality semipolar (11{bar 2}2) GaN on sapphire using orientation-controlled epitaxy, (v) synthesis of nanoscale GaN and InGaN medium, and (vi) development of a novel liftoff process for manufacturing GaN thin-film vertical LEDs. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  20. Plain Talk About Condensation and Radiation Below Metal Roof Assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, L.

    . Unfortunately, some of these advantages may give rise to certain disadvantages in comfort, durability and operating costs (7) This paper provides a brief historical overview of common metal roof insulation methods as well as recent innovations for low cost... assemblies. INTRODUCTION A primary objective of this paper is to try and simplify the complex subject of condensation in metal roof assemblies. A secondary objective is to focus on condensation considerations with reflective insulation systems (as...

  1. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The main accomplishments in this quarter included: (1) laboratory tests have been conducted, (2) with the added trendline analysis method, the accuracy of the data interpretation methodology will be improved, (3) method to use torque to thrust ratio as indicator of rock relative hardness has also been explored, and (3) about one half of the development work for the roof geology mapping program, MRGIS, has completed.

  2. Premium Efficient Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moser, P. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Premium efficient motors are available which convert electrical energy into mechanical energy with fewer losses than the more standard motors. The fewer losses in these motors are due to changes in the motor design and improved manufacturing methods...

  3. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24, Pa rt 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for nonresidential buildings with low-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in all California climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meet prescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an ''overall-envelope'' approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performance approach (all roof types).

  4. Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional and Policy Lessons Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical,...

  5. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

  6. Advanced Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoth, Edward A.; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J.

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, ���������������¢��������������������������������Motors and Generators for the 21st Century���������������¢�������������������������������. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can be met with a variety of bonded magnet compositions. The torque ripple was found to drop significantly by using thinner magnet segments. The powder co-filling and subsequent compaction processing allow for thinner magnet structures to be formed. Torque ripple can be further reduced by using skewing and pole shaping techniques. The techniques can be incorporated into the rotor during the powder co-filling process.

  7. Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling load from cool roofs. While important, the annual CO2008. Evolution of cool roof standards in the United States.2005. “Cool Colored Roofs to Save Energy and Improve Air

  8. Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

  9. Apparatus for thermal performance measurements of insulated roof systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courville, G.E.; Childs, K.W.; Walukas, D.J.; Childs, P.W.; Griggs, E.I.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy conducted thermal performance measurements on low-slope roofs with a recently developed field test apparatus at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The apparatus accommodates four 4 ft x 8 ft test specimens and includes the measurement capabilities for specimen temperatures, temperature gradients, heat flows and moisture content. A weather station characterizes outdoor weather conditions. Tests underway include (1) validation of a roof surface temperature model developed to study the effects of wet insulation; (2) measurement of temperature distributions and heat transfer in high R-value roofs; and (3) validation of an analysis of the effectiveness of high reflectance surfaces. Preliminary experimental results are presented and correlations between experiment and modeling are discussed.

  10. Reducing roof fall accidents on retreat mining sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark, C.; Zelanko, J.C. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (United States). Rock Mechanics Section

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pillar recovery continues to be one of the most hazardous activities in underground mining. Global stability, achieved through proper pillar design, is a necessary prerequisite for safe pillar recovery. Local stability means preventing roof falls in the working area. It is achieved by minimizing the 'risk factors' described in this paper. Roof Control Plans developed at each underground coal mine often address both engineering parameters and human behavior issues. These plans are essential to all mining activities, but nowhere are they more important than in pillar recovery. Pillaring leaves little tolerance for error, and mistakes can be deadly. Roof Control Plans must be carefully drawn up to address site-specific conditions, and then carefully implemented and followed. Miners and foremen involved in pillar extraction should be trained to know and understand the plan prior to beginning retreat mining. More details can be found at www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/pubs/pdfs/rtrog.pdf. 3 figs.

  11. Tangles of superpositions and the convex-roof extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Osterloh; Jens Siewert; Armin Uhlmann

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss aspects of the convex-roof extension of multipartite entanglement measures, that is, $SL(2,\\CC)$ invariant tangles. We highlight two key concepts that contain valuable information about the tangle of a density matrix: the {\\em zero-polytope} is a convex set of density matrices with vanishing tangle whereas the {\\em convex characteristic curve} readily provides a non-trivial lower bound for the convex roof and serves as a tool for constructing the convex roof outside the zero-polytope. Both concepts are derived from the tangle for superpositions of the eigenstates of the density matrix. We illustrate their application by considering examples of density matrices for two-qubit and three-qubit states of rank 2, thereby pointing out both the power and the limitations of the concepts.

  12. Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Real, Markus (Oberberg, CH)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

  13. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE ROOF BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-year non-cost extension has been granted for this project. In this quarter, the field, theoretical and programming works have been performed toward achieving the research goals set in the proposal. The main accomplishments in this quarter included: (1) laboratory tests have been conducted, (2) with the added trendline analysis method, the accuracy of the data interpretation methodology will be improved and the interfaces and voids can be more reliably detected, (3) method to use torque to thrust ratio as indicator of rock relative hardness has also been explored, and (3) about 80% of the development work for the roof geology mapping program, MRGIS, has completed and a special version of the program is in the field testing stage.

  14. You Don't Need to Raise the Roof: Cutting Solar Permitting Costs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    You Don't Need to Raise the Roof: Cutting Solar Permitting Costs for Wooden Rooftops You Don't Need to Raise the Roof: Cutting Solar Permitting Costs for Wooden Rooftops June 17,...

  15. Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.; Gao, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of comparative testing rooms (one with an ordinary roof and the other with a planting roof) was established in our laboratory, and in- situ measurement (in summer) data have been collected and treated. The indoor ...

  16. Conservation of stone-roofs: Challenges and the effect of new Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teba, Tarek

    Stone-roofing has a great history which spans many millennia BC which witnessed a lot of development to roofing systems and geometry regarding the area and type of building demands. Therefore, this paper discusses this ...

  17. Asphalt roofing industry Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy modified bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Request for Emissions Testing at Four Asphalt Roofing and Processing Facilities was submitted by the US EPA Emission Standards Division (ESD), Minerals and Inorganic Chemicals Group (MICG) to the Emission Measurement Center (EMC). The Emission Measurement Center directed Midwest Research Institute (MRI) to conduct emissions testing at asphalt roofing plants. This report presents results of MRI`s FTIR and Method 25A testing conducted at US Intec in Port Arthur, Texas. The field measurements were performed in September 1997 under several test conditions for both controlled and uncontrolled emissions.

  18. Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption for Cool Roofing Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellot, Joe [The Garland Company] [The Garland Company; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL] [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spread of cool roofing has been more than prolific over the last decade. Driven by public demand and by government initiatives cool roofing has been a recognized low cost method to reduce energy demand by reflecting sunlight away from structures and back in to the atmosphere. While much of the country can benefit from the use of cool coatings it remains to be seen whether the energy savings described are appropriate in cooler climates. By use of commonly available calculators one can analyze the potential energy savings based on environmental conditions and construction practices.

  19. Sustainable Retrofit of Residential Roofs Using Metal Roofing Panels, Thin-Film Photovoltaic Laminates, and PCM Heat Sink Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL] [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During September-October 2009, research teams representing Metal Construction Association (the largest North American trade association representing metal building manufacturers, builders, and material suppliers), CertainTeed (one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of thermal insulation and building envelope materials), Unisolar (largest U.S. producer of amorphous silicone photo-voltaic (PV) laminates), Phase Change Energy (manufacturer of bio-based PCM), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) installed three experimental attics utilizing different roof retrofit strategies in the ORNL campus. The main goal of this project was experimental evaluation of a newly-developed sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing amorphous silicone PV laminates integrated with metal roof and PCM heat sink. The experimental attic with PV laminate was expected to work during the winter time as a passive solar collector with PCM storing solar heat, absorbed during the day, and increasing overall attic air temperature during the night.

  20. Implementing Motor Decision Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.

    The first step to reducing energy costs and increasing reliability in motors is to establish a motor plan. A motor plan allows decisions to be made in advance of motor failure, and increases the options available. By contrast, most motor decisions...

  1. Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar for studying nonuniformly hyperbolic flows with unbounded roof functions. In particular, we establish the decay of other classes of flows with unbounded roof functions. For geometric Lorenz attractors (in- cluding

  2. Uncertainty analysis and validation of the estimation of effective hydraulic properties: application to green roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : application to green roof substrate A. Mesgoueza,b, , S. Buisb,a , S. Ruyb,a , G. Lefeuve on determining the effective properties at the Darcy scale of green roof substrates (GRS), highly heterogeneous of composite porous materials in order to improve the hydraulic functioning of green roof sub- strates

  3. Development/Plasticity/Repair The Bone Morphogenetic Protein Roof Plate Chemorepellent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Samantha

    Development/Plasticity/Repair The Bone Morphogenetic Protein Roof Plate Chemorepellent Regulates, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8 Commissural spinal axons extend away from the roof plate (RP) in response to the dorsal midline and are generated by the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the roof plate (RP) (Liem

  4. BUILDING ROOF SEGMENTATION AND RECONSTRUCTION FROM LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    BUILDING ROOF SEGMENTATION AND RECONSTRUCTION FROM LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES presents an approach to creating a polyhedral model of building roof from LiDAR point clouds using. The normal vectors are then clustered together to determine the principal directions of the roof planes

  5. VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH the urbanization process. This study evaluated the performance and feasibility of using vegetated or green roof systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

  6. Simulation of Heat Exchange Phenomena and Water Regime in Green Roof Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    187 Simulation of Heat Exchange Phenomena and Water Regime in Green Roof Substrates S. Charpentier UR EPHor Agrocampus-Ouest Centre d'Angers 2, rue Le Nôtre, F49045 Angers France Keywords: green roof roofs increases in Western European and North American cities. It is estimated that 12% of all flat

  7. Cool Roofs and Global Cooling Surabi Menon, Ronnen Levinson, Marc Fischer, Dev Millstein,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cool Roofs and Global Cooling Surabi Menon, Ronnen Levinson, Marc Fischer, Dev Millstein, Nancy potential of reflective (or white or cool) surfaces such as roofs and pavements. However, the article's results regarding white roofs are preliminary and uncertain. Moreover there are other published papers

  8. Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar for studying nonuniformly hyperbolic flows with unbounded roof functions. In particular, we establish the decay of other classes of flows with unbounded roof functions. For geometric Lorenz attractors (in­ cluding

  9. ORNL Roof and Attic System Shows Efficient Retrofit By Zaher Karp Reuters, July 27, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ORNL Roof and Attic System Shows Efficient Retrofit Option By Zaher Karp ­ Reuters, July 27, 2009 A new roof and attic system developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Building Technology Center. Texas-based Billy Ellis Roofing funds the research through the Building Technology Center

  10. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete ColumnSteel Beam Roof Level T-Connections under Displacement Reversals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parra-Montesinos, Gustavo J.

    Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Column­Steel Beam Roof Level T-Connections under Displacement study on the seismic response of two hybrid RC column-to-steel S beam RCS roof level T longitudinal bars; and 2 confinement requirements in RCS roof level T-connections. In the first subassembly

  11. Tighter Relaxations for Higher-Order Models based on Generalized Roof Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet

    Tighter Relaxations for Higher-Order Models based on Generalized Roof Duality Johan Fredriksson one of the most successful approaches, namely roof duality, for approximately solving such problems cone. In the sec- ond method, it is shown that the roof dual bound can be applied in an iterated way

  12. Modelling the Zn emissions from roofing materials at Crteil city scale -Defining a methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling the Zn emissions from roofing materials at Créteil city scale - Defining a methodology@cereve.enpc.fr) Abstract Today, urban runoff is considered as an important source of environment pollution. Roofing. An accurate evaluation of contaminant flows from roofs is thus required at the city scale. This paper aims

  13. A COST BASED APPROACH TO DESIGN OF RESIDENTIAL STEEL ROOF SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    A COST BASED APPROACH TO DESIGN OF RESIDENTIAL STEEL ROOF SYSTEMS B. Mobasher1 , S-Y.Chen2 , C-5306 Abstract A comprehensive system for the design of residential steel roof truss systems is presented automatically design a roof truss given minimal input and using the design curves as the performance constraints

  14. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptiverequirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability toreflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiateheat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittanceroofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool rooffor a non-cool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, coolingpower demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightlyincreasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywideambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasinghuman comfort.DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of acool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential (NR)building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energysavings of approximately 3.2 kW h/m2 (300 kW h/1000 ft2), average annualnatural gas deficits of 5.6 MJ/m2 (4.9 therm/1000 ft2), average annualsource energy savings of 30 MJ/m2 (2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2), and average peakpower demand savings of 2.1 W/m2 (0.19 kW/1000 ft2). The 15-year netpresent value (NPV) of energy savings averages $4.90/m2 ($450/1000 ft2)with time-dependent valuation (TDV), and $4.00/m2 ($370/1000 ft2) withoutTDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included,the average total savings (15-year NPV+equipment savings) rises to$5.90/m2 ($550/1000 ft2) with TDV, and to $5.00/m2 ($470/1000 ft2)without TDV.Total savings range from 1.90 to 8.30 $/m2 (0.18 0.77 $/ft2)with TDV, and from 1.70 to 7.10 $/m2 (0.16 0.66 $/ft2) without TDV,across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a coolroof is 0.00 2.20 $/m2 (0.00 0.20 $/ft2). Cool roofs with premiums up to$2.20/m2 ($0.20/ft2) are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 216; those with premiums not exceeding $1.90/m2 ($0.18/ft2) are expectedto be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommendsthat the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24,Part 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for NR buildings withlow-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in allCalifornia climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meetprescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an"overall-envelope" approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performanceapproach (all roof types).

  15. Edinburgh Motor Assessment (EMAS) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Thomas

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edinburgh Motor Assessment (EMAS) is a brief motor screening test, specifically designed for assessment of patients with dementia, aphasia and other cognitive disorders. It focuses, therefore, on those motor symptoms, ...

  16. A Practical Primer to LED Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    heatsink is what allows the high flux LED to generate much more light An LED (Light Emitting Diode) consists of a chip of semiconducting material treated to create a structure...

  17. what is a cool roof? what is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on materials, climate zone, & electricity rates.1 · Improved occupant comfort · Compliance with building energy Licensing Board for any construction project valued at over $500 in labor and materials. #12;COOL ROOFS 2008 on hot, sunny days. Solar reflectance refers to a material's ability to reflect the sun's solar energy

  18. Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    decisions by offering design requirements and establishing building codes. Over the last decade, muchPreliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures By Joe Mellott, Joshua New to reduce energy demand by reflecting sunlight away from structures and back into the atmosphere. By use

  19. Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

  20. LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    December 2014 LED Watch: The Outlook for OLEDs James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy LD+A Magazine

  1. Load test of the 277W Building high bay roof deck and support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, R.M.

    1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The 277W Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 1. The 277W Building is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; roof membrane -- tar and gravel; roof slope -- flat (<10 deg); and roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 227W Building was visited in March 1994 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

  2. EVALUATION OF ROOF BOLTING REQUIREMENTS BASED ON IN-MINE BOLTER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal, potash, salt etc. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on such information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. Field tests have been performed in two underground coal mines in this quarter. It also found from the tests that the non-drilling thrust and torque should be deducted from the acquired drilling data. The non-drilling torque is actually higher than that is used to overcome the shear strength is proportional to the rotation rate.

  3. The Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Tile Roofs with and without Batten Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay and concrete tile roofs were installed on a fully instrumented attic test facility operating in East Tennessee s climate. Roof, attic and deck temperatures and heat flows were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventionally pigmented and direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The data were used to benchmark a computer tool for simulation of roofs and attics and the tool used to develop an approach for computing an equivalent seasonal R-value for sub-tile venting. The approach computed equal heat fluxes through the ceilings of roofs having different combinations of surface radiation properties and or building constructions. A direct nailed shingle roof served as a control for estimating the equivalent thermal resistance of the air space. Simulations were benchmarked to data in the ASHRAE Fundamentals for the thermal resistance of inclined and closed air spaces.

  4. Load test of the 283W Clearwell Roof Deck and Support Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, R.M.

    1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 283W Clearwell roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 0, as modified below. The 283W Clearwell is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: Roof deck - concrete slab supported by columns and walls; Roof membrane - tar and gravel; Roof slope - flat (< 10 deg); and Roof elevation - approximately 6 in. above ground level. The 283W Clearwell was visited in April 1993 for a visual inspection, but could not be inspected because of the confined space requirements. It was revisited in February 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof could not be inspected, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof for personnel access.

  5. Bridgeton Research Center Roof Replacement and Related Work December 4, 2000 DSR # 0029-99 C/D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridgeton Research Center Roof Replacement and Related Work December 4, 2000 DSR # 0029-99 C/D SECTION 07220 ­ ROOF INSULATION PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS A. Drawings and general provisions: contains requirements for wood blocking to be installed prior to roof insulation. 1. Roof insulation

  6. Perspective-Dependent Color-Changing Roofing Sheets Anthony Cartwright, Joseph Karas, Steven McCarthy, Brian Paige

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    on their energy bills. Two primary factors affecting the temperature of roofs have been identified: solar weight to the top of the roof. Many companies also produce highly reflective roof coatings that block solar radiation and can reduce average surface temperatures of the roof up to __ degrees. However

  7. CATALOG OF PROCESSED DATA FOR 7 BUILDINGS A.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    APPENDIX A CATALOG OF PROCESSED DATA FOR 7 BUILDINGS A.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof Angeles, 16000 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 13) A.5457 Los Angeles, 8436 West 3rd St., Roof (10th floor) (pp. 19) #12;#12;A.0466--1 Appendix A.0466 LOS ANGELES, 15250 VENTURA BLVD., ROOF (13th Floor

  8. Dual LED/incandescent security fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauna, Kevin Wayne

    2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual LED and incandescent security lighting system uses a hybrid approach to LED illumination. It combines an ambient LED illuminator with a standard incandescent lamp on a motion control sensor. The LED illuminator will activate with the onset of darkness (daylight control) and typically remain on during the course of the night ("always on"). The LED illumination, typically amber, is sufficient to provide low to moderate level lighting coverage to the wall and ground area adjacent to and under the fixture. The incandescent lamp is integrated with a motion control circuit and sensor. When movement in the field of view is detected (after darkness), the incandescent lamp is switched on, providing an increased level of illumination to the area. Instead of an "always on" LED illuminator, the LEDs may also be switched off when the incandescent lamp is switched on.

  9. MOTOR BIKES, MOPEDS, AND MOTOR SCOOTERS Registration and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    6. 6.1 MOTOR BIKES, MOPEDS, AND MOTOR SCOOTERS Registration and Operation Motor Bikes, Mopeds, and Motor Scooters are defined as motor vehicles and are subject to all regulations governing motor vehicle operation on the grounds of the University. Such a motor vehicle owned and operated by a member

  10. A Study of the Energy-Saving Potential of Metal Roofs Incorporating Dynamic Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Manlove, Gary [Metanna, Monument, CO

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents various metal roof configurations that were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, U.S. between 2009 and 2013, and describes their potential for reducing the attic-generated space-conditioning loads. These roofs contained different combinations of phase-change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface, and above-sheathing ventilation with standing-seam metal panels on top. These roofs were designed to be installed on existing roofs decks, or on top of asphalt shingles for retrofit construction. All the tested roofs showed the potential for substantial energy savings compared to an asphalt shingle roof, which was used as a control for comparison. The roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. The attics were built on top of a conditioned room. All attics were vented at the soffit and ridge. The test roofs and attics were instrumented with an array of thermocouples. Heat flux transducers were installed in the roof deck and attic floor (ceiling) to measure the heat flows through the roof and between the attic and conditioned space below. Temperature and heat flux data were collected during the heating, cooling and swing seasons over a three-year period. Data from previous years of testing have been published. Here, data from the latest roof configurations being tested in year three of the project are presented. All test roofs were highly effective in reducing the heat flows through the roof and ceiling, and in reducing the diurnal attic-temperature fluctuations.

  11. LED Linear Lamps and Troffer Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The CALiPER program performed a series of investigations on linear LED lamps. Each report in the series covers the performance of up to 31 linear LED lamps, which were purchased in late 2012 or 2013. The first report focuses on bare lamp performance of LED T8 replacement lamps and subsequent reports examine performance in various troffers, as well as cost-effectiveness. There is also a concise guidance document that describes the findings of the Series 21 studies and provides practical advice to manufacturers, specifiers, and consumers (Report 21.4: Summary of Linear (T8) LED Lamp Testing , 5 pages, June 2014).

  12. LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this June 20, 2011 webcast on LED products marketed as replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, Jason Tuenge of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) discussed current Lighting...

  13. LED Street Lighting Conversion Workshop Presentations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the National League of Cities Mobile Workshop, LED Street Lighting Conversion: Saving Your Community Money, While Improving Public Safety,...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: high-brightness LED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnership, Research & Capabilities, Solid-State Lighting Solid state lighting (SSL), which uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs), has the potential to be 10 times more energy...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: efficient LED lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnership, Research & Capabilities, Solid-State Lighting Solid state lighting (SSL), which uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs), has the potential to be 10 times more energy...

  16. Challenges in LED Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video about LED lighting technology, where it is headed, and the DOE’s role in its continued R&D.

  17. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controls Norma Isahakian, City of Los Angeles Bureau of Street Lighting San Jose's "Smart" LED Streetlights: Controlled Amy Olay, City of San Jose Adaptive Lighting Controls...

  18. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Innovative Metal Building Roof Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Daniel James [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to meet the coming energy codes, multiple layers of various insulation types will be required. The demand for greater efficiency has pushed insulation levels beyond the cavity depth. These experiments show the potential for improving metal building roof thermal performance. Additional work is currently being done by several stakeholders, so the data is expanding. These experiments are for research and development purposes, and may not be viable for immediate use.

  19. Roofing as a Contributor to Urban Runoff Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    at: http://www.eng.ua.edu/~rpitt Map courtesy of U.S. Geological Website on Acid Rain #12;2 Roof · Summer 2002: Laboratory TCLP (acid rain simulation) · Fall/Winter 2002 and Spring 2003: Laboratory Testing Set-Up at Penn State Harrisburg During Rain Event, August 2005 pH Rainfall pH Range: 3.9 ­ 6

  20. Thermal resistance of prototypical cellular plastic roof insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, D.L.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooperative industry/government project was initiated in 1989 to evaluate the viability of alternative hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as blowing agents in polyisocyanurate (PIR) boardstock for roofing applications. Five sets of PIR boardstock were produced to industry specifications for current roof insulation technology. The boardstock allowed the performance of four alternative blowing agents (HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb, and two blends of HCFC-123 and HCFC-14lb) to compared to CFC-11. Laboratory and field tests show the relative thermal performance of the individual PIR boards. One set of laboratory tests show the thermal conductivity (k) from 0 to 50{degree}C (30 to 120{degree}F) of boards prior to installation and as a function of time after exposure to field conditions in the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (0, 9, and 15 months). Another set of laboratory tests show k as a function of aging time 24{degree}C (75{degree}F) and 65{degree}C (150{degree}F) for full-thickness, half-thickness, and quarter-thickness specimens. These test results and modeling calculations show the value of thin specimen testing as an accelerated aging procedure. 24 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Geologic structures that affect coal-mine roof stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, F.E. (Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Bureau of Mines has investigated several geologic structures that plague underground coal mining. These structures have caused numerous roof falls and, consequently, many miners have been hurt or fatally injured. Hazardous geologic anomalies that can be encountered in the eastern and western US coal fields include slips, hill seams, slickensides, sedimentary dikes, kettlebottoms, and paleochannels. Slips occur throughout the United States and are high-angled fractures in the roof rock. Typically, the rock adjacent to slips is highly slickensided and striated. Hill seams are weathered fracture zones and usually are found in areas where the overburden is shallow. Due to their nature and regional mining conditions, hill seams usually are found only in the southern Appalachian coal basin. Slickensides are lower angled planes of weakness found in coal-mine roof rock throughout the country. Slickensides usually are found in clusters and the adjacent rock is highly polished and striated. Sedimentary dikes (also clastic dikes and clay veins) are the remnants of ancient fissures that have been filled through sedimentary processes, Sedimentary dikes normally are found in coal basins that were slowly subsided. Kettlebottoms are the fossilized remains of trees that once grew in and above the swamp forest and generally are found in coal basins that were rapidly subsided. Paleochannels are the lithified remains of rivers and frequently are found in all coal basins except the Black Warrior.

  2. Equilibrium thermal characteristics of a building integrated photovoltaic tiled roof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, L.; Gottschalg, R.; Loveday, D.L. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Infield, D.G. [Institute of Energy and Environment, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Davies, D.; Berry, M. [Solarcentury, 91-94 Lower Marsh Waterloo, London, SE1 7AB (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) modules attain high temperatures when exposed to a combination of high radiation levels and elevated ambient temperatures. The temperature rise can be particularly problematic for fully building integrated PV (BIPV) roof tile systems if back ventilation is restricted. PV laminates could suffer yield degradation and accelerated aging in these conditions. This paper presents a laboratory based experimental investigation undertaken to determine the potential for high temperature operation in such a BIPV installation. This is achieved by ascertaining the dependence of the PV roof tile temperature on incident radiation and ambient temperature. A theory based correction was developed to account for the unrealistic sky temperature of the solar simulator used in the experiments. The particular PV roof tiles used are warranted up to an operational temperature of 85 C, anything above this temperature will void the warranty because of potential damage to the integrity of the encapsulation. As a guide for installers, a map of southern Europe has been generated indicating locations where excessive module temperatures might be expected and thus where installation is inadvisable. (author)

  3. Solving the 'Green Gap' in LED Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One long-standing high-priority research area for DOE is to increase the efficiency of deep green LEDs. Although most products today use phosphor conversion (PC) to produce white light from a blue LED, having a good green source could lead to color-mixed white sources that would avoid the losses associated with the PC approach.

  4. Today LED Holiday Lights, Tomorrow the World?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.

    2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This article for The APEM Advantage, the quarterly newsletter of the Association of Professional Energy Managers (APEM) describes the recent increase in the popularity of light emitting diode (LED) lighting and compares LED light output with that of incandescent and compact fluorescent lighting.

  5. Locally Led Conservation The Local Work Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grants ­ Conservation Stewardship Program ­ Environmental Quality Incentive Program ­ Farm & Ranch Lands1 Locally Led Conservation & The Local Work Group Mark Habiger NRCS #12;2 What Is "Locally Led Conservation"? · Community Stakeholders ­ 1. Assessing their natural resource conservation needs ­ 2. Setting

  6. LED Light Sources for Projection Display Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    LED Light Sources for Projection Display Applications By Chenhui Peng 04-13-2012 #12;Outline · 1. · The first practical LED is in red color and it is made with gallium arsenide (GaAs). 4http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light with holes and release energy in the form of photons. 5http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode #12

  7. Financing Guidance for LED Street Lighting Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Financing an LED street lighting replacement program can present a hurdle for many system owners, even if the planned transition offers very favorable economics. Replacing the existing system requires a significant budget, particularly as the scope of the program increases. Cities such as Los Angeles and Seattle have invested many millions of dollars into their (very successful) LED street lighting replacement programs.

  8. High Performance Green LEDs by Homoepitaxial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, Christian; Schubert, E Fred

    2009-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This work's objective was the development of processes to double or triple the light output power from green and deep green (525 - 555 nm) AlGaInN light emitting diode (LED) dies within 3 years in reference to the Lumileds Luxeon II. The project paid particular effort to all aspects of the internal generation efficiency of light. LEDs in this spectral region show the highest potential for significant performance boosts and enable the realization of phosphor-free white LEDs comprised by red-green-blue LED modules. Such modules will perform at and outperform the efficacy target projections for white-light LED systems in the Department of Energy's accelerated roadmap of the SSL initiative.

  9. An LED pulser for measuring photomultiplier linearity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friend, M; Quinn, B

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light-emitting diode (LED) pulser for testing the low-rate response of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to scintillator-like pulses has been designed, developed, and implemented. This pulser is intended to simulate 80 ns full width at half maximum photon pulses over the dynamic range of the PMT, in order to precisely determine PMT linearity. This particular design has the advantage that, unlike many LED test rigs, it does not require the use of multiple calibrated LEDs, making it insensitive to LED gain drifts. Instead, a finite-difference measurement is made using two LEDs which need not be calibrated with respect to one another. These measurements give a better than 1% mapping of the response function, allowing for the testing and development of particularly linear PMT bases.

  10. Comparison of the Perception of Facility Managers on Green Roofs Attributes and Barriers to their Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrer Garcia, Eduardo R

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    on Green Roofs Wong et, al (2005) conducted a study on perception of building professionals on the issues of green roofs. The objective of the study was to determine the current perception of building professionals on the issues of green roof... development and any conflicting opinions among them. Wong et, al (2005) used two components for the field study, a self-administered postal survey questionnaire and interviews. The survey was conducted among three target populations, architectural firms...

  11. Reflections on Cambridge: Inside the roof of King's College Chapel - 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    Alan Macfarlane, a Fellow of King's College, Cambridge, visits the roof above the famous Chapel and explains some of its features. Filmed in summer 2009 by Xu Bei....

  12. Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Pomerantz, M.; Gabersek, S.; Gartland, L.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, thus they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typical roofs in the United States are dark, which creates a potential for savings energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. In this report, the authors make quantitative estimates of the impact of roof color by simulating prototypical buildings with light- and dark-colored roofs and calculating savings by taking the differences in annual cooling and heating energy use, and peak electricity demand. Monetary savings are calculated using local utility rates. Savings are estimated for 11 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in a variety of climates.

  13. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W{sub e} using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat generated in the package may cause a deterioration of encapsulant materials, affecting the performance of both the LED die and phosphor, leading to a decrease in the luminous efficacy over lifetime. Recent studies from research groups at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute found that, under the condition to obtain a white light, about 40% of the light is transmitted outward of the phosphor layer and 60% of the light is reflected inward.1,2 It is claimed that using scattered photon extraction (SPE) technique, luminous efficacy is increased by 60%. In this project, a transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor was used to replace the powdered phosphor layer. In the normal pcLED package, the powdered phosphor is mixed with silicone either to be deposited on the top of LED die forming a chip level conversion (CLC) white LED or to be casted in the package forming a volume conversion white LED. In the monolithic phosphors there are no phosphor powder/silicone interfaces so it can reduce the light scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is inserted in the white LED package between the blue LED die and phosphor layer. It will selectively transmit the blue light from the LED die and reflect the phosphor's yellow inward emission outward. The two technologies try to recover backward light to the outward direction in the pcLED package thereby improving the package extraction efficiency.

  14. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  15. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Upgrade Piping Loads on Cleanroom Roof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakla, Steve; /Fermilab

    1995-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed piping layout for the DO upgrade will run along the south wall of DAB. The cryogenic service pipe runs above the upper and lower cleanroom roofs and will need to be supported by the roofs beams. Calculations were done to determine the stresses in the I-beams created by the existing and additional loads due to the upgrade. Refer to drawing no. 3823.115-ME-317283 for drawings of the piping layout. Figure 1 shows the 'plan view' portion of this drawing. The weight of the individual lines were calculated in figure 2 assuming a pipe density of O.28 lbm/in{sup 3} for stainless steel (0.12% C) and a fluid density (assuming LN2 at 1 atm) of 0.03 lbm/in{sup 3}. The weights of the corrugated steel flooring, assembly hall feed cans, support beams, and roof hatch were also included in the analysis. These loads are calculated on pgs. 5-6. A floor load of 50 lbf/ft{sup 2} was also added in order to maintain the existing floor load limit in addition to the added piping loads. Measurements of the dimensions of the I-beams determined that the nominal sizes of the beams were W8 x 21 for the lower roof and W14 x 26 for the upper roof. Pipe lengths were determined from the drawing for each of the lines on pgs. 1-2 of the calculations (refer to all piping by line numbers according to figure 2). A total weight was calculated for lines 3-9 along the south wall and lines 1-2 running along the north wall of the lower cleanroom roof. To simplify the calculations these weights were assumed to be evenly distributed on the 5 I-beam supports of the lower cleanroom roof 2.5 feet in from the south wall. The stress analysis was done using FrameMac, a 2-D finite element program for the Macintosh. Beam 3 was not included in the analysis because it is structurally equivalent to beam 1. The program outputted maximum values for shear stress, bending stress, shear force, and moments in each of the beams analyzed. These values were then compared to the allowable stresses as per the specifications and codes stated in the AISC: Manual of Steel Construction. The stresses on the roof beams needed to be determined in a number of different places. The first was in the beam itself which included the flange and web sections. The second place was at the ends of the beams where the flanges were removed to make the perpendicular connections to the other beams on the lower roof. The final point was the framed beam connection which included the bolt analysis. FrameMac calculated stresses only for the beams which included the sections where the flanges were removed to make the end connections. To analyze the connections, the allowable bending and shear stresses were solved for allowable shear and moments. This was done because FrameMac does not have the capability to analyze the dimensions for the bolts and angles used in the connections were known and the program outputted values for reaction forces and moments at the ends of the beams. Multiplying the allowable shear stress for the bolts and angle connections by their respective areas gave the allowable shear force. The allowable moment for the angle connection was calculated by multiplying the section modulus of the angle by the allowable bending stress. These allowable loads are calculated on pgs. 7-8. The allowable and maximum calculated stresses by FrameMac are summarized in a table. In conclusion, the cleanroom roofs will be able to safely support the weight of the upgrade cryogenic piping, feed cans, corrugated flooring and a 50 lbf/ft{sup 2} floor load with the addition of diagonal braces at the ends of beams 1,2,3,4, and 8. The location and size of these diagonal braces are shown in fig. 4. Also, the piping supports and feed cans will all need to be placed directly above the I-beam supports. These supports will consist of unistrut structures that will be detailed and specified separate to this analysis. The output and input data from FrameMac and the drawings used in the analysis follow the calculation pages.

  16. Implementing Motor Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colip, R. L.

    Electric motors account for sixty five percent of industrial energy consumed today. There are many opportunities to conserve electricity by using more energy efficient motors and drives. Proven technologies and practices can reduce energy...

  17. Stepping Motor Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Noble G.

    This paper describes a hardware system designed to facilitate position and velocity control of a group of eight stepping motors using a PDP-11. The system includes motor driver cards and other interface cards in addition ...

  18. LED Lighting Facts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED Lighting Facts LED

  19. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    49 Figure 26. Comparison of roof heat flux for East and West49 Figure 27. Roof heat flux vs. outside air temperature for8-19. 50 Figure 28. Roof heat flux vs. outside air

  20. Sensorless, Online Motor Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazici, Birsen

    of faults or incipi- ent faults in electric motor drives: Sensorless torque measurement Direct detection as the motor. Exten- sive online monitoring of the motors can lead to greater plant availability, extended over the last several years, ade- quate data processing capability is now available on cost

  1. Quantum motor and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgeny G. Fateev

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a popular language, the possibilities of the Casimir expulsion effect are presented, which can be the basis of quantum motors. Such motors can be in the form of a special multilayer thin film with periodic and complex nanosized structures. Quantum motors of the type of the Casimir platforms can be the base of transportation, energy and many other systems in the future.

  2. Decisions that led to Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    German physicists Otto Hahn and Fritz Strass- mann's claim that they had achieved nuclear fission. He led a team that included Alfred O. C. Nier who was an expert on mass...

  3. LED Essentials- Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 11, 2007, Kevin Dowling, VP of Innovation for Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, presented a broad introduction to LED technology, and discussed the technology status, advantages...

  4. LED Color Stability: 10 Important Questions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This April 15, 2014 webinar examined the causes of color shift, and took a look at existing metrics used to describe color shift/color stability in LED lighting. The lumen maintenance lifetime of...

  5. Text-Alternative Version LED Lighting Forecast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE report Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications estimates the energy savings of LED white-light sources over the analysis period of 2013 to 2030....

  6. Asphalt Roofing Shingles Into Energy Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jameson, Rex, PE

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a widely cited September, 1999 report by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, nearly 11 million tons of asphalt roofing shingle wastes are produced in the United States each year. Recent data suggests that the total is made up of about 9.4 million tons from roofing tear-offs and about 1.6 million tons from manufacturing scrap. Developing beneficial uses for these materials would conserve natural resources, promote protection of the environment and strengthen the economy. This project explored the feasibility of using chipped asphalt shingle materials in cement manufacturing kilns and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. A method of enhancing the value of chipped shingle materials for use as fuel by removing certain fractions for use as substitute raw materials for the manufacture of new shingles was also explored. Procedures were developed to prevent asbestos containing materials from being processed at the chipping facilities, and the frequency of the occurrence of asbestos in residential roofing tear-off materials was evaluated. The economic feasibility of each potential use was evaluated based on experience gained during the project and on a review of the well established use of shingle materials in hot mix asphalt. This project demonstrated that chipped asphalt shingle materials can be suitable for use as fuel in circulating fluidized boilers and cement kilns. More experience would be necessary to determine the full benefits that could be derived and to discover long term effects, but no technical barriers to full scale commercial use of chipped asphalt shingle materials in these applications were discovered. While the technical feasibility of various options was demonstrated, only the use of asphalt shingle materials in hot mix asphalt applications is currently viable economically.

  7. Motor Control STEVEN P. WISE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmehr, Reza

    Motor Control STEVEN P. WISE National Institute of Mental Health REZA SHADMEHR Johns Hopkins University I. What Controls Movement II. What the Motor System Controls III. Mechanisms of Motor Control IV. Motor Memory V. Flexibility in Motor Control VI. Evolution of the Motor System GLOSSARY agonist A muscle

  8. Attic or Roof? An Evaluation of Two Advanced Weatherization Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines implementation of advanced retrofit measures in the context of a large-scale weatherization program and the archetypal Chicago brick bungalow. One strategy applies best practice air sealing methods and a standard insulation method to the attic floor. The other strategy creates an unvented roof assembly using materials and methods typically available to weatherization contractors. Through implementations of the retrofit strategies in a total of eight (8) test homes, the research found that the two different strategies achieve similar reductions in air leakage measurement (55%) and predicted energy performance (18%) relative to the pre-retrofit conditions.

  9. Cool Roofs: An Easy Upgrade | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControls andCONVENTIONAL ENERGY|Cool Roofs: An

  10. Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013Department ofU.S.forCategoriesDepartmentCool Roof

  11. Urban Heat Islands: Cool Roof Infrastructure | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads intoMansoor Ghassem )DepartmentUppingDepartmentCool Roof

  12. Developing Energy Efficient Roof Systems DEERS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy OffshoreDeveloper - Q & A Home >Roof Systems

  13. Cool Roofs and Heat Islands | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump to: navigation, search Tool

  14. New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForum |EnergyNew Catalytic ConversionNew Cool Roof

  15. Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIREofNewsletter Newsletter Better BuildingsAttics and Roof

  16. LEDS GP Success Story: Fostering Coordinated LEDS Support in Kenya (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) strives to advance climate-resilient, low-emission development through catalyzing collaboration, information exchange, and action on the ground. The Government of Kenya is a key LEDS GP member and offers an inspiring example of how LEDS GP is having an impact globally. The 2012 LEDS Collaboration in Action workshop in London provided an interactive space for members to share experiences on cross-ministerial LEDS leadership and to learn about concrete development impacts of LEDS around the world. Inspired by these stories, the Kenya's Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030 (MPND) began to collaborate closely with the Ministry of Environment and Mineral Resources to create strong links between climate change action and development in the country, culminating in the integration of Kenya's National Climate Change Action Plan and the country's Medium Term Development Plan.

  17. Motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  18. Neuron, Vol. 24, 127141, September, 1999, Copyright 1999 by Cell Press BMPs as Mediators of Roof Plate Repulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Samantha

    Neuron, Vol. 24, 127­141, September, 1999, Copyright ©1999 by Cell Press BMPs as Mediators of Roof., 1997). that the roof plate (RP) expresses a diffusible activity One source of FP-independent guidance

  19. Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work Dec. 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work Dec. 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH AFFIDAVIT OF NON-USE OF ASBESTOS Project: Roof Replacement and Related Work at LIBRARY OF SCIENCE & MEDICINE

  20. Pittsburgh LED Street Lighting Research Project Performance Criteria

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Pittsburgh LED Street Lighting Research Project document on Technical and Aesthetic Performance for Business District LED Lighting.

  1. Digging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fierer, Noah

    microbes across the greater New York City area is locally variable. Green roof fungal communities wereDigging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks Krista L a number of benefits, including decreased urban heat island effects and reduced energy costs for buildings

  2. Roof Replacement and Related Work February 17, 2000 DSR # 0000-00 XXX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roof Replacement and Related Work February 17, 2000 DSR # 0000-00 XXX SECTION 02071 - REMOVAL # 0000-00 XXX A. Removal and disposal shall be performed in accordance with ap- plicable State 02071 - 2 (Rev. 9/00) #12;Roof Replacement and Related Work February 17, 2000 DSR # 0000-00 XXX 1

  3. Reduced Energy and Maintenance Costs Using Polyurethane as a Replacement Roof System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, G. D.

    failures had occurred and resealing and reflashing penetrations. In many instances roof crews were unable to accomplish a permanent fix without a major tear-off and replacement of the existing roof. 40 ESL-HH-92-05-08 Proceedings of the Eighth...

  4. Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    moisture to the outside. Solar radiation raises the temperature of air in the grooves and on average, during a sunny summer day 0.5 L of water can be ventilated out of the roof per 1m width of the roof. In this paper, one climatic condition was investigated...

  5. Roof Integrated Solar Absorbers: The Measured Performance of ''Invisible'' Solar Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon, C. J. (Florida Solar Energy Center); Merrigan, T. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), with the support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has investigated the thermal performance of solar absorbers that are an integral, yet indistinguishable, part of a building's roof. The first roof-integrated solar absorber (RISA) system was retrofitted into FSEC's Flexible Roof Facility in Cocoa, Florida, in September 1998. This ''proof-of-concept'' system uses the asphalt shingle roof surface and the plywood decking under the shingles as an unglazed solar absorber. Data was gathered for a one-year period on the system performance. In Phase 2, two more RISA prototypes were constructed and submitted for testing. The first used the asphalt shingles on the roof surface with the tubing mounted on the underside of the plywood decking. The second prototype used metal roofing panels over a plywood substrate and placed the polymer tubing between the plywood decking and the metal roofing. This paper takes a first look at the thermal performance results for the ''invisible'' solar absorbers that use the actual roof surface of a building for solar heat collection.

  6. Comparative Summer Thermal Performance of Finished and Unfinished Metal Roofing Products with Composition Shingles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J.; Sonne, J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , both finished and unfinished, might compare with other more traditional roofing types. All of the test cells had R-19 insulation installed on the attic floor except in the double roof configuration which had R-19 of open cell foam blown onto...

  7. Replacing Motors Counting Savings: Results from a 100 Motor Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, N. M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REPLACING MOTORS, COUNTING SAVINGS: RESULTS FROM A 100 MOTOR STUDY Nicole M. Kaufman Motor Systems Engineer Advanced Energy Raleigh, NC ABSTRACT Software tools such as MotorMaster+ aid facility personnel in conducting payback... analyses for replacing motors. These tools make assumptions on the motors’ operational efficiency in their calculations. By observing 100 pre-EPCA (Energy Policy & Conservation Act) motors in operation, removing them from service and conducting IEEE...

  8. Replacing Motors Counting Savings: Results from a 100 Motor Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, N. M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REPLACING MOTORS, COUNTING SAVINGS: RESULTS FROM A 100 MOTOR STUDY Nicole M. Kaufman Motor Systems Engineer Advanced Energy Raleigh, NC ABSTRACT Software tools such as MotorMaster+ aid facility personnel in conducting payback... analyses for replacing motors. These tools make assumptions on the motors’ operational efficiency in their calculations. By observing 100 pre-EPCA (Energy Policy & Conservation Act) motors in operation, removing them from service and conducting IEEE...

  9. Proposal for the award of a contract for the civil engineering work relating to the roof renovation of Building 867

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the civil engineering work relating to the roof renovation of Building 867

  10. CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVries, Kerry L; Mellegard, Kirby D; Callahan, Gary D; Goodman, William M

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

  11. Numerical evaluation of the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranville, Frédéric; Lucas, Franck; Johan, Seriacaroupin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the thermal performances of roof-mounted radiant barriers. Using dynamic simulations of a mathematical model of a whole test cell including a radiant barrier installed between the roof top and the ceiling, the thermal performance of the roof is calculated. The mean method is more particularly used to assess the thermal resistance of the building component and lead to a value which is compared to the one obtained for a mass insulation product such as polyurethane foam. On a further stage, the thermal mathematical model is replaced by a thermo-aeraulic model which is used to evaluate the thermal resistance of the roof as a function of the airflow rate. The results shows a better performance of the roof in this new configuration, which is widely used in practice. Finally, the mathematical relation between the thermal resistance and the airflow rate is proposed.

  12. A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

  13. Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b , Peng Gong c t The level of air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago was quantified using a dry deposition model. The result showed that a total of 1675 kg of air pollutants was removed by 19.8 ha of green roofs in one year

  14. 24897Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 88 / Wednesday, May 7, 1997 / Proposed Rules 1 Petition for review pending, GS Roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for review pending, GS Roofing Products Company, Inc., et al. v. Surface Transportation Board, No. 97­107 (8: In a decision in GS Roofing Products Company, Inc., Beazer West, Inc., D/B/ A Gifford Hill & Company, Bean., Docket No. 41230 (STB served Mar. 11, 1997) (GS Roofing), 1 we reviewed a fact- specific complaint

  15. HOUGH-TRANSFORM AND EXTENDED RANSAC ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF 3D BUILDING ROOF PLANES FROM LIDAR DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HOUGH-TRANSFORM AND EXTENDED RANSAC ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF 3D BUILDING ROOF PLANES reconstruction methods, the techniques allowing the detection of 3D building roof planes are of crucial even if this plane does not always represent a roof plane. So the proposed extension allows harmonizing

  16. A new method for modelling roofing materials emissions on the city scale: Application for zinc in the city of Crteil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A new method for modelling roofing materials emissions on the city scale: Application for zinc as an important source of environmental pollution. Roofing materials, in particular the metallic ones Directive (2000/60 CE), an accurate evaluation of contaminant flows from roofs is thus required on the city

  17. Assessment of technologies for constructing self-drying low-slope roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, D.M.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues associated with removing excessive moisture from low-slope roofs have been assessed. The economic costs associated with moisture trapped in existing roofs have been estimated. The evidence suggests that existing moisture levels cause approximately a 40% overall reduction in the R-value of installed roofing insulation in the United States. Excess operating costs are further increased by a summertime heat transfer mode unique to wet insulation, caused by the daily migration of water within the roof. By itself, this effect can increase peak electrical demand for air conditioning by roughly 15 W/m{sup 2} of roofing, depending on the type of insulation. This effect will increase peak demand capacity required of utilities in any geographic region (e.g., 900 MW in the South). A simple formula has been derived for predicting the effect that self-drying roofs can have upon time-averaged construction costs. It is presumed that time-averaged costs depend predominantly upon (1) actual service life and (2) the likelihood that the less expensive recover membranes can be installed safely over old roofs. For example, an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years should reduce the current cost of roofing ($12 billion/year) by 21%. Another simple formula for predicting the reroofing waste volume indicates that an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years might reduce the current estimated 0.4 billion ft{sup 3}/year of waste by 25%. A finite-difference computer program has been used to study the flow of heat and moisture within typical existing roofs for a variety of US climates. Nearly all publicly available experimental drying data have been consulted. The drying times for most existing low-slope roofs in the United States are controlled largely climate and the permeability of the structural deck to water vapor.

  18. LED Lighting Forecast | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED Lighting Facts

  19. LED Outdoor Area Lighting Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED LightingOutdoor Area

  20. LED structure with enhanced mirror reflectivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Michael; Donofrio, Matthew; Heikman, Sten; Schneider, Kevin S; Haberern, Kevin W; Edmond, John A

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally related to LED chips having improved overall emission by reducing the light-absorbing effects of barrier layers adjacent mirror contacts. In one embodiment, a LED chip comprises one or more LEDs, with each LED having an active region, a first contact under the active region having a highly reflective mirror, and a barrier layer adjacent the mirror. The barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that it does not extend beyond the periphery of the mirror. In another possible embodiment, an insulator is further provided, with the insulator adjacent the barrier layer and adjacent portions of the mirror not contacted by the active region or by the barrier layer. In yet another embodiment, a second contact is provided on the active region. In a further embodiment, the barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that the periphery of the mirror is at least 40% free of the barrier layer, and the second contact is below the first contact and accessible from the bottom of the chip.

  1. LEDs for Energy Efficient Greenhouse Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Devesh; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light energy is an important factor for plant growth. In regions where the natural light source, i.e. solar radiation, is not sufficient for growth optimization, additional light sources are being used. Traditional light sources such as high pressure sodium lamps and other metal halide lamps are not very efficient and generate high radiant heat. Therefore, new sustainable solutions should be developed for energy efficient greenhouse lighting. Recent developments in the field of light source technologies have opened up new perspectives for sustainable and highly efficient light sources in the form of light-emitting diodes, i.e. LEDs, for greenhouse lighting. This review focuses on the potential of LEDs to replace traditional light sources in the greenhouse. In a comparative economic analysis of traditional vs. LED lighting, we show that the introduction of LEDs allows reduction of the production cost of vegetables in the long-run of several years, due to the high energy efficiency, low maintenance cost and lon...

  2. Parametric electric motor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stahura, D. [GM-AC Delco Systems, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1995-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology for the axial gap motor was developed by DOE with an investment of approximately $15 million. This development effort is for motor technologies of high power density and high efficiency. Such motors that are also small and light-weight are not available on the commercial market because high-power motors have typically been used in large industrial applications where small size and light weight are not requirements. AC Delco has been developing motors since 1918 and is interested in leveraging its research and development dollars to produce an array of motor systems for vehicles and to develop a future line of propulsion products. The DOE focus of the study was applied to machining applications. The most attractive feature of this motor is the axial air gap, which may make possible the removal of the motor`s stationary component from a total enclosure of the remainder of the machine if the power characteristics are adequate. The objectives of this project were to evaluate alternative electric drive systems for machine tools and automotive electric drive systems and to select a best machine type for each of those applications. A major challenge of this project was to produce a small, light-weight, highly efficient motor at a cost-effective price. The project developed machine and machine drive systems and design criteria for the range of applications. The final results included the creation of a baseline for developing electric vehicle powertrain system designs, conventional vehicle engine support system designs, and advanced machine tool configurations. In addition, an axial gap permanent magnet motor was built and tested, and gave, said one engineer involved, a sterling performance. This effort will commercialize advanced motor technology and extend knowledge and design capability in the most efficient electric machine design known today.

  3. Energy Efficient Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmeyer, W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and how to interpret efficiency data. A perspective is given from which to evaluate available energy efficient motor offerings for a given application....

  4. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levin, Michael Benjamin (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  5. Use of roof temperature modeling to predict necessary conditions for locating wet insulation with infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In low-sloped roofing systems using porous insulation, the presence of water can significantly degrade thermal performance. For this reason, it is desirable to develop a reliable method for detecting the presence of water in a roofing system. Because of the different thermal characteristics of wet and dry insulation, there is often a surface temperature differential between areas containing wet insulation and areas containing dry insulation. Under the right circumstances, the areas of wet insulation can be detected by means of infrared sensing techniques. These techniques have already gained widespread acceptance, but there is still some uncertainty as to what are appropriate environmental conditions for viewing. To better define the conditions under which infrared techniques can distinguish between areas of wet and dry insulation, a one-dimensional, transient heat transfer model of a roofing system was developed. The model considers conduction through the roof, insolation on the surface, radiant exchange between the roof and sky, convective heat transfer between the roof and air, and the influence of trapped moisture on the thermal properties of the insulation. A study was undertaken using this model to develop an easily-applied technique for prediction of necessary conditions for locating wet roof insulation using infrared thermography.

  6. Investigation of factors influencing infrared roof moisture surveys using a mathematical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.; Courville, G.E.; Childs, P.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In low sloped roofing systems using porous insulation, the presence of water can significantly degrade thermal performance. Because of the different thermal characteristics of wet and dry insulation, there is often a surface temperature differential between areas of wet and dry insulation. Under the right circumstances, the areas of wet insulation can be detected by means of infrared sensing techniques. To better define the conditions under which infrared techniques can distinguish between areas of wet and dry insulation, a mathematical model was developed. This model is a one-dimensional, transient heat transfer model of a roofing system. The model considers conduction through the roof, insolation, radiant exchange between roof and sky, convective heat transfer between the roof and air, and the influence of moisture trapped in insulation. For one particular roof system, a parametric study was undertaken using this model to determine the influence of moisture content, outside air temperature, wind speed, insolation, sky temperature, and other factors on the roof surface temperature. Preliminary recommendations for employing thermal sensing techniques to locate wet insulation are developed.

  7. Investigation of factors influencing infrared roof moisture surveys using a mathematical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.; Courville, G.E.; Childs, P.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In low sloped roofing systems using porous insulation, the presence of water can significantly degrade thermal performance. Because of the different thermal characteristics of wet and dry insulation, there is often a surface temperature differential between areas of wet and dry insulation. Under the right circumstances, the areas of wet insulation can be detected by means of infrared sensing techniques. To better define the conditions under which infrared techniques can distinguish between areas of wet and dry insulation, a mathematical model was developed. This model is a one-dimensional, transient heat transfer model of a roofing system. The model considers conduction through the roof, insulation, radiant exchange between roof and sky, convective heat transfer between the roof and air, and the influence of moisture trapped in insulation. For one particular roof system, a parametric study was undertaken using this model to determine the influence of moisture content, outside air temperature, wind speed, insulation, sky temperature, and other factors on the roof surface temperature. Preliminary recommendations for employing thermal sensing techniques to locate wet insulation are developed. 11 references, 12 figures.

  8. Neural correlates underlying motor map plasticity and skilled motor behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanathan, Dhakshin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of neurons within the motor cortex. Physiol Rev, 1975. 55(and S.P. Wise, The motor cortex of the rat: cytoarchitecturedelayed changes of rat motor cortical output representation

  9. Quantum Fisher Information as the Convex Roof of Variance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixia Yu

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Fisher information places the fundamental limit to the accuracy of estimating an unknown parameter. Here we shall provide the quantum Fisher information an operational meaning: a mixed state can be so prepared that a given observable has the minimal averaged variance, which equals exactly to the quantum Fisher information for estimating an unknown parameter generated by the unitary dynamics with the given observable as Hamiltonian. In particular we shall prove that the quantum Fisher information is the convex roof of the variance, as conjectured by Toth and Petz based on numerical and analytical evidences, by constructing explicitly a pure-state ensemble of the given mixed state in which the averaged variance of a given observable equals to the quantum Fisher information.

  10. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. The incidents related to rainwater leakage and condensation concerns. Condensation concerns have been extensively studied by others and are not further discussed in this report. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  11. The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

  12. Validation of the thermal effect of roof with the Spraying and green plants in an insulated building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru; Ojima, Toshio

    2004-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, roof-spraying and rooftop lawns have proven effective on roofs with poor thermal insulation. However, the roofs of most buildings have insulating material to provide thermal insulation during the winter. The effects of insulation has not previously been quantified. In this study, the authors collected measurements of an insulated building to quantify the thermal effects of roof-spraying and rooftop lawns. Roof-spraying did not significantly reduce cooling loads and required significant amounts of water. The conclusion is that roof spraying is not suitable for buildings with well-insulated roofs. Rooftop lawns, however, significantly stabilized the indoor temperature while additionally helping to mitigate the heat island phenomenon.

  13. Fatal accidents involving roof falls in coal mining, 1996--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents information on fatalities involving roof and rib falls that occurred in coal mining operations from January 1996 through December 1998. It includes statistics for the fatalities, as well as abstracts, best practices and illustrations. Conclusion statements have been substituted for best practices where no Title 30 Code of Regulations violations were cited during the accident investigation. From January 1996 through December 1998, 36 miners died at coal operations from accidents classified as roof falls. The information in the report is based on statistics taken from the 1996 through 1998 MSHA Fatal Illustration Programs: Roof Fall Fatalities by District.

  14. Fatal accidents involving roof falls in coal mining, 1996--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents information on fatalities involving roof and rib falls that occurred in coal mining operations from January 1996 through December 1998. It includes statistics for the fatalities, as well as abstracts, best practices and illustrations. Conclusion statements have been substituted for best practices where no Title 30 Code of Regulations violations were cited during the accident investigation. From January 1996 through December 1998, 36 miners died at coal operations from accidents classified as roof falls. The information in the report is based on statistics taken from the 1996 through 1998 MSHA Fatal Illustration Programs: Roof Fall Fatalities by District.

  15. Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are comparable across lifecycle phases, subsystems, and environmental impact category, and can be normalized to a userdefined functional unit. • Drill-down Review – These provide an indepth look at individual lamp designs with the ability to review across subsystem or lifecycle phase.

  16. Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epler, John

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The technology was commercialized in our LUXEON Q product in Sept., 2013. Also, the retention of the sapphire increased the robustness of the device, enabling sales of low-cost submount-free chips to lighting manufacturers. Thus, blue LED die sales were initiated in the form of a PSS-FC in February, 2013.

  17. Ontario Hydro Motor Efficiency Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dautovich, D. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric motors consume more than one-half of the electrical energy produced by Ontario Hydro. In the residential sector, the major motor load is for refrigerators and freezers while packaged equipment dominate the motor load in the commercial...

  18. Motor Vehicle Record Procedure Objective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Motor Vehicle Record Procedure Objective Outline the procedure for obtaining motor vehicle record (MVR) through Fleet Services. Vehicle Operator Policy 3. Operators with 7 or more points on their motor vehicle record

  19. Condensation Risk of Mechanically Attached Roof Systems in Cold Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A white roof, cool roof, is constructed to decrease thermal loads from solar radiation, therefore saving energy by decreasing the cooling demands. Unfortunately, cool roofs with mechanically attached membrane, have shown to have a higher risk of intermediate condensation in the materials below the membrane in certain climates (Ennis & Kehrer, 2011) and in comparisons with similar construction with a darker exterior surface (Bludau, Zirkelbach, & Kuenzel, 2009). As a consequence, questions have been raised regarding the sustainability and reliability of using cool roof membranes in Northern U.S. climate zones. A white roof surface reflects more of the incident solar radiation in comparisons with a dark surface, which makes a distinguished difference on the surface temperature of the roof. However, flat roofs with either a light or dark surface and if facing a clear sky, are constantly losing energy to the sky due to the exchange of infrared radiation. This phenomenon exists both during the night and the day. During the day, if the sun shines on the roof surface, the exchange of infrared radiation typically becomes insignificant. During nights and in cold climates, the temperature difference between the roof surface and the sky can deviate up to 20 C (Hagentoft, 2001) which could result in a very cold surface temperature compared to the ambient temperature. Further, a colder surface temperature of the roof increases the energy loss and the risk of condensation in the building materials below the membrane. In conclusion, both light and dark coated roof membranes are cooled by the infrared radiation exchange during the night, though a darker membrane is more heated by the solar radiation during the day, thus decreasing the risk of condensation. The phenomenon of night time cooling from the sky and the lack of solar gains during the day is not likely the exclusive problem concerning the risk of condensation in cool roofs with mechanically attached membranes. Roof systems with thermoplastic membranes are prone to be more effected by interior air intrusion into the roof construction; both due to the wind induced pressure differences and due to the flexibility and elasticity of the membrane (Molleti, Baskaran, Kalinger, & Beaulieu, 2011). Depending on the air permeability of the material underneath the membrane, wind forces increase the risk of fluttering (also referred as billowing) of the thermoplastic membrane. Expectably, the wind induced pressure differences creates a convective air flow into the construction i.e. Page 2 air intrusion. If the conditions are right, moisture from the exchanging air may condensate on surfaces with a temperature below dew-point. The definite path of convective airflows through the building envelope is usually very difficult to determine and therefore simplified models (K nzel, Zirkelbach, & Scfafaczek, 2011) help to estimate an additional moisture loads as a result of the air intrusion. The wind uplifting pressure in combination with wind gusts are important factors for a fluttering roof. Unfortunately, the effect from a fluctuating wind is difficult to estimate as this is a highly dynamic phenomenon and existing standards (ASTM, 2011a) only take into account a steady state approach i.e. there is no guidance or regulations on how to estimate the air intrusion rate. Obviously, a more detailed knowledge on the hygrothermal performance of mechanically attached cool roof system is requested; in consideration to varying surface colors, roof air tightness, climate zones and indoor moisture supply.

  20. Stepping motor controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  1. Series Input Modular Architecture for Driving Multiple LEDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , where each cell drives four 700 mA LEDs. Keywords ­ solid-state lighting, light emitting diodes, LED have been achieved over the past decade in solid state light emitting diodes (LEDs), leading to high

  2. Asymptotic Analysis of Cooperative Molecular Motor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durrett, Richard

    Mesoscale Model for Collections of Molecular Motors Stochastic Asymptotic Techniques #12;Molecular Motors

  3. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report This...

  4. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Freezer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Freezer Case Lighting Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Freezer Case Lighting This document is a report...

  5. (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting and HVAC Units: February 11, 2010 (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting and HVAC...

  6. Energy Department Announces New University-Led Projects to Create...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University-Led Projects to Create More Efficient, Lower Cost Concentrating Solar Power Systems Energy Department Announces New University-Led Projects to Create More Efficient,...

  7. Research Led by Sandia Reveals Leading-Edge Erosion Significantly...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Led by Sandia Reveals Leading-Edge Erosion Significantly Reduces Wind Turbine Performance Research Led by Sandia Reveals Leading-Edge Erosion Significantly Reduces Wind...

  8. Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

  9. Green Roof Water Harvesting and Recycling Effects on Soil and Water Chemistry and Plant Physiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laminack, Kirk Dickison

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    pressures put on fresh water supplies in urban ecosystems. Alternative irrigation sources can include grey water, sewage effluent (black water) and harvested rainwater which can be a) water captured from an impervious roof and b) stormwater captured from...

  10. INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope Insulation; Roofing; Fenestration (Page 1 of 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope ­ Insulation; Roofing; Fenestration (Page 1 of 3:__________________________________ Brand Name:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal Resistance (R-Value):_________________ Perimeter

  11. Determination of immediate roof at mines of the Kutahya-Omerler coal basin, Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Konak; T. Onargan; C.O. Aksoy; H. Kose; C. Tatar; C. Pamukcu [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Department of Mining Engineering

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The estimation of the relations between excavation height, longwall advance rate, convergence around a longwall in the roof-soil direction, and load distribution on support is reported, that are of specific importance for selecting support type. The principal attention is focused on determination of the immediate roof height that depends on the mobility characteristics of overlying rocks and governs mainly the stopping convergence and load intensity on the support. Numerical modeling, laboratory and field experiments are undertaken in this study, which included evaluation of composition and physicomechanical properties of rocks, assessment of stress-strain state of rock mass and of the immediate roof height, measurements of disintegration and bulking factor of overlying rocks, convergence of stopping floor and roof, and loads on hydraulic legs of supports. The study parameters obtained by different methods for the Omerler Mine are presented.

  12. Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indiana allows taxpayers to take a deduction on solar-powered roof fans (or vent, also sometimes called an attic fan) installed in a home that the taxpayer owns or leases. The deduction is for 50%...

  13. Reflections on Cambridge: Cambridge University from the roof of King's College Chapel - 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    Film taken from the roof of the famous chapel, with Alan Macfarlane a Fellow of the College explaining a few of the sights. Filmed in summer 2009 by Xu Bei....

  14. Preservation of early wrought iron trusses : the 1848 roof of the Cochituate gatehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferriss, Lori (Lori E.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the historic significance, structural condition, and preservation challenges of the wrought iron roof trusses of the Cochituate aqueduct's inlet gatehouse as the possible earliest surviving example ...

  15. Sustainable Roofscapes: Developing a green roof implementation model for Tucson, AZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Sustainable Roofscapes: Developing a green roof implementation model for Tucson, AZ BRENT JACOBSEN Advisor: Dr. Margaret Livingston School of Landscape Architecture and Planning College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture Special Acknowledgements: The University of Arizona, Technology and Research

  16. TASK 2.5.7 FIELD EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE COOL-COLORED ROOFING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ) demonstrated that white barrel and white flat tiles reduced cooling energy consumption by 22% of the base load the exterior face of the roof sheathing and the underside of the tile. The greater the tile's profile

  17. The Trade-off between Solar Reflectance and Above-Sheathing Ventilation for Metal Roofs on Residential and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL] [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative to white and cool-color roofs that meets prescriptive requirements for steep-slope (residential and non-residential) and low-slope (non-residential) roofing has been documented. Roofs fitted with an inclined air space above the sheathing (herein termed above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV), performed as well as if not better than high-reflectance, high-emittance roofs fastened directly to the deck. Field measurements demonstrated the benefit of roofs designed with ASV. A computer tool was benchmarked against the field data. Testing and benchmarks were conducted at roofs inclined at 18.34 ; the roof span from soffit to ridge was 18.7 ft (5.7 m). The tool was then exercised to compute the solar reflectance needed by a roof equipped with ASV to exhibit the same annual cooling load as that for a direct-to-deck cool-color roof. A painted metal roof with an air space height of 0.75 in. (0.019 m) and spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) up the roof incline of 18.34 needed only a 0.10 solar reflectance to exhibit the same annual cooling load as a direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof (solar reflectance of 0.25). This held for all eight ASHRAE climate zones complying with ASHRAE 90.1 (2007a). A dark heat-absorbing roof fitted with 1.5 in. (0.038 m) air space spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) and inclined at 18.34 was shown to have a seasonal cooling load equivalent to that of a conventional direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof. Computations for retrofit application based on ASHRAE 90.1 (1980) showed that ASV air spaces of either 0.75 or 1.5 in. (0.019 and 0.038 m) would permit black roofs to have annual cooling loads equivalent to the direct-to-deck cool roof. Results are encouraging, and a parametric study of roof slope and ASV aspect ratio is needed for developing guidelines applicable to all steep- and low-slope roof applications.

  18. Laboratory measurements of the drying rates of low-slope roofing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.O.; Kyle, D.M.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The service life of a roofing system typically ends when excessive amounts of water have entered the system. Roofing professionals determine whether the existing failed roofing system can be repaired or salvaged by recovering. A key element in this decision is whether the accumulated water will be able to leave the roofing system in a time frame that will prevent irreparable structural damage. There are several combined heat and mass transfer models that can be used to predict drying times for low-slope roofing systems. Very little experimental data exists that can be used to validate the performance of these models. To satisfy these needs, a series of laboratory experiments has been performed. Five test panels, comprised of a plywood deck, four types of roofing insulation, and a single ply membrane were installed in a climate simulator. The test panels were outfitted with temperature sensors and heat flux transducers, and were mounted on load cells. Water was added to the test panels and they were subjected to external diurnal cycles representative of summer and winter conditions for a southern US continental climate. The load cells supplied continuous records of the weights of the test panels; these data were used to compute the drying rates of the test panels. When these experiments were completed, the test panels were ``recovered`` with different thicknesses of insulation and the environmental conditions were reapplied to the test panels. This paper reports on the design and performance of these experiments. The data compiled during these tests supply insight into the effects of meteorological conditions, insulation R-value, insulation water vapor permeance, and roof recover on the rate that water will be removed from low-slope roofing systems.

  19. System and method for motor parameter estimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values for motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.

  20. Motor processes 1 Motor Processes in Mental Rotation1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Motor processes 1 Motor Processes in Mental Rotation1 1 M.W. wishes to thank the LPPA for its are at least in part guided by motor processes, even in the case of images of abstract objects rather than of a specific motor action. We directly test the hypothesis by means of a dual-task paradigm in which subjects

  1. Analysis of DOE s Roof Savings Calculator with Comparison to other Simulation Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Mellot, Joe [The Garland Company; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned based on national averages and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance surfaces, HVAC duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation levels, and other parameters. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA. However, RSC gives different energy savings estimates than previous cool roof simulation tools so more thorough software and empirical validation proved necessary. This report consolidates much of the preliminary analysis for comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to that from other simulation engines.

  2. LED North America - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9LDRD, What doesLED

  3. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item youTheWSRC-TR-97-0100WHITE LED WITH HIGH PACKAGE

  4. SemiLEDs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAir JumpCalifornia | OpenSelawik|SemiLEDs Jump

  5. SunLed Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to: navigation,SunElectra Jump to: navigation,SunLed

  6. Recessed LED Downlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified11Department ofMeetingSynthetic DieselRecessed LED

  7. Justification for Energy Efficient Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschart, R. J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study of Energy Efficient (or EE) motors in NEMA frame sizes, (1-200 HP). It examines the economics of using EE motors for new motor requirements, as replacements for motors - instead of rewinding...

  8. New and Underutilized Technology: High Bay LED Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following information outlines key deployment considerations for high bay LED lighting within the Federal sector.

  9. Text-Alternative Version: LED Essentials- Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the LED Essentials - Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages webcast.

  10. Markov Process of Muscle Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. Kondratiev; E. Pechersky; S. Pirogov

    2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a Markov random process describing a muscle molecular motor behavior. Every motor is either bound up with a thin filament or unbound. In the bound state the motor creates a force proportional to its displacement from the neutral position. In both states the motor spend an exponential time depending on the state. The thin filament moves at its velocity proportional to average of all displacements of all motors. We assume that the time which a motor stays at the bound state does not depend on its displacement. Then one can find an exact solution of a non-linear equation appearing in the limit of infinite number of the motors.

  11. MotorWeek

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, PBS's MotorWeek, television's original automotive magazine, visited Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center "to learn what it really takes to make clean power sources a viable reality."

  12. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  13. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 5, 0.05 Roofing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for built-up membrane; single- ply membrane; metal roofing systems; coated foam membrane; shingles; tiles; parapets; roof drainage system; roof specialties; and skylights.

  14. Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    widely used building energy-efficiency standards, includingaddress cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standardsworldwide. Building energy-efficiency standards typically

  15. Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on February 12, 2015, focused on methods to design and build roof and wall systems for high performance homes that optimize energy and moisture performance.

  16. Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the February 12, 2015, Building America webinar, High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies.

  17. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance Part I: Analysis of roofing product databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleiman, Mohamad

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coating on clay roofing tiles. Philosophical Magazine. 90:metal and glazes applied to tiles. Metal. Can be shaped tomaterial. Shingle, slate, or tile. Pieces that fit together

  18. Building American Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on February 12, 2015, focused on methods to design and build roof and wall systems for high performance homes that optimize energy and moisture performance.

  19. MotorMaster+ International | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the capabilities and features of MotorMaster+. However, users can evaluate repairreplacement options on a broader range of motors, including 60 hertz (Hz) motors tested under...

  20. Motor Control CTIO 60 inches CHIRON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    Motor Control CTIO 60 inches CHIRON CHI60HF8.1 La Serena, December 2010 #12;Contents..............................................................................................................................3 1. Image Slicer motor..............................................................................................................5 2. Focus motor

  1. Sensory-Motor Integration and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Dan Bruce

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spinal interneurons during motor pattern generation inStep, Swim, and Scratch Motor Patterns in the Turtle. JStep, Swim, and Scratch Motor Patterns in the Turtle. J

  2. Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor

  3. Brushless Motor Controller Report Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Brushless Motor Controller Report Spring 2010 May 15, 2010 Brian Clementi MAE of 2010 322 Bogert ...................................................................................................... 5 A. Motor Description...................................................................................................... 5 B. The Motor Controller Board

  4. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks for roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. This project directly investigated rain and indirectly investigated built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.

  5. Dynein Motor Domain Shows Ring-Shaped Motor, Buttress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynein Motor Domain Shows Ring-Shaped Motor, Buttress Print Movement is fundamental to life. It takes place even at the cellular level where cargo is continually being transported...

  6. Design and prototyping methods for brushless motors and motor control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Shane W. (Shane William)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, simple, low-cost design and prototyping methods for custom brushless permanent magnet synchronous motors are explored. Three case-study motors are used to develop, illustrate and validate the methods. Two ...

  7. Bent shaft motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benavides, G.L.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonelectromagnetic motor comprising a base, a bent shaft which is rotatable relative to the base wherein the bent shaft comprises a straight portion aligned with a main axis and an offset portion that is offset with respect to the main axis; and a drive means for driving the offset portion of the bent shaft along a generally circular path in a plane perpendicular to the main axis to rotate the bent shaft. The bent shaft and drive means for driving the bent shaft can be selected from piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, rheological and shape memory alloys. The drive means of the nonelectromagnetic motor can additionally comprise a shell which shell surrounds and houses the bent shaft and precesses or gyrates which in turn causes the bent drive shaft to rotate. The nonelectromagnetic motor does not rely on friction for the application of torque upon a rotor. 11 figs.

  8. Bent shaft motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonelectromagnetic motor comprising a base, a bent shaft which is rotable relative to the base wherein the bent shaft comprises a straight portion aligned with a main axis and an offset portion that is offset with respect to the main axis; and a drive means for driving the offset portion of the bent shaft along a generally circular path in a plane perpendicular to the main axis to rotate the bent shaft. The bent shaft and drive means for driving the bent shaft can be selected from piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, rheological and shape memory alloys. The drive means of the nonelectromagnetic motor can additionally comprise a shell which shell surrounds and houses the bent shaft and precesses or gyrates which in turn causes the bent drive shaft to rotate. The nonelectromagnetic motor does not rely on friction for the application of torque upon a rotor.

  9. Efficient, Inexpensive Motors: A New Trend in The Motors Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wroblewksi, R. G.

    EFFICIENT, INEXPENSIVE MOTORS: A NEW TREND IN THE MOTORS MARKET Ronald G. Wroblewski, P.E. Trainer and Consultant ABSTRACT The Consortiwn for Energy Efficiency (CEE) has established criteria for premium-efficiency motors above the EPACf... standard. CEE has set a wrifonn efficiency benchmark that all market players (manufacturers, utilities, and end-users) can use. Some end-users however, have been reluctant to specify these motors because they think they are too expensive...

  10. Regenerative braking on bicycles to power LED safety flashers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Ian M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work develops a method for capturing some of the kinetic energy ordinarily lost during braking on bicycles to power LED safety flashers. The system is designed to eliminate: (a) battery changing in popular LED flashers, ...

  11. Building highly efficient LEDs in the yellow-green spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne and Purdue researchers are peering deep into the atomic structure and composition of LED lights in order to build highly efficient LEDs in the yellow-green spectrum.

  12. EECBG Success Story: Small Nebraska Town Welcomes LEDs and Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    historic square, built in the 1850's, is about to become home to something new: LED lights. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Tecumseh is installing 95 new LED light fixtures...

  13. LED Manufacturing Process Modifications Will Boost Quality and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 The Issue Highly energyefficient LightEmitting Diode (LED) lighting products have made great process that will enable LED manufacturers to produce higher quality, energyefficient products at lower

  14. LEDs Go Ivy League: Princeton’s Dillon Gymnasium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video about LED lighting in Dillon Gymnasium, a focal point of sports and recreation at Princeton since 1947. William Evans discusses measurable benefits of LED lighting in the gym and...

  15. Text-Alternative Version: Challenges in LED Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Narrator: LEDs have made remarkable progress in the past decade and gained a strong foothold in the US marketplace. In 2012, LED lighting saved an estimated 71 trillion BTUs, equivalent to annual...

  16. A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce its peak day heat transfer by almost 85 percent of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibits attic air temperatures that do not exceed the maximum daily outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the roof deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to gauge the cost of energy savings and potential payback.

  17. A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce the heat transfer penetrating its roof deck by almost 85% of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibited attic air temperatures that did not exceed the peak day outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit home constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to access economics for the assembly.

  18. Convex Hulls of Varieties and Entanglement Measures Based on the Roof Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias J. Osborne

    2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the problem of calculating the convex hull of certain affine algebraic varieties. As we explain, the motivation for considering this problem is that certain pure-state measures of quantum entanglement, which we call polynomial entanglement measures, can be represented as affine algebraic varieties. We consider the evaluation of certain mixed-state extensions of these polynomial entanglement measures, namely convex and concave roofs. We show that the evaluation of a roof-based mixed-state extension is equivalent to calculating a hyperplane which is multiply tangent to the variety in a number of places equal to the number of terms in an optimal decomposition for the measure. In this way we provide an implicit representation of optimal decompositions for mixed-state entanglement measures based on the roof construction.

  19. Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps" webcast, held June 20, 2011.

  20. Text-Alternative Version: LEDs for Interior Office Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the LEDs for Interior Office Applications webcast, held March 18, 2010.

  1. Text-Alternative Version: Evaluating LED Street Lighting Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the Evaluating LED Street Lighting Solutions webcast, held July 20, 2010.

  2. Method for assessing motor insulation on operating motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kueck, John D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Otaduy, Pedro J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for monitoring the condition of electrical-motor-driven devices. The method is achieved by monitoring electrical variables associated with the functioning of an operating motor, applying these electrical variables to a three phase equivalent circuit and determining non-symmetrical faults in the operating motor based upon symmetrical components analysis techniques.

  3. Method for assessing motor insulation on operating motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kueck, J.D.; Otaduy, P.J.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for monitoring the condition of electrical-motor-driven devices is disclosed. The method is achieved by monitoring electrical variables associated with the functioning of an operating motor, applying these electrical variables to a three phase equivalent circuit and determining non-symmetrical faults in the operating motor based upon symmetrical components analysis techniques. 15 figs.

  4. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    like Brazil, has strong programs on energy efficiency, andenergy savings due to cool roofs for the median climate in Brazil,energy savings due to cool roofs for the median climate in Brazil,

  5. Mann LED Elevator Ligh ng: ECI Savings Table Cost (billed)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipson, Michal

    the elevators, deter mined an LED replace ment lamp for the ex is ng halogen lamps, cal culated a cost benefitMann LED Elevator Ligh ng: ECI Savings Table Utility Historical Energy Use (MMBtu) Est. FY 2012,000 2 Energy Conservation Initiative (ECI) Project Summary Mann LED Elevator Ligh ng, Facility 1027 Mann

  6. DIFFUSION MEDIATED TRANSPORT AND THE BROWNIAN MOTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIFFUSION MEDIATED TRANSPORT AND THE BROWNIAN MOTOR David Kinderlehrer Center for Nonlinear in small viscous systems and provide brief illustrations to brownian motor or molecular rachet situations which are found in intracellular transport. Keywords: Brownian motor, molecular rachet, motor protein

  7. Evaluating High Efficiency Motor Retrofit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, T. A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the petrochemical and refining Industries, and most manufacturing plants, the reliable operation of AC motors always has been crucial to the continuous operation of the process. Now, the cost of operating these motors has also become a...

  8. Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work December 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Library of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work December 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH in sufficient de- tail to facilitate continued evaluation of Applications for Payment and progress reports of Science & Medicine Roof Replacement and Related Work December 11, 2000 DSR # 0059-00 BSH b. Submittals. c

  9. Instability leading to coal bumps and nonlinear evolutionary mechanisms for a coal-pillar-and-roof system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Instability leading to coal bumps and nonlinear evolutionary mechanisms for a coal mechanisms of the mechanical system that is composed of the stiff hosts (roof and floor) and the coal pillar using catastrophe theory. It is assumed that the roof is an elastic beam and the coal pillar is a strain

  10. INSTANTANEOUS FREQUENCY VERSUS TIME FOR 7 BUILDINGS B.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    APPENDIX B INSTANTANEOUS FREQUENCY VERSUS TIME FOR 7 BUILDINGS B.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura.5455 Los Angeles, 16000 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 11) B.5457 Los Angeles, 8436 West 3rd ST., Roof (10th floor) (pp. 16) #12;#12;B.0466­1 Appendix B.0466 LOS ANGELES, 15250 VENTURA BLVD. Table B

  11. Scaling of economic benefits from Green Roof implementation in Washington, DC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, H.; Clark, C. E.; Zhou, J.; Adriaens, P.; Environmental Science Division; Dalian Univ. of Technology; Univ. of Michigan

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green roof technology is recognized for mitigating stormwater runoff and energy consumption. Methods to overcome the cost gap between green roofs and conventional roofs were recently quantified by incorporating air quality benefits. This study investigates the impact of scaling on these benefits at the city-wide scale using Washington, DC as a test bed because of the proposed targets in the 20-20-20 vision (20 million ft{sup 2} by 2020) articulated by Casey Trees, a nonprofit organization. Building-specific stormwater benefits were analyzed assuming two proposed policy scenarios for stormwater fees ranging from 35 to 50% reduction for green roof implementation. Heat flux calculations were used to estimate building-specific energy savings for commercial buildings. To assess benefits at the city scale, stormwater infrastructure savings were based on operational savings and size reduction due to reduced stormwater volume generation. Scaled energy infrastructure benefits were calculated using two size reductions methods for air conditioners. Avoided carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide (NOx), and sulfur dioxide emissions were based on reductions in electricity and natural gas consumption. Lastly, experimental and fugacity-based estimates were used to quantify the NOx uptake by green roofs, which was translated to health benefits using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency models. The results of the net present value (NPV) analysis showed that stormwater infrastructure benefits totaled $1.04 million (M), while fee-based stormwater benefits were $0.22-0.32 M/y. Energy savings were $0.87 M/y, while air conditioner resizing benefits were estimated at $0.02 to $0.04 M/y and avoided emissions benefits (based on current emission trading values) were $0.09 M-0.41 M/y. Over the lifetime of the green roof (40 years), the NPV is about 30-40% less than that of conventional roofs (not including green roof maintenance costs). These considerable benefits, in concert with current and emerging policy frameworks, may facilitate future adoption of this technology.

  12. In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. (National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States)); Christian, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

  13. In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. [National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States); Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

  14. RMP Colloquia Modeling molecular motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jülicher, Frank

    The authors present general considerations and simple models for the operation of isothermal motors at small structural differences from the usual Carnot engines. Turning to more explicit models for a single motorRMP Colloquia Modeling molecular motors Frank Ju¨licher,* Armand Ajdari, and Jacques Prost

  15. Highly Efficient Electric Motor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over wider operating range with same size motor Uses up to 40% less electricity NREL Energy Forum;Annual Serviceable Addressable Market (SAM) for >1hp non-hermetic motors NREL Energy Forum November 2009Highly Efficient Electric Motor Systems NREL Energy Forum November 2009 www.novatorque.com Emily

  16. Kinematic Motor Learning Wolfram Schenck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    Kinematic Motor Learning Wolfram Schenck Computer Engineering Group Faculty of Technology Bielefeld-521-106-6440 mail: wschenck@ti.uni-bielefeld.de Abstract This paper focuses on adaptive motor control in the kinematic domain. Several motor learning strategies from the literature are adopted to kinematic problems

  17. Motor Speech Disorders in Neurodevelopmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    4/14/13 1 Motor Speech Disorders in Neurodevelopmental Syndromes Shelley Velleman University many graduate and undergraduate research assistants at UMass, U of Louisville, and UVM 2 Motor Speech difference/insult §Symptoms 3 Motor Speech Disorders Dysarthria: neurological bases §result of damage

  18. Magazine R729 Motor prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, Randy

    Magazine R729 Primer Motor prediction Daniel M. Wolpert* and J. Randall Flanagan The concept of motor prediction was first considered by Helmholtz when trying to understand how we localise visual position of the eye, predicted the gaze position based on a copy of the motor command acting on the eye

  19. TARSHA-KURDI, F., LANDES, T., GRUSSENMEYER, P., (2008). Extended RANSAC algorithm for automatic detection of building roof planes from Lidar data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detection of building roof planes from Lidar data. The Photogrammetric Journal of Finland. Vol. 21, n°1, 2008, pp.97-109. EXTENDED RANSAC ALGORITHM FOR AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF BUILDING ROOF PLANES FROM LIDAR the detection of 3D building roof planes are of crucial importance. For this purpose, this paper studies

  20. Cree Sets New Benchmarks for LED Efficacy and Brightness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cree has successfully created a cool white LED prototype that delivers 107 lm/W at 350mA. This achievement builds on the Cree EZBright® LED chip platform, developed in part with prior funding support from DOE. Cree made the prototype LED under their DOE project focused on developing LED chips incorporating photonic crystal elements for improved light extraction and novel package technology for higher down-conversion efficiency compared to conventional LEDs. Based on a 1 millimeter-square chip, the new prototype LED produces white light with a CCT of 5500K and a CRI of 73. Integration of four of these prototype LEDs can produce luminous flux of more than 450 lumens.

  1. MotorMaster database of three-phase electric motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickney, B.L.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Selecting the right motor for a new or replacement application used to be a daunting task. Making an intelligent choice involved a search through a stack of motor catalogs for information on efficiency, voltage, speed, horsepower, torque, service factor, power factor, frame type, and cost. The MotorMaster software package, available from the Washington State Energy Office, takes the drudgery out of motor selection by enabling rapid analysis of the most efficient and cost-effective single-speed three-phase induction motors. It has a built-in motor database, easy to use comparison and analysis features, and can calculate utility rebates and simple paybacks. By speeding the selection process and providing comprehensive economic justification for the final equipment choice, software tools like MotorMaster can become an important component of utility DSM programs. And as a bonus, wide use of such software may lead to more systematic and consistent use of energy efficient equipment.

  2. Effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a saltstone vault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, A.D.; Lam, Poh-Sang; Hsu, R.H.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site, low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is mixed with slag, flyash, and cement to form a grout-like material called ``Saltstone.`` The Saltstone is poured into concrete vaults constructed at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SDF is designed for the release of contaminants in a slow, controlled manner over thousands of years. The impact of SDF on groundwater has been studied in a radiological performance assessment (PA). Groundwater models were used to predict the fluid flow and contaminant transport at SDF. The models predicted a spatial contaminant concentration distribution in groundwater as a function of time. This study focuses on the roof configuration of Saltstone vault, with special interests in cost-effectiveness. We conducted a study to evaluate the effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a Saltstone vault. Four roof configurations were simulated. The tool used for the simulation was ECLIPSE, a finite-difference petroleum reservoir engineering code with an environmental tracer option. Nitrate was used as the ``tracer`` contaminant. In this study, ECLIPSE solves the two-phase two-dimensional flow and transport problem up to 10,000 years. This paper describes a modeling study used to evaluate roof design options for the Saltstone vault.

  3. Laying the Foundation for a Solar America: The Million Solar Roofs Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strahs, G.; Tombari, C.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technology Program embarks on the next phase of its technology acceptance efforts under the Solar America Initiative, there is merit to examining the program's previous market transformation effort, the Million Solar Roofs Initiative. Its goal was to transform markets for distributed solar technologies by facilitating the installation of solar systems.

  4. Ten Years at the Calif. Energy Commission White Roofs to Cool your Building, your City and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Ten Years at the Calif. Energy Commission & White Roofs to Cool your Building, your City and (this" 32" 37" 42" 50" CEC Max Screen Area (1400 in2 or ~57.4 diagonal inches) Energy Star 3.0 TVs (10 is new !) Cool the World Arthur H. Rosenfeld, Former Commissioner California Energy Commission

  5. EPIC-RoofNet: An Experimental Testbed for Solar-powered Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasipuri, Asis

    EPIC-RoofNet: An Experimental Testbed for Solar-powered Wireless Sensor Networks Amitangshu Pal experiments on solar-powered sensor nodes. Due to constraints in cost and size, the solar panels of solar energy available at such solar-powered sensor nodes can be highly unpredictable and at times

  6. The case for cool roofs Ronnen Levinson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, RMLevinson@LBL.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the electrical grid by reducing late-afternoon peak power demand. Widespread use of cool roofs can lower outdoor (e.g., better retention of plasticizers and incorporation of biocides) and, therefore, are expected, because the pigments are responsible for only a small fraction of the product cost. Only for high

  7. Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300 Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    India, Mexico, and the United States have signed up to join the Cool Roofs Working Group, which was announced yesterday in Abu Dhabi at the second Clean Energy Ministerial -- a high-level global forum to promote policies and programs that advance clean energy technology, to share lessons learned and best practices and to encourage the transition to a global clean energy economy.

  8. HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H and the sheet metal: This is ventilation by natural convection. The remaining conductive heat from the sheet or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers

  9. 32 IAEI NEWS March.April 2009 www.iaei.org still on the roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    of a PV system, we need to look at one more component usually located on the roof. This is the PV source source-circuit combiner is found on larger residen- tial systems and on most large commercial systems. PV Need Combiner The rated output voltage of the PV modules and the inverter dc input characteristics

  10. Development of a new roof bolt technology to improve gate-road performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caggiano, V.; Rauch, G.; Beck, K.-D.; Chen, J. [Hilti, Inc. (United States)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hilti has developed, in conjunction with Foundation Coal, a self-drilling bolt that cuts roof bolting times. The system uses a wet, self-drilling, hollow bolt technology with a self-contained resin cartridge. The resin is dispensed using an injection adapter that provides the high pressure water needed to dispense the resin. The OneStep roof bolt contains an axially shifting mixer that ensures the resin is properly mixed as it exits the water ports near the end of the bolt near the drill head. This eliminates the opportunity for plastic materials to interface between the strata and the bolt. In 2004 the OneStep Bolt was successfully installed in DSK's Prosper Haniel Colliery in Germany, achieving a 42% reduction in single-boom roof bolt cycle time and a 36% reduction in twin-boom roof bolt cycle time. Foundation Coal will be installing 2000 6 ft active bolts in one of the North Appalachian longwall locations. 1 fig.

  11. Studies of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory at Colorado State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the solar power market. As a result of our technology lead, SunPower is today a global leader in the market for solar power." In addition to SunPower Systems, over the years, Dr. Bienkiewicz and his team at WEFL have assisted other companies and inventors in development of various loose-laid and attached roofing systems

  12. TASK 2.5.7 FIELD EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE COOL-COLORED ROOFING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL; Cherry, Nigel J [ORNL; Allen, Richard Lowell [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ronnen, Levinson [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Akbari, Hashem [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Berhahl, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aesthetically pleasing dark roofs can be formulated to reflect like a highly reflective white roof in the near infrared portion of the solar spectrum. New paint pigments increase the near infrared reflectance of exterior finishes by minimizing the absorption of near-infrared radiation (NIR). The boost in the NIR reflectance drops the surface temperatures of roofs and walls, which in turn reduces cooling-energy use and provides savings for the homeowner and relief for the utilities. In moderate and hot climates, a roof surface with high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance was shown by Akbari et al. (2004) and by Parker and Sherwin (1998) to reduce the exterior temperature and produce savings in comfort cooling. The new cool color pigments can potentially reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, which in turn reduces metropolitan heat buildup and urban smog. The pigments can also help conserve water resources otherwise used to clean and process fuel consumed by fossil-fuel driven power plants. Cool roofs also result in a lower ambient temperature that further decreases the need for air conditioning, retards smog formation, and improves thermal comfort. Parker, Sonne and Sherwin (2002) demonstrated that white barrel and white flat tiles reduced cooling energy consumption by 22% of the base load used by an adjacent and identical home having direct nailed dark shingles. Part of the savings was due to the reflectance of the white tiles; however, another part was due to the mass of the tile and to the venting occurring within the double batten installation. With, Cherry and Haig (2009) have studied the influence of the thermal mass and batten space ventilation and have found that, referenced to an asphalt shingle system, it can be equivalent to an additional 28 points of solar reflectivity. The double batten arrangement has wooden counter battens laid vertically (soffit-to-ridge) against the roof deck, and then the conventional battens are laid horizontally across the counter battens, providing a nailing surface for the concrete tile. This double batten construction forms an inclined air channel running from the soffit to the ridge. The bottom surface of the channel is formed by the roof decking and is relatively flat and smooth. The top surface is created by the underside of the roofing tiles, and is designed to be an air permeable covering to alleviate the underside air pressure and minimize wind uplift on the tiles. The resulting air flows also have a cooling influence which further complicates prediction of the heat penetrating through the deck because an accurate measure of the airflow is required to predict the heat transfer. Measured temperatures and heat flows at the roof surface, within the attic and at the ceiling of the houses are discussed as well as the power usage to help gauge the benefit of cool-pigmented reflective roof products fitted with and without ventilation above the roof deck. Ventilation occurring above the deck is an inherent feature for tile roof assemblies, and is formed by an air space between the exterior face of the roof sheathing and the underside of the tile. The greater the tile s profile the greater is the effect of the ventilation which herein is termed above-sheathing ventilation (ASV). However, because of the complexity of the thermally induced flow, little credit is allowed by state and federal building codes. ASHRAE (2005) provides empirical data for the effective thermal resistance of plane air spaces. A -in. (0.0191-m) plane air space inclined at 45 with the horizontal has an RUS-0.85 (RSI-0.15) . Our intent is to help further deploy cool color pigments in roofs by conducting field experiments to evaluate the new cool-colored roofing materials in the hot climate of Southern California. The collected data will be used to showcase and market the performance of new cool-roof products and also to help formulate and validate computer codes capable of calculating the heat transfer occurring within the attic and the whole building. Field measures and computer predictions showed that the d

  13. Sustainable design for a subtropical green roof with local, recyclable substrates and native plant species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Angelica

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    and recycled materials needs to be included as a means of minimizing environmental impacts and improving local economies. The goal of this research was to test for vegetation and substrate suitability for a subtropical climate green roof found in East Texas...

  14. Rainwater harvesting system with roof catchment, gutter, downspout, storage and drip irrigation system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Rainwater harvesting system with roof catchment, gutter, downspout, storage and drip irrigation:30 am systems: rain barrel, drip irrigation, stock watering Program: 8:30 am ­ 4:00 pm indoor usage system. Douglas County Conservation District and the Rural Water Authority of Douglas County Present: Who

  15. Thermal Performance of Exposed Composed Roofs in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S.; Morsey, M. S.; Fakhry, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is considered the major part of the building envelop which exposed to high thermal load due to the high solar intensity and high outdoor air temperature through summer season which reach to 6 months. In Egypt the thermal effect of roof is increased as one go...

  16. In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE s Roof Savings Calculator and Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Mellot, Joe [The Garland Company; Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Green Metal Consulting, Inc.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) was developed through collaborations among Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), White Box Technologies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the Environmental Protection Agency in the context of a California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research project to make cool-color roofing materials a market reality. The RSC website and a simulation engine validated against demonstration homes were developed to replace the liberal DOE Cool Roof Calculator and the conservative EPA Energy Star Roofing Calculator, which reported different roof savings estimates. A preliminary analysis arrived at a tentative explanation for why RSC results differed from previous LBNL studies and provided guidance for future analysis in the comparison of four simulation programs (doe2attic, DOE-2.1E, EnergyPlus, and MicroPas), including heat exchange between the attic surfaces (principally the roof and ceiling) and the resulting heat flows through the ceiling to the building below. The results were consolidated in an ORNL technical report, ORNL/TM-2013/501. This report is an in-depth inter-comparison of four programs with detailed measured data from an experimental facility operated by ORNL in South Carolina in which different segments of the attic had different roof and attic systems.

  17. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B. [Moscow Aviation Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  18. New GATEWAY Report Monitors LED System Performance in a High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the light. The Yuma site is an extreme environment: high ambient temperatures and direct solar radiation heat up the luminaires throughout the day, and at sunset the LED...

  19. To Bridge LEDs' Green Gap, Scientists Think Small

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    where LED efficiency plunges, simulations at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) have shown. Using NERSC's Cray XC30...

  20. LED Luminaire Lifetime: Recommendations for Testing and Reporting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    product life, and many relied on the gradual lumen depreciation of the LED (light-emitting diode) source as the best indicator- resulting, on occasion, in unrealistic claims...

  1. LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    White Light Options for Parking Area Lighting Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report Guide to FEMP-Designated Parking Lot...

  2. The City of Los Angeles LED Streetlight Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video about the Los Angeles LED streetlight program, featuring an interview with City of Los Angeles Bureau of Street Lighting Director, Ed Ebrahimian.

  3. ORNL-led team demonstrates desalination with nanoporous graphene...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications 865.576.6448 ORNL-led team demonstrates desalination with nanoporous graphene membrane Researchers created nanopores in graphene (red, and enlarged in the circle...

  4. Article Published on LED Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of a comprehensive lifetime rating - as well as the problematic relationship between SSL lifetime and lumen maintenance - determining an appropriate LLD factor for LED products...

  5. CBEA LED Site Lighting Specification - Version 1.3, Released...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Applications Outdoor Area Lighting Home About the Solid-State Lighting Program R&D Program Market-Based Programs SSL Basics Using LEDs Information Resources Financial Opportunities...

  6. Lighting the Great Outdoors: LEDs in Exterior Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Tyson D. S.; Bryan, Mary M.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in the development of white light LEDs promises great impact by opening up the huge potential for LED illumination in new areas. One such area is general illumination for exterior applications. For example, there are an estimated combined 60.5 million roadway and parking installations in the U.S. These lights account for an estimated 53.3 TWh of electricity usage annually -- nearly 7% of all lighting. If LEDs could provide the same light performance with just 25% greater efficiency, savings of over 13 TWh could be achieved. In 2007, the authors assessed emerging LED lighting technologies in a parking garage and on a city street. The purpose of these tests was to enable a utility to determine whether energy efficiency programs promoting white light LED products might be justified. The results have supported the great promise of LEDs in exterior applications, while also highlighting the barriers that continue to hinder their widespread adoption. Such barriers include 1) inconsistent product quality across manufacturers; 2) lack of key metrics for comparing LEDs to conventional sources; and 3) high upfront cost of LED luminaires compared to conventional luminaires. This paper examines these barriers, ways in which energy-efficiency programs could help to overcome them, and the potential for energy and financial savings from LED lighting in these two exterior applications.

  7. LEDs Go Ivy League: Princeton University and DOE GATEWAY Demonstrations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video about LED lighting at Princeton University, which has dramatically reduced energy costs in a number of installations around campus. William Evans, electrical engineer, describes the...

  8. Adopting LED Technology: What Federal Facility Managers Need to Know

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document describes the presentation slides for the "Adopting LED Technology: What Federal Facility Managers Need to Know" webinar that took place on September 11, 2014.

  9. Cooking Up New Nanoribbons to Make Better White LEDs | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    appealing white phosphors based on LEDs. The materials combine the rare-earth element europium with aluminum oxide to form europium aluminate nanoribbons. Powders of europium oxide...

  10. LED Chips and Packaging for 120 LPW SSL Component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Ibbetson

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Cree has developed a new, high-efficiency, low-cost, light emitting diode (LED) lamp module that should be capable of replacing standard, halogen, fluorescent and metal halide lamps based on the total cost of ownership. White LEDs are produced by combining one or more saturated color LEDs with a phosphor or other light down-converting media to achieve white broad-band illumination. This two year project addressed LED chip and package efficiency improvements to establish a technology platform suitable for low-cost, high-efficiency commercial luminaires. Novel photonic-crystal LEDs were developed to improve the light extraction efficiency of blue GaN-based LEDs compared to the baseline technology. Improved packaging designs that reduced down-conversion and absorption related light losses, led to a higher overall LED efficiency. Specifically, blue LEDs were demonstrated with light output nearing 600 mW and an external quantum efficiency greater than 60 percent (using 1 mm2 chips at an operating current of 350 mA). The results were achieved using a novel, production capable photonic-crystal LED fabrication process. These LEDs formed the basis for a multi-chip white lamp module prototype, which provided 510 lumens light output at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3875 K and an operating current of 350 mA per 1mm2 chip. The overall conversion efficiency at 4100 K improved to ~ 65%. The resulting efficacy is 112 lumens per watt (LPW) â?? a 33% improvement over the start of the project. In addition, a proof-of-concept luminaire was demonstrated that provided a flux of 1700 lumens at a 3842 K CCT.

  11. Using MotorMaster to Track Motor Inventory and Analyze Purchasing Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, M.; Meffort, W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    maintenance actions and to analyze motor replacement options. The approach used to secure and enter motor nameplate data along with examples of purchasing analyses completed will be presented. The success of the MotorMaster software with large motors has...

  12. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  13. Semiconductors 4-bit I2C LED dimmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    with SMBus · Internal power-on reset · Noise filter on SCL/SDA inputs · 4 open drain outputs directly drive for dimming LEDs in 256 discrete steps for Red/Green/Blue (RGB) color mixing and back light applications to 1.69 second. The open drain outputs directly drive the LEDs with maximum output sink current of 25 m

  14. How to Build a Motor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Motor Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates Expand...

  15. Tesla Motors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    465 million loan arrangement with Tesla Motors, Inc. to produce specially designed, all-electric plug-in vehicles; and to develop a manufacturing facility to produce battery...

  16. Evaluating High Efficiency Motor Retrofit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, T. A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPERATING COST Although It would seem that most peoPlel un derstand the re I atlonsh I p beneen the fIrst cost and operating cost for motors, that's not the case. The purchase price of a standard efficIency 50 HP enclosed motor I s about $2000. Operatl...Ife, the energy efficIent motor will save about $7100 - assum f ng power costs grow as forecasted. That's why the co nom J cs of Energy $aver motors are so attractIve. The savIngs, assuming continuous operatIon at a 5i/kWh power cost, range from $300 per year...

  17. Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Rosenfeld, Arthur; Elliot, Matthew

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the solar reflectance of the urban surface reduce its solar heat gain, lowers its temperatures, and decreases its outflow of thermal infrared radiation into the atmosphere. This process of 'negative radiative forcing' can help counter the effects of global warming. In addition, cool roofs reduce cooling-energy use in air conditioned buildings and increase comfort in unconditioned buildings; and cool roofs and cool pavements mitigate summer urban heat islands, improving outdoor air quality and comfort. Installing cool roofs and cool pavements in cities worldwide is a compelling win-win-win activity that can be undertaken immediately, outside of international negotiations to cap CO{sub 2} emissions. We propose an international campaign to use solar reflective materials when roofs and pavements are built or resurfaced in temperate and tropical regions.

  18. A NEW LED-LED PORTABLE CO2 GAS SENSOR BASED ON AN INTERCHANGEABLE MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyowon

    to oxygen scavenging [5]. High CO2 levels (10- 80 %) are desirable for foods such as meat and poultryA NEW LED-LED PORTABLE CO2 GAS SENSOR BASED ON AN INTERCHANGEABLE MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS Abstract A new system for CO2 measurement (0-100%) by based on a paired emitter-detector diode

  19. Heat transfers in a double-skin roof ventilated by natural convection in summer time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biwole, Pascal; Pompeo, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The double-skin roofs investigated in this paper are formed by adding a metallic screen on an existing sheet metal roof. The system enhances passive cooling of dwellings and can help diminishing power costs for air conditioning in summer or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers are investigated. Depending on its surface properties, the screen reflects a large amount of oncoming solar radiation. Natural convection in the channel underneath drives off the residual heat. The bi-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters for the system's efficiency. They are, by order of importance, the sheet metal surface emissivity, the screen internal and external surface emissivity, the insulation thickness and the inclination angle for a channel width over 6 cm. The influence of those parameters on Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers is also investigated. Temperature and air velocity profiles on seve...

  20. Performance of 3-Sun Mirror Modules on Sun Tracking Carousels on Flat Roof Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraas, Dr. Lewis [JX Crystals, Inc.; Avery, James E. [JX Crystals, Inc.; Minkin, Leonid M [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Hurt, Rick A [ORNL; Boehm, Robert F [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial buildings represent a near term market for cost competitive solar electric power provided installation costs and solar photovoltaic module costs can be reduced. JX Crystals has developed a carousel sun tracker that is prefabricated and can easily be deployed on building flat roof tops without roof penetration. JX Crystals is also developing 3-sun PV mirror modules where less expensive mirrors are substituted for two-thirds of the expensive single crystal silicon solar cell surface area. Carousels each with four 3-sun modules have been set up at two sites, specifically at Oak Ridge National Lab and at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas. The test results for these systems are presented.

  1. Developing a Motor Management Policy at BASF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zickefoose, B.; Theising, T. R.

    In early 1998 Thomas R. Theising, BASF Corporate Engineering initiated the formation of a motor management team. The goal of the team was to develop a Motor Management Guideline to better manage the purchase and repair of motors used throughout...

  2. Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief T he Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology in Tennessee to demonstrate, test, evaluation, and showcase innovative commercial motor vehicle (CMV) safety

  3. COMMERICAL MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATOR EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION SUPPLEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    COMMERICAL MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATOR EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION SUPPLEMENT _________________________________________________________ Applicants for positions involving the operation of a commercial motor vehicle must comply with Title 49 CFR: _______________ Please list the following information for each unexpired commercial motor vehicle operator license

  4. Industrial motor repair in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schueler, V.; Leistner, P.; Douglass, J.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report characterizes the motor repair industry in the United States; summarizes current motor repair and testing practice; and identifies barriers to energy motor repair practice and recommends strategies for overcoming those barriers.

  5. Roof and Attic Design Guidelines for new and retrofit Construction of Homes in Hot and Coild Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; LaFrance, Marc [International Energy Agency] [International Energy Agency

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some guidelines for improving the energy efficiency of roofs and attics are presented and are based on the research of the DOE Building Technology. The results of combined analytical and experimental studies were used to benchmark computer tools, which in turn, were used to simulate homes in hot and cold climates. Adding floor and roof insulation, above deck ventilation, radiant barriers, cool color shingle, metal or tile roofs, sealing the attic floor, sealing the duct system and sealing the attic were simulated to compute the cost of energy savings. Results are prioritized to help building owners make an informed economic decision when contemplating roof and attic retrofits. Sealing the attic floor is a top retrofit option. The sealed attic approach and a new prototype roof assembly an insulated and ventilated roof are good options for retrofit work but have paybacks ranging from 15 to 25 years. A new sealed attic concept was simulated and computations show its simple payback is about 10 to 12 years in hot and cold climates; its first cost is significantly reduced from that of a spray foam approach. For new construction the best option is to keep the ducts out of the attic, make sure the attic floor is sealed and add at least code level of insulation to the ceiling.

  6. Calculation of the convex roof for an open entangled harmonic oscillator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landau, Mayer A.; Stroud, C. R. Jr. [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We explicitly calculate the time dependence of entanglement via the convex roof extension for a system of noninteracting harmonic oscillators. These oscillators interact only indirectly with each other by way of a zero-temperature bath. The initial state of the oscillators is taken to be that of an entangled Schroedinger-cat state. This type of initial condition leads to superexponential decay of the entanglement when the initial state has the same symmetry as the interaction Hamiltonian.

  7. Entanglement detection and lower bound of convex-roof extension of negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ming; Fei, Shao-Ming; 10.1088/1751-8113/45/3/035301

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a set of inequalities based on mean values of quantum mechanical observables nonlinear entanglement witnesses for bipartite quantum systems. These inequalities give rise to sufficient and necessary conditions for separability of all bipartite pure states and even some mixed states. In terms of these mean values of quantum mechanical observables a measurable lower bound of the convex-roof extension of the negativity is derived.

  8. Convex-roof extended negativity as an entanglement measure for bipartite quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soojoon Lee; Dong Pyo Chi; Sung Dahm Oh; Jaewan Kim

    2003-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the concept of the negativity, a good measure of entanglement for bipartite pure states, to mixed states by means of the convex-roof extension. We show that the measure does not increase under local quantum operations and classical communication, and derive explicit formulae for the entanglement measure of isotropic states and Werner states, applying the formalism presented by Vollbrecht and Werner [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 64}, 062307 (2001)].

  9. Entanglement detection and lower bound of convex-roof extension of negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming Li; Tong-Jiang Yan; Shao-Ming Fei

    2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a set of inequalities based on mean values of quantum mechanical observables nonlinear entanglement witnesses for bipartite quantum systems. These inequalities give rise to sufficient and necessary conditions for separability of all bipartite pure states and even some mixed states. In terms of these mean values of quantum mechanical observables a measurable lower bound of the convex-roof extension of the negativity is derived.

  10. Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.; Gao, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Enve lope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-4-2 Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building Weijie Zhang Jinshun Wu Yiran Wei Xudong Gao... ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Enve lope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-4-2 room has been made and some theoretical relations between outdoor air temperature and indoor thermal load within certain region have been...

  11. LOW-COST LED LUMINAIRE FOR GENERAL ILLUMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowes, Ted

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During this two-year Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Manufacturing R&D project Cree developed novel light emitting diode (LED) technologies contributing to a cost-optimized, efficient LED troffer luminaire platform emitting at ~3500K correlated color temperature (CCT) at a color rendering index (CRI) of >90. To successfully achieve program goals, Cree used a comprehensive approach to address cost reduction of the various optical, thermal and electrical subsystems in the luminaire without impacting performance. These developments built on Cree’s high- brightness, low-cost LED platforms to design a novel LED component architecture that will enable low-cost troffer luminaire designs with high total system efficacy. The project scope included cost reductions to nearly all major troffer subsystems as well as assembly costs. For example, no thermal management components were included in the troffer, owing to the optimized distribution of compact low- to mid-power LEDs. It is estimated that a significant manufacturing cost savings will result relative to Cree’s conventional troffers at the start of the project. A chief project accomplishment was the successful development of a new compact, high-efficacy LED component geometry with a broad far-field intensity distribution and even color point vs. emission angle. After further optimization and testing for production, the Cree XQ series of LEDs resulted. XQ LEDs are currently utilized in Cree’s AR series troffers, and they are being considered for use in other platforms. The XQ lens geometry influenced the independent development of Cree’s XB-E and XB-G high-voltage LEDs, which also have a broad intensity distribution at high efficacy, and are finding wide implementation in Cree’s omnidirectional A-lamps.

  12. IEMDC IN-LINE ELECTRIC MOTOR DRIVEN COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Crowley; Prem N. Bansal

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the final project summary and deliverables required by the award for the development of an In-line Electric Motor Driven Compressor (IEMDC). Extensive work was undertaken during the course of the project to develop the motor and the compressor section of the IEMDC unit. Multiple design iterations were performed to design an electric motor for operation in a natural gas environment and to successfully integrate the motor with a compressor. During the project execution, many challenges were successfully overcome in order to achieve the project goals and to maintain the system design integrity. Some of the challenges included limiting the magnitude of the compressor aerodynamic loading for appropriate sizing of the magnetic bearings, achieving a compact motor rotor size to meet the rotor dynamic requirements of API standards, devising a motor cooling scheme using high pressure natural gas, minimizing the impact of cooling on system efficiency, and balancing the system thrust loads for the magnetic thrust bearing. Design methods that were used on the project included validated state-of-the-art techniques such as finite element analysis and computational fluid dynamics along with the combined expertise of both Curtiss-Wright Electro-Mechanical Corporation and Dresser-Rand Company. One of the most significant areas of work undertaken on the project was the development of the unit configuration for the system. Determining the configuration of the unit was a significant step in achieving integration of the electric motor into a totally enclosed compression system. Product review of the IEMDC unit configuration was performed during the course of the development process; this led to an alternate design configuration. The alternate configuration is a modular design with the electric motor and compressor section each being primarily contained in its own pressure containing case. This new concept resolved the previous conflict between the aerodynamic flow passage requirements and electric motor requirements for support and utilities by bounding the flowpath within the compressor section. However most importantly, the benefits delivered by the new design remained the same as those proposed by the goals of the project. In addition, this alternate configuration resulted in the achievement of a few additional advantages over the original concept such as easier maintenance, operation, and installation. Interaction and feedback solicited from target clients regarding the unit configuration supports the fact that the design addresses industry issues regarding accessibility, maintainability, preferred operating practice, and increased reliability.

  13. Verification of Motor Repair Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, K.

    Motor testing at Advanced Energy has shown that a motor that has not suffered irreparable damage as a result of failure can be repaired to perform as well as before the failure. But the only way to achieve the performance level of an energy...

  14. Optimized Phosphors for Warm White LED Light Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlur, Anant; Brewster, Megan; Garcia, Florencio; Hill, M. Christine; Lyons, Robert; Murphy, James; Stecher, Tom; Stoklosa, Stan; Weaver, Stan; Happek, Uwe; Aesram, Danny; Deshpande, Anirudha

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop phosphor systems and LED light engines that have steady-state LED efficacies (using LEDs with a 60% wall-plug efficiency) of 105–120 lm/W with correlated color temperatures (CCT) ~3000 K, color rendering indices (CRI) >85, <0.003 distance from the blackbody curve (dbb), and <2% loss in phosphor efficiency under high temperature, high humidity conditions. In order to reach these goals, this involves the composition and processing optimization of phosphors previously developed by GE in combination with light engine package modification.

  15. LED Lights for All Occasions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED Lighting FactsLED

  16. Roof system effects on in-situ thermal performance of HCFC polyisocyanurate insulation. [Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Courville, G.; Graves, R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry-produced, permeably-faced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with several different hydrochlorofluorcarbons (HCFCS) is undergoing in-situ testing at the Building Envelopes Research User Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The overall objective of this research is to determine the long term thermal performance differences between PIR foamed with CFC-11 and PIR foamed with HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb and blends of HCFCs. Boards from the same batch were installed in outdoor test facilities and instrumented in part to determine if the insulation thermal performance aging characteristics are dependent on how they are handled and installed in the field. One of the major contributions of this research is the field validation of an accelerated thermal aging procedure. The laboratory measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity (k) of 10-mm-thick slices conducted over a period of less than a year are used to predict the k of 38-50-mm-thick PIR laminated board stock for 12--20 years after production. In situ thermal performance measurements of these well characterized three-year-old boards under white and under black ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) membranes are compared with the accelerated aging procedure and with boards from the same batch in different roofing systems: mechanically attached EPDM, fully adhered EPDM, and built-up roof (BUR). The comparison indicates that this accelerated aging procedure should be seriously considered for providing in-service thermal performance information to building owners and roofing contractors.

  17. Roof system effects on in-situ thermal performance of HCFC polyisocyanurate insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Courville, G.; Graves, R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry-produced, permeably-faced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with several different hydrochlorofluorcarbons (HCFCS) is undergoing in-situ testing at the Building Envelopes Research User Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The overall objective of this research is to determine the long term thermal performance differences between PIR foamed with CFC-11 and PIR foamed with HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb and blends of HCFCs. Boards from the same batch were installed in outdoor test facilities and instrumented in part to determine if the insulation thermal performance aging characteristics are dependent on how they are handled and installed in the field. One of the major contributions of this research is the field validation of an accelerated thermal aging procedure. The laboratory measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity (k) of 10-mm-thick slices conducted over a period of less than a year are used to predict the k of 38-50-mm-thick PIR laminated board stock for 12--20 years after production. In situ thermal performance measurements of these well characterized three-year-old boards under white and under black ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) membranes are compared with the accelerated aging procedure and with boards from the same batch in different roofing systems: mechanically attached EPDM, fully adhered EPDM, and built-up roof (BUR). The comparison indicates that this accelerated aging procedure should be seriously considered for providing in-service thermal performance information to building owners and roofing contractors.

  18. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SUSTAINABLE AND ENERGY EFFICIENT RE-ROOFING TECHNOLOGY USING FIELD-TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three test attics were constructed to evaluate a new sustainable method of re-roofing utilizing photo-voltaic (PV) laminates, metal roofing panels, and PCM heat sink in the Envelope Systems Research Apparatus (ESRA) facility in the ORNL campus. Figure 1 is a picture of the three attic roofs located adjacent to each other. The leftmost roof is the conventional shingle roof, followed by the metal panel roof incorporating the cool-roof coating, and third from left is the roof with the PCM. On the PCM roof, the PV panels are seen as well; they're labelled from left-to-right as panels 5, 6 and 7. The metal panel roof consists of three metal panels with the cool-roof coating; in further discussion this is referred to as the infrared reflective (IRR) metal roof. The IRR metal panels reflect the incoming solar radiation and then quickly re-emit the remaining absorbed portion, thereby reducing the solar heat gain of the attic. Surface reflectance of the panels were measured using a Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. In the 0.35-2.0 {mu}m wavelength interval, which accounts for more than 94% of the solar energy, the IRR panels have an average reflectance of 0.303. In the infrared portion of the spectrum, the IRR panel reflectance is 0.633. The PCM roof consists of a layer of macro-encapsulated bio-based PCM at the bottom, followed by a 2-cm thick layer of dense fiberglass insulation with a reflective surface on top, and metal panels with pre-installed PV laminates on top. The PCM has a melting point of 29 C (84.2 F) and total enthalpy between 180 and 190 J/g. The PCM was macro-packaged in between two layers of heavy-duty plastic foil forming arrays of PCM cells. Two air cavities, between PCM cells and above the fiberglass insulation, helped the over-the-deck natural air ventilation. It is anticipated that during summer, this extra ventilation will help in reducing the attic-generated cooling loads. The extra ventilation, in conjunction with the PCM heat sink, are used to minimize thermal stresses due to the PV laminates on sunny days. In PV laminates sunlight is converted into electricity and heat simultaneous. In case of building integrated applications, a relatively high solar absorption of amorphous silicon laminates can be utilized during the winter for solar heating purposes with PCM providing necessary heat storage capacity. However, PV laminates may also generate increased building cooling loads during the summer months. Therefore, in this project, the PCM heat sink was to minimize summer heat gains as well. The PCM-fibreglass-PV assembly and the IRR metal panels are capable of being installed directly on top of existing shingle roofs during re-roofing, precluding the need for recycling or disposal of waste materials. The PV laminates installed on the PCM attic are PVL-144 models from Uni-Solar. Each laminate contains 22 triple junction amorphous silicon solar cells connected in series. The silicon cells are of dimensions 356 mm x 239 mm (14-in. x 9.4-in.). The PVL-144 laminate is encapsulated in durable ETFE (poly-ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) high light-transmissive polymer. Table 1 lists the power, voltage and current ratings of the PVL-144 panel.

  19. Unique Lanthide-Free Motor Construction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of rare-earth elements E: Efficiency Partners Ames Laboratory: improved magnet properties NREL: motor thermal management ORNL: motor testing 2 Relevance - Objectives Overall...

  20. Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Motor Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one in a series of tip sheets to help manufacturers optimize their industrial motor and motor-driven systems.

  1. Team Led by Argonne National Lab Selected as DOE's Batteries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Team Led by Argonne National Lab Selected as DOE's Batteries and Energy Storage Hub On November 30, 2012 In features Energy Department Announces Team to Receive up to 120...

  2. WEBINAR: CAN LEDS PERFORM IN A PERFORMING ARTS BUILDING? | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Nadine McGuire Theatre + Dance Pavilion at the University of Florida. Can LEDs render skin tones and makeup accurately in a dressing room? Can they provide the vertical...

  3. EECBG Success Story: Solar LED Light Pilot Project Illuminates...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    courtesy of Lionel Green, Sand Mountain Reporter. A strip of new solar-powered light emitting-diode (LED) streetlights in Boaz, Alabama were installed with grant funds from the...

  4. MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (MOF); the structure was determined at Beamline 11.3.1. Coating a blue light-emitting diode (LED) with this compound readily generates white light with high luminous...

  5. Text-Alternative Version: LED Color Stability Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michael Royer: All right, welcome ladies and gentleman. I'm Michael Royer of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and I'd like to welcome you to today's webinar on LED Color Stability, Ten...

  6. Measured Off-Grid LED Lighting System Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Budget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for SmallA. Jacobson. 2007. "The Off-Grid Lighting Market in WesternTesting for Emerging Off-grid White-LED Illumination Systems

  7. Implementing and Sustaining Operator Led Energy Efficiency Improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyle, A.; Knight, N.; Rutkowski, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , to significantly reduce energy consumption, the site must focus on a strategic approach which involves developing, implementing and sustaining a client specific program of energy optimization. We discuss ways of sustaining energy performance through operator led...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: AlGaAs LEDs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electroluminescence was first reported by H.J. Round in 1907, and the first light-emitting diode (LED) was reported by O.V. Losev in 1927. Not until the birth of semiconductor...

  9. Advances in Chip Technology, Packaging Enable White LED Breakthroughs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Significant advances in chip technology have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with record efficacies as high as 74 lumens per watt - on par with...

  10. Laboratory Evaluation of LED T8 Replacement Lamp Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Miller, Naomi J.

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A report on a lab setting analysis involving LED lamps intended to directly replace T8 fluorescent lamps (4') showing light output, power, and economic comparisons with other fluorescent options.

  11. WEBINAR: LED LIGHTING IN A PERFORMING ARTS BUILDING

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Can LEDs render skin tones and makeup accurately in a dressing room? Can they provide the vertical footcandles in a studio to make dancers' bodies visible, or deliver acting studio lighting to...

  12. Demonstrating LED and Fiber Optic Lighting in Commissary Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—covers goals of the project and applications for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and fiber optic lighting.

  13. af led lyskilder: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effective Fabrication of a Solar PV Panel for LED Lighting CiteSeer Summary: Abstract Solar cells are very fragile so they need a encapsulant and encasing for protection and...

  14. White LED Benchmark of 65 Lumens Per Watt Achieved

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel chip design and the balance of multiple interrelated design parameters have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with efficacies greater than 65 lumens per watt at 350 mA. The results are particularly significant because they were achieved with a pre-production prototype chip using the same package used in Cree's commercially available XLamp® 7090 high power LED, rather than a laboratory device.

  15. Integrated LED-based luminare for general lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowling, Kevin J.; Lys, Ihor A.; Roberge, Brian; Williamson, Ryan C.; Roberts, Ron; Datta, Michael; Mollnow, Tomas; Morgan, Frederick M.

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting apparatus and methods employing LED light sources are described. The LED light sources are integrated with other components in the form of a luminaire or other general purpose lighting structure. Some of the lighting structures are formed as Parabolic Aluminum Reflector (PAR) luminaires, allowing them to be inserted into conventional sockets. The lighting structures display beneficial operating characteristics, such as efficient operation, high thermal dissipation, high output, and good color mixing.

  16. An Integrated Solid-State LED Luminaire for General Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Dowling; Fritz Morgan Ihor Lys; Mike Datta; Bernd Keller; Thomas Yuan

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong systems approach to designing and building practical LED-based replacement lamps is lacking. The general method of taking high-performance LEDs and marrying them to standard printed circuit boards, drivers and a heat sink has fallen short of the promise of LED lighting. In this program, a top-down assessment of requirements and a bottom-up reinvention of LED sources, electronics, optics and mechanics have resulted in the highest performance lamp possible. The team, comprised of Color Kinetics, the leaders in LED lighting and Cree, the leaders in LED devices took an approach to reinvent the package, the driver and the overall form and aesthetic of a replacement source. The challenge was to create a new benchmark in LED lighting - the resultant lamp, a PAR38 equivalent, met the light output, color, color quality and efficacy marks set out in the program as well as being dimmable, which is important for market acceptance. The approach combined the use of multiple source die, a chip-on-board approach, a very efficient driver topology, the use of both direct emission and phosphor conversion, and a unique faceted optic to avoid the losses, artifacts and hotspots of lensed approaches. The integral heat sink provided a mechanical base and airflow using a chimney-effect for use in a wide variety of locations and orientations. These research results led to a much better understanding of the system effects of component level technologies. It was clear that best-of-breed sub-system results do not necessarily result in the best end result for the complete system. In doing this work, we did not neglect the practical aspects of these systems. These were not rarified results and commercially impractical but lent themselves to eventual commercial products in the marketplace. The end result - a high performance replacement lamp - will save significant energy while providing a high-quality light source.

  17. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  18. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  19. The Impact of Above-Sheathing Ventilation on the Thermal and Moisture Performance of Steep-Slope Residential Roofs and Attics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, W.; Karagiozis, A.; Wilson, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IMPACT OF ABOVE-SHEATHING VENTILATION ON THE THERMAL AND MOISTURE PERFORMANCE OF STEEP-SLOPE RESIDENTIAL ROOFS AND ATTICS William (Bill) Miller Research Scientist Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee Joe Wilson Product... Manager Metro Roof Products Oceanside, California Achilles Karagiozis Research Scientist Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee ABSTRACT Field studies were conducted on several attic assemblies having stone-coated metal shake roofs...

  20. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.

    1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixer pump is described used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump. 10 figs.

  1. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, Richard F. (Ohio Township, Allegheny County, PA); Pollick, Richard D. (Sarver, PA); Nyilas, Charles P. (Monroeville, PA); Denmeade, Timothy J. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  2. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, Richard F. (Ohio Township, PA); Pollick, Richard D. (Sarver, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixer pump used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump.

  3. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part 1: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on February 12, 2015, focused on methods to design and build roof and wall systems for high performance homes that optimize energy and moisture performance.

  4. STEPS IN SLOW FLAGELLAR MOTOR ROTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leake, Mark C.

    STEPS IN SLOW FLAGELLAR MOTOR ROTATION Alexander D. Rowe1 , Yoshiyuki Sowa2, Mark C. Leake1+ -specific motors. Torque is generated by the interaction between stator complexes and FliG proteins revolution. CHIMERIC MOTOR: The stator units comprising the flagellar motors of the YS34 strain - used

  5. Total Economics of Energy Efficient Motors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nester, A. T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    priced energy-efficient motor or a standard electric motor. It will also address the question of whether it is cost-effective to rewind an old motor which has failed or to replace it with a new energy-efficient motor....

  6. Motor Control Abnormalities in Parkinson's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motor Control Abnormalities in Parkinson's Disease Pietro Mazzoni, Britne Shabbott, and Juan Camilo Corte´s Motor Performance Laboratory, The Neurological Institute, Columbia University, New York, New. Motor symptoms can also be described in terms of motor control, a level of description that explains how

  7. Recover Power with Hydraulic Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, J. R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    displacement device, the HPRM torque and speed are almost completely independent - unlike hydraulic power recovery turbines (centrifugal motors). Three screw HPRM's have low moments of inertia, operate at low vibration and noise levels and extract power...

  8. Radial-Gap Permanent Magnet Motor and Drive Research FY 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.

    2005-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task was to study permanent magnet (PM) radial-gap traction drive systems that could meet the U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR Program's 2010 goals to expose weaknesses or identify strengths. Initially, the approach was to compare attributes such as physical deformations during operation, performance (torque, power, efficiency versus speed), material requirements (strength), material costs, manufacturability, weight, power density, specific power, reliability, and drivability for specific motors. Three motors selected were the commercially available 60-kW radial-gap surface-mounted PM motor manufactured by UQM Technologies, Inc.; a hypothetical PM motor with rotor-supported magnets similar to the Honda MCF-21; and Delphi's automotive electric machine drive motor, whose rotor is a ferromagnetic cylinder, held at one end by a shaft that supports the magnets on its inner surface. Potential problems have appeared related to PM motors, such as (1) high no-load spin losses and high operational power losses, probably from eddy current losses in the rotor; (2) the undemonstrated dual mode inverter control (DMIC) for driving a brushless dc motor (BDCM) (UQM and Delphi motors); (3) uncertainty about the potential for reducing current with DMIC; and (4) uncertainty about the relation between material requirements and maximum rotor speed. Therefore, the approach was changed to study in detail three of the comparison attributes: drivability, performance, and material requirements. Drivability and related problems were examined by demonstrating that DMIC may be used to drive an 18-pole 30-kW PM motor to 6000 rpm, where the maximum electrical frequency is 900 Hz. An available axial-gap test motor with 18 poles was used because its control is identical to that of a radial gap PM motor. Performance was analytically examined, which led to a derivation showing that DMIC controls a PM motor so that the motor uses minimum current to produce any power regardless of speed for relative speeds, n = {omega}/{omega}{sub base} {ge} 2. Performance was also examined with efficiency measurements during the 30-kW PM motor test. Material requirements were examined with finite-element analyses (FEA) to determine the speed and location where yield starts and the corresponding deformations and stresses.

  9. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  10. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  11. Use of the finite element method to predict roof collapse and subsidence resulting from the underground gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jegbefume, E.U.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plane strain two-dimensional finite element model employing the method of negative reaction loading was used to model roof collapse and subsidence that result from underground coal gasification. Subsidence results from a preliminary finite element model were compared with those from a theoretical model having identical assumptions. The finite element model was extended to include dry zones of rock around the cavity resulting from the underground gasification. The model was further extended to include thermal loading, thermal softening and roof collapse. Roof collapse initiation and growth were modelled by examining the portion of the roof immediately above the cavity. A creep program utilizing the method incremental strains was developed and run in conjunction with the Pafec 70 + program. The overburden rock was treated as a linear viscoelastic material having deformation parameters of the generalized Kelvin model. Finally, the finite element model was used to carry out a case history study of subsidence and roof collapse of an underground gasification field experiment in Wyoming.

  12. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Wood, Kurt; Skilton, Wayne; Petersheim, Jerry

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread use of solar-reflective roofing materials can save energy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warming by cooling the roughly 20% of the urban surface that is roofed. In this study we created prototype solar-reflective nonwhite concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing materials using a two-layer spray coating process intended to maximize both solar reflectance and factory-line throughput. Each layer is a thin, quick-drying, pigmented latex paint based on either acrylic or a poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic blend. The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced with bare granules from 0.06 to 0.62. The second layer is a 'cool' color topcoat with weak near-infrared (NIR) absorption and/or strong NIR backscattering. Each layer dries within seconds, potentially allowing a factory line to pass first under the white spray, then under the color spray. We combined a white basecoat with monocolor topcoats in various shades of red, brown, green and blue to prepare 24 cool color prototype tiles and 24 cool color prototypes shingles. The solar reflectances of the tiles ranged from 0.26 (dark brown; CIELAB lightness value L* = 29) to 0.57 (light green; L* = 76); those of the shingles ranged from 0.18 (dark brown; L* = 26) to 0.34 (light green; L* = 68). Over half of the tiles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.40, and over half of the shingles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.25.

  13. An LED-based Flasher System for VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, D; McCutcheon, M; Nikkinen, L; 10.1016/j.nima.2009.10.107

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a flasher system designed for use in monitoring the gains of the photomultiplier tubes used in the VERITAS gamma-ray telescopes. This system uses blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) so it can be operated at much higher rates than a traditional laser-based system. Calibration information can be obtained with better statistical precision with reduced loss of observing time. The LEDs are also much less expensive than a laser. The design features of the new system are presented, along with measurements made with a prototype mounted on one of the VERITAS telescopes.

  14. Global Rebalancing: US Protection versus Europe-led reflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvin, George; Izurieta, Alex

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impact of a Europe-led reflation is re-enforced by the strong income and trade linkages with middle- income and poor regions of the world (eg, Eastern Europe, Latin America and Africa)18. An EU-led reflation supposes a set of demand... switching on the required scale within an acceptable time frame. The central point is that the extra growth cannot come entirely or even chiefly from Asia (where resources are already stretched to the limit), but must come from a combination of renewed EU...

  15. LED Luminaire Lifetime: Recommendations For Testing and Reporting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED Lighting

  16. LED Performance Specification Series: T8 Replacement Lamps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED LightingOutdoor

  17. LED T8 Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED LightingOutdoorLEDT8

  18. LEDs Ready for Takeoff at Louisiana Airport | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting Facts LED

  19. CEBAF Center Roof Work to Impact Parking Lot, Loading Dock Area | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o'IUHopper c omputeLab Roof

  20. Efficient Motor System Tools Sponsored by the DOE Motor Challenge Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blazewicz, S.; McCoy, G. A.; Olszewski, M.; Scheihing, P.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    motors and motor-dri ven equipment that wi 11 improve indus! ri al energy effic iency, producti vi ty and environmental performance. The overall goal is to increase the market penetration of energy-efficient industrial electric motor systems...