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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

(Production and environmental impacts of alternative motor fuels)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The traveler participated in the 13th meeting of the Executive Committee on Alternative Motor Fuels (International Energy Agency). Participating countries in addition to the US are Canada, Italy, Finland, Japan, Sweden, and New Zealand (absent). The status of five existing annexes was reviewed and a pre-proposal for an additional annex to be a review of environmental impacts of fuels was presented by the traveler. This was well received by committee members, and a detailed proposal for such work will be developed for presentation at the next Executive Committee meeting.

McGill, R.N.

1990-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

2

Measuring Devices: Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers - Single, Dual, and Multi-Product and Blended Product. Intro about it. EPOs, Field Manual, Training ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Motor Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle

4

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Motor Vehicle Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Motor Natural Gas Motor Vehicle Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Motor Vehicle Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Motor Vehicle Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Motor Vehicle Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Motor Vehicle Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Motor Vehicle Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Motor Vehicle Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Natural Gas Motor Vehicle Fuel Promotion An eight member Natural Gas Fuel Board (Board) was created to advise the

5

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Cell Motor Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit A tax credit of up to $4,000 is available for the purchase of qualified

6

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Cell Motor Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction A taxpayer is eligible for a $2,000 tax deduction for the purchase of a

7

Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Series: Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Motor Gasoline (less Adj.) Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blenede w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Other Conventional Gasoline Finished Motor Gasoline Adjustment Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Jet, Commercial Kerosene-Type Jet, Military Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Distillate Fuel Oil > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate Fuel Oil > 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Propane/Propylene Period: Weekly 4-Week Average

8

Liquid Fuel From Bacteria: Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from CO2, Hydrogen, and Oxygen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: MIT is using solar-derived hydrogen and common soil bacteria called Ralstonia eutropha to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) directly into biofuel. This bacteria already has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. MIT is engineering the bacteria to use hydrogen to convert CO2 directly into liquid transportation fuels. Hydrogen is a flammable gas, so the MIT team is building an innovative reactor system that will safely house the bacteria and gas mixture during the fuel-creation process. The system will pump in precise mixtures of hydrogen, oxygen, and CO2, and the online fuel-recovery system will continuously capture and remove the biofuel product.

None

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Enhanced conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

1985-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers and Consoles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers and Consoles. Purpose: This 5-day RMFD course provides participants with the knowledge ...

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

13

Motor vehicle fuel analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas detecting system is described for classifying the type of liquid fuel in a container or tank. The system includes a plurality of semiconductor gas sensors, each of which differs from the other in its response to various organic vapors. The system includes a means of processing the responses of the plurality of sensors such that the responses to any particular organic substance or mixture is sufficiently distinctive to constitute a recognizable ``signature``. The signature of known substances are collected and divided into two classes based on some other known characteristic of the substances. A pattern recognition system classifies the signature of an unknown substance with reference to the two user-defined classes, thereby classifying the unknown substance with regard to the characteristic of interest, such as its suitability for a particular use. 14 figs.

Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Special Naphthas Lubricants Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

15

Designing Alternatives to State Motor Fuel Taxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Alternatives to State Motor Fuel Taxes All states rely on gasoline taxes as one source are financed from a wide variety of sources, all states use motor fuel taxes as an important source of funds of funds for road improvement and mainte- nance. Historically, gasoline usage has been roughly proportional

Bertini, Robert L.

16

Motor vehicle fuel economy, the forgotten HC control stragegy?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions of hydrocarbons from motor vehicles are recognized as major contributors to ozone pollution in urban areas. Petroleum-based motor fuels contain volatile organic compounds (VOC) which, together with oxides of nitrogen, promote the formation of ozone in the troposphere via complex photochemical reactions. VOC emissions from the tailpipe and evaporation from the fuel and engine systems of highway vehicles are believed to account for about 40% of total VOC emissions in any region. But motor fuels also generate emissions throughout the fuel cycle, from crude oil production to refining, storage, transportation, and handling, that can make significant contributions to the total inventory of VOC emissions. Many of these sources of emissions are directly related to the quantity of fuel produced and handled throughout the fuel cycle. It is, therefore, reasonable to expect that a reduction in total fuel throughput might result in a reduction of VOC emissions. In particular, reducing vehicle fuel consumption by increasing vehicle fuel economy should reduce total fuel throughput, thereby cutting total emissions of VOCS. In this report we identify the sources of VOC emissions throughout the motor fuel cycle, quantify them to the extent possible, and describe their dependence on automobile and light truck fuel economy.

Deluchi, M.; Wang, Quanlu; Greene, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Conversion of olefins to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Linear and/or branched claim C.sub.2 to C.sub.12 olefins are converted to hydrocarbon mixtures suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a catalyst capable of ensuring the production of desirable products with only a relatively minor amount of heavy products boiling beyond the diesel oil range. The catalyst having desirable stability during continuous production operations, comprises a steam stabilized zeolite Y catalyst of hydrophobic character, desirably in aluminum-extracted form. The olefins such as propylene, may be diluted with inerts, such as paraffins or with water, the latter serving to moderate the acidity of the catalyst, or to further moderate the activity of the aluminum-extracted catalyst, so as to increase the effective life of the catalyst.

Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY); Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MotorWeek Fuel Cell MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek Fuel Cell Video (Text Version) on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

19

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES from motor vehicles because unlike emissions of CO2, which are relatively easy to estimate, emissions-related emissions. In the U.S., for example, emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the production and use of motor

Kammen, Daniel M.

20

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportationfrom alternative fuels for motor vehicles and electricity-Environmental Externalities of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportationfrom alternative fuels for motor vehicles and electricity-Environmental Externalities of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Available Alternative Fuel School Bus Products--2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 4-page Clean Cities fact sheet provides a list of the currently available (and soon to be available) model year 2004 alternative fuel school bus and school bus engine products. It includes information from Blue Bird Corporation, Collins Bus Corporation, Corbeil Bus, Ford Motor Company, General Motors Corporation, Thomas Built Buses, Inc., Clean Air Partners, Cummins Westport, and Deere & Company.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

MotorWeek: Fuel Economy Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Navigational links Navigational links Site Map | Videos | Links | More Info | Search | Contacts | HOME www.fueleconomy.gov Photograph of Cars Find and Compare Cars | Gas Mileage Tips | Gasoline Prices | Your MPG Will Vary | Why is Fuel Economy Important? | Your MPG | Hybrids, Diesels, Alt Fuels, Etc. | Tax Incentives | Extreme MPG U.S. Department of Energy | Print the Fuel Economy Guide | U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Gas Mileage Tips Driving more efficiently Keeping your car in shape Planning and combining trips Choosing a more efficient vehicle More Info MotorWeek: Text Version Video: MotorWeek test showing impact of driving style on MPG. Fuel Economy Focus John Davis The window sticker on a new car contains lots of information besides just the price. For instance, down at the bottom are the all important government fuel economy estimates. But just like the price on the sticker may have little in common with what you actually pay for the car, the mileage estimates may also be far different from real world results. So, why does gas mileage vary so much? Well, the answers are as varied as your mileage.

24

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production Tax A private biodiesel producer that produces less than 5,000 gallons of biodiesel annually is subject to the annual state motor fuel tax. The

25

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief primer on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat, and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. References for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper.

Singh, S.P.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. Because the subject is vast and the space is limited, references for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper. 24 references.

Singh, S.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Catalysts for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst composition capable of ensuring the production of only relatively minor amounts of heavy products boiling beyond the diesel oil range. The catalyst composition, having desirable stability during continuous production operation, employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component. The latter component is a steam-stabilized zeolite Y catalyst of hydrophobic character, desirably in acid-extracted form.

Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY); Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010:

29

Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

30

Table A1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Number of Vehicles Vehicle-Miles Traveled Motor Fuel Consumption Motor Fuel 2001 Household and Vehicle Expenditures ... Age of Primary Driver 16 to 17 Years ...

31

Motor vehicle fuel economy, the forgotten HC control stragegy. [Hydrocarbon (HC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions of hydrocarbons from motor vehicles are recognized as major contributors to ozone pollution in urban areas. Petroleum-based motor fuels contain volatile organic compounds (VOC) which, together with oxides of nitrogen, promote the formation of ozone in the troposphere via complex photochemical reactions. VOC emissions from the tailpipe and evaporation from the fuel and engine systems of highway vehicles are believed to account for about 40% of total VOC emissions in any region. But motor fuels also generate emissions throughout the fuel cycle, from crude oil production to refining, storage, transportation, and handling, that can make significant contributions to the total inventory of VOC emissions. Many of these sources of emissions are directly related to the quantity of fuel produced and handled throughout the fuel cycle. It is, therefore, reasonable to expect that a reduction in total fuel throughput might result in a reduction of VOC emissions. In particular, reducing vehicle fuel consumption by increasing vehicle fuel economy should reduce total fuel throughput, thereby cutting total emissions of VOCS. In this report we identify the sources of VOC emissions throughout the motor fuel cycle, quantify them to the extent possible, and describe their dependence on automobile and light truck fuel economy.

Deluchi, M.; Wang, Quanlu; Greene, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fourth annual report to Congress, Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the alternative fuel vehicle programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These programs, which represent the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative fuels, are beginning their fifth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fourth year.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory for the Denver Metropolitan Area Sajal S sales from tax department -quite precise Inventory -uncertainty can be estimated Travel Based Model FuelGasohol (LTK, PAS) Tons/day3748369Gasoline (LTK, PAS) g per kg of fuel7859Gasohol (LTK, PAS) g per kg

Denver, University of

34

Adsorbent-treated cat cracked gasoline in motor fuels  

SciTech Connect

A methof is described for supressing carburetor deposit formation of motor fuels containing untreated cat cracked gasoline by blending adsorbent-treated cat cracked gasoline into the motor fuel. Up to about 50 percent by weight of the total composition is adsorbent treated cat cracked gasoline, but preferably from about 5 to about 25 percent by weight of the total composition is adsorbent treated cat cracked gasoline. In a preferred embodiment a standard reference fuel capable of providing a predetermined level of carburetor deposit formation is provided by the addition of either adsorbent-treated cat cracked gasoline, untreated cat cracked gasoline, or aromatic amines to a base fuel.

Thomas, S.P.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010: Year: Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase 1: Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase 2:

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Subsidy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Production Subsidy Prohibition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Subsidy Prohibition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Subsidy Prohibition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Subsidy Prohibition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Subsidy Prohibition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Subsidy Prohibition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Subsidy Prohibition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Production Subsidy Prohibition

37

Figure 102. U.S. motor gasoline and diesel fuel consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 102. U.S. motor gasoline and diesel fuel consumption, 2000-2040 (million barrels per day) Motor Gasoline Petroleum Portion ...

38

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation fuels, oil-production ?elds, motor-vehiclethe production of crude oil used to make motor fuel, thethe production of crude oil used to make motor fuel, the

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark; McCubbin, Donald; Kim, H.J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation fuels, oil-production fields, motor-vehiclethe production of crude oil used to make motor fuel, thethe production of crude oil used to make motor fuel, the

Delucchi, Mark A.; Murphy, James; Kim, Jin; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Derived Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOT Motor-fuel use statistics summary to 1995 The data included...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motor-fuel use statistics summary to 1995 The data included in this submission is United States Department of Transportation (DOT) data up to 1995. The data includes motor-fuel...

42

Fuel Ethanol Oxygenate Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 27,197 26,722 26,923 26,320 25,564 27,995 1981-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 628 784 836 842 527 636 2004-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 25,209 24,689 24,786 24,186 23,810 26,040 2004-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 523 404 487 460 431 473 2004-2013 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 450 432 430 432 415 429 2004-2013 West Coast (PADD 5)

43

Process Refinements - Accounting for Motor-Fuel Losses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accounting for Motor-Fuel Losses Accounting for Motor-Fuel Losses Motor fuel may be lost by leakage from storage tanks, spillage, fire, or other means; in addition, measurement differences brought about by temperature or other conditions and meter faults can result in apparent losses. Because this lost fuel is neither consumed on the highway nor used for off-highway purposes, it presents a problem for determining the appropriate base for taxation. In the past, FHWA allowed States to report actual losses or a percentage loss, which was capped at 1%. Usage data for States that did not report losses were not adjusted by FHWA to account for losses. In addition, diesel losses were not considered significant and were not counted. During the reassessment meetings and in the Federal Register notice of August 17, 2000, it was recommended that actual diesel losses also be documented and reported. However, because diesel reporting accounts for actual on-highway fuel use, a reporting of diesel losses is unnecessary.

44

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Production Tax Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Production Tax Credits The Enterprise Zone Program and the High Quality Jobs Program offer state

45

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit

46

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Production Assistance  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Alternative Fuels Production Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Production Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Production Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Production Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Production Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Production Assistance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Production Assistance on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Production Assistance The Georgia Division of Energy Resources and the Georgia Environmental

47

Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Tax Incentives to someone by E-mail Production Tax Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Tax Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Production Tax Incentives The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority (KEDFA) provides tax

49

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Qualified Plug-In Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Qualified Plug-In Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section...

50

Mega-scale product line engineering at General Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Motors faces probably the most complex Systems and Software Product Line Engineering (PLE) challenges ever, in terms of product complexity, richness of variation, size of organization, and an unforgiving requirement to support over a dozen simultaneous ... Keywords: bill-of-features, feature modeling, feature profiles, hierarchical product lines, product baselines, product configurator, product line engineering, product portfolio, software product lines, variation points

Rick Flores; Charles Krueger; Paul Clements

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Property Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Production Property Tax Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Property Tax Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Property Tax Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Property Tax Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Property Tax Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Property Tax Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Production Property Tax Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

52

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Based Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Based Fuel Production Wage and Salary Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

53

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

171 Emissions related to the use of lubricating oil by motoruse of lubricating oil by motor vehicles The LEM estimatesoil refining to gasoline), the efficiency of fuel use by motor

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

171 Emissions related to the use of lubricating oil by motoruse of lubricating oil by motor vehicles The LEM estimatesoil refining to gasoline), the efficiency of fuel use by motor

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

general sales taxes) on motor gasoline (EIA, State Energythe sales tax paid on motor-vehicles, gasoline and motor-Motor fuels: portions of federal gasoline and diesel-fuel tax

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuels, International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Model, ReferenceTable Y-25 continued. Fuel ------> Nuclear Feedstock ------>to plant. 1) For nuclear/uranium, "Fuel production" refers

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuels, International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Model, ReferenceTable Y-25 continued. Fuel ------> Nuclear Feedstock ------>to plant. 1) For nuclear/uranium, "Fuel production" refers

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Petroleum Products and Alternative Fuels Tax Law (Tennessee) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Petroleum Products and Alternative Fuels Tax Law (Tennessee) Petroleum Products and Alternative Fuels Tax Law (Tennessee) Petroleum Products and Alternative Fuels Tax Law (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Fees Rebate Program Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department of Revenue The Petroleum Products and Alternative Fuels Tax Law is relevant to all natural gas and/or biofuel projects. Compressed Natural Gas CNG, petroleum product and/or alternative dealers must apply for and obtain a permit from the Tennessee Department of Revenue. The permit authorizes the dealer to collect and remit taxes on CNG delivered to motor vehicles by means of a

59

Figure 1.8 Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy, 1973-2011 (Miles per Gallon)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 1.8 Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy, 1973-2011 (Miles per Gallon) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review August 2013 17

60

Costs of electronuclear fuel production  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) proposes to study the electronuclear fuel producer (EFP) as a means of producing fissile fuel to generate electricity. The main advantage of the EFP is that it may reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation by breeding /sup 233/U from thorium, thereby avoiding plutonium separation. A report on the costs of electronuclear fuel production based upon two designs considered by LASL is presented. The findings indicate that the EFP design variations considered are not likely to result in electricity generation costs as low as the uranium fuel cycle used in the US today. At current estimates of annual fuel output (500 kg /sup 233/U per EFP), the costs of electricity generation using fuel produced by the EFP are more than three times higher than generating costs using the traditional fuel cycle. Sensitivity analysis indicates that electronuclear fuel production would become cost competitive with the traditional uranium fuel cycle when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (yellowcake) prices approach $1000 per pound.

Flaim, T.; Loose, V.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arizona Department of Motor Vehicles, Phoenix, Arizona,Enhancement Through Increased Motor-Fuel Tax Enforcement,Commercial and Industrialb Motor vehiclesc (AVMV USA,Yr )

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

Leiby, P.N.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Incentive The Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce (Department) provides incentive payments to qualified ethanol and biodiesel producers

64

Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or biomass as a feedstock. Beginning Aug. 1, 2010, tax incentives are also available for energy-efficient alternative fuel production facilities and up to five alternative fuel...

65

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL TAX REGULATIONS Regulation 1178.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(a) GENERAL. A taxpayer shall maintain and make available for examination on request by the board or its authorized representatives, records in the manner set forth at California Code of Regulations, Title 18, Section 4901 (b) SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS. In addition to the record keeping requirements set forth in subdivision (a), suppliers shall comply with the following requirements. A supplier shall maintain complete records of all rack removals, sales, imports and exempt dispositions including exemption certificates, self-consumed fuel, inventories, purchases, receipts, and tank gaugings or meter readings, of motor vehicle and any other fuel that is required to be accounted for on the suppliers return or report. Such records include but are not limited to: (1) Refinery Reports related to the production of motor vehicle fuel. (2) Inventory reconciliation by location. (3) Storage inventory reports. (4) List of storage locations. (5) Tax returns from other states to support export claims. (6) Cardlock statements. (7) Calculations or formulas to support off-highway exempt usage.

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production to Production to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Production and Distribution Ethanol is a domestically produced alternative fuel that's most commonly made from corn. It can also be made from cellulosic feedstocks, such as

67

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Grants The Biofuels Production Incentive Grant Program provides grants to producers of advanced biofuels, specifically fuels derived from any

68

Enhanced catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The conversion of synthesis gas to liquid molar fuels by means of a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst composition is enhanced by the addition of molybdenum, tungsten or a combination thereof as an additional component of said composition. The presence of the additive component increases the olefinic content of the hydrocarbon products produced. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Economic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary and Motor Vehicle Fuel Cell Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); and · Similarly, use of PEM fuel cell waste heat for hot water heating would require careful integration with hot consider cogeneration of hot water to be a potential competitive advantage of stationary fuel cellsPWP-092 Economic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary and Motor Vehicle Fuel Cell Systems

Kammen, Daniel M.

70

Imports of Total Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reformulated and conventional gasoline production excludes adjustments for fuel ethanol and motor gasoline blending components. Historical data prior to June 4, ...

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive The Ethanol Production Incentive provides qualified ethanol producers with quarterly payments based on production volume during times when ethanol

72

Los Alamos scientists advance biomass fuel production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issues submit Los Alamos scientists advance biomass fuel production Adapting biomass waste molecules for energy production May 1, 2013 Lab research can yield energy from...

73

Methanol production from biomass and natural gas as transportation fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two processes are examined for production of methanol. They are assessed against the essential requirements of a future alternative fuel for road transport: that it (1) is producible in amounts comparable to the 19 EJ of motor fuel annually consumed in the US, (2) minimizes emissions of criteria pollutants, (3) reduces greenhouse gas emissions from production and use, (4) is cost-competitive with petroleum fuel, and (5) is compatible with the emerging vehicle technologies, especially those powdered by fuel cells. The methanol yield, production cost, and potential for reduction of overall fuel-cycle CO{sub 2} emissions were evaluated and compared to those of reformulated gasoline. The results show that a process utilizing natural gas and biomass as cofeedstocks can meet the five requirements more effectively than individual processes utilizing those feedstocks separately. When end-use efficiencies are accounted for, the cost per vehicle mile traveled would be less than that of gasoline used in current vehicles. CO{sub 2} emissions from the vehicle fleet would be reduced 66% by methanol used in fuel cell vehicles and 8--36% in flexible-fuel or dedicated-methanol vehicles during the transition period. Methanol produced from natural gas and biomass, together in one process, and used in fuel cell vehicles would leverage petroleum displacement by a factor of about 5 and achieve twice the overall CO{sub 2} emission reduction obtainable from the use of biomass alone.

Borgwardt, R.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Risk Management Research Lab.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive Montana-based ethanol producers are eligible for a tax incentive of $0.20 per gallon of ethanol produced solely from Montana agricultural products or

75

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production Incentive A qualified Kansas biodiesel producer is eligible for a production incentive of $0.30 per gallon of biodiesel sold. The incentive is payable

76

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive Ethanol producers may qualify for an income tax credit equal to 30% of production facility nameplate capacity between 500,000 and 15 million

77

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Incentive Qualified ethanol and biodiesel producers are eligible for production incentives on a per gallon basis. To be eligible for the incentive, the

78

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for a production incentive payable from the Kansas Qualified Agricultural Ethyl Alcohol Producer Fund. An

79

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Credit County governments are eligible to receive waste reduction credits for using yard clippings, clean wood waste, or paper waste as feedstock for the

80

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Promotion The state legislature supports the Federal "25 x 25" initiative, under which 25% of the total energy consumed in the United States by 2025 would

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive The Missouri Department of Agriculture manages the Missouri Ethanol Producer Incentive Fund (Fund), which provides monthly grants to qualified

82

Distillate Fuel Oil Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

83

Residual Fuel Oil Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

84

Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Hydrogen is an energy carrier, not an energy source-hydrogen stores and delivers energy in a usable form, but it must be produced from hydrogen containing compounds. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as coal (preferentially with carbon sequestration), natural gas, and biomass or using nuclear energy and renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydroelectric power to split water. This great potential for diversity of supply is an important reason why hydrogen is such a promising energy carrier. Hydrogen can be produced at large central plants, semi-centrally, or in small distributed units located at or very near the point of use, such as at refueling stations or stationary power

85

Crop production without fossil fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With diminishing fossil fuel reserves and concerns about global warming, the agricultural sector needs to reduce its use of fossil fuels. The objective of this (more)

Ahlgren, Serina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fuel bioethanol production from whey permeate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the feasibility for the production of fuel bioethanol from whey permeate. The identification of the limiting factors (more)

Glutz, Franois-Nicolas de

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide the worlds uranium enrichment services. With theseenergy efficiency of uranium enrichment, in mWh-enrichment-gas Motor-vehicle flows Uranium enrichment Agriculture Fuel

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable transportation energy capable system. The prime energy for this project comes from an agreement with a wind turbine operator.

Garabedian, Harold T.

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production Webinar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production Tasios Melis, UC Berkeley 24-Jan-2011 1 UCB-Melis 2 CO 2 H 2 O Photosynthesis Photons H 2 HC O 2 , Biomass Feedstock and products...

90

Tax and Fee Payments by Motor-Vehicle Users for the Use of Highways, Fuels, and Vehicles: Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sales tax paid on motor-vehicles, gasoline and motor-as gasoline excise taxes, road tolls, and motor- vehicleMotor fuels: portions of federal gasoline and diesel-fuel tax

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fuel cell electric power production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for generating electricity from a fuel cell includes generating a hydrogen-rich gas as the fuel for the fuel cell by treating a hydrocarbon feed, which may be a normally liquid feed, in an autothermal reformer utilizing a first monolithic catalyst zone having palladium and platinum catalytic components therein and a second, platinum group metal steam reforming catalyst. Air is used as the oxidant in the hydrocarbon reforming zone and a low oxygen to carbon ratio is maintained to control the amount of dilution of the hydrogen-rich gas with nitrogen of the air without sustaining an insupportable amount of carbon deposition on the catalyst. Anode vent gas may be utilized as the fuel to preheat the inlet stream to the reformer. The fuel cell and the reformer are preferably operated at elevated pressures, up to about a pressure of 150 psia for the fuel cell.

Hwang, Herng-Shinn (Livingston, NJ); Heck, Ronald M. (Frenchtown, NJ); Yarrington, Robert M. (Westfield, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fifth annual report to congress. Federal alternative motor fuels programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the status of the US Department of Energy`s alternative fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. These programs comprise the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transportation fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Electric vehicles are not included in these programs, and the annual report does not include information on them. Since the inception of the programs, great strides have been made in developing commercially viable alternative fuel vehicle technologies. However, as is the case in the commercialization of all new technologies, some performance problems have been experienced on vehicles involved in early demonstration efforts. Substantial improvements have been recorded in vehicle practicality, safety, and performance in real-world demonstrations. An aspect of particular interest is emissions output. Results from light duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated superior inservice emissions performance. Heavy duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated dramatic reductions in particulate emissions. However, emissions results from vehicles converted to run on alternative fuel have not been as promising. Although the technologies available today are commercially viable in some markets, further improvements in infrastructure and economics will result in greater market expansion. Information is included in this report on light and heavy duty vehicles, transit buses, vehicle conversions, safety, infrastructure support, vehicle availability, and information dissemination.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tax and Fee Payments by Motor-Vehicle Users for the Use of Highways, Fuels, and Vehicles: Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhancement Through Increased Motor-Fuel Tax Enforcement,1976). L. R. Moran, Motor Vehicles, Model Year 1991,Commercial and Industrialb Motor vehiclesc (AVMV USA,Yr )

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption . U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Vehicles Vehicle-Miles Traveled Motor Fuel Consumption Motor Fuel Expenditures RSE Row Factor: (million) (percent) (billion) (percent) (billion gallons) (gallon percent) (quadril- lion Btu) (billion dollars) (percent) 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 Household Characteristics Total .................................................... 156.8 100.0 1,793 100.0 90.6 100.0 11.2 104.7 100.0 2.8 Census Region and Division Northeast ........................................... 26.6 17.0 299 16.7 14.5 16.0 1.8 17.2 16.4 5.7 New England ................................... 7.6 4.8 84 4.7 4.1 4.5 0.5 4.8 4.6 13.8 Middle Atlantic

95

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E STIMATES OF EMISSIONS FACTORS FOR ALCOHOL FUEL PRODUCTIONOF EMISSIONS FACTORS FOR ALCOHOL FUEL PRODUCTION PLANTS A.

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Small-scale alcohol fuel production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report of a project to demonstrate the feasibility of small-scale alcohol fuel production. A list of equipment and costs incurred in contracting the still are included. No experimental results are presented. (DMC)

Evans, J.; McQueary, J.

1983-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

97

Improving Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Photosynthesis for Hydrogen and Fuels Production January 24, 2011 Webinar Q&A Q: How do you induce hypoxic photosynthesis? I imagine you N-stress, to accumulate starch...

98

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Facility Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center:...

99

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total world mine production of uranium, Australia producedin 2010 mine production will satisfy 75% of world uraniummine production worldwide, 0.50 for reprocessed tails and spent fuel, and 0.30 for military high-enriched uranium.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total world mine production of uranium, Australia producedin 2010 mine production will satisfy 75% of world uraniummine production worldwide, 0.50 for reprocessed tails and spent fuel, and 0.30 for military high-enriched uranium.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Fuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Production / Quality to someone by E-mail Fuel Production / Quality to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Fuel Production / Quality on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Fuel Production / Quality on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Fuel Production / Quality on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Fuel Production / Quality on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Fuel Production / Quality on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives for Fuel Production / Quality on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

102

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Facility Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Facility Grants The Renewable Fuels Development Program provides grants for the

103

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Production and Distribution  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production and Production and Distribution to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Production and Distribution on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Production and Distribution on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Production and Distribution on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Production and Distribution on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Production and Distribution on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Production and Distribution on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Production and Distribution

104

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production and Distribution to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Production and Distribution on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Production and Distribution

105

Synthetic fuel production by indirect coal liquefaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the production of a synthetic crude oil product by direct contact of coal with an appropriate catalyst, with abundant domestic coal resources but lim- ited oil and gas resources, the conversion of coal into liquid in South Africa (for Fischer- Tropsch fuels). Also, the US Department of Energy an- nounced its financial

106

Alcohol fuel production training program. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to offer instruction in the small scale production of ethanol, which can be added to gasoline by about 10%. The course was designed to help farmers in particular to make ethanol to extend fuel use. This project has four objectives. They are: (1) design an alcohol fuel production course with appropriate equipment for hands-on training; (2) offer at least three training sessions on alcohol fuel production in Cumberland County each year of the project; (3) work with the Governor's Task Force on Gasohol to disseminate the necessary information on alcohol production to the public; (4) identify, in consultation with the New Jersey Department of Energy and Agriculture, other training sites in the state and offer at least three training sessions outside of Cumberland County during the second year of the project. As of March 31, 1982, Cumberland County College completed all activities and objectives outlined in its Appropriate Technology project ''Alcohol Fuel Production.'' Given the six month extension requested to accommodate farmers in other parts of the state and the growing season, this project was completed within the stated time schedule. Although the response for the course was high in the beginning of 1981, the increased supply of low cost fuels at the end of the year probably accounts for the decline in the public's willingness to take a course of this nature.

Burke, J.

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ongoing program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) for stationary power plant applications. The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where the fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several FCE sub-megawatt power plants are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the reporting period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance of plant equipment designs is discussed in this report.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption

109

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production and Distribution to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Distribution on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

110

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Distribution  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production and Distribution to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Distribution on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Distribution on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Distribution on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Distribution on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Distribution on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Distribution on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Blends Production & Distribution Specifications Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

111

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Investment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production Investment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Investment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Investment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Investment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Investment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Investment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Investment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production Investment Tax Credit

112

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements

113

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Property Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Property Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Property Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Property Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Property Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Property Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Property Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Property Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Property Tax Exemption

114

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits

115

Catalyst and process for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ongoing program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) for stationary power plant applications. The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations or in distributed locations near the customer, including hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FuelCell Energy has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented Direct FuelCell technology, where the fuel is directly fed to fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating, and air conditioning. Several FCE sub-megawatt power plants are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the reporting period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance of plant equipment designs is discussed in this report. FCE's DFC products development has been carried out under a joint public-private effort with DOE being the major contributor. Current funding is primarily under a Cooperative Agreement with DOE.

H. C. Maru; M. Farooque

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on AddThis.com...

118

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Biobutanol Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive

119

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production and Distribution  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production and Distribution Contracts to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production and Distribution Contracts on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production and Distribution Contracts on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production and Distribution Contracts on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production and Distribution Contracts on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production and Distribution Contracts on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production and Distribution Contracts on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

120

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Sustainable Biofuels Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices

122

H2 Production and Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

The world demand for energy and the need for protecting our environment can be achieved by increasing energy efficiency and by developing clean energy sources. Among the alternative fuels, hydrogen is receiving a lot of attention around the world. In this chapter, recent applications of oxide nanostructures in H2 production and fuel cell technology are summarized. We cover in detail catalytic studies for hydrogen production via the water gas shift reaction over ceria-based nanosystems. These studies illustrate the importance of understanding the fundamental conditions necessary for optimal operation of the catalysts.

Wang, Xianqin; Rodriguez, Jose A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

124

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size field test to the commercial design. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) is in the later stage of the multiyear program for development and verification of carbonate fuel cell based power plants supported by DOE/NETL with additional funding from DOD/DARPA and the FuelCell Energy team. FCE has scaled up the technology to full-size and developed DFC{reg_sign} stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment technology to meet product requirements, and acquired high rate manufacturing capabilities to reduce cost. FCE has designed submegawatt (DFC300A) and megawatt (DFC1500 and DFC3000) class fuel cell products for commercialization of its DFC{reg_sign} technology. A significant progress was made during the reporting period. The reforming unit design was optimized using a three-dimensional stack simulation model. Thermal and flow uniformities of the oxidant-In flow in the stack module were improved using computational fluid dynamics based flow simulation model. The manufacturing capacity was increased. The submegawatt stack module overall cost was reduced by {approx}30% on a per kW basis. An integrated deoxidizer-prereformer design was tested successfully at submegawatt scale using fuels simulating digester gas, coal bed methane gas and peak shave (natural) gas.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The carbonate fuel cell promises highly efficient, cost-effective and environmentally superior power generation from pipeline natural gas, coal gas, biogas, and other gaseous and liquid fuels. FuelCell Energy, Inc. has been engaged in the development of this unique technology, focusing on the development of the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{reg_sign}). The DFC{reg_sign} design incorporates the unique internal reforming feature which allows utilization of a hydrocarbon fuel directly in the fuel cell without requiring any external reforming reactor and associated heat exchange equipment. This approach upgrades waste heat to chemical energy and thereby contributes to a higher overall conversion efficiency of fuel energy to electricity with low levels of environmental emissions. Among the internal reforming options, FuelCell Energy has selected the Indirect Internal Reforming (IIR)--Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) combination as its baseline design. The IIR-DIR combination allows reforming control (and thus cooling) over the entire cell area. This results in uniform cell temperature. In the IIR-DIR stack, a reforming unit (RU) is placed in between a group of fuel cells. The hydrocarbon fuel is first fed into the RU where it is reformed partially to hydrogen and carbon monoxide fuel using heat produced by the fuel cell electrochemical reactions. The reformed gases are then fed to the DIR chamber, where the residual fuel is reformed simultaneously with the electrochemical fuel cell reactions. FuelCell Energy plans to offer commercial DFC power plants in various sizes, focusing on the subMW as well as the MW-scale units. The plan is to offer standardized, packaged DFC power plants operating on natural gas or other hydrocarbon-containing fuels for commercial sale. The power plant design will include a diesel fuel processing option to allow dual fuel applications. These power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed power generation, industrial cogeneration, marine applications and uninterrupted power for military bases. FuelCell Energy operated a 1.8 MW plant at a utility site in 1996-97, the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in North America. This proof-of-concept power plant demonstrated high efficiency, low emissions, reactive power control, and unattended operation capabilities. Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the full-size power plant; FuelCell Energy launched the Product Design Improvement (PDI) program sponsored by government and the private-sector cost-share. The PDI efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program was initiated in December 1994. Year 2000 program accomplishments are discussed in this report.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Refiner and Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

127

Petroleum Products Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

128

Petroleum Products Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

129

U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970's: 2,111,349: 2,195,268: 2,333,778: 2,436,156: ... Motor Gasoline Supply and Disposition; ... U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

130

Stocks of Finished Motor Gasoline - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reformulated and conventional gasoline production excludes adjustments for fuel ethanol and motor gasoline blending components. Historical data prior to June 4, ...

131

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

132

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:

133

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program was designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE, formerly Energy Research Corporation) from an early state of development for stationary power plant applications. The current program efforts were focused on technology and system development, and cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, in Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where a hydrocarbon fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several sub-MW power plants based on the DFC design are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Several one-megawatt power plant design was verified by operation on natural gas at FCE. This plant is currently installed at a customer site in King County, WA under another US government program and is currently in operation. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the program period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance-of-plant equipment designs is discussed in this report.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL TAX REGULATIONS Regulation 1111.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A highway includes a way or place, of whatever nature, within the exterior boundaries of the State including a way or place within a Federal area, publicly maintained and open to the use of the public for purposes of vehicular travel, notwithstanding private participation in the maintenance of the way or place. A way or place within a national or State forest which is entirely privately maintained, or a road over which forest products are transported in a national or State forest privately constructed or maintained pursuant to an existing agreement with the public authority having jurisdiction thereof will not be considered a highway notwithstanding the fact that it may be declared by the public authority to be a part of its road system. A way or place under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Agriculture within a national forest including private property within or adjacent thereto, which way or place is open to public use, is a highway but the tax is refundable on the fuel used in the operation of a motor vehicle thereon by any person who for the use of such highway pays, or contributes to, the cost of construction or maintenance of the way or place pursuant to an agreement with, or permission of, the United States Department of Agriculture. (See Section 8101.1, Revenue and Taxation Code.) A way or place is not a highway within the meaning of Section 7319 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, during such times as it is closed by the governmental authority to the use of the public regardless of the

unknown authors

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Photo of hydrogen researcher. Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources including fossil fuels, such as natural gas and coal (with carbon sequestration); nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost reduction. For cost-competitive transportation, a key driver for energy independence, hydrogen must be comparable to conventional fuels and technologies on a per-mile basis in order to succeed in the commercial marketplace. Learn more about DOE's hydrogen cost goal and the analysis used in projecting the future cost of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy supports the research and development of a wide range of technologies to produce hydrogen economically and in environmentally friendly ways.

136

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers, Paris, France,Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (2003) providesOrganization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers. Because of

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers, Paris, France,Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (2003) providesOrganization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers. Because of

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Historical Global Estimates Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860-1982 (NDP-006) DOI: 10.3334CDIACffe.ndp006 image Data image...

139

Plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive as an ecologically beneficial component for liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive for liquid motor fuels comprises an anaerobic fermentation vessel, a gasholder, a system for removal of sulphuretted hydrogen, and a hotwell. The plant further comprises an aerobic fermentation vessel, a device for liquid substance pumping, a device for liquid aeration with an oxygen-containing gas, a removal system of solid mass residue after fermentation, a gas distribution device; a device for heavy gases utilization; a device for ammonia adsorption by water; a liquid-gas mixer; a cavity mixer, a system that serves superficial active and dispersant matters and a cooler; all of these being connected to each other by pipelines. The technical result being the implementation of a process for producing an oxygen containing additive, which after being added to liquid motor fuels, provides an ecologically beneficial component for motor fuels by ensuring the stability of composition fuel properties during long-term storage.

Siryk, Yury Paul; Balytski, Ivan Peter; Korolyov, Volodymyr George; Klishyn, Olexiy Nick; Lnianiy, Vitaly Nick; Lyakh, Yury Alex; Rogulin, Victor Valery

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment emissions from corn/ethanol and wood bio- fuelMulti-modal emissions Corn-ethanol production, energy use:biodiesel fuel cycles, and corn/ ethanol fuel cycles. GHGCH

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Profile of motor-vehicle fleets in Atlanta 1994. Assessing the market for alternative-fuel vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the EIA survey of motorvehicle fleets, both private and municipal, in Atlanta. These data should be useful to those whose goal is to assist or participate in the early development of alternative-fuel vehicle markets. The data also should be useful to persons implementing motor-vehicle-related clean air programs or analyzing transportation energy use. Persons in the petroleum industry will find useful information regarding conventional fuels and the fuel-purchasing behavior of fleets.

NONE

1995-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

Bioethanol Fuel Production Concept Study: Topline Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE is in the process of developing technologies for converting plant matter other than feed stock, e.g., corn stover, into biofuels. The goal of this research project was to determine what the farming community thinks of ethanol as a fuel source, and specifically what they think of bioethanol produced from corn stover. This project also assessed the image of the DOE and the biofuels program and determined the perceived barriers to ethanol-from-stover production.

Marketing Horizons, Inc.

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

143

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production Tax Credit Qualified biodiesel and green diesel producers are eligible for a tax credit of $0.01 per gallon of biodiesel or green diesel fuels produced.

144

Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Design Improvement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report provides results of Energy Research Corporation`s technical approach to performing the program `Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Product Design Improvement` covered under the DOE-ERC Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC31184. This work is supported by DOE/METC and DOD/DARPA as well as ERC Team funds. The objective of the DOE-sponsored program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry for civilian applications. The overall objective of the DOD/DARPA initiative is to adapt the civilian 2 MW-Class fuel cell power plant for dual fuel DOD applications. This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the power plant demonstration status to the commercial entry early production unit design stage. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of these overall program goals are: (1) Provide environmental information to support DOE evaluation with respect to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), (2) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (3) Establish design for multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (4) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (5) Acquire capabilities to support developmental testing of 0370 stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness of the power plant for commercial entry.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

Greenbaum, E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Production Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit Companies that invest in the development of a biofuel production facility

147

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Tax Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit An ethanol facility is eligible for a credit of $0.075 per gallon of ethanol, before denaturing, for new production for up to 36 consecutive

148

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Fee to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Facility Fee The cost to submit an air quality permit application for an ethanol production plant is $1,000. An annual renewal fee is also required for the

149

Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The Kentucky Economic Development and Finance Authority (KEDFA) provides tax incentives to construct, retrofit, or upgrade an alternative fuel production or gasification facility that uses coal or biomass as a feedstock. Beginning Aug. 1, 2010, tax incentives are also available for energy-efficient alternative fuel production facilities and up to five alternative fuel production facilities that use natural gas or natural gas liquids as a feedstock. Energy-efficient alternative fuels are defined as homogeneous fuels that are produced from processes designed to densify

150

Petroleum Products Table 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

62.6 71.6 92.3 89.9 82.6 72.7 - 78.2 See footnotes at end of table. 31. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 56 Energy Information Administration ...

151

VP 100: UQM revving up electric motor production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UQM revving up electric motor production UQM revving up electric motor production VP 100: UQM revving up electric motor production July 15, 2010 - 9:06am Addthis UQM will manufacture electric vehicle propulsion systems like this at its new facility in Longmont, Colo. | Photo courtesy of UQ UQM will manufacture electric vehicle propulsion systems like this at its new facility in Longmont, Colo. | Photo courtesy of UQ Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Business is booming at UQM Technologies, a Frederick, Colo.-based manufacturer and developer of electric vehicle propulsion systems. Last summer, UQM signed a 10-year contract to build motor and control systems for all electric cars to be manufactured by CODA Automotive of California. UQM aims to produce 20,000 of the propulsion systems over a

152

Abstract--There are two types of drivers in production machine systems: constant velocity (CV) motor and servo-motor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) motor and servo-motor. If a system contains two drivers or more, among which some are of the CV motor while the other are the servo-motor, the system has the so-called hybrid driver architecture is stable. A simulation is performed to show verify the proposed controller. The CV motor has the velocity

Zhang, WJ "Chris"

153

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Production Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit A taxpayer who processes biodiesel, ethanol, or gasoline blends consisting

154

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Tax Ethanol Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for an income tax credit of $1.00 per gallon of corn- or cellulosic-based ethanol that meets ASTM

155

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Tax Deduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Deduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Tax Deduction The cost of purchasing qualified biomass feedstocks to be processed into

156

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit A taxpayer that constructs and places into service a commercial facility

157

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Tax Credit A certified commercial biofuel producer is eligible for an income tax credit of $0.05 per gasoline gallon equivalent of biofuel produced for use

158

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Tax Exemption Qualifying buildings, equipment, and land used in the manufacturing of

159

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Production Tax Biofuel Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Production Tax Credit Biofuel producers in New York State may qualify for a state tax credit of $0.15 per gallon of biodiesel (B100) or ethanol produced after the

160

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Tax Ethanol Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit An ethanol producer located in Indiana is entitled to a credit of $0.125 per gallon of ethanol produced, including cellulosic ethanol. The Indiana

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production and Blending Tax Credit

162

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit Businesses and individuals are eligible for a tax credit of up to 15% of

163

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production Facility Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption Any newly constructed or expanded biomass-to-energy facility is exempt from

164

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production Tax Credit A biodiesel facility may receive a credit of $0.075 per gallon of biodiesel

165

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Excise Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production Excise Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Excise Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Excise Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Excise Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Excise Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Excise Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Excise Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production Excise Tax Credit A biodiesel producer that produces at least 100,000 gallons of biodiesel

166

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production Tax Credit A biodiesel producer located in Indiana may receive a credit of $1.00 per gallon of biodiesel produced and used in biodiesel blends. The Indiana

167

Integration Strategy for DB-MHR TRISO Fuel production in conjunction with MOX Fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the nuclear power options for the future involves the evolution of gas cooled reactors to support the likely high temperature operations needed for commercial scale hydrogen production. One such proposed option is to use a Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor fueled with uranium based TRISO (coated particle) fuel. It has also been suggested that such a MHR could be operated in a ''Deep Burn'' manner fueled with TRISO fuel produced from recycle spent nuclear fuel. This concept known as a DBMHR must withstand significant development and fuel fabrication cost to be economically viable. The purpose of this report is to consider and propose a strategy where synergy with a parallel MOX fuel to LWR program provides economic or other advantage for either or both programs. A strategy involving three phases has been envisioned with potential for economic benefit relative to a stand-alone TRISO/DBMHR program. Such a strategy and related timing will ultimately be driven by economics, but is offered here for consideration of value to the total AFCI program. Phase I Near-term. Conventional spent fuel aqueous processing, MOX fuel fabrication, and use of present and future LWR/ALWR's with objective of a ''Continuous Recycle'' mode of fuel cycle management. Phase II Intermediate. Augmentation of LWR/ALWR industry with MHR deployment as justified by hydrogen economy and/or electrical demand. Phase III Long-term. Introduction of DBMHR's to offer alternative method for transuranic destruction and associated repository benefits, in addition to Phase II benefits. The basic philosophy of this strategy appears sound. However, the details of the technology plans and economic evaluations should receive additional detail and evaluation in the next fiscal year as funding can support.

MCGUIRE, DAVID

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Tritium production using highly enriched fuel  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary studies utilizing the MOFDA code have been made for tritium production at the K reactors using 33 and 35 grams per foot oralloy (93.5% U-235) in aluminum in conjunction with standard K5N and K5E fuel elements, respectively. For this report, it was assumed that all tritium would be produced in discrete charges of LiAl target elements. It is intended that the study will be extended at some later time to include LiAl splines. The analysis includes the effect of coolant loss on reactivity for hot-or-cold and green-or-exposed conditions for several oralloy loading fractions.

Miller, R.L.

1967-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Photocatalytic semiconductor clusters for fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High quality crystalline, monodisperse nanometer-size semiconductor clusters were successfully grown using an inverse micellar synthesis process and their optical and structural properties were studied. Among the materials studied were PbS, FeS{sub 2}, MoS{sub 2}, CdS and related compounds. The results demonstrated strong electronic quantum confinement effects and broad tailorability of the bandgaps with decreasing cluster size, features that are important for the potential use of these materials as photocatalysts for solar fuel production and solar detoxification. The highlights of the work are included in an Executive Summary.

Wilcoxon, J.P.; Bliss, D.E.; Martin, J.E. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Alternative Fuels Data Center: On-Farm Biofuel Production Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

On-Farm Biofuel On-Farm Biofuel Production Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: On-Farm Biofuel Production Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: On-Farm Biofuel Production Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: On-Farm Biofuel Production Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: On-Farm Biofuel Production Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: On-Farm Biofuel Production Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: On-Farm Biofuel Production Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type On-Farm Biofuel Production Grants The Governor's Office of Agricultural Policy provides grants through the

171

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

172

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing The Kansas Development Finance Authority may issue revenue bonds to cover

173

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

174

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

175

Commercial Jet Fuel Production - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Beginning in 1993, motor ...

176

Biological production of liquid fuels from biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A scheme for the production of liquid fuels from renewable resources such as poplar wood and lignocellulosic wastes from a refuse hydropulper was investigated. The particular scheme being studied involves the conversion of a cellulosic residue, resulting from a solvent delignified lignocellulosic feed, into either high concentration sugar syrups or into ethyl and/or butyl alcohol. The construction of a pilot apparatus for solvent delignifying 150 g samples of lignocellulosic feeds was completed. Also, an analysis method for characterizing the delignified product has been selected and tested. This is a method recommended in the Forage Fiber Handbook. Delignified samples are now being prepared and tested for their extent of delignification and susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis. Work is continuing on characterizing the cellulase and cellobiase enzyme systems derived from the YX strain of Thermomonospora.

Not Available

177

Correlation of I/M240 and FTP emissions for Alternative Motor Fuels Act test vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The National Remewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is managing a series of light duty vehicle chasis dynamometer chasis tests on alternative fuel vehicles for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This testing program is part of a larger demonstration of alternative fuel vehicles that was mandated by the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (AMFA). In Phase I of the AMFA emissions test program (AMFA I) 18 vehicles were tested by three laboratories. All the vehicles tested were 1991 model year. In Phase II of the program (AMFA II), the number of vehicles was increased to nearly 300, including M85 Dodge Spirits, E85 Chevrolet Luminas, and compressed natural gas Dodge passenger vans. Phase II testing includes a Federal Test Procedure (FTP) test, followed by two of the EPA`s Inspection/Maintenance (I/M240) tests. It is concluded that the I/M240 test is not an appropriate comparison to the FTP. Further the I/M 240 test is not as reliable as the FTP in estimating the `real world` emissions of these relatively low emission vehicles. 7 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Kelly, K.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emission Vehicle Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Production Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

179

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Payments to someone by E-mail Payments to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Payments on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Biofuel Production Payments Through the Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels (Section 9005),

180

U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity Release Date: May 20, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 Go Notice: Changes to Petroleum Supply Survey Forms for 2013 This is the third release of U.S. Energy Information Administration data on fuel ethanol production capacity. EIA first reported fuel ethanol production capacities as of January 1, 2011 on November 29, 2011. This new report contains production capacity data for all operating U.S. fuel ethanol production plants as of January 1, 2013. U.S. Nameplate Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity as of January 1, 2013 PAD District Number of Plants 2013 Nameplate Capacity 2012 Nameplate Capacity (MMgal/year) (mb/d) (MMgal/year) (mb/d) PADD 1 4 360 23 316 21

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Alternative Fuels Data Center: License Exemptions for Biodiesel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

License Exemptions for License Exemptions for Biodiesel Production for Personal Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: License Exemptions for Biodiesel Production for Personal Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: License Exemptions for Biodiesel Production for Personal Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: License Exemptions for Biodiesel Production for Personal Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: License Exemptions for Biodiesel Production for Personal Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: License Exemptions for Biodiesel Production for Personal Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: License Exemptions for Biodiesel Production for Personal Use on AddThis.com...

182

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Hydrogen Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

183

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Agriculture and Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculture and Forestry Biofuel Production Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

184

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Supply of Petroleum Products for Blending  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Supply of Petroleum Supply of Petroleum Products for Blending with Biofuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Supply of Petroleum Products for Blending with Biofuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Supply of Petroleum Products for Blending with Biofuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Supply of Petroleum Products for Blending with Biofuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Supply of Petroleum Products for Blending with Biofuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Supply of Petroleum Products for Blending with Biofuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Supply of Petroleum Products for Blending with Biofuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

185

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Grants and Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Grants and Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Production Grants and Loan Guarantees on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

186

Genetically Modified Bacteria for Fuel Production: Development of Rhodobacteria as a Versatile Platform for Fuels Production  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: Penn State is genetically engineering bacteria called Rhodobacter to use electricity or electrically generated hydrogen to convert carbon dioxide into liquid fuels. Penn State is taking genes from oil-producing algae called Botryococcus braunii and putting them into Rhodobacter to produce hydrocarbon molecules, which closely resemble gasoline. Penn State is developing engineered tanks to support microbial fuel production and determining the most economical way to feed the electricity or hydrogen to the bacteria, including using renewable sources of power like solar energy.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12002: H2 Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record Record : 12002 Date: February 22, 2012 Title: H2 Production Status & Threshold Costs Plot 2006-2011 Originator: Eric Miller and Sarah...

188

Mimicking Photosynthesis for Production of Solar Fuels | U.S...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Science Highlights 2012 Mimicking Photosynthesis for Production of Solar Fuels Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of...

189

Solid woodbased fuels in energy production in Finland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Political incentives often have a central role in bioenergy production. Influence of these incentives is expected to increase, because conventional fossil fuels are draining and (more)

Mkel, Matti.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Low-Volatility Motor Oils. Development and Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

saturated hydrocarbons. Viscosity index. 1. >0.03. <90. 80 120. 2. ?0.03. ?90 ... GOST 2079988 does not set a volatility level for this oil, which is within the limits of .... Short Handbook of the Properties of Lubricating Materials and Fuels [

191

Skills, human resource management and the Toyota production system (TPS): the case of Toyota Motor Thailand (TMT).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates the implementation of the Toyota Production System (TPS) at Toyota Motor Thailand (TMT). Rather than being uniquely ?best practice?, the TPS is (more)

Weerasombat, Thunyalak

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the sixteen Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) stacks, ERC is finalizing the next generation commercial entry product design. The second generation cells are 50% larger in area, 40% lighter on equal geometric area basis, and 30% thinner than the earlier design. These improvements have resulted in doubling of the full-height stack power. A low-cost and high-strength matrix has also been developed for improving product ruggedness. The low-cost advanced cell design incorporating these improvements has been refined through six short stack tests. Power production per cell of two times the SCDP maximum power operation, over ten thermal cycles, and overall operating flexibility with respect to load and thermal changes have been demonstrated in these short stack tests. An internally insulated stack enclosure has been designed and fabricated to eliminate the need for an inert gas environment during operation. ERC has acquired the capability for testing 400kW full-height direct fuel ceil (DFC) stack and balance-of-plant equipment. With the readiness of the power plant test facility, the cell package design, and the stack module, full-height stack testing has begun. The first full- height stack incorporating the post-SCDP second generation design was completed. The stack reached a power level of 253 kW, setting a world record for the highest power production from the advanced fuel cell system. Excellent performance uniformity at this power level affirmed manufacturing reproducibility of the components at the factory. This unoptimized small size test has achieved pipeline natural gas to DC electricity conversion efficiency of 47% (based on lower heating value - LHV) including the parasitic power consumed by the BOP equipment; that should translate to more than 50% efficiency in commercial operation, before employing cogeneration. The power plant system also operated smoothly. With the success of this test confirming the full-height stack basic design and with the completion of SCDP stacks post-test feedback, manufacture of the full-height stack representing the commercial prototype design has been completed and system demonstration is planned to start in the first quarter of 1999. These developments as well as manufacturing advances are discussed in this report.

P. Voyentzie; T. Leo; A. Kush; L. Christner; G. Carlson; C. Yuh

1998-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

193

Production of biocomponent containing jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent demands for low aromatic content jet fuels have shown significant increase in the last 20 years. This was generated by the growing of aviation. Further than quality requirements were more aggravated in front of jet fuels. This was generated by ... Keywords: aromatic content, biocomponent, crystallization point, jet fuel, kerosene, vegetable oil

Z. Eller; P. Solymosi; T. Kasza; Z. Varga; J. Hancsk

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fuel Production Fuel producers operate refineries and power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and if to enter the hydrogen market and how to respond to an increasing demand for electricity from PHEVs and BEVs for vehicle and fuel. Consumers have two goals: firstly, to keep their cars and secondly to own the best

California at Davis, University of

195

Defossiling Fuel: How Synthetic Biology Can Transform Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Defossiling Fuel: How Synthetic Biology Can Transform Biofuel Production David F. Savage , Jeffrey through natural intermediates to final molecule is long, and biofuel production is perhaps the ultimate engineering, economic, political, and environmental realities. Are biofuels sustainable? Consider U

196

Enhanced catalyst and process for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The conversion of synthesis gas to liquid molar fuels by means of a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst composition is enhanced by the addition of molybdenum, tungsten or a combination thereof as an additional component of said composition. The presence of the additive component increases the olefinic content of the hydrocarbon products produced. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

ULTRACLEAN FUELS PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: ADVANCES TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

SciTech Connect

Ultraclean fuels production has become increasingly important as a method to help decrease emissions and allow the introduction of alternative feed stocks for transportation fuels. Established methods, such as Fischer-Tropsch, have seen a resurgence of interest as natural gas prices drop and existing petroleum resources require more intensive clean-up and purification to meet stringent environmental standards. This review covers some of the advances in deep desulfurization, synthesis gas conversion into fuels and feed stocks that were presented at the 245th American Chemical Society Spring Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA in the Division of Energy and Fuels symposium on "Ultraclean Fuels Production and Utilization".

Fox, E.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Table 5.24 Retail Motor Gasoline and On-Highway Diesel Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: Motor Gasoline by Grade: 1949-1973 Platt's Oil Price Handbook and Oilmanac, 1974, 51st Edition.

199

U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970's: 5,785: 6,014: 6,376: 6,674: 6,537: 6,675: 6,978: 7,177: ... Motor Gasoline Supply and Disposition; ... U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum ...

200

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop on September 24-25, 2013, in Golden, Colorado. The workshop featured 29 participants representing academia, government, and national laboratories with expertise in the relevant fields. The objective of the Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop was to share information and identify issues, barriers, and research and development needs for biological hydrogen production to enable hydrogen production that meets cost goals. Proceedings 2013 Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop Final Report Presentations Introductory Session Fuel Cell Technologies Office Overview, Sara Dillich, DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

202

TAX EXPENDITURES RELATED TO THE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF MOTOR FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-miles of travel RECS = Residential Energy Consumption Survey SIC = standard industrial classification SOx = sulfur industries, or oil over other energy industries: virtually all major energy sources require large investments.......................24 18.5.1 Corporate income-tax expenditures for the oil industry

Delucchi, Mark

203

Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

Shang, Jer Y. (McLean, VA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels, for maximizing profits, and for profitable production of each of the three jet fuels from the by-product liquids have been developed. Economic analyses of the designs show that jet fuel can be produced from the by-products, but not economically. However, jet fuel production could be subsidized profitably by processing the phenolic and naphtha streams to cresols, phenols, BTX, and other valuable chemical by-products. Uncertainties in the studies are marketability of the chemical by-products, replacement fuel costs, and viable schemes to process the phenol stream, among others. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel from a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products, removing at least some coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. The process provides a useful method of mass producing these products from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands. 1 fig.

Shang, Jer Yu.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

This incentive is available through June 30, 2013, and funding must be appropriated each year. (Reference Tennessee Code 67-3-103 and 67-3-423) Fuels & Vehicles Biodiesel...

207

Proceedings of the alcohol fuel production and utilization conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conference was held to provide farmers, businesses, industries, and specialty groups with the best available information on current and projected activities related to the production and utilization of biomass for alcohol fuels. All aspects of the alcohol fuel production and utilization process were discussed. From biomass sources, through conversion processes to end-use products and applications were topics discussed by numerous experts. Other experts took this basic information and put it together into total systems. Speakers presented overviews on alcohol fuel related activities on state, regional, and national levels. Finally, commercialization incentives, funding sources, environmental considerations, research developments, safety considerations, and regulatory requirements were discussed as factors which must be addressed when considering the production and utilization of alcohol fuels. Separate abstracts have been prepared for items within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Production of fossil fuel from federal and Indian lands fell ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales of fossil fuels from production on federal and Indian lands in fiscal year (FY) 2012 dropped 4% from FY 2011, according to data from the Department of the ...

209

U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Nameplate Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity as of January 1, 2013 PAD District: Number of Plants: 2013 Nameplate Capacity: 2012 Nameplate Capacity

210

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methanol, nuclear, and hydro power plants, individually orvehicles]) H = Hydro power (% of electricity generation [power plant fuel. Coal Fuel oil NG/ boiler NG/ turbine Nuclear* Biomass Hydro*

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methanol, nuclear, and hydro power plants, individually orvehicles]) H = Hydro power (% of electricity generation [power plant fuel. Coal Fuel oil NG/ boiler NG/ turbine Nuclear* Biomass Hydro*

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Production Printable Version Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic feedstocks using a variety of process technologies. Hydrogen-containing compounds such as fossil fuels, biomass or even water can be a source of hydrogen. Thermochemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from biomass and from fossil fuels such as coal, natural gas and petroleum. Power generated from sunlight, wind and nuclear sources can be used to produce hydrogen electrolytically. Sunlight alone can also drive photolytic production of

214

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CH2 NG MeOH NG n.e. MeOH coal n.e. MeOH Ethanol Ethanol woodTO END USERS (U. S. Fuel --> Coal CG RFG Diesel FTD Fuel oilLPG CNG Nuclear Feedstock ----> Coal Fuel dispensing Fuel

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CH2 NG MeOH NG n.e. MeOH coal n.e. MeOH Ethanol Ethanol woodTO END USERS (U. S. Fuel --> Coal CG RFG Diesel FTD Fuel oilLPG CNG Nuclear Feedstock ----> Coal Fuel dispensing Fuel

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has two primary purposes: (1) Build a small-footprint (SFP) fuel production plant to prove the feasibility of this relatively transportable technology on an intermediate scale (i.e. between laboratory-bench and commercial capacity) and produce as much as 150,000 gallons of hydrogen-saturated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel; and (2) Use the virtually sulfur-free fuel produced to demonstrate (over a period of at least six months) that it can not only be used in existing diesel engines, but that it also can enable significantly increased effectiveness and life of the next-generation exhaust-after-treatment emission control systems that are currently under development and that will be required for future diesel engines. Furthermore, a well-to-wheels economic analysis will be performed to characterize the overall costs and benefits that would be associated with the actual commercial production, distribution and use of such FT diesel fuel made by the process under consideration, from the currently underutilized (or entirely un-used) energy resources targeted, primarily natural gas that is stranded, sub-quality, off-shore, etc. During the first year of the project, which is the subject of this report, there have been two significant areas of progress: (1) Most of the preparatory work required to build the SFP fuel-production plant has been completed, and (2) Relationships have been established, and necessary project coordination has been started, with the half dozen project-partner organizations that will have a role in the fuel demonstration and evaluation phase of the project. Additional project tasks directly related to the State of Alaska have also been added to the project. These include: A study of underutilized potential Alaska energy resources that could contribute to domestic diesel and distillate fuel production by providing input energy for future commercial-size SFP fuel production plants; Demonstration of the use of the product fuel in a heavy-duty diesel vehicle during the Alaska winter; a comparative study of the cold-starting characteristics of FT and conventional diesel fuel; and demonstration of the use of the fuel to generate electricity for rural Alaskan villages using both a diesel generator set, and a reformer-equipped fuel cell.

Stephen P. Bergin

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

217

Production of New Biomass/Waste-Containing Solid Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CQ Inc. and its industry partners--PBS Coals, Inc. (Friedens, Pennsylvania), American Fiber Resources (Fairmont, West Virginia), Allegheny Energy Supply (Williamsport, Maryland), and the Heritage Research Group (Indianapolis, Indiana)--addressed the objectives of the Department of Energy and industry to produce economical, new solid fuels from coal, biomass, and waste materials that reduce emissions from coal-fired boilers. This project builds on the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production. The electric utility industry is interested in the use of biomass and wastes as fuel to reduce both emissions and fuel costs. In addition to these benefits, utilities also recognize the business advantage of consuming the waste byproducts of customers both to retain customers and to improve the public image of the industry. Unfortunately, biomass and waste byproducts can be troublesome fuels because of low bulk density, high moisture content, variable composition, handling and feeding problems, and inadequate information about combustion and emissions characteristics. Current methods of co-firing biomass and wastes either use a separate fuel receiving, storage, and boiler feed system, or mass burn the biomass by simply mixing it with coal on the storage pile. For biomass or biomass-containing composite fuels to be extensively used in the U.S., especially in the steam market, a lower cost method of producing these fuels must be developed that is applicable to a variety of combinations of biomass, wastes, and coal; economically competitive with current fuels; and provides environmental benefits compared with coal. During Phase I of this project (January 1999 to July 2000), several biomass/waste materials were evaluated for potential use in a composite fuel. As a result of that work and the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production, paper mill sludge and coal were selected for further evaluation and demonstration in Phase II. In Phase II (June 2001 to December 2004), the project team demonstrated the GranuFlow technology as part of a process to combine paper sludge and coal to produce a composite fuel with combustion and handling characteristics acceptable to existing boilers and fuel handling systems. Bench-scale studies were performed at DOE-NETL, followed by full-scale commercial demonstrations to produce the composite fuel in a 400-tph coal cleaning plant and combustion tests at a 90-MW power plant boiler to evaluate impacts on fuel handling, boiler operations and performance, and emissions. A circuit was successfully installed to re-pulp and inject paper sludge into the fine coal dewatering circuit of a commercial coal-cleaning plant to produce 5,000 tons of a ''composite'' fuel containing about 5% paper sludge. Subsequent combustion tests showed that boiler efficiency and stability were not compromised when the composite fuel was blended with the boiler's normal coal supply. Firing of the composite fuel blend did not have any significant impact on emissions as compared to the normal coal supply, and it did not cause any excursions beyond Title V regulatory limits; all emissions were well within regulatory limits. SO{sub 2} emissions decreased during the composite fuel blend tests as a result of its higher heat content and slightly lower sulfur content as compared to the normal coal supply. The composite fuel contained an extremely high proportion of fines because the parent coal (feedstock to the coal-cleaning plant) is a ''soft'' coal (HGI > 90) and contained a high proportion of fines. The composite fuel was produced and combustion-tested under record wet conditions for the local area. In spite of these conditions, full load was obtained by the boiler when firing the composite fuel blend, and testing was completed without any handling or combustion problems beyond those typically associated with wet coal. Fuel handling and pulverizer performance (mill capacity and outlet temperatures) could become greater concerns when firing composite fuels which contain higher percent

Glenn A. Shirey; David J. Akers

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

Fuel-Cycle Assessment of Selected Bioethanol Production Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel-Cycle Assessment of Selected Bioethanol Production Pathways in the United States ANL/ESD/06-Cycle Assessment of Selected Bioethanol Production Pathways in the United States ANL/ESD/06-7 by M. Wu, M. Wang ................................................................................ 6 2 Simplified Process Flow Diagram of Biochemical Conversion of Corn Stover to Ethanol with Steam

Argonne National Laboratory

219

Beef production options and requirements for fossil fuel  

SciTech Connect

A large percentage of the feed resources used in beef production cannot be used by man or most other animals. These noncompetitive feeds could be used in different ways to increase beef production, but fossil fuel consumption by the beef industry would not be greatly reduced.

Ward, G.M.; Knox, P.L.; Hobson, B.W.

1977-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by producing region. Imports of natural gas by producinghave to import between 9% and 43% of its gas demand. Data ongas losses end use consumption). Motor-vehicle flows Imports

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by producing region. Imports of natural gas by producinghave to import between 9% and 43% of its gas demand. Data ongas losses end use consumption). Motor-vehicle flows Imports

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

nuclear; biomass; and other renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, geothermal, and hydro-electric power. The overall challenge to hydrogen production is cost...

223

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen Production Argonne researchers are studying thermochemical cycles to determine their potential...

224

PRODUCTION OF NEW BIOMASS/WASTE-CONTAINING SOLID FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CQ Inc. and its team members (ALSTOM Power Inc., Bliss Industries, McFadden Machine Company, and industry advisors from coal-burning utilities, equipment manufacturers, and the pellet fuels industry) addressed the objectives of the Department of Energy and industry to produce economical, new solid fuels from coal, biomass, and waste materials that reduce emissions from coal-fired boilers. This project builds on the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production. The electric utility industry is interested in the use of biomass and wastes as fuel to reduce both emissions and fuel costs. In addition to these benefits, utilities also recognize the business advantage of consuming the waste byproducts of customers both to retain customers and to improve the public image of the industry. Unfortunately, biomass and waste byproducts can be troublesome fuels because of low bulk density, high moisture content, variable composition, handling and feeding problems, and inadequate information about combustion and emissions characteristics. Current methods of co-firing biomass and wastes either use a separate fuel receiving, storage, and boiler feed system, or mass burn the biomass by simply mixing it with coal on the storage pile. For biomass or biomass-containing composite fuels to be extensively used in the U.S., especially in the steam market, a lower cost method of producing these fuels must be developed that includes both moisture reduction and pelletization or agglomeration for necessary fuel density and ease of handling. Further, this method of fuel production must be applicable to a variety of combinations of biomass, wastes, and coal; economically competitive with current fuels; and provide environmental benefits compared with coal. Notable accomplishments from the work performed in Phase I of this project include the development of three standard fuel formulations from mixtures of coal fines, biomass, and waste materials that can be used in existing boilers, evaluation of these composite fuels to determine their applicability to the major combustor types, development of preliminary designs and economic projections for commercial facilities producing up to 200,000 tons per year of biomass/waste-containing fuels, and the development of dewatering technologies to reduce the moisture content of high-moisture biomass and waste materials during the pelletization process.

David J. Akers; Glenn A. Shirey; Zalman Zitron; Charles Q. Maney

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

Proceedings: Impacts of Fuel Quality on Power Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conference on the Impacts of Fuel Quality on Power Production highlighted the challenges facing power producers using such established power technologies as fluidized bed, sub-critical boilers, and incinerations as well as emerging technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), super- and ultrasuper-critical boilers, and oxy-fuel systems. Presentations reported industry experience in the United States and Europe with an emphasis on minim...

2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

226

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen, LPG = liquefied petroleum gases. 1) The gasolinegas; LPG = liquefied petroleum gases; cell. = cellulosic; EV177 Other petroleum fuel sulfur

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen, LPG = liquefied petroleum gases. 1) The gasolinegas; LPG = liquefied petroleum gases; cell. = cellulosic; EV177 Other petroleum fuel sulfur

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wood, grass, or corn. It considers fuel-cell electric vehicles (FCVs) as well as internal- combustion

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wood, grass, or corn. It considers fuel-cell electric vehicles (FCVs) as well as internal- combustion

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Task 1 of the work, in which processes to produce each of the three jet fuels, JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X, were designed, has been completed. The formal Task 1 report should issue next quarter. Task 2 work was initiated this quarter. In Task 2, process conditions for producing jet fuel from the Great Plains tar oil stream will be verified and samples of each of the three jet fuels will be produced. Experimental work shows that the hydrotreating conditions specified in Task 1 will not convert sufficient aromatics in the tar oil to produce jet fuel. Alternative schemes have been proposed and are being tested in the laboratories at Amoco Research Center. The simplest of these schemes, in which the heavy ends from the hydrotreater are recycled to extinction, was tested and proved infeasible. A second stage, fixed bed hydrotreater will be added to the process along with the expanded bed, first-stage hydrotreater and the hydrocracker specified in the Task 1 design. Future work will include additional experiments to specify the best process configuration and production of samples of each of the three grades of jet fuel. 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 have also been produced and shipped to the US Air Force for further testing. Lummus-Crest Inc. is now completing a preliminary process design for the profitable production of JP-8 and has made recommendations for a production run to produce larger quantities of JP-8. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. In addition to the maximum jet fuel schemes, conceptual designs have also been formulated for maximizing profits from refining of the Great Plains by-products. Conceptual processing schemes for profitable production of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X have been developed, as has a maximum profit'' case. All four of these additional cases have now been transferred to Lummus for design and integration studies. Development of these schemes required the use of linear programming technology. This technology includes not only conventional refining processes which have been adapted for use with coal-derived liquids (e.g. hydrotreating, hydrocracking), but also processes which may be uniquely suited to the Great Plains by-products such as cresylic acid extraction, hydordealkylation, and needle coking. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SUPPORTING INFORMATION to Large-Scale Gasification-Based Co-Production of Fuels and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

started production from coal syngas as vehicle fuel (Dry, 2002). Subsequently a coal-to-fuels program (derived by natural gas F-T conversion) are now beginning to be blended with conventional diesel fuels resurgence of interest in F-T fuels from gasified coal. Coal-based FT fuel production was commercialized

234

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus-Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels have been manufactured from the Great Plains tar oil. Larger samples of JP-8 are nearly completed. Specification of a design basis for profitable production of JP-8 is under way. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fuel-cycle assessment of selected bioethanol production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large amount of corn stover is available in the U.S. corn belt for the potential production of cellulosic bioethanol when the production technology becomes commercially ready. In fact, because corn stover is already available, it could serve as a starting point for producing cellulosic ethanol as a transportation fuel to help reduce the nation's demand for petroleum oil. Using the data available on the collection and transportation of corn stover and on the production of cellulosic ethanol, we have added the corn stover-to-ethanol pathway in the GREET model, a fuel-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory. We then analyzed the life-cycle energy use and emission impacts of corn stover-derived fuel ethanol for use as E85 in flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). The analysis included fertilizer manufacturing, corn farming, farming machinery manufacturing, stover collection and transportation, ethanol production, ethanol transportation, and ethanol use in light-duty vehicles (LDVs). Energy consumption of petroleum oil and fossil energy, emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}], nitrous oxide [N{sub 2}O], and methane [CH{sub 4}]), and emissions of criteria pollutants (carbon monoxide [CO], volatile organic compounds [VOCs], nitrogen oxide [NO{sub x}], sulfur oxide [SO{sub x}], and particulate matter with diameters smaller than 10 micrometers [PM{sub 10}]) during the fuel cycle were estimated. Scenarios of ethanol from corn grain, corn stover, and other cellulosic feedstocks were then compared with petroleum reformulated gasoline (RFG). Results showed that FFVs fueled with corn stover ethanol blends offer substantial energy savings (94-95%) relative to those fueled with RFG. For each Btu of corn stover ethanol produced and used, 0.09 Btu of fossil fuel is required. The cellulosic ethanol pathway avoids 86-89% of greenhouse gas emissions. Unlike the life cycle of corn grain-based ethanol, in which the ethanol plant consumes most of the fossil fuel, farming consumes most of the fossil fuel in the life cycle of corn stover-based ethanol.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Hong, H.; Energy Systems

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Technical and Economic Evaluation of Macroalgae Cultivation for Fuel Production (Draft)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of macroalgae as sources of renewable liquid and gaseous fuels is evaluated. A series of options for production of macroalgae feedstock is considered. Because of their high carbohydrate content, the fuel products for which macroalgae are most suitable are methane and ethanol. Fuel product costs were compared with projected fuel costs in the year 1995.

Feinberg, D. A.; Hock, S. M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of jet fuel (JP-4, JP-8, JP-8X) produced from the liquid by-products of the gasification of lignite coal from the Great Plains Gasification Plant were analyzed to determine the quantity and type of organo-oxygen compounds present. Results were compared to similar fuel samples produced from petroleum. Large quantities of oxygen compounds were found in the coal-derived liquids and were removed in the refining process. Trace quantities of organo-oxygenate compounds were suspected to be present in the refined fuels. Compounds were identified and quantified as part of an effort to determine the effect of these compounds in fuel instability. Results of the analysis showed trace levels of phenols, naphthols, benzofurans, hexanol, and hydrogenated naphthols were present in levels below 100 ppM. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Knudson, C.L.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by type of fuel; electricity distribution efficiency in athe efficiency of electricity distribution for every country1994, and that the electricity distribution system was 91.3%

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by type of fuel; electricity distribution efficiency in athe efficiency of electricity distribution for every country1994, and that the electricity distribution system was 91.3%

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: MotorWeek H2 on the Horizon Video...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

world's first tri-generation fuel cell produces hydrogen, heat, and electricity using biogas generated by the Orange County Sanitation District's waste water treatment facility....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch process, or emissions fromvehicles. FTD = Fischer-Tropsch diesel, CNG = compressedvolume % in LPG) FTD = Fischer-Tropsch dieses (volume % in

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch process, or emissions fromvehicles. FTD = Fischer-Tropsch diesel, CNG = compressedvolume % in LPG) FTD = Fischer-Tropsch dieses (volume % in

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

E85 motor fuel is increasingly price-competitive with gasoline in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Ethanol & Biodiesel ... Customers accustomed to comparing gasoline prices on a price-per-gallon basis may not be familiar with how to compare fuel prices on an ...

244

CO{sub 2} mitigation and fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel appears to be an effective intermediate agent, for reducing CO{sub 2} from the utility power and the transportation sectors. On the utilization side, methanol as a liquid fuel fits in well with the current infrastructure for storage and delivery to the automotive sector with better efficiency. On the production side, CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel plants together with natural gas and biomass can be used as feedstocks for methanol synthesis with reduced CO{sub 2}. Over the past several years, processes have emerged which have varying degrees of CO{sub 2} emission reduction depending on the feedstocks used for methanol synthesis process. This paper reviews the methanol processes from the point of view of production efficiency and CO{sub 2} emissions reduction. The processes include: (1) the Hydrocarb Process which primarily utilizes coal and natural gas and stores carbon, and (2) the Hynol Process which utilizes biomass (including carbonaceous wastes, municipal solid waste (MSW)) or coal and natural gas, and (3) the Carnol Process which utilizes natural gas and CO{sub 2} recovered from fossil fuel fired powered plant stacks, especially coal fired plants. The Carnol System consists of power generation, methanol production and methanol utilization as an automotive fuel. The efficiency and CO{sub 2} emissions for the entire system are compared to the conventional system of petroleum derived automotive fuel (gasoline) and coal fired power generation plants. CO{sub 2} reduction by as much as 56% and 77% can be achieved when methanol is used in internal combustion and fuel cell automotive vehicles, respectively.

Steinberg, M.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. Coke oil n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.CG RFG Diesel FTD Fuel oil Stillgas Coke LPG LPG CNG NuclearFTD NG Fuel oil Still gas Coke oil oil oil LPG oil LPG NGL57

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. Coke oil n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.CG RFG Diesel FTD Fuel oil Stillgas Coke LPG LPG CNG NuclearFTD NG Fuel oil Still gas Coke oil oil oil LPG oil LPG NGL57

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residual Oil Distillate Oil Motor Gasoline Other Petroleumthe use of lubricating oil by motor vehicles is based on theuse of lubricating oil related to motor- vehicle use (g/mi).

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

H2 PRODUCTION AND FUEL CELLS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxide nanosystems play a key role as components of catalysts used for the production of H{sub 2} via the steam reforming or the partial oxidation of hydrocarbons, and for the water-gas shift reaction. The behavior seen for Cu-ceria and Au-ceria WGS catalysts indicates that the oxide is much more than a simple support. The special chemical properties of the oxide nanoparticles (defect rich, high mobility of oxygen) favor interactions with the reactants or other catalyst components. More in-situ characterization and mechanistic studies are necessary for the optimization of these nanocatalysts. The use of oxide nanomaterials for the fabrication of PEMFCs and SOFCs can lead to devices with a high practical impact. One objective is to build electrodes with low cost conducting oxide nanoarrays. The electron and oxygen-ion conducting capabilities of many oxides improve when going from the bulk to the nanoscale. Furthermore, one can get a more homogeneous surface morphology and an increase of the effective reaction area. Much more fundamental and practical research needs to be done in this area.

WANG, X.; RODRIGUEZ, J.A.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ethanol Production for Automotive Fuel Usage  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of the 20 million gallon per year anhydrous ethanol facility a t Raft River has been completed. The corresponding geothermal gathering, extraction and reinjection systems to supply the process heating requirement were also completed. The ethanol facility operating on sugar beets, potatoes and wheat will share common fermentation and product recovery equipment. The geothermal fluid requirement will be approximately 6,000 gpm. It is anticipated that this flow will be supplied by 9 supply wells spaced at no closer than 1/4 mile in order to prevent mutual interferences. The geothermal fluid will be flashed in three stages to supply process steam at 250 F, 225 F and 205 F for various process needs. Steam condensate plus liquid remaining after the third flash will all be reinjected through 9 reinjection wells. The capital cost estimated for this ethanol plant employing all three feedstocks is $64 million. If only a single feedstock were used (for the same 20 mm gal/yr plant) the capital costs are estimated at $51.6 million, $43.1 million and $40. 5 million for sugar beets, potatoes and wheat respectively. The estimated capital cost for the geothermal system is $18 million.

Lindemuth, T.E.; Stenzel, R.A.; Yim, Y.J.; Yu, J.

1980-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest, under a contract with the United States Department of Energy, are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high-density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. Conceptual designs have been completed and a case for profitable production of JP-8 has been selected for experimental testing and preliminary design in the later phases of the contract. Experimental work to date has shown that the tar oil stream requires substantially more severe processing than the preliminary design estimates indicated. A new design basis is now being tested and samples of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X are in production, based on that new, more severe processing scheme. Six barrels of tar oil have been hydrotreated according to the first step of the processing scheme and will be used to produce barrel quantities of JP-8. 2 refs., 2 figs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Production of metal waste forms from spent fuel treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Treatment of spent nuclear fuel at Argonne National Laboratory consists of a pyroprocessing scheme in which the development of suitable waste forms is being advanced. Of the two waste forms being proposed, metal and mineral, the production of the metal waste form utilizes induction melting to stabilize the waste product. Alloying of metallic nuclear materials by induction melting has long been an Argonne strength and thus, the transition to metallic waste processing seems compatible. A test program is being initiated to coalesce the production of the metal waste forms with current induction melting capabilities.

Westphal, B.R.; Keiser, D.D.; Rigg, R.H.; Laug, D.V.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TM TM -2003/171 A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption July 2003 Ho-Ling Hwang Lorena F. Truett Stacy C. Davis DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the followi ng source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

253

Local government energy management: liquid petroleum gas (LPG) as a motor vehicle fuel  

SciTech Connect

The retrofit or conversion of automotive engines to operate on liquid petroleum gas (LPG) or propane fuel is one of many potentially cost-effective strategies for reducing a local government's annual fleet operating and maintenance costs. The cost effectiveness of an LPG conversion decision is highly dependent on the initial conversion cost, vehicle type, current and projected fuel costs, vehicle fuel economy (miles per gallon), and yearly average mileage. A series of plots have been developed which indicate simple paybacks for the conversion of several vehicle types (passenger car, small and standard pickups, and two and three ton trucks) over a wide range of fuel economies and annual usage patterns. A simple payback of less than three years can be achieved for vehicles with poor fuel economy and high annual use. The figures provided in this report may be used by fleet management personnel as a screening tool to identify those passenger cars, small or standard pickups, or light duty trucks which are candidates for LPG conversion. In addition to examining the benefits of an LPG conversion, local governments should also consider the competing energy management strategies of downsizing, and the acquisition of fuel efficient, diesel powered vehicles.

McCoy, G.A.; Kerstetter, J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However, the phenolic and naphtha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10--15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10 percent of the US market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream. 9 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.; Tatterson, D.F. (Amoco Oil Co., Naperville, IL (USA). Research and Development Dept.); Fornoff, L.L.; Link, M.A.; Stahlnecker, E.; Torster, K. (Lummus Crest, Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Production of jet fuels from coal derived liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company has conducted bench- and pilot plant-scale experiments to produce jet fuels from the tar oil from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant in Beulah, North Dakota. Experiments show that the hydroprocessing conditions recommended in Task 1 are not severe enough to saturate the aromatics in the tar oil to meet jet fuel specifications. Alternatives were investigated. Jet fuel specifications can be achieved when the tar oil is: hydrotreated in an expanded-bed hydrotreater to lower aromatics and heteroatom content; the effluent is then hydrotreated in a second, fixed bed hydrotreater; and, finally, the 550{degree}F boiling fraction from the two hydrotreaters is hydrocracked to extinction. The process was verified by pilot-plant production of 2 barrels of JP-8 turbine fuel, which met all but the flash point specification for JP-8. In addition, small samples of JP-4, JP-8, and high-density fuel were produced as a part of Task 2. 13 figs., 21 tabs.

Furlong, M.; Fox, J.; Masin, J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

U.S. Oxygenate Plant Production of Fuel Ethanol (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Oxygenate Plant Production of Fuel Ethanol (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ... Fuel Ethanol Oxygenate Production;

257

High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of highly reliable downhole equipment is an essential element in enabling the widespread utilization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The downhole equipment used in these systems will be required to operate at high voltages and temperatures on the order of 200 to 250C (and eventually to 300?C). These conditions exceed the practical operating ranges of currently available thermoplastic wire insulations, and thus limit the operating lifetime of tools such as Electric Submersible Pumps (ESPs). In this work, high-temperature insulations based on composite materials were developed and demonstrated. The products of this work were found to exhibit electrical resistivities and dielectric breakdown strengths that PEEK at temperatures above 250C. In addition, sub-scale motor windings were fabricated and tested to validate the performance of this technology

Hooker, Matthew; Hazelton, Craig; Kano, Kimi

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs Fifth Annual Report to Congress - 1996  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Abstract Abstract This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the U.S. Department of Energy's alterna- tive fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6374, et seq.). These programs, which comprise the most compre- hensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transporta- tion fuels and alternative fuel vehi- cles, are beginning their sixth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Even though present interest in electric vehicles is quite high, they are not currently included in these vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs, and the annual report does not include information on them.

259

Ford Motor's Feaheny urges action on alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect

The privately operated automobile and truck are seen as the dominant transportation system for people and for goods, now and in the future. Alternative forms of fuel are discussed: propane or LPG, alcohol-methanol and/or ethanol, electric vehicles, hydrogen, and natural gas. It is concluded that alternate fuel development should proceed now; that LPG or propane at Ford is feasible now; that methanol, made from natural gas or coal gas is probably the long term answer; and that compressed natural gas should be developed.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Assessment of Co-Production of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update of EPRI TR-1004066 ("Assessment of Technical Innovations for the Co-Production of Transportation Fuels and Electricity", August 2001). The need for this update became evident as a result of technology, economic and market developments over the past five years. A key driver has been the escalation of natural gas prices, which results in increased competitiveness of coal-fired plant options.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Evaluation of Fuel Clad Corrosion Product Deposits and Circulating Corrosion Products in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have experienced negative consequences resulting from build-up of corrosion product deposits (crud) on fuel cladding. The negative consequences include unplanned shifts in core power (axial offset anomaly, or AOA), fuel cladding failure, anomalous shutdown chemistry, and elevated ex-core radiation fields. These problems have grown more common as PWRs have moved toward higher 235U enrichments and higher duty cores needed for extended cycle operation. This report expl...

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Persian Gulf Oil and Gas Exports Fact Sheet,Emissions from the Oil and Gas Industry, Report Numbern.e. FTD NG n.e. Fuel oil Still gas oil n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Persian Gulf Oil and Gas Exports Fact Sheet,Emissions from the Oil and Gas Industry, Report Numbern.e. FTD NG n.e. Fuel oil Still gas oil n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Biomass Biorefinery for the production of Polymers and Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conversion of biomass crops to fuel is receiving considerable attention as a means to reduce our dependence on foreign oil imports and to meet future energy needs. Besides their use for fuel, biomass crops are an attractive vehicle for producing value added products such as biopolymers. Metabolix, Inc. of Cambridge proposes to develop methods for producing biodegradable polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in green tissue plants as well as utilizating residual plant biomass after polymer extraction for fuel generation to offset the energy required for polymer extraction. The primary plant target is switchgrass, and backup targets are alfalfa and tobacco. The combined polymer and fuel production from the transgenic biomass crops establishes a biorefinery that has the potential to reduce the nations dependence on foreign oil imports for both the feedstocks and energy needed for plastic production. Concerns about the widespread use of transgenic crops and the growers ability to prevent the contamination of the surrounding environment with foreign genes will be addressed by incorporating and expanding on some of the latest plant biotechnology developed by the project partners of this proposal. This proposal also addresses extraction of PHAs from biomass, modification of PHAs so that they have suitable properties for large volume polymer applications, processing of the PHAs using conversion processes now practiced at large scale (e.g., to film, fiber, and molded parts), conversion of PHA polymers to chemical building blocks, and demonstration of the usefulness of PHAs in large volume applications. The biodegradability of PHAs can also help to reduce solid waste in our landfills. If successful, this program will reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, as well as contribute jobs and revenue to the agricultural economy and reduce the overall emissions of carbon to the atmosphere.

Dr. Oliver P. Peoples

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

motor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279950 Varnish cache server motor Dataset Summary Description The data included in this submission is United States Department of Transportation (DOT) data up to 1995. The data includes motor-fuel gallonage taxes 1950-1995, motor-fuel use 1919-1995, private and commercial highway use of special fuels, by state 1949-1995, highway use of gasoline, by state 1949-1995, gasohol sales by state, 1980-1992, and estimated use of gasohol, 1993-1995. The data is presented in .xlsx format. Source DOT Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords DOT Fuel highway motor vehicle Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Motor-fuel gallonage taxes 1950-1995 (xlsx, 37.3 KiB)

266

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil n.e. ULSD oil n.e. FTD NG n.e. Fuel oil Still gas oiln.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. CH2 water CH2 NGMeOH NG n.e. MeOH coal n.e. MeOH Ethanol Ethanol wood n.e.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil n.e. ULSD oil n.e. FTD NG n.e. Fuel oil Still gas oiln.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. CH2 water CH2 NGMeOH NG n.e. MeOH coal n.e. MeOH Ethanol Ethanol wood n.e.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

motor vehicles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

motor vehicles motor vehicles Dataset Summary Description The data included in this submission is United States Department of Transportation (DOT) data on rates and revenue statistics up to 1995. The data includes state motor-fuel tax receipts, 1919-1995, state motor fuel taxes and related receipts, 1950-1995, and state and federal motor fuel tax rates, 1919-1995 The data is presented in .xlsx format. Source DOT Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords DOT highway motor vehicles rates revenues Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon State motor-fuel tax receipts, 1919-1995 (xlsx, 13.8 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon State motor fuel taxes and related receipts, 1950-1995 (xlsx, 78.5 KiB)

269

U.S. ethanol production and the Renewable Fuel Standard ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

270

Renewable utility-scale electricity production differs by fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

271

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and from unconventional reserves; energy intensity of oilunconventional production; venting and flaring of associated gas; CO 2 and SO 2 emissions from oil

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and from unconventional reserves; energy intensity of oilunconventional production; venting and flaring of associated gas; CO 2 and SO 2 emissions from oil

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier.

Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Michael McKellar

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Aurica Motors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product California-based Aurica Motors is planning to develop and manufacture an electric vehicle at a former Toyota plant in the state. References Aurica Motors1...

276

Aggregate effects of reducing the motor fuels excise tax in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper assesses the effects of the proposed reduction in the excise tax on gasoline and diesel fuel on the US economy. The analytical approach used consists of a computable general equilibrium model composed of 14 producing sectors, 14 consuming sectors, 6 household categories classified by income, and a government. The effects of a 4.3 cents per gallon reduction in the excise tax on gasoline and diesel fuel on prices and quantities are examined. The results suggests, for example, a decrease in the tax would result in higher output by the producing sectors (by about $2.86 billion), an expansion in the consumption of goods and services (by about $3.48 billion), and an increase in welfare (by about $3.59 billion). The government would realize a decrease in revenue of about $2.37 billion. When subjected to a sensitivity analysis, the results are reasonably robust with regard to the assumption of the values of the substitution elasticities.

Uri, N.D.; Boyd, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Aggregate effects of reducing the motor fuels excise tax in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The analysis in this article examines the impact of reducing the excise tax on gasoline and diesel fuel on the U.S. economy. The analytical approach used consists of a computable general equilibrium model composed of 14 producing sectors, 14 consuming sectors, 6 household categories classified by income, and a government. The effects are examined of a 4.3 cents per gallon reduction in the excise tax on gasoline and diesel fuel on prices and quantities. The results suggest, for example, a decrease in the tax would result in higher output by the producing sectors (by about $2.86 billion), an expansion in the consumption of goods and services (by about $3.48 billion), and an increase in welfare (by about $3.59 billion). The government would realize a decrease in revenue of about $2.37 billion. When subjected to a sensitivity analysis, the results are reasonably robust with regard to the assumption of the values of the substitution elasticities.

Uri, N.D. [Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, DC (United States); Boyd, R. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Dept. of Economics

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Decarbonized Fuel Production Facility, A Technical Strategy for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. electricity market is undergoing a transformation driven by changes such as deregulation of power generation, more stringent environmental regulations, climate change concerns, and other market forces. With these changes come new players such as merchant power plants. The industry is also counting on new gas-fired generation to meet demand. Environmental initiatives concerning PM 2.5, air toxics, mercury control, and CO2 reduction could adversely impact the economic viability of coal. The future use of coal to produce electricity is uncertain and possibly in peril unless we recognize that in the coming decades, the traditional means of how energy (both electricity and fuel) is generated, transported, and utilized will likely be very different from what it is today. In this paper, we describe a technical strategy for the coal industry that can help assure coals competitiveness during the next century as electricity markets evolve and are reshaped by these changes. Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy unveiled a new concept, Vision 21 a futuristic way of combining high-efficiency power technologies with advanced coal processing technologies and environmental controls to create a near-zero discharge, multi-product energy complex. This paper presents a Page 1conceptualization of a Vision 21 plant that focuses on production of hydrogen from coal. It will show how the concept can help assure that coal can remain competitive with natural gas as a fuel for baseload electricity generation for existing and new power plants. It can also provide a feedstock for chemical and liquid fuels production, even if emissions of carbon dioxide must be controlled. This paper presents hydrogen delivery scenarios for the power sector that provide the basis for the projected economic and technical performance objectives.

Joseph S. Badin; Michael R. Delallo; Michael G. Klett; Michael D. Rutkowski; Jerome R. Temchin

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Production Analysis Using the H2A v3 Model (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

280

Energy-efficient alcohol-fuel production. Technical final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed utilization schedule for the alcohol fuel plant and methane generator is to produce 180 proof ethanol during the spring, summer, and fall (April to October). The ethanol will be used in the farm tractors and trucks during the planting, growing, and harvesting seasons. Some alcohol can be stored for use during the winter. The still will not be operated during the winter (November to March) when the methane from the digester will be used to replace fuel oil for heating a swine farrowing building. There are tentative plans to develop a larger methane generator, which will utilize all of the manure (dairy, beef, horses, and swine) produced on the ISU farm. If this project is completed, there will be enough methane to produce all of the alcohol fuel needed to operate all of the farm equipment, heat the buildings, and possibly generate electricity for the farm. The methane generating system developed is working so well that there is a great deal of interest in expanding the project to where it could utilize all of the livestock waste on the farm for methane production.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Production - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Beginning in 1993, motor ...

282

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and on lubricating oils motor-vehicle salesmen; selectivefor example motor vehicles, oil and gas properties, housethe Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles (M. Delucchi

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July (1996). Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association of theaddition, some motor-vehicle manufacturers have been finedEPA charges motor-vehicle manufacturers to cover the cost of

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Thermocatalytic CO2-Free Production of Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this project is the development of an economically viable thermocatalytic process for production of hydrogen and carbon from natural gas or other hydrocarbon fuels with minimal environmental impact. The three major technical goals of this project are: (1) to accomplish efficient production of hydrogen and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive and durable carbon catalysts, (2) to obviate the concurrent production of CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts and drastically reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the process, and (3) to produce valuable carbon products in order to reduce the cost of hydrogen production The important feature of the process is that the reaction is catalyzed by carbon particulates produced in the process, so no external catalyst is required (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts are generated during hydrocarbon decomposition stage, (2) no expensive catalysts are used in the process, (3) several valuable forms of carbon can be produced in the process depending on the process conditions (e.g., turbostratic carbon, pyrolytic graphite, spherical carbon particles, carbon filaments etc.), and (4) CO{sub 2} emissions could be drastically reduced (compared to conventional processes).

University of Central Florida

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Figure 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices Prices, 1949-2011 Fossil Fuel Composite Price, Change From Previous Year, 1950-2011 68 U.S. Energy Information ...

286

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies

287

Lubricant and fuel compositions containing reaction products of polyalkenyl succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes an additive for liquid hydrocarbon fuel composition, particularly diesel fuels. The additive composition is the reaction product of polyalkenyl-substituted succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles. It also finds use in lubricant compositions.

Blain, D.A.; Cardis, A.B.; McGonigle, S.S.

1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Lubricant and fuel compositions containing reaction products of polyalkenyl succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disclosed in an additive for liquid hydrocarbon fuel composition, particularly diesel fuels. The additive composition is the reaction product of polyalkenyl-substituted succinimides, aldehydes, and triazoles. It also finds use in lubricant compositions.

Blain, D.A.; Cardis, A.B.; McGonigle, S.S.

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Realistic assessment of direct radiolysis for synthetic fuels production using fusion radiation sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These studies indicate that synthetic fuel production by direct radiolysis cannot compete economically with other production methods. Low G-values and radiation contamination of products are given as reasons. (MOW)

Pendergrass, J.H.; Booth, L.A.; Finch, F.T.; Frank, T.G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

World Biofuels Production Potential Understanding the Challenges to Meeting the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the worldwide potential to produce biofuels including biofuels for export. It was undertaken to improve our understanding of the potential for imported biofuels to satisfy the requirements of Title II of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in the coming decades. Many other countries biofuels production and policies are expanding as rapidly as ours. Therefore, we modeled a detailed and up-to-date representation of the amount of biofuel feedstocks that are being and can be grown, current and future biofuels production capacity, and other factors relevant to the economic competitiveness of worldwide biofuels production, use, and trade. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified and prepared feedstock data for countries that were likely to be significant exporters of biofuels to the U.S. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) calculated conversion costs by conducting material flow analyses and technology assessments on biofuels technologies. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) integrated the country specific feedstock estimates and conversion costs into the global Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) MARKAL (MARKet ALlocation) model. The model uses least-cost optimization to project the future state of the global energy system in five year increments. World biofuels production was assessed over the 2010 to 2030 timeframe using scenarios covering a range U.S. policies (tax credits, tariffs, and regulations), as well as oil prices, feedstock availability, and a global CO{sub 2} price. All scenarios include the full implementation of existing U.S. and selected other countries biofuels policies (Table 4). For the U.S., the most important policy is the EISA Title II Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). It progressively increases the required volumes of renewable fuel used in motor vehicles (Appendix B). The RFS requires 36 billion (B) gallons (gal) per year of renewable fuels by 2022. Within the mandate, amounts of advanced biofuels, including biomass-based diesel and cellulosic biofuels, are required beginning in 2009. Imported renewable fuels are also eligible for the RFS. Another key U.S. policy is the $1.01 per gal tax credit for producers of cellulosic biofuels enacted as part of the 2008 Farm Bill. This credit, along with the DOE's research, development and demonstration (RD&D) programs, are assumed to enable the rapid expansion of U.S. and global cellulosic biofuels production needed for the U.S. to approach the 2022 RFS goal. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has yet to issue RFS rules to determine which fuels would meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and land use restrictions specified in EISA, we assume that cellulosic ethanol, biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL), sugar-derived ethanol, and fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel would all meet the EISA advanced biofuel requirements. We also assume that enough U.S. corn ethanol would meet EISA's biofuel requirements or otherwise be grandfathered under EISA to reach 15 B gal per year.

Sastri, B.; Lee, A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Production and Handling Slide 1: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Handling The Uranium Fuel Cycle Skip Presentation Navigation Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents The Uranium Fuel Cycle Refer to caption below for image...

292

G. Uniform Engine Fuels, Petroleum Products, and Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1.33. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). ... LNG automotive fuel shall be labeled with its automotive fuel rating in accordance with 16 CFR Part 306. ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings Wind and hydropower are currently being evaluated in the U.S. and abroad as electricity sources that could enable large volume production of renewable hydrogen for use in transportation and distributed power applications. To further explore this prospect the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, and the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program at the Department of Energy held a workshop to bring together stakeholders from wind, hydropower, and the electrolysis industries on September 9-10, 2003. The main objectives of the workshop were to: 1) discuss with stakeholders their current activities related to hydrogen, 2) explore with industry opportunities for low-cost hydrogen production through integration between wind and hydropower, water electrolysis and the electricity grid, and 3) review and provide feedback on a current Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory analysis efforts to study opportunities for wind electrolysis and other renewable electricity sources.

294

Measuring Devices: Compressed Natural Gas Retail Motor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Natural Gas Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers. ... Hydrogen Measuring Devices; Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid-Measuring Devices; ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

Car Based Transport and Transit Oriented Metropolitan Chinese Urban Motorization Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reprocessing of used motor oil are a serious environmentalcan be traced to motor fuels and the oils and salts that

Ximing, Lu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Production of high density fuel through low temperature devolatilization of fossil fuels with hydrogen and iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for producing high-energy high-density fuels and valuable co-products from fossil fuel sources which comprises the low temperature devolatilization of a fossil fuel such as coal in a moving fluid-bed reactor at a temperature of about 450-650C in the presence of hydrogen and iron oxides. The method is advantageous in that high quality liquid fuels are obtained in addition to valuable co-products such as elemental iron, elemental sulfur and carbon black, and the process is carried out efficiently with a large number of recyclable steps. In addition, the hydropyrolysis of the present invention can produce a highly reactive low-sulfur char which is convertible into a slurry fuel. 1 fig.

Khan, M.R.

1990-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: DOE H2A Production Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

filling-station) facilities. Required input to the models includes capital and operating costs for the hydrogen production process, fuel type and use, and financial parameters...

298

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and ...  

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth. December 19, 2013. The Energy Department released three ...

299

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update September 30, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski...

300

Determination of alternative fuels combustion products: Phase 2 final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the laboratory efforts to accomplish four independent tasks: (1) speciation of hydrocarbon exhaust emissions from a light-duty vehicle operated over the chassis dynamometer portion of the light-duty FTP after modifications for operation on butane and butane blends; (2) evaluation of NREL`s Variable Conductance Vacuum Insulated Catalytic Converter Test Article 4 for the reduction of cold-start FTP exhaust emissions after extended soak periods for a Ford FFV Taurus operating on E85; (3) support of UDRI in an attempt to define correlations between engine-out combustion products identified by SwRI during chassis dynamometer testing, and those found during flow tube reactor experiments conducted by UDRI; and (4) characterization of small-diameter particulate matter from a Ford Taurus FFV operating in a simulated fuel-rich failure mode on CNG, LPG, M85, E85, and reformulated gasoline. 22 refs., 18 figs., 17 tabs.

Whitney, K.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

How large are tax subsidies to motor-vehicle users in the US?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this deriving from motor fuels (the oil industry) ratherincome (%) Income year 1991 a Oil industries Motor vehicleindustries Oil and motor vehicle industries combined Amount

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Production and Handling Slide 3: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents The Uranium Fuel Cycle See caption below for image description The second step in the uranium fuel cycle...

303

Production and Handling Slide 23: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation Table of Contents The Uranium Fuel Cycle Refer to caption below for image description The fourth major step in the uranium fuel cycle is uranium enrichment. Slide 23...

304

Refiner/marketer targets production of transportation fuels and distillates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Citgo Petroleum Corp., the wholly owned subsidiary of Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA), the Venezuelan national oil company, owns two gasoline producing refineries, a 305,000-b/d system in Lake Charles, La., and a 130,000-b/d facility in Corpus Christi, Texas. Each is considered a deep conversion facility capable of converting heavy, sour crudes into a high percentage of transportation fuels and distillates. Two smaller refineries, one in Paulsboro, N.J., and one in Savannah, GA., have the capacity to process 40,000 b/d and 28,000 b/d of crude, respectively, for asphalt products. In the past two years, Citgo`s light oils refineries operated safely and reliably with a minimum of unscheduled shutdowns. An ongoing emphasis to increase reliability has resulted in extended run lengths at the refineries. Citgo has invested $314 million at its facilities in 1995, much of this toward environmental and regulatory projects, such as the new waste water treatment unit at the Lake Charles refinery. Over the next few years, Citgo expects to complete $1.5 billion in capital spending for major processing units such as a 60,000-b/d FCC feed hydrotreater unit at the Lake Charles refinery and crude expansion at the Corpus Christi refinery. Product exchanges and expanded transport agreements are allowing Citgo to extend its marketing reach.

Thompson, J.E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Motor gasolines, Summer 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The samples were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The analytical data for 796 samples of motor gasoline, were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). They represent the products of 22 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1959. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R + M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.3 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.7 for unleaded 90.0 and above, 89.0 for leaded below 93.0, and no data in this report for 93.0 and above grades of leaded gasoline.

Shelton, E.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Defect Formation and Fission Product Dynamics in Oxide Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to address major nuclear fuels performance issues for the design and use of oxide-type fuels in the current and advanced nuclear reactor applications. Fuel performance is a major issue for extending fuel burn-up which has the added advantage of reducing the used fuel waste stream. It will also be a significant issue with respect to developing advanced fuel cycle processes where it may be possible to incorporate minor actinides in various fuel forms so that they can be 'burned' rather than join the used fuel waste stream. The potential to fission or transmute minor actinides and certain long-lived fission product isotopes would transform the high level waste storage strategy by removing the need to consider fuel storage on the millennium time scale.

Stubbins, James

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

308

Advanced Motors  

SciTech Connect

Project Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, ???????????????¢????????????????????????????????Motors and Generators for the 21st Century???????????????¢???????????????????????????????. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can be met with a variety of bonded magnet compositions. The torque ripple was found to drop significantly by using thinner magnet segments. The powder co-filling and subsequent compaction processing allow for thinner magnet structures to be formed. Torque ripple can be further reduced by using skewing and pole shaping techniques. The techniques can be incorporated into the rotor during the powder co-filling process.

Knoth, Edward A.; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J.

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

309

Motor vehicles in the 1990s: Emerging environmental constraints on current fuels, and emissions and energy trade-offs related to nonpetroleum alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Manufacturers of motor vehicles and engines may face substantial compliance challenges because of existing or proposed environmental regulations. Among the challenges due to existing regulations is the need for improved control of evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles and emissions of particulate matter from heavy-duty diesel trucks. Potential future challenges could arise from the need to control refueling emissions and from more stringent emission standards for hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen. Virtually all of these regulations require technological changes to vehicles and engines, assuming that gasoline and diesel fuel remain as the operating fuels. However, recent speculation has centered on the possibility of meeting some or all of these regulatory challenges with alternative fuels such as natural gas or methanol. This study addresses that possibility by examining current and potential standards, characterizing vehicles that use alternative fuels, and assessing -- via an informal canvass of manufacturers -- the likelihood of meeting the regulations with both conventional and alternative fuels. A selective literature review compares emissions, energy use, and costs associated with both types of fuels. Finally, a plausible scenario of introducing methanol- fueled autos and light trucks by the early 1990s is defined as the basis for examining changes in emission levels nationally. While the overall reduction -- from all transportation sources -- of reactive hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen due to these vehicles is less than 1% by 1997, the potential remains for greater levels of reduction within urbanized areas, especially if tax-based incentives and other measures are used to encourage the use of vehicles powered by alternative fuels. 68 refs., 2 figs., 23 tabs.

Singh, M.K.; Saricks, C.L.; LaBelle, S.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning by fuel type, 1860-1982  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide emission calculations resulting from fossil fuel useage for the years 1860-1982 are presented.

Rotty, R.M.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States). Institute for Energy Analysis

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Synthetic Fuel Center construction and alternative test fuels production: Final report, 7 June 1982 to 7 September 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Synthetic Fuel Center has been established by the Department of Energy as part of the Alternative Fuels Utilization Program. The main function is to provide test fuels in 5-gallon to 500-gallon quantities for research projects on utilization of alternative fuels. In the three-year report period, 26 fuels were prepared for 11 projects. Quantities ranged from 50 to 200 gallons of each fuel; the total production was 2490 gallons. Starting materials for processing or blending included two shale oils, two shale-derived naphthas, and two coal-derived middle distillates. A hydrogenation pilot plant was installed for processing synthetic feedstocks from oil shale and coal. Moderate severity upgrading of shale oil is reported, and the unit is capable of intermediate to high severity conversion of shale oil and coal liquids. Catalytic reforming of shale-derived naphthas at low pressure raised the octane of these paraffinic materials from less than 50 to above 90 Research Octane Number. Processing capabilities include distillation, adsorption, filtration, and centrifuging. Storage tanks from 500-gallon to 10,000-gallon capacity were installed. These are connected through piping and a manifold to the processing unit and other tanks for storage or blending. Fuel blending to target properties or compositions was a major activity. Complete characterizations were made of all feedstocks and products.

Sefer, N.R.; Erwin, J.; Russell, J.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel or power generation (coal, natural gas, fuel oil,generation mix for power used to compress fossil natural gas.power (% of electricity generation [EVs, hydrogen vehicles]) NGL = natural gas

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biomass (lignin) and biogas for process heat. TheyBTU-lignin/BTU-fuel) and emission factors for biogas (g/BTU-gas) by biogas-use factors (BTU-gas/BTU-fuel). The emission

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth December 19, 2013 - 11:36am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department released three new reports today showcasing strong growth across the U.S. fuel cell and hydrogen technologies market - continuing America's leadership in clean energy innovation and providing U.S. businesses more affordable, cleaner transportation and power options. According to these reports, the United States continues to be one of the world's largest and fastest growing markets for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. In 2012, nearly 80 percent of total investment in the global fuel cell industry was made in U.S.

315

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produced, is estimated as: DCW = AF ? AW ? ( 1+ FGD ) ? ( 1BTU / TM eq. 98 where: DCW = diesel fuel consumed to

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels be used annually by 2022, which allows continued

317

Production and Handling Slide 5: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refer to caption below for image description The third step in the uranium fuel cycle involves the conversion of "yellowcake" to uranium hexafluoride (UF6), the chemical form...

318

Production and Handling Slide 43: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation Table of Contents The Uranium Fuel Cycle Refer to caption below for image description Enriched uranium hexafluoride, generally containing 3 to 5% uranium-235, is sent...

319

Production and Handling Slide 37: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Contents The Uranium Fuel Cycle Refer to caption below for image description The enrichment process generates two streams of uranium hexafluoride, one enriched in...

320

Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

explored as a fuel for passenger vehicles. It can be used in fuel cells to power electric motors or burned in internal combustion engines (ICEs). It is an environmentally...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Solar Thermochemical Fuels Production: Solar Thermochemical Fuel Production via a Novel Lowe Pressure, Magnetically Stabilized, Non-volatile Iron Oxide Looping Process  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The University of Florida is developing a windowless high-temperature chemical reactor that converts concentrated solar thermal energy to syngas, which can be used to produce gasoline. The overarching project goal is lowering the cost of the solar thermochemical production of syngas for clean and synthetic hydrocarbon fuels like petroleum. The team will develop processes that rely on water and recycled CO2 as the sole feed-stock, and concentrated solar radiation as the sole energy source, to power the reactor to produce fuel efficiently. Successful large-scale deployment of this solar thermochemical fuel production could substantially improve our national and economic security by replacing imported oil with domestically produced solar fuels.

None

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing  

SciTech Connect

Two scenarios are typically envisioned for thorium fuel cycles: 'open' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th and fission of {sup 233}U in situ without reprocessing or 'closed' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th followed by reprocessing, and recycling of {sup 233}U either in situ or in critical fission reactors. This study evaluates a third option based on the possibility of breeding fissile material in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor and burning the same fuel in a critical reactor without any reprocessing or reconditioning. This fuel cycle requires the hybrid and the critical reactor to use the same fuel form. TRISO particles embedded in carbon pebbles were selected as the preferred form of fuel and an inertial laser fusion system featuring a subcritical blanket was combined with critical pebble bed reactors, either gas-cooled or liquid-salt-cooled. The hybrid reactor was modeled based on the earlier, hybrid version of the LLNL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE1) system, whereas the critical reactors were modeled according to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) design. An extensive neutronic analysis was carried out for both the hybrid and the fission reactors in order to track the fuel composition at each stage of the fuel cycle and ultimately determine the plant support ratio, which has been defined as the ratio between the thermal power generated in fission reactors and the fusion power required to breed the fissile fuel burnt in these fission reactors. It was found that the maximum attainable plant support ratio for a thorium fuel cycle that employs neither enrichment nor reprocessing is about 2. This requires tuning the neutron energy towards high energy for breeding and towards thermal energy for burning. A high fuel loading in the pebbles allows a faster spectrum in the hybrid blanket; mixing dummy carbon pebbles with fuel pebbles enables a softer spectrum in the critical reactors. This combination consumes about 20% of the thorium initially loaded in the hybrid reactor ({approx}200 GWd/tHM), partially during hybrid operation, but mostly during operation in the critical reactor. The plant support ratio is low compared to the one attainable using continuous fuel chemical reprocessing, which can yield a plant support ratio of about 20, but the resulting fuel cycle offers better proliferation resistance as fissile material is never separated from the other fuel components.

Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

323

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motor-vehicle parts, and motor-oil are recycled. Presumably,parts, motor fuels, or motor oil. I assume a range of 4-8%.relationship between motor-vehicle use and oil imports is

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motor-vehicle parts, and motor-oil are recycled. Presumably,parts, motor fuels, or motor oil. I assume a range of 4-8%.relationship between motor-vehicle use and oil imports is

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fuel gas production from animal residue. Dynatech report No. 1551  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive mathematical model description of anaerobic digestion of animal residues was developed, taking into account material and energy balances, kinetics, and economics of the process. The model has the flexibility to be applicable to residues from any size or type of animal husbandry operation. A computer program was written for this model and includes a routine for optimization to minimum unit gas cost, with the optimization variables being digester temperature, retention time, and influent volatile solids concentration. The computer program was used to determine the optimum base-line process conditions and economics for fuel gas production via anaerobic digestion of residues from a 10,000 head environmental beef feedlot. This feedlot at the conditions for minimum unit gas cost will produce 300 MCF/day of methane at a cost of $5.17/MCF (CH/sub 4/), with a total capital requirement of $1,165,000, a total capital investment of $694,000, and an annual average net operating cost of $370,000. The major contributions to this unit gas cost are due to labor (37 percent), raw manure (11 percent), power for gas compression (10 percent), and digester cost (13 percent). A conceptual design of an anaerobic digestion process for the baseline conditions is presented. A sensitivity analysis of the unit gas cost to changes in the major contributions to unit gas cost was performed, and the results of this analysis indicate areas in the anaerobic digestion system design where reasonable improvements could be expected so as to produce gas at an economically feasible cost. This sensitivity analysis includes the effects on unit gas cost of feedlot size and type, digester type, digester operating conditions, and economic input data.

Ashare, E.; Wise, D.L.; Wentworth, R.L.

1977-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Determination of alternative fuels combustion products: Phase 3 report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the laboratory efforts to characterize particulate and gaseous exhaust emissions from a passenger vehicle operating on alternative fuels. Tests were conducted at room temperature (nominally 72 F) and 20 F utilizing the chassis dynamometer portion of the FTP for light-duty vehicles. Fuels evaluated include Federal RFG, LPG meeting HD-5 specifications, a national average blend of CNG, E85, and M85. Exhaust particulate generated at room temperature was further characterized to determine polynuclear aromatic content, trace element content, and trace organic constituents. For all fuels except M85, the room temperature particulate emission rate from this vehicle was about 2 to 3 mg/mile. On M85, the particulate emission rate was more than 6 mg/mile. In addition, elemental analysis of particulate revealed an order of magnitude more sulfur and calcium from M85 than any other fuel. The sulfur and calcium indicate that these higher emissions might be due to engine lubricating oil in the exhaust. For RFG, particulate emissions at 20 F were more than six times higher than at room temperature. For alcohol fuels, particulate emissions at 20 F were two to three times higher than at room temperature. For CNG and LPG, particulate emissions were virtually the same at 72 F and 20 F. However, PAH emissions from CNG and LPG were higher than expected. Both gaseous fuels had larger amounts of pyrene, 1-nitropyrene, and benzo(g,h,i)perylene in their emissions than the other fuels.

Whitney, K.A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Syntroleum plant is mechanically complete and currently undergoing start-up. The fuel production and demonstration plan is near completion. The study on the impact of small footprint plant (SFP) fuel on engine performance is about half-completed. Cold start testing has been completed. Preparations have been completed for testing the fuel in diesel electric generators in Alaska. Preparations are in progress for testing the fuel in bus fleets at Denali National Park and the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority. The experiments and analyses conducted during this project show that Fischer-Tropsch (FT) gas-to-liquid diesel fuel can easily be used in a diesel engine with little to no modifications. Additionally, based on the results and discussion presented, further improvements in performance and emissions can be realized by configuring the engine to take advantage of FT diesel fuel's properties. The FT fuel also shows excellent cold start properties and enabled the engine tested to start at more the ten degrees than traditional fuels would allow. This plant produced through this project will produce large amounts of FT fuel. This will allow the fuel to be tested extensively, in current, prototype, and advanced diesel engines. The fuel may also contribute to the nation's energy security. The military has expressed interest in testing the fuel in aircraft and ground vehicles.

Steve Bergin

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

328

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maximum, and restricts regenerative energy to be less thanthe extra energy made available by regenerative braking. Theregenerative braking (for fuel-cell vehicles without electro-chemical energy

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Trexa Motor Corporation TMC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trexa Motor Corporation TMC Jump to: navigation, search Name Trexa Motor Corporation (TMC) Place Los Angeles, California Sector Vehicles Product Los Angeles - based subsidiary of...

331

Mission Motors Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motors Company Place San Francisco, California Zip 94103 Product San Francisco-based electric Motorcycle manufacturer. References Mission Motors Company1 LinkedIn...

332

Mild, Nontoxic Production of Fuels and Chemicals from Biomass  

Fossil fuel resources supply almost 90 percent of the worlds energy and the vast majority of its organic chemicals. This dependency is insupportable in light of rising emissions, demand and diminishing access. Abundant, renewable biomass is an ...

333

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program August 2010 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary ...............................................................................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Organization of the FCT Program ..................................................................................................................

334

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Anaerobic digesters · Electrogenesis ­ Generation of electricity ­ Exoelectrogens ­ Microbial fuel cells1 Hydrogen and electricity production using microbial fuel cell-based technologies Bruce E. Logan · US electricity generation: 13 quad ·Electricity needed for H2 transportation: · Via water

Lee, Dongwon

336

Subtask 2.6 - Assessment of Alternative Fuels on CO2 Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many coal-based electric generating units use alternative fuels, and this effort assessed the impact of alternative fuels on CO{sub 2} production and other emissions and also assessed the potential impact of changes in emission regulations under the Clean Air Act (CAA) for facilities utilizing alternative fuels that may be categorized as wastes. Information was assembled from publicly available U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration databases that included alternative fuel use for 2004 and 2005. Alternative fuel types were categorized along with information on usage by coal-based electric, number of facilities utilizing each fuel type, and the heating value of solid, liquid, and gaseous alternative fuels. The sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions associated with alternative fuels and primary fuels were also evaluated. Carbon dioxide emissions are also associated with the transport of all fuels. A calculation of carbon dioxide emissions associated with the transport of biomass-based fuels that are typically accessed on a regional basis was made. A review of CAA emission regulations for coal-based electric generating facilities from Section 112 (1) and Section 129 (2) for solid waste incinerators was performed with consideration for a potential regulatory change from Section 112 (1) regulation to Section 129 (2). Increased emission controls would be expected to be required if coal-based electric generating facilities using alternative fuels would be recategorized under CAA Section 129 (2) for solid waste incinerators, and if this change were made, it is anticipated that coal-fired electric generating facilities might reduce the use of alternative fuels. Conclusions included information on the use profile for alternative fuels and the impacts to emissions as well as the impact of potential application of emission regulations for solid waste incinerators to electric generating facilities using alternative fuels.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Darren Naasz

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

U.S. Product Supplied of Distillate Fuel Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual : Download Data (XLS File) U.S. Product Supplied of Distillate Fuel Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov

338

U.S. Product Supplied of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Product Supplied of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 295,460 ...

339

Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

340

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell T

344

Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2011  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell

345

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost High-H2 Syngas Production for Power and Liquid Fuels Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Project Number: FE0011958 Project Description Proof-of-concept of a metal-polymeric...

346

Stationary Fuel Cell System Composite Data Products: Data Through Quarter 4 of 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes stationary fuel cell system composite data products for data through the fourth quarter of 2012.

Ainscough, C.; Kurtz, J.; Saur, G.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

State-of-the-Art Fuel Cell Voltage Durability Status: Spring 2013 Composite Data Products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes composite data products (CDPs) produced in 2013 for state-of-the-art fuel cell voltage durability status.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Saur, G.; Peters, M.; Post, M.; Ainscough, C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R&D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Method for forming nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction and the product thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for producing nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction having components providing therein a barrier system for resisting destructive action by volatile fission products or impurities and also interdiffusion of metal constituents, and the product thereof. The composite nuclear fuel containers of the method comprise a casing of zirconium or alloy thereof with a layer of copper overlying an oxidized surface portion of the zirconium or alloy thereof.

Cheng, Bo-Ching (Fremont, CA); Rosenbaum, Herman S. (Fremont, CA); Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement tracer tests. Topical report, December 20, 1995--December 20, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ERC is developing the detailed design of the commercial entry MW-class power plant. The product requirements and specifications have been derived. The planned baseline power plant is rated at 2.85 MW on natural gas and has a heat rate of 6.22 {times} 10{sup 6} J/kWh (5900 Btu/kWh; 58% LHV). Additional optional features will be available to include non-standard site conditions and other fuels. In parallel, the baseline product design has progressed to the final design phase. The preliminary product design, which also included parametric optimization, major component vendor interaction, and cost estimation, has been completed during the past year. The power plant approach consists of several factory-constructed truck-transportable modules. A computer-generated power plant layout is shown in a figure. The proposed power plant is expected to have a gross output of 3.03 MW, providing net 2.85 MW AC. The parasitic power loss is approximately 6%, of which, inverter, step-up transformer, BOP motors, and miscellaneous loads consume 2%, 1%, 2%, and 1%, respectively.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Analyzing Losses: Transuranics into Waste and Fission Products into Recycled Fuel  

SciTech Connect

All mass streams from separations and fuel fabrication are products that must meet criteria. Those headed for disposal must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the eventual disposal sites corresponding to their waste classification. Those headed for reuse must meet fuel or target impurity limits. A loss is any material that ends up where it is undesired. The various types of losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of transuranic (TRU) material into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. We have analyzed four separation options and two fuel fabrication options in a generic fuel cycle. The separation options are aqueous uranium extraction plus (UREX+1), electrochemical, Atomics International reduction oxidation separation (AIROX), and melt refining. UREX+1 and electrochemical are traditional, full separation techniques. AIROX and melt refining are taken as examples of limited separations, also known as minimum fuel treatment. The fuels are oxide and metal. To define a generic fuel cycle, a fuel recycling loop is fed from used light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel (UOX) at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup. The recycling loop uses a fast reactor with TRU conversion ratio (CR) of 0.50. Excess recovered uranium is put into storage. Only waste, not used fuel, is disposed unless the impurities accumulate to a level so that it is impossible to make new fuel for the fast reactor. Impurities accumulate as dictated by separation removal and fission product generation. Our model approximates adjustment to fast reactor fuel stream blending of TRU and U products from incoming LWR UOX and recycling FR fuel to compensate for impurity accumulation by adjusting TRU:U ratios. Our mass flow model ignores postulated fuel impurity limits; we compare the calculated impurity values with those limits to identify elements of concern. AIROX and melt refining cannot be used to separate used LWR UOX-51 because they cannot separate U from TRU, it is then impossible to make X% TRU for fast reactors with UOX-51 used fuel with 1.3% TRU. AIROX and melt refining can serve in the recycle loop for about 3 recycles, at which point the accumulated impurities displace fertile uranium and the fuel can no longer be as critical as the original fast reactor fuel recipe. UREX+1 and electrochemical can serve in either capacity; key impurities appear to be lanthanides and several transition metals.

Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert E. Cherry; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros; Candido Pereira; Denia Djokic

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Solar Thermochemical Fuels Production: Solar Fuels via Partial Redox Cycles with Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The University of Minnesota is developing a solar thermochemical reactor that will efficiently produce fuel from sunlight, using solar energy to produce heat to break chemical bonds. The University of Minnesota is envisioning producing the fuel by using partial redox cycles and ceria-based reactive materials. The team will achieve unprecedented solar-to-fuel conversion efficiencies of more than 10% (where current state-of-the-art efficiency is 1%) by combined efforts and innovations in material development, and reactor design with effective heat recovery mechanisms and demonstration. This new technology will allow for the effective use of vast domestic solar resources to produce precursors to synthetic fuels that could replace gasoline.

None

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

354

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

None

1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report, data on motor fuel use available online at /and diesel fuel used by motor vehicles. We recommend thatanalyses of the social cost of motor vehicle use in the US.

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Determination of alternative fuels combustion products: Phase 1 report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the laboratory effort to identify and quantify organic exhaust species generated from alternative-fueled light-duty vehicles operating over the Federal Test Procedure on compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, ethanol, and reformulated gasoline. The exhaust species from these vehicles were identified and quantified for fuel/air equivalence ratios of 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, nominally, and were analyzed with and without a vehicle catalyst in place to determine the influence of a catalytic converter on species formation.

Whitney, K.A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Modeling PWR Fuel Corrosion Product Deposition and Growth Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes further developments to the crud chemistry model developed in 2003. This model calculates the thermal and chemical conditions within fuel crud deposits. The model was developed to understand fuel crud scrape observations and help alleviate AOA in plants suffering this problem. The model predicts the main form of boron in thick crud (30m) is precipitated LiBO2. This precipitates because Li and boric acid concentrate in the bottom of the deposit due to evaporation. The rise in temper...

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, West Virginia University, University of Utah, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. Feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification, coalbed methane, light products produced by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol, and natural gas.

Gerald P. Huffman

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

AGNI Motors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place India Zip 370 230 Sector Vehicles Product UK-based manufacturer of DC Motors and Battery Management Systems for Electric Vehicles References AGNI Motors1 LinkedIn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

End of life fission product distributions in F-1 experiment fuel rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission product migration and end-of-life distributions were examined in the F-1 (X094) series of sealed, mixed-oxide fuel rods irradiated in the fast flux of EBR-II. Cesium, rubidium, iodine, and strontium data obtained from axial gamma scanning, mass spectrometry, and radiochemical analyses are presented. The results show significant migration of cesium, probably as both a volatile species and as the noble gas precursor. Cesium metal species leaving the fuel region accumulate predominately at the fuel-blanket interface. Volatile cesium reaching the fission product traps is readily sorbed by the charcoal.

Goodin, D.T.; Langer, S.; Bell, W.E.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day high-Btu SNG from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report describes results on feedstock characterization. 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change to Ethanol, E85 corn, C0/NG50/B50, where the B50on five fuels: RFG, M85, E85, LPG, and CNG. The vehicle wasPM E85 CNG LPG Off-cycle emissions,

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of charcoal from biomass combustion (g-CO 2 /bu-crop) WB,Aerosols from biomass combustion have constituents otheris about 0.06) Coke combustion Biomass fuel combustion

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

Stephen P. Bergin

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels  

SciTech Connect

The ability to generate microorganisms that can produce biofuels similar to petroleum-based transportation fuels would allow the use of existing engines and infrastructure and would save an enormous amount of capital required for replacing the current infrastructure to accommodate biofuels that have properties significantly different from petroleum-based fuels. Several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of manipulating microbes to produce molecules similar to petroleum-derived products, albeit at relatively low productivity (e.g. maximum butanol production is around 20 g/L). For cost-effective production of biofuels, the fuel-producing hosts and pathways must be engineered and optimized. Advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology will provide new tools for metabolic engineers to better understand how to rewire the cell in order to create the desired phenotypes for the production of economically viable biofuels.

Kuk Lee, Sung; Chou, Howard; Ham, Timothy S.; Soon Lee, Taek; Keasling, Jay D.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

367

Recent world fossil-fuel and primary energy production and consumption trends  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide fossil fuel and primary electric power production figures since 1973 show a recent drop in oil production similar to the 1975 decline after recession. Crude oil consumption has declined since 1978, while production has increased. Natural gas production and consumption continue to increase as does power generation from all energy sources. Differences are noted between data sources and comparisons made of the validity of the data. 13 references, 7 figures, 12 tables. (DCK)

Parent, J.D.

1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

Synthetic Fuel Production Utilizing CO2 Recycling as an Alternative ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... which incorporates energy from nuclear, solar, wind and hydropower sources. Widespread implementation of synfuel production will enable a greater reliance...

369

Electrical Motor Drive Apparatus and Method - Energy Innovation Portal  

Vehicles and Fuels Industrial Technologies Electrical ... Auto manufacturers ; Industrial motor drive manufacturers; Patents and Patent Applications. ID Number.

370

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Production and Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Delivery Hydrogen Production and Delivery Most of the hydrogen in the United States is produced by steam reforming of natural gas. For the near term, this production method will continue to dominate. Researchers at NREL are developing advanced processes to produce hydrogen economically from sustainable resources. NREL's hydrogen production and delivery R&D efforts, which are led by Huyen Dinh, focus on the following topics: Biological Water Splitting Fermentation Conversion of Biomass and Wastes Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Solar Thermal Water Splitting Renewable Electrolysis Hydrogen Dispenser Hose Reliability Hydrogen Production and Delivery Pathway Analysis. Biological Water Splitting Certain photosynthetic microbes use light energy to produce hydrogen from

371

Economic and energetic evaluation of alcohol fuel production from agriculture: Yolo County, California  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation reviews the technical aspects of alcohol fuel production and consumption, examines the set of policy-related issues that affect both the private and the public sectors, and investigates the economic and energetic feasibility of small-scale on-farm production on a representative Sacramento Valley field and vegetable crop farm. Candidate feedstocks, including both starch and sugar-rich crops, are: barley, corn, fodder beet, grain sorghum, Jerusalem artichoke, sugar beet, sweet sorghum, tomatoes, and wheat. The leading fuel crops were found to be sweet sorghum, Jerusalem artichoke, corn, fodder beet, and grain sorghum in order of declining preference. With better than average crop yields and the current mix of financial incentives, the breakeven cost of alcohol fuel is $1.03 per gallon when diesel fuel and gasoline prices are $1.30 and $1.46, respectively. Without subsidy, the breakeven cost is $1.62 per gallon. An energy analysis was calculated for each of the feedstocks under consideration. With the exception of sweet sorghum, wheat, and barley, all feedstocks showed a negative net energy balance. The use of agricultural residues as a boiler fuel, however, made a significant difference in the overall energy balance. The role of government in energy policy is reviewed and typical policy instruments are discussed. Although on-farm alcohol fuel production is not currently economically competitive with gasoline and diesel fuel, technological innovation and the return of increasing petroleum prices could alter the situation.

Meo, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels & Infrastructure Fuels & Infrastructure All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 49 results Fuel Trends - Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Average Retail Fuel Prices in the U.S. Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Trend of alternative and traditional motor fuel prices from 2000-2013 Last update December 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-eaiva6 Consumption of Natural Gas in the U.S.

373

Producing Clean Syngas via Catalytic Reforming for Fuels Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermochemical biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals can be achieved through gasification to syngas. The biomass derived raw syngas contains the building blocks of carbon monoxide and hydrogen as well as impurities such as tars, light hydrocarbons, and hydrogen sulfide. These impurities must be removed prior to fuel synthesis. We used catalytic reforming to convert tars and hydrocarbons to additional syngas, which increases biomass carbon utilization. In this work, nickel based, fluidizable tar reforming catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for tar and methane reforming performance with oak and model syngas in two types of pilot scale fluidized reactors (recirculating and recirculating regenerating). Because hydrogen sulfide (present in raw syngas and added to model syngas) reacts with the active nickel surface, regeneration with steam and hydrogen was required. Pre and post catalyst characterization showed changes specific to the syngas type used. Results of this work will be discussed in the context of selecting the best process for pilot scale demonstration.

Magrini, K. A.; Parent, Y.; Jablonski, W.; Yung, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Fuel gas production by microwave plasma in liquid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to apply plasma in liquid to replace gas-phase plasma because we expect much higher reaction rates for the chemical deposition of plasma in liquid than for chemical vapor deposition. A reactor for producing microwave plasma in a liquid could produce plasma in hydrocarbon liquids and waste oils. Generated gases consist of up to 81% hydrogen by volume. We confirmed that fuel gases such as methane and ethylene can be produced by microwave plasma in liquid.

Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Tawara, Michinaga; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kenya [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Shikoku Industry and Technology Promotion Center, 2-5 Marunouchi, Takamatsu, Kagawa 760-0033 (Japan)

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

An investigation of synthetic fuel production via chemical looping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels with a reduced greenhouse gas emissions profile would ease the transition to a carbon-neutral energy sector with the transportation industry being the immediate beneficiary followed by the power industry. Revolutionary solutions in transportation, such as electricity and hydrogen, depend on the deployment of carbon capture and storage technologies and/or renewable energy systems. Additionally, high oil prices may increase the development of unconventional sources, such as tar sands, that have a higher emissions profile. One process that is gaining interest is a system for producing reduced carbon fuels though chemical looping technologies. An investigation of the implications of such a process using methane and carbon dioxide that is reformed to yield methanol has been done. An important aspect of the investigation is the use of off-the-shelf technologies to achieve the results. The ability of the process to yield reduced emissions fuels depends on the source for the feed and process heat. For the range of conditions considered, the emissions profile of methanol produced in this method varies from 0.475 to 1.645 moles carbon dioxide per mole methanol. The thermal load can be provided by methane, coal or carbon neutral (biogas). The upper bound can be lowered to 0.750 by applying CCS and/or using nonfossil heat sources for the reforming. The process provides an initial pathway to incorporate CO{sub 2} into fuels independent of electrolytic hydrogen or developments in other sectors of the economy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Frank Zeman; Marco Castaldi [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States). Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Modeling PWR Fuel Corrosion Product Deposition and Growth Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) drove industry to conduct crud scrape campaigns at a number of units to characterize and better understand the material being deposited on the fuel clad surface. This report describes the first phase of a program to develop models that describe the crud deposition and growth process, including the many phenomena that influence not only the deposit mass, but the composition. The models will be benchmarked against published crud...

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

377

Optimal Simultaneous Production of Hydrogen and Liquid Fuels from Glycerol: Integrating the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel production Fischer-Tropsch or methanol synthesis . Moreover, under the reaction conditions hydrocarbons through the Fischer-Tropsch process. To do this, it is necessary to partially oxidize the CH4 production Fischer- Tropsch . Moreover, under the reaction conditions explored, no CO2 was detected, i

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

378

Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Fund (AFIG) (Pennsylvania)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

motor fuels and fuel systems are compressed and liquefied natural gas, ethanol (E85), methanol (M85), hydrogen, hythane, electricity, fuels from biological materials or...

379

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

380

Generation of synthesis gas for fuels and chemicals production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many scientists believe that the oil production will peak in the near future, if the peak has not already occurred. Peak oil theories and uncertain (more)

Tun, Per

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hydrogen Production Sub-Program Overview - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(FCT) Program, within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy * (EERE), is developing technologies for distributed and centralized renewable production of hydrogen....

382

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

Steve Bergin

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advances in Automated QA/QC for TRISO Fuel Particle Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel in most Generation IV reactor designs typically encompasses billions of the TRISO particles. Present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, cannot economically test a statistically significant fraction of the large number of the individual fuel particles required. Fully automated inspection technologies are essential to economical TRISO fuel particle production. A combination of in-line nondestructive (NDE) measurements employing electromagnetic induction and digital optical imaging analysis is currently under investigation and preliminary data indicate the potential for meeting the demands of this application. To calibrate high-speed NDE methods, surrogate fuel particle samples are being coated with layers containing a wide array of defect types found to degrade fuel performance and these are being characterized via high-resolution CT and digital radiographic images.

Hockey, Ronald L.; Bond, Leonard J.; Batishko, Charles R.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Lowden, Richard A.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

Steve Bergin

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

385

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the ninth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1, 2005-December 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) reformate purification, (2) heat transfer enhancement, (3) autothermal reforming coal-derived methanol degradation test; and (4) model development for fuel cell system integration. The project is on schedule and is now shifting towards the design of an integrated PEM fuel cell system capable of using the coal-derived product. This system includes a membrane clean up unit and a commercially available PEM fuel cell.

Paul A. Erickson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Fossil fuel potential of Turkey: A statistical evaluation of reserves, production, and consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Turkey is a developing country with tremendous economic growth, its energy demand is also getting increased. Of this energy, about 70% is supplied from fossil fuels and the remaining 30% is from renewable sources. Among the fossil fuels, 90% of oil, natural gas, and coal are imported, and only 10% is from domestic sources. All the lignite is supplied from domestic sources. The total share of renewable sources and lignite in the total energy production is 45%. In order for Turkey to have sufficient and reliable energy sources, first the renewable energy sources must be developed, and energy production from fossil fuels, except for lignite, must be minimized. Particularly, scarcity of fossil fuels and increasing oil prices have a strong effect on economic growth of the country.

Korkmaz, S.; Kara-Gulbay, R.; Turan, M. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

Tao, Greg, G.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Product Development Test. Second annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second annual report covering progress made under DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC21-92MC29237, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test. The project is for the design, construction, and testing of a 2MW carbonate fuel cell power plant in the City of Santa Clara, California. The report is divided into sections which describe the progress in various program activities, and provides an overview of the program, including the project objectives, site location, and schedule.

Not Available

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

390

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

Yusibani, Elin [Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage, AIST (Japan); Department of Physics, Universitas Syiah Kuala (Indonesia); Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

391

Liquid Fuels Market Model (LFMM) Unveiling LFMM  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Implementation of the Renewable Fuel Implementation of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in the Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) of NEMS Michael H. Cole, PhD, PE michael.cole@eia.gov August 1, 2012 | Washington, DC LFMM / NEMS overview 2 M. Cole, EIA Advanced Biofuels Workshop August 1, 2012 | Washington, DC * LFMM is a mathematical representation of the U.S. liquid fuels market (motor gasoline, diesel, biofuels, etc.). EIA analysts use LFMM to project motor fuel prices and production approaches through 2040. * LFMM is a cost-minimization linear program (LP). For a given set of fuel demands, LFMM will find the least-cost means of satisfying those demands, subject to various constraints (such as the RFS). * LFMM is part of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which is a computer model of the U.S. energy economy. EIA uses

392

Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Optimal fuel cell system design considering functional performance and production costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work the optimization-based, integrated concurrent design method is applied to the modelling, analysis, and design of a transportation fuel cell system. A general optimal design model considering both functional performance and production costs is first introduced. Using the Ballard Mark V Transit Bus fuel cell system as an example, the study explores the intrinsic relations among various fuel cell system performance and cost aspects to provide insights for new cost-effective designs. A joint performance and cost optimization is carried out to demonstrate this new approach. This approach breaks the traditional barrier between design concerning functional performance. and manufacturing concerning production costs., allowing both functional performance and production costs to

D. Xue A; Z. Dong B

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Biofuels Fuels Technology Pathway Options for Advanced Drop-in Biofuels Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced drop-in hydrocarbon biofuels require biofuel alternatives for refinery products other than gasoline. Candidate biofuels must have performance characteristics equivalent to conventional petroleum-based fuels. The technology pathways for biofuel alternatives also must be plausible, sustainable (e.g., positive energy balance, environmentally benign, etc.), and demonstrate a reasonable pathway to economic viability and end-user affordability. Viable biofuels technology pathways must address feedstock production and environmental issues through to the fuel or chemical end products. Potential end products include compatible replacement fuel products (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and JP8 and JP5 jet fuel) and other petroleum products or chemicals typically produced from a barrel of crude. Considering the complexity and technology diversity of a complete biofuels supply chain, no single entity or technology provider is capable of addressing in depth all aspects of any given pathway; however, all the necessary expert entities exist. As such, we propose the assembly of a team capable of conducting an in-depth technology pathway options analysis (including sustainability indicators and complete LCA) to identify and define the domestic biofuel pathways for a Green Fleet. This team is not only capable of conducting in-depth analyses on technology pathways, but collectively they are able to trouble shoot and/or engineer solutions that would give industrial technology providers the highest potential for success. Such a team would provide the greatest possible down-side protection for high-risk advanced drop-in biofuels procurement(s).

Kevin L Kenney

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Enhancement of IGCC through clean by-product fuel coproduction  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of this paper is to first design a base case IGCC plant that is representative of a base-loaded power plant, and then to identify and to quantify the potential benefits of a spare gasifier and fuel-grade methanol coproduction as additions to the base case plant. This is significantly different than previous methanol coproduction IGCC studies which have assumed cyclic operation with undersized coal gasification capacity. The proposed IGCC plant will be at FPL's Martin Site, located near the eastern shore of Lake Okeechobee, Florida. The major components of the proposed IGCC plant are: dry-feed (Shell) or slurry-feed (Dow) gasifiers, GE advanced gas turbine (Model MS7001F), methanol plant based on liquid Phase Methanol (LPMeOH*) process.

Schmoe, L.A. (Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)); Tam, S.S. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Walters, A.B. (Florida Power and Light Co., West Palm Beach, FL (US)); Weber, W. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Monthly petroleum product price report  

SciTech Connect

Monthly report supplies national weighted average prices on a monthly basis at different levels of the marketing chain, for petroleum products sold by refiners, large resellers, gas plant operators, and importers. Data are for the year to date and previous year. Some historic data are included to indicate trends. Gasoline price data are collected from retail gasoline dealers. Heating oil prices come from sellers of heating oil to ultimate consumers. A glossary of petroleum products is appended. Petroleum products include motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, diesel fuel, heating oil, residual fuel oil, aviation fuel, kerosene, petrochemical feedstocks, propane, butane, ethane, and natural gasoline. 12 tables.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA); Quarter 1 2012 Composite Data Products - Deployment (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation is about the Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA). Quarter 1 2012 Composite Data Products - Deployment March 8, 2012.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA); November 2011 Composite Data Products - Deployment (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation is about the Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA). November 2011 Composite Data Products - Deployment November 30, 2011.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA; Quarter 2 of 2010; Composite Data Products, Final Version April 14, 2010  

SciTech Connect

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's early fuel cell market demonstration projects for the second quarter of 2010.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams  

SciTech Connect

We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spreadsheet) -- imported petroleum by source (Table 117 inthe LEM estimates the sources of petroleum the particularestimates the source of finished petroleum products supplied

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

403

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

404

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Motor Vehicles, Albany, New York, personal communication,the Justice Court Fund, Albany, New York, data transmittal,of Accounting Operations, Albany, New York (1992). D. M.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials, APPENDIX A: Energy Use and Emissions from the Lifecycle of Diesel-Like Fuels Derived From Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIKE FUELS DERIVED FROM BIOMASS An Appendix to the Report, LIKE FUELS DERIVED FROM BIOMASS An Appendix to the Report AFUEL Transesterified, biomass-derived oil or biodiesel can

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Parametric electric motor study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology for the axial gap motor was developed by DOE with an investment of approximately $15 million. This development effort is for motor technologies of high power density and high efficiency. Such motors that are also small and light-weight are not available on the commercial market because high-power motors have typically been used in large industrial applications where small size and light weight are not requirements. AC Delco has been developing motors since 1918 and is interested in leveraging its research and development dollars to produce an array of motor systems for vehicles and to develop a future line of propulsion products. The DOE focus of the study was applied to machining applications. The most attractive feature of this motor is the axial air gap, which may make possible the removal of the motor`s stationary component from a total enclosure of the remainder of the machine if the power characteristics are adequate. The objectives of this project were to evaluate alternative electric drive systems for machine tools and automotive electric drive systems and to select a best machine type for each of those applications. A major challenge of this project was to produce a small, light-weight, highly efficient motor at a cost-effective price. The project developed machine and machine drive systems and design criteria for the range of applications. The final results included the creation of a baseline for developing electric vehicle powertrain system designs, conventional vehicle engine support system designs, and advanced machine tool configurations. In addition, an axial gap permanent magnet motor was built and tested, and gave, said one engineer involved, a sterling performance. This effort will commercialize advanced motor technology and extend knowledge and design capability in the most efficient electric machine design known today.

Adams, D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stahura, D. [GM-AC Delco Systems, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1995-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Process for the production of fuel gas from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and process for the conversion of hydrocarbonaceous materials, such as coal, to more valuable gaseous products in a fluidized bed gasification reaction and efficient withdrawal of agglomerated ash from the fluidized bed is disclosed. The improvements are obtained by introducing an oxygen containing gas into the bottom of the fluidized bed through a separate conduit positioned within the center of a nozzle adapted to agglomerate and withdraw the ash from the bottom of the fluidized bed. The conduit extends above the constricted center portion of the nozzle and preferably terminates within and does not extend from the nozzle. In addition to improving ash agglomeration and withdrawal, the present invention prevents sintering and clinkering of the ash in the fluidized bed and permits the efficient recycle of fine material recovered from the product gases by contacting the fines in the fluidized bed with the oxygen as it emanates from the conduit positioned within the withdrawal nozzle. Finally, the present method of oxygen introduction permits the efficient recycle of a portion of the product gases to the reaction zone to increase the reducing properties of the hot product gas.

Patel, Jitendra G. (Bolingbrook, IL); Sandstrom, William A. (Chicago, IL); Tarman, Paul B. (Elmhurst, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Recent Developments on the Production of Transportation Fuels via Catalytic Conversion of Microalgae: Experiments and Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize food versus fuel concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

Shi, Fan; Wang, Ping; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

409

Recent developments in the production of liquid fuels via catalytic conversion of microalgae: experiments and simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize food versus fuel concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

Shi,Fan; Wang, Pin; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

ERC product improvement activities for direct fuel cell power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current power plant demonstration status to the commercial design in an approximately five-year period. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of the overall program goal are: (1) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (2) Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (3) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (4) Define the stack and BOP equipment packaging arrangement and define module designs, (5) Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. A seven-task program, dedicated to attaining objective(s) in the areas noted above, was initiated in December 1994. Accomplishments of the first six months are discussed in this paper.

Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.; Bentley, C. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update March 26, 2009 v.30.2021.052209 Prepared by: Brian D. James & Jeffrey A. Kalinoski One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared for: Contract No. GS-10F-0099J to the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas and pollutants than

412

MINING PROCESS AND PRODUCT INFORMATION FROM PRESSURE FLUCTUATIONS WITHIN A FUEL PARTICLE COATER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Fuel Development and Qualification Program included the design, installation, and testing of a 6-inch diameter nuclear fuel particle coater to demonstrate quality TRISO fuel production on a small industrial scale. Scale-up from the laboratory-scale coater faced challenges associated with an increase in the kernel charge mass, kernel diameter, and a redesign of the gas distributor to achieve adequate fluidization throughout the deposition of the four TRISO coating layers. TRISO coatings are applied at very high temperatures in atmospheres of dense particulate clouds, corrosive gases, and hydrogen concentrations over 45% by volume. The severe environment, stringent product and process requirements, and the fragility of partially-formed coatings limit the insertion of probes or instruments into the coater vessel during operation. Pressure instrumentation were installed on the gas inlet line and exhaust line of the 6-inch coater to monitor the bed differential pressure and internal pressure fluctuations emanating from the fuel bed as a result of bed and gas bubble movement. These instruments are external to the particle bed and provide a glimpse into the dynamics of fuel particle bed during the coating process and data that could be used to help ascertain the adequacy of fluidization and, potentially, the dominant fluidization regimes. Pressure fluctuation and differential pressure data are not presently useful as process control instruments, but data suggest a link between the pressure signal structure and some measurable product attributes that could be exploited to get an early estimate of the attribute values.

Douglas W. Marshall; Charles M. Barnes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

INNOVATIVE FRESH WATER PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An innovative Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) process was recently described where evaporation of mineralized water is driven by diffusion within a packed bed. The energy source to drive the process is derived from low pressure condensing steam within the main condenser of a steam power generating plant. Since waste heat is used to drive the process, the main cost of fresh water production is attributed to the energy cost of pumping air and water through the packed bed. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A combined thermodynamic and dynamic analysis demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3'' Hg. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the diffusion tower and direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. An experimental DDD facility has been fabricated, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. The analyses agree quite well with the current data and the information available in the literature. Direct contact condensers with and without packing have been investigated. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is significantly enhanced when packing is added to the direct contact condensers.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS PRODUCTION FACILITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS PRODUCTION FACILITY Donna L. Cragle and Janice P. Watkins, Center for Epidemiologic Research; Kathryn Robertson-DeMers, Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Donna Cragle, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Key Words: mortality study, radiation exposure, leukemia, occupational cohort, trend test INTRODUCTION Since 1952 the Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, South Carolina, has operated as a Department of Energy (DOE) production facility for nuclear fuels and other materials. A previous study 1 through 1980 of 9,860 white males employed at least 90 consecutive days at the SRS between 1952 and 1974 found an increased number of leukemia deaths among

415

Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Engineering Bacteria for Efficient Fuel Production: Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Free Fatty Acids  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: OPX Biotechnologies is engineering a microorganism currently used in industrial biotechnology to directly produce a liquid fuel from hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). The microorganism has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. OPX Biotechnologies is modifying the microorganism to divert energy and carbon away from growth and towards the production of liquid fuels in larger, commercially viable quantities. The microbial system will produce a fuel precursor that can be chemically upgraded to various hydrocarbon fuels.

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

417

Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fuel Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project concerns a diffusion driven desalination (DDD) process where warm water is evaporated into a low humidity air stream, and the vapor is condensed out to produce distilled water. Although the process has a low fresh water to feed water conversion efficiency, it has been demonstrated that this process can potentially produce low cost distilled water when driven by low grade waste heat. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A dynamic analysis of heat and mass transfer demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3 Hg. The optimum operating condition for the DDD process with a high temperature of 50 C and sink temperature of 25 C has an air mass flux of 1.5 kg/m{sup 2}-s, air to feed water mass flow ratio of 1 in the diffusion tower, and a fresh water to air mass flow ratio of 2 in the condenser. Operating at these conditions yields a fresh water production efficiency (m{sub fW}/m{sub L}) of 0.031 and electric energy consumption rate of 0.0023 kW-hr/kg{sub fW}. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. The analyses agree quite well with the current data. Recently, it has been recognized that the fresh water production efficiency can be significantly enhanced with air heating. This type of configuration is well suited for power plants utilizing air-cooled condensers. The experimental DDD facility has been modified with an air heating section, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is enhanced when air is heated prior to entering the diffusion tower. Further analytical analysis is required to predict the thermal and mass transport with the air heating configuration.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight; Venugopal Jogi

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

US Ethanol Production and Use Under Alternative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasoline as a motor fuel, use of ethanol-blended gasoline results in lower carbon monoxide emission encourages ethanol production. Two prominent policy instruments are currently employed: a federal excise tax are currently employed: a federal excise tax credit on each gallon produced and a "renewable fuel standard" (RFS

419

Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) product development test. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-92MC28065, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test (PDT) during the period of October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. Information is presented on stack design, manufacturing, stack assembly, procurement, site preparation, and test plan.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production: Commercial Facilities · Applicant's Legal Name: Yokayo Biofuels, Inc. · Name of project: A Catalyst for Success · Project Description: Yokayo Biofuels, an industry veteran with over 10 years experience

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "motor fuel production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ENHANCED HYDROGEN ECONOMICS VIA COPRODUCTION OF FUELS AND CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research effort to develop environmentally cleaner projects as a spin-off of the FutureGen project, which seeks to reduce or eliminate emissions from plants that utilize coal for power or hydrogen production. New clean coal conversion processes were designed and tested for coproducing clean pitches and cokes used in the metals industry as well as a heavy crude oil. These new processes were based on direct liquefaction and pyrolysis techniques that liberate volatile liquids from coal without the need for high pressure or on-site gaseous hydrogen. As a result of the research, a commercial scale plant for the production of synthetic foundry coke has broken ground near Wise, Virginia under the auspices of Carbonite Inc. This plant will produce foundry coke by pyrolyzing a blend of steam coal feedstocks. A second plant is planned by Quantex Energy Inc (in Texas) which will use solvent extraction to coproduce a coke residue as well as crude oil. A third plant is being actively considered for Kingsport, Tennessee, pending a favorable resolution of regulatory issues.

Kennel, Elliot B; Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Dadyburjor, Dady; Dixit, Santhoshi; Garlapalli, Ravinder; Magean, Liviu; Mukkha, Mayuri; Olajide, Olufemi A; Stiller, Alfred H; Yurchick, Christopher L

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

INNOVATIVE FRESH WATER PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system, which is powered by the waste heat from low pressure condensing steam in power plants. The desalination is driven by water vapor saturating dry air flowing through a diffusion tower. Liquid water is condensed out of the air/vapor mixture in a direct contact condenser. A thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production efficiency of 4.5% based on a feed water inlet temperature of only 50 C. An example is discussed in which the DDD process utilizes waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant to produce 1.51 million gallons of fresh water per day. The main focus of the initial development of the desalination process has been on the diffusion tower. A detailed mathematical model for the diffusion tower has been described, and its numerical implementation has been used to characterize its performance and provide guidance for design. The analysis has been used to design a laboratory scale diffusion tower, which has been thoroughly instrumented to allow detailed measurements of heat and mass transfer coefficient, as well as fresh water production efficiency. The experimental facility has been described in detail.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Mohamed Darwish; Diego Acevedo; Jessica Knight

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: Vision Motor Corp. - Tyrano Eaton - Hybrid Drive System Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric...

424

C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this program in its third year, as briefly summarized below. (1) Nanoscale iron-based catalysts containing molybdenum, palladium, or nickel and supported on alumina have been developed that are very effective for the dehydrogenation of methane and ethane to produce pure hydrogen and carbon nanotubes, a potentially valuable byproduct. Some of the nanotube structures are being investigated as a safe storage medium for hydrogen. Dehydrogenation of higher hydrocarbons, including several liquids that are compatible with vehicular transportation under fuel cell power, is currently under investigation. (2) Operation of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis under supercritical fluid (SCF) solvent conditions increases liquid fuel yields and improves the selectivity of the process to produce desired products. (3) Small additions ({approx}1%) of organic probe molecules with carbon-carbon triple bonds to the FT reaction markedly shift the molecular weight distribution and increase the oxygenate content of the products. The goal is to develop better technology for producing cleaner burning diesel fuel and other fuels. (4) Several different types of catalyst are under investigation to develop better control of FT fuel product distributions. (5) C1 processes have been developed for producing ethylene and propylene, two high-value products, from methanol. Novel silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) catalysts containing nickel and other metals are used. (6) Binary tungsten-cobalt carbide catalysts have been found to have excellent activities and lifetimes for reforming of methane into synthesis gas using carbon dioxide. This type of catalyst is being further investigated for synthesis gas reactions relevant to the goal of producing hydrogen from coal.

Gerald P. Huffman

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Biodiesel Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption Motor fuels sold to an ethanol or biodiesel production facility and motor

426

Accelerator breeder: a viable option for the production of nuclear fuels  

SciTech Connect

Despite the growing pains of the US nuclear power industry, our dependence on nuclear energy for the production of electricity and possibly process heat is likely to increase dramatically over the next few deacades. This statement dismisses fusion as being entirely too speculative to be practical within that time frame. Sometime, between the years 2000 and 2050, fissile material will be in short supply whether it is to fuel existing LWR's or to provide initial fuel inventory for FBR's. The accelerator breeder could produce the fuel shortfall predicted to occur during the first half of the 21st century. The accelerator breeder offers the only practical means today of producing, or breeding, large quantities of fissile fuel from fertile materials, albeit at high cost. Studies performed over the last few years at Chalk River Laboratory and at Brookhaven National Laboratory have demonstrated that the accelerator breeder is practical, technically feasible with state-of-the-art technology, and is economically competitive with any other proposed synthetic means of fissile fuel production. This paper gives the parameters of a nearly optimized accelerator-breeder system, then discusses the development needs, and the economics and institutional problems that this breeding concept faces.

Grand, P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

428

New generation of monitors for PAH's from synthetic fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gap exists between the crude techniques available for measuring polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds in the workplace, and the sophisticated analytical tools used in the laboratory for a much more complete characterization of pollutants from synfuel operations such as coal, tar sand, and oil shale processing. Real-time or near-real instruments suitable for use by industrial hygienists are urgently needed to measure fugitive emissions. Several new instruments and instrumental techniques are described that could satisfy some of these needs. They include second derivative UV-absorption, synchronous luminescence, room-temperature phosphorescence, photoacoustic spectrometers, a portable mass spectrometer, differential sublimation, and thermoluminescence. Already, studies to evaluate the practicality of these approaches have indicated a suitability for monitoring naphthalene and its alkyl derivatives at parts-per-billion (ppB) concentrations either in the vapor or the solution phase, trace amounts of phenolic compounds, and thiocyanate in by-product water, and suitability for the rapid analysis of samples filtered or spotted on paper adsorbents.

Gammage, R B; Vo-Dinh, T; Hawthorne, A R; Thorngate, J H; Parkinson, W W

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ultra-Clean Diesel Fuel: U.S. Production and Distribution Capability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines have potential for use in a large number of future vehicles in the US. However, to achieve this potential, proponents of diesel engine technologies must solve diesel's pollution problems, including objectionable levels of emissions of particulates and oxides of nitrogen. To meet emissions reduction goals, diesel fuel quality improvements could enable diesel engines with advanced aftertreatment systems to achieve the necessary emissions performance. The diesel fuel would most likely have to be reformulated to be as clean as low sulfur gasoline. This report examines the small- and large-market extremes for introduction of ultra-clean diesel fuel in the US and concludes that petroleum refinery and distribution systems could produce adequate low sulfur blendstocks to satisfy small markets for low sulfur (30 parts per million) light duty diesel fuel, and deliver that fuel to retail consumers with only modest changes. Initially, there could be poor economic returns on under-utilized infrastructure investments. Subsequent growth in the diesel fuel market could be inconsistent with U.S. refinery configurations and economics. As diesel fuel volumes grow, the manufacturing cost may increase, depending upon how hydrodesulfurization technologies develop, whether significantly greater volumes of the diesel pool have to be desulfurized, to what degree other properties like aromatic levels have to be changed, and whether competitive fuel production technologies become economic. Low sulfur (10 parts per million) and low aromatics (10 volume percent) diesel fuel for the total market could require desulfurization, dearomatization, and hydrogen production investments amounting to a third of current refinery market value. The refinery capital cost component alone would be 3 cents per gallon of diesel fuel. Outside of refineries, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant investment cost would be 3 to 6 cents per gallon. With total projected investments of $11.8 billion (6 to 9 cents per gallon) for the U.S. Gulf Coast alone, financing, engineering, and construction and material availability are major issues that must be addressed, for both refinery and GTL investments.

Hadder, G.R.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Pathway Integration Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies - BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66 Company, ExxonMobil Corporation, and Shell Oil Products US; two utilities - Southern California Edison and DTE Energy; and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission is to accelerate the development of pre-competitive and innovative technologies to enable

431

CO sub 2 sources for microalgae-based liquid fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers in the Aquatic Species Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute are developing species of microalgae that have high percentages of lipids, or oils. These lipids can be extracted and converted to diesel fuel substitutes. Because microalgae need carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a nutrient, optimal microalgae growth occurs in CO{sub 2}-saturated solutions. For this reason, the authors of this study sought to identify possible large-scale sources of CO{sub 2} for microalgae-based liquid fuels production. The authors concluded that several such promising sources exist. 42 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs.

Feinberg, D.; Karpuk, M.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wyoming Incentives and Laws Wyoming Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Natural Gas Vehicle Acquisition Requirements Expired: 02/27/2013 The Wyoming Departments of Transportation and Administration and Information must retrofit existing vehicles or acquire new vehicles that operate on natural gas or a combination of natural gas and another fuel by July 1, 2012. $200,000 in funding is available to retrofit or procure the vehicles. (Reference House Enrolled Act 67, 2011) Ethanol Motor Fuel Production Tax Credit Expired: 06/30/2009 Ethanol fuel producers may redeem a tax credit of $0.40 per gallon with the

433

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

434

IMPACT OF FISSION PRODUCTS IMPURITY ON THE PLUTONIUM CONTENT IN PWR MOX FUELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a neutronics analysis done in response to the charter IFCA-SAT-2 entitled 'Fuel impurity physics calculations'. This charter specifies that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies (UOX SNF) is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate PWR MOX fuel assemblies. Only non-gaseous FP have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1). This mixture of Pu and FP is called PuFP. Note that, in this preliminary analysis, the FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

Gilles Youinou; Andrea Alfonsi

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the third report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 30, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) External evaluation of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design, set up and initial testing of the autothermal reactor, (3) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (4) Catalyst degradation studies, and (5) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research.

Gerald P. Huffman

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the second report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1--March 31, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) Internal and external evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel; (2) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation; (3) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor; (4) Steam reformation of Coal Based Methanol; and (5) Initial catalyst degradation studies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Co-production Plant Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future high-efficiency, low-emission generation plants that produce electric power, transportation fuels, and/or chemicals from fossil fuel feed stocks require a new class of fuel-flexible combustors. In this program, a validated combustor approach was developed which enables single-digit NO{sub x} operation for a future generation plants with low-Btu off gas and allows the flexibility of process-independent backup with natural gas. This combustion technology overcomes the limitations of current syngas gas turbine combustion systems, which are designed on a site-by-site basis, and enable improved future co-generation plant designs. In this capacity, the fuel-flexible combustor enhances the efficiency and productivity of future co-production plants. In task 2, a summary of market requested fuel gas compositions was created and the syngas fuel space was characterized. Additionally, a technology matrix and chemical kinetic models were used to evaluate various combustion technologies and to select two combustor concepts. In task 4 systems analysis of a co-production plant in conjunction with chemical kinetic analysis was performed to determine the desired combustor operating conditions for the burner concepts. Task 5 discusses the experimental evaluation of three syngas capable combustor designs. The hybrid combustor, Prototype-1 utilized a diffusion flame approach for syngas fuels with a lean premixed swirl concept for natural gas fuels for both syngas and natural gas fuels at FA+e gas turbine conditions. The hybrid nozzle was sized to accommodate syngas fuels ranging from {approx}100 to 280 btu/scf and with a diffusion tip geometry optimized for Early Entry Co-generation Plant (EECP) fuel compositions. The swozzle concept utilized existing GE DLN design methodologies to eliminate flow separation and enhance fuel-air mixing. With changing business priorities, a fully premixed natural gas & syngas nozzle, Protoytpe-1N, was also developed later in the program. It did not have the diluent requirements of Prototype-1 and was demonstrated at targeted gas turbine conditions. The TVC combustor, Prototype-2, premixes the syngas with air for low emission performance. The combustor was designed for operation with syngas and no additional diluents. The combustor was successfully operated at targeted gas turbine conditions. Another goal of the program was to advance the status of development tools for syngas systems. In Task 3 a syngas flame evaluation facility was developed. Fundamental data on syngas flame speeds and flame strain were obtained at pressure for a wide range of syngas fuels with preheated air. Several promising reduced order kinetic mechanisms were compared with the results from the evaluation facility. The mechanism with the best agreement was selected for application to syngas combustor modeling studies in Task 6. Prototype-1 was modeled using an advanced LES combustion code. The tools and combustor technology development culminate in a full-scale demonstration of the most promising technology in Task 8. The combustor was operated at engine conditions and evaluated against the various engine performance requirements.

Joel Haynes; Justin Brumberg; Venkatraman Iyer; Jonathan Janssen; Ben Lacy; Matt Mosbacher; Craig Russell; Ertan Yilmaz; Williams York; Willy Ziminsky; Tim Lieuwen; Suresh Menon; Jerry Seitzman; Ashok Anand; Patrick May

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Designing the perfect plant feedstock for biofuel production: Using the whole buffalo to diversify fuels and products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ÔØ Å ÒÙ× Ö ÔØ ÔØ Å ÒÙ× Ö ÔØ Designing the perfect plant feedstock for biofuel production: Using the whole buffalo to diversify fuels and products B.L. Joyce, C.N. Stewart Jr. PII: S0734-9750(11)00138-8 DOI: doi: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2011.08.006 Reference: JBA 6469 To appear in: Biotechnology Advances Received date: 21 April 2011 Revised date: 6 July 2011 Accepted date: 4 August 2011 Please cite this article as: Joyce BL, Stewart Jr. CN, Designing the perfect plant feed- stock for biofuel production: Using the whole buffalo to diversify fuels and products, Biotechnology Advances (2011), doi: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2011.08.006 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting

440

Vision Industries dba Vision Motor Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vision Motor Corp) Place Santa Monica, California Zip 90405 Product Santa Monica-based electric vehicle manufacturer. References Vision Industries (dba Vision Motor Corp)1...

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441

Co-production of electricity and alternate fuels from coal. Final report, August 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calderon process and its process development unit, PDU, were originally conceived to produce two useful products from a bituminous coal: a desulfurized medium BTU gas containing primarily CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O; and a desulfurized low BTU gas containing these same constituents plus N{sub 2} from the air used to provide heat for the process through the combustion of a portion of the fuel. The process was viewed as a means for providing both a synthesis gas for liquid fuel production (perhaps CH{sub 3}OH, alternatively CH{sub 4} or NH{sub 3}) and a pressurized, low BTU fuel gas, for gas turbine based power generation. The Calderon coal process comprises three principle sections which perform the following functions: coal pyrolysis in a continuous, steady flow unit based on coke oven technology; air blown, slagging, coke gasification in a moving bed unit based on a blast furnace technology; and a novel, lime pebble based, product gas processing in which a variety of functions are accomplished including the cracking of hydrocarbons and the removal of sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and of particulates from both the medium and low BTU gases. The product gas processing unit, based on multiple moving beds, has also been conceived to regenerate the lime pebbles and recover sulfur as elemental S.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Determination of combustion products from alternative fuels - part 1. LPG and CNG combustion products  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes efforts underway to identify volatile organic exhaust species generated by a light-duty vehicle operating over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) on CNG and LPG, and to compare them to exhaust constituents generated from the same vehicle operating on a fuel blended to meet California Phase 2 specifications. The exhaust species from this vehicle were identified and quantified for fuel/air equivalence ratios of 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, nominally, and were analyzed with and without the vehicle`s catalytic converter in place to determine the influence of the vehicle`s catalyst on species formation. Speciation data showed greater than 87 percent of all LPG and greater than 95 percent of all CNG hydrocarbon exhaust constituents to be composed of C{sub 1} to C{sub 3} compounds. In addition, toxic emissions from the combustion of CNG and LPG were as low as 10 percent of those generated by combustion of gasoline. A comparison of ozone forming potential of the three fuels was made based on the Maximum Incremental Reactivity scale used by the California Air Resources Board. Post-catalyst results from stoichiometric operation indicated that LPG and CNG produced 63 percent and 88 percent less potential ozone than reformulated gasoline, respectively. On average over all equivalence ratios, CNG and LPG exhaust constituents were approximately 65 percent less reactive than those from reformulated gasoline. 4 refs., 3 figs., 14 tabs.

Whitney, K.A.; Bailey, B.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Selection and Properties of Alternative Forming Fluids for TRISO Fuel Kernel Production  

SciTech Connect

Current Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs incorporate TRi-structural ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel, which consists of a spherical fissile fuel kernel surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. An internal sol-gel process forms the fuel kernel using wet chemistry to produce uranium oxyhydroxide gel spheres by dropping a cold precursor solution into a hot column of trichloroethylene (TCE). Over time, gelation byproducts inhibit complete gelation, and the TCE must be purified or discarded. The resulting TCE waste stream contains both radioactive and hazardous materials and is thus considered a mixed hazardous waste. Changing the forming fluid to a non-hazardous alternative could greatly improve the economics of TRISO fuel kernel production. Selection criteria for a replacement forming fluid narrowed a list of ~10,800 chemicals to yield ten potential replacement forming fluids: 1-bromododecane, 1- bromotetradecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, 1-chlorotetradecane, 1-iododecane, 1-iodododecane, 1-iodohexadecane, 1-iodooctadecane, and squalane. The density, viscosity, and surface tension for each potential replacement forming fluid were measured as a function of temperature between 25 C and 80 C. Calculated settling velocities and heat transfer rates give an overall column height approximation. 1-bromotetradecane, 1-chlorooctadecane, and 1-iodododecane show the greatest promise as replacements, and future tests will verify their ability to form satisfactory fuel kernels.

Doug Marshall; M. Baker; J. King; B. Gorman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m[sup 3] internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h[sup [minus]1] was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO[sub 2], and NO[sub x]. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J. (Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M. (Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Labs., Karachi (Pakistan))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m{sup 3} internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h{sup {minus}1} was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M. [Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Labs., Karachi (Pakistan)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z