Sample records for motion kinetic energy

  1. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  2. Motion-to-Energy (M2Eâ„¢) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  3. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    INL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  4. Motion-to-Energy (M2Eâ?¢) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  5. Quantum potential energy as concealed motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Holland

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that the Schroedinger equation may be derived from a hydrodynamic model in which the Lagrangian position coordinates of a continuum of particles represent the quantum state. Using Routh\\s method of ignorable coordinates it is shown that the quantum potential energy of particle interaction that represents quantum effects in this model may be regarded as the kinetic energy of additional concealed freedoms. The method brings an alternative perspective to Planck\\s constant, which plays the role of a hidden variable, and to the canonical quantization procedure, since what is termed kinetic energy in quantum mechanics may be regarded literally as energy due to motion.

  6. Energy of tsunami waves generated by bottom motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy of tsunami waves generated by bottom motion By Denys Dutykh, Fr´ed´eric Dias CMLA, ENS investigation on the energy of waves generated by bottom motion is performed here. We start with the full for the linearized water wave equations. Exchanges between potential and kinetic energies are clearly revealed

  7. 14CME Kinetic Energy and Mass Kinetic energy is the energy that a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14CME Kinetic Energy and Mass Kinetic energy is the energy that a body has by virtue of its mass the table by determining the value of the missing entries using the formula for Kinetic Energy. Problem 2: What is the minimum and maximum range for the observed kinetic energies for the 10 CMEs? The largest

  8. Testing the kinetic energy functional: Kinetic energy density as a density functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Kieron

    is to the exchange-correlation energy as a functional of the density. A large part of the total energy, the kinetic contexts. For finite systems these forms integrate to the same global ki- netic energy, but they differTesting the kinetic energy functional: Kinetic energy density as a density functional Eunji Sim

  9. Kinetic Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6Kentwood, Michigan:Killingworth, Connecticut:105.Kinetic

  10. Kinetic Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach, Florida:Kenyon MunicipalKinetic Energy LLC

  11. MEANKINETIC ENERGY,EDDY ENERGY,AND KINETIC ENERGYEXCHANGEBETWEENFLUCTUATIONSAND MEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    MEANKINETIC ENERGY,EDDY ENERGY,AND KINETIC ENERGYEXCHANGEBETWEENFLUCTUATIONSAND MEAN FLOWWITHIN by cornputing three quantities suggested by the theory of turbulence: the nean kinetic energy, the eddy energy, and the energy exchange between the nean and fluctuating portions of the flow field (ca11ed dE/dt). Contours

  12. Amber Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende NewSowitecAWSAgri-EnergyAmbene Jump to: navigation,

  13. Blue Motion Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey:formBlue Energy Address: Box 29068 1950BlueEnergy

  14. average kinetic energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy by kinetic averaging Pierre-Emmanuel Jabin Ecole Normale Sup-Landau energy for two dimensional divergence free fields ap- pearing in the gradient theory of...

  15. Rotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zagar, Nedjeljka

    energy, divergent energy, ALADIN, limited-area modelling 1. Introduction Horizontal divergenceRotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN By V. BLAZ ICA1 *, N. Z AGAR1 received 7 June 2012; in final form 7 March 2013) ABSTRACT Kinetic energy spectra from the mesoscale

  16. PHYS 626 --Fundamentals of Plasma Physics --Section 6.4-6.5 1. Using the ideal MHD equation of motion, an energy equation can be derived. It is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    of motion, an energy equation can be derived. It is simply the continuity equation of energy density, which is the sum of kinetic energy density mU2 /2, magnetic energy density B2 /2µ0, and the internal energy density p/( -1). The total energy obtained by integrating the energy density over the whole space

  17. Negative kinetic energy term of general relativity and its removing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We first present a new Lagrangian of general relativity, which can be divided into kinetic energy term and potential energy term. Taking advantage of vierbein formalism, we reduce the kinetic energy term to a sum of five positive terms and one negative term. Some gauge conditions removing the negative kinetic energy term are discussed. Finally, we present a Lagrangian that only include positive kinetic energy terms. To remove the negative kinetic energy term leads to a new field equation of general relativity in which there are at least five equations of constraint and at most five dynamical equations, this characteristic is different from the normal Einstein field equation in which there are four equations of constraint and six dynamical equations.

  18. An action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At first, we state some results in arXiv: 0707.2639, and then, using a positive kinetic energy coordinate condition given by arXiv: 0707.2639, we present an action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity. Based on this action, the corresponding theory of canonical quantization is discussed.

  19. FREE ENERGIES OF STAGING A SCENARIO AND PERPETUAL MOTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamon, Peter

    CHAPTER 1 FREE ENERGIES OF STAGING A SCENARIO AND PERPETUAL MOTION MACHINES OF THE THIRD KIND Peter to a notion of staging free energy: the free energy invested in choreographing all the actors of a biochemical \\offprintinfo{(Title, Edition)}{(Author)} at the beginning of your document. 1 #12;2 FREE ENERGIES OF STAGING

  20. atom kinetic energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .self-consistent Thomas Fermi TF atom discussed w Kais, Sabre 3 Towards an exact orbital-free single-particle kinetic energy density for the inhomogeneous electron liquid in the...

  1. Kinetic energy error in the NIMROD spheromak simulations Carl Sovinec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sovinec, Carl

    Kinetic energy error in the NIMROD spheromak simulations Carl Sovinec 10/25/00 Dmitri Ryutov at the ends (as in the spheromak simulations), it may lead to compression in a boundary layer.] The maximum

  2. Transverse collective motion in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogilvie, C.A.; Cebra, D.A.; Clayton, J.; Danielewicz, P.; Howden, S.; Karn, J.; Nadasen, A.; Vander Molen, A.; Westfall, G.D.; Wilson, W.K.; Winfield, J.S. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (US))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light charged fragments from the reactions {sup 40}Ar+{sup 51}V at 35 MeV/nucleon and {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C at 50 MeV/nucleon have been measured with a 4{pi} array. Transverse collective motion is observed for all fragment types and increases in strength for the heavier fragments. The transverse momentum is qualitatively similar for the different impact parameters selected by the midrapidity charge. The global transverse momentum analysis includes corrections for correlations due to momentum conservation. The results are compared to those at higher energies to investigate whether the same or a new reaction phenomenon produces the collective motion. We outline some implications for the extraction of thermodynamic information from the kinetic energy of emitted fragments.

  3. Philips Color Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilips Color Kinetics Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  4. Help:Motion Chart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:NetHealth DivisionHelioMotion Chart Jump to:

  5. ORBITAL-FREE KINETIC-ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan Alexander

    Chapter 5 ORBITAL-FREE KINETIC-ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY Yan Alexander Wang and Emily A Theory (DFT), there was the Thomas-Fermi (TF) model, which uses the electron density ¢¡ r£ (a function-dependent DFT Density-Functional Theory DI density-independent DM1 first-order reduced density matrix EDF energy

  6. Utilizing Mobility to Minimize the Total Communication and Motion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostofi, Yasamin

    Utilizing Mobility to Minimize the Total Communication and Motion Energy Consumption of a Robotic costs. However, simplified path loss models are utilized to model the communication channels. In Yan Operation Yuan Yan and Yasamin Mostofi Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University

  7. Energy Conserving Equations of Motion for Gear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, James R.

    : 10.1115/1.1891815 1 Introduction The undesirable noise and vibration caused by gears in a large critically on the high frequency response. A primary source of gear noise and vibration is the varying meshEnergy Conserving Equations of Motion for Gear Systems Sejoong Oh Senior Engineer General Motors

  8. Foldtrack in Motion | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" |beam damageFlyer,Installation ininin

  9. Ocean Motion International LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpenThe

  10. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roldán, É. [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Martínez, I. A.; Rica, R. A., E-mail: rul@ugr.es [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Dinis, L. [GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  11. Harvesting Kinetic Energy with Switched-Inductor DCDC Converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    the highest output power density, except when supplied from indoor lighting under which conditions power energy in motion may not compete with solar power but, in contrast to indoor lighting and thermal sources, moderate and consistent output power across a vast range of applications is typical [3]­[4]. Although

  12. Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O Nanoscale Films of Amorphous Solid Water. Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O Nanoscale...

  13. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  14. Dark energy and extending the geodesic equations of motion: connecting the galactic and cosmological length scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speliotopoulos, A. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    z RESEARCH ARTICLE Dark energy and extending the geodesicof motion using the Dark Energy length scale was proposed.observations. Keywords Dark energy · Galactic density pro?le

  15. Plasmadynamics and ionization kinetics of thermionic energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawless, J.L. Jr.; Lam, S.H.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce the plasma arc-drop, thermionic energy conversion is studied with both analytical and numerical tools. Simplifications are made in both the plasmadynamic and ionization-recombination theories. These are applied to a scheme proposed presently using laser irradiation to enhance the ionization kinetics of the thermionic plasma and thereby reduce the arc-drop. It is also predicted that it is possible to generate the required laser light from a thermionic-type cesium plasma. The analysis takes advantage of theoretical simplifications derived for the ionization-recombination kinetics. It is shown that large laser ionization enhancements can occur and that collisional cesium recombination lasing is expected. To complement the kinetic theory, a numerical method is developed to solve the thermionic plasma dynamics. To combine the analysis of ionization-recombination kinetics with the plasma dynamics of thermionic conversion, a finite difference computer program is constructed. It is capable of solving for both unsteady and steady thermionic converter behavior including possible laser ionization enhancement or atomic recombination lasing. A proposal to improve thermionic converter performance using laser radiation is considered. In this proposed scheme, laser radiation impinging on a thermionic plasma enhances the ionization process thereby raising the plasma density and reducing the plasma arc-drop. A source for such radiation may possibly be a cesium recombination laser operating in a different thermionic converter. The possibility of this being an energy efficient process is discussed. (WHK)

  16. On Measuring the Terms of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budget from an AUV LOUIS GOODMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Louis

    of production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Heat flux is obtained by correlating the vertical velocityOn Measuring the Terms of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budget from an AUV LOUIS GOODMAN School of the steady-state, homogeneous turbulent kinetic energy budgets are obtained from mea- surements of turbulence

  17. Reaction Path Optimization with Holonomic Constraints and Kinetic Energy Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brokaw, Jason B.; Haas, Kevin R.; Chu, Jhih-wei

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods are developed to enhance the stability, efficiency, and robustness of reaction path optimization using a chain of replicas. First, distances between replicas are kept equal during path optimization via holonomic constraints. Finding a reaction path is, thus, transformed into a constrained optimization problem. This approach avoids force projections for finding minimum energy paths (MEPs), and fast-converging schemes such as quasi-Newton methods can be readily applied. Second, we define a new objective function - the total Hamiltonian - for reaction path optimization, by combining the kinetic energy potential of each replica with its potential energy function. Minimizing the total Hamiltonian of a chain determines a minimum Hamiltonian path (MHP). If the distances between replicas are kept equal and a consistent force constant is used, then the kinetic energy potentials of all replicas have the same value. The MHP in this case is the most probable isokinetic path. Our results indicate that low-temperature kinetic energy potentials (<5 K) can be used to prevent the development of kinks during path optimization and can significantly reduce the required steps of minimization by 2-3 times without causing noticeable differences between a MHP and MEP. These methods are applied to three test cases, the C?eq-to-Cax isomerization of an alanine dipeptide, the ?C?- to-¹C? transition of an ?-D-glucopyranose, and the helix-to-sheet transition of a GNNQQNY heptapeptide. By applying the methods developed in this work, convergence of reaction path optimization can be achieved for these complex transitions, involving full atomic details and a large number of replicas (>100). For the case of helix-to-sheet transition, we identify pathways whose energy barriers are consistent with experimental measurements. Further, we develop a method based on the work energy theorem to quantify the accuracy of reaction paths and to determine whether the atoms used to define a path are enough to provide quantitative estimation of energy barriers.

  18. Plasmadynamics and ionization kinetics of thermionic energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawless, J.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce the plasma arc-drop, thermionic energy conversion is studied with both analytical and numerical tools. Simplifications are made in both the plasmadynamic and ionization-recombination theories. These are applied to a scheme proposed presently using laser irradiation to enhance the ionization kinetics of the thermionic plasma and thereby reduce the arc-drop. It is also predicted that it is possible to generate the required laser light from a thermionic-type Cesium plasma. The analysis takes advantage of theoretical simplifications derived for the ionization-recombination kinetics. It is shown that large laser ionization enhancements can occur and that collisional Cesium recombination lasing is expected. To complement the kinetic theory, a numerical method is developed to solve the thermionic plasma dynamics. The effects of the complete system of electron-atom inelastic collisions on the ionization-recombination problem are shown to reduce to a system nearly as simple as the well-known one-quantum approximation. To combine the above analysis of ionization-recombination kinetics with the plasma dynamics of thermionic conversion, a finite difference computer program is constructed. Using the above developments, a proposal to improve thermionic converter performance using laser radiation is considered. In this proposed scheme, laser radiation impinging on a thermionic plasma enhances the ionization process thereby raising the plasma density and reducing the plasma arc-drop. A source for such radiation may possibly be a Cesium recombination laser operating in a different thermionic converter. The possibility of this being an energy efficient process is discussed.

  19. Kinetic Energy Decay Rates of Supersonic and Super-Alfvenic Turbulence in Star-Forming Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Ralf S. Klessen; Andreas Burkert; Michael D. Smith

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present numerical studies of compressible, decaying turbulence, with and without magnetic fields, with initial rms Alfven and Mach numbers ranging up to five, and apply the results to the question of the support of star-forming interstellar clouds of molecular gas. We find that, in 1D, magnetized turbulence actually decays faster than unmagnetized turbulence. In all the regimes that we have studied 3D turbulence-super-Alfvenic, supersonic, sub-Alfvenic, and subsonic-the kinetic energy decays as (t-t0)^(-x), with 0.85 < x < 1.2. We compared results from two entirely different algorithms in the unmagnetized case, and have performed extensive resolution studies in all cases, reaching resolutions of 256^3 zones or 350,000 particles. We conclude that the observed long lifetimes and supersonic motions in molecular clouds must be due to external driving, as undriven turbulence decays far too fast to explain the observations.

  20. On a Broken Formal Symmetry between Kinetic and Gravitational Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armin Nikkhah Shirazi

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, the discovery of symmetries has played an important role in the progress of our fundamental understanding of nature. This paper will demonstrate that there exists in Newtonian theory in a spherical gravitational field a formal symmetry between the kinetic (KE) and gravitational potential energy (GPE) of a test mass. Put differently, there exists a way of expressing GPE such that the form of the mathematical expression remains invariant under an interchange of KE and GPE. When extended to relativity by a suitable assumption, it leads to a framework that bridges the general relativistic and Newtonian conceptions of gravitational energy, even though the symmetry is broken except in the infinitesimal limit. Recognizing this symmetry at infinitesimal scales makes it possible to write a relativistic equation of an individual graviton, the properties of which under under one interpretation may be unexpected.

  1. The Excitation Energy Dependence of the Total Kinetic Energy Release in 235U(n,f)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Yanez; L. Yao; J. King; W. Loveland; F. Tovesson; N. Fotiades

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The total kinetic energy release in the neutron induced fission of $^{235}$U was measured (using white spectrum neutrons from LANSCE) for neutron energies from E$_{n}$ = 3.2 to 50 MeV. In this energy range the average post-neutron total kinetic energy release drops from 167.4 $\\pm$ 0.7 to 162.1 $\\pm$ 0.8 MeV, exhibiting a local dip near the second chance fission threshold. The values and the slope of the TKE vs. E$_{n}$ agree with previous measurements but do disagree (in magnitude) with systematics. The variances of the TKE distributions are larger than expected and apart from structure near the second chance fission threshold, are invariant for the neutron energy range from 11 to 50 MeV. We also report the dependence of the total excitation energy in fission, TXE, on neutron energy.

  2. MHK Technologies/Blue Motion Energy marine turbine | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska:LuzClickKemblaWinfield <Information

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - axial kinetic energy Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    axial flow fan systems. Despite... -vortex-driven flow structures to increase the energy efficiency of axial flow fan systems to provide high quality... the mean kinetic...

  4. On spherically symmetric metric satisfying the positive kinetic energy coordinate condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Generally speaking, there is a negative kinetic energy term in the Lagrangian of the Einstein-Hilbert action of general relativity; On the other hand, the negative kinetic energy term can be vanished by designating a special coordinate system. For general spherically symmetric metric, the question that seeking special coordinate system that satisfies the positive kinetic energy coordinate condition is referred to solving a linear first-order partial differential equation. And then, we present a metric corresponding to the Reissner-Nordstrom solution that satisfies the positive kinetic energy coordinate condition. Finally, we discuss simply the case of the Tolman metric.

  5. Seasonal Modulation of Eddy Kinetic Energy and Its Formation Mechanism in the Southeast Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    energy and exert profound impacts on large-scale ocean circulations. Satellite altimeter ob- servations- sociations with the large-scale oceanic circulations and the climate. The global eddy kinetic energy (EKESeasonal Modulation of Eddy Kinetic Energy and Its Formation Mechanism in the Southeast Indian

  6. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  7. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  8. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  9. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  10. Zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy of the ArCl anion Thomas Lenzer,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    and the neutral complexes are observed in the ZEKE spectra. From our spectroscopic data we construct modelZero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy of the ArCl anion Thomas Lenzer,a) Ivan Yourshaw, Berkeley, California 94720 Received 19 January 1999; accepted 23 February 1999 Zero electron kinetic energy

  11. Zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy of the XeCl Thomas Lenzer,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    measurements for the neutral state we construct a Morse­Morse-switching­van der Waals model potential functionZero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy of the XeCl� anion Thomas Lenzer,a) Ivan Yourshaw, Berkeley, California 94720 Received 9 November 2001; accepted 21 December 2001 Zero electron kinetic energy

  12. Power spectral analysis of Jupiter's clouds and kinetic energy from Cassini David S. Choi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of wind vectors and atmospheric kinetic energy within Jupiter's troposphere. We computed power spectraPower spectral analysis of Jupiter's clouds and kinetic energy from Cassini David S. Choi , Adam P o Article history: Received 16 December 2010 Revised 8 September 2011 Accepted 6 October 2011

  13. Author's personal copy Power spectral analysis of Jupiter's clouds and kinetic energy from Cassini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, David S.

    full-longitudinal maps of wind vectors and atmospheric kinetic energy within Jupiter's troposphere. WeAuthor's personal copy Power spectral analysis of Jupiter's clouds and kinetic energy from Cassini 85721, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 16 December 2010 Revised 8 September 2011

  14. The distribution of eddy kinetic and potential energies in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    Understanding of the major sources, sinks, and reservoirs of energy in the ocean is briefly updated in a diagram. The nature of the dominant kinetic energy reservoir, that of the balanced variablity, is then found to be ...

  15. Visual motion sensitivity in dyslexia: evidence for temporal and energy integration decits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Peter

    Visual motion sensitivity in dyslexia: evidence for temporal and energy integration de®cits Joel B December 1999 Abstract In addition to poor literacy skills, developmental dyslexia has been associated in extracting motion coherence from dynamic noise, a de®cit associated with both developmental dyslexia

  16. Hybrid Recursive Energy-based Method for Robust Optical Flow on Large Motion Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    Hybrid Recursive Energy-based Method for Robust Optical Flow on Large Motion Fields Jangheon Kim for optical flow estimation. The method efficiently combines the advantage of discrete motion estimation and optical flow estimation in a recursive block-to-pixel estimation scheme. Integrated local and global

  17. 15.1 Preliminaries: Wave Motion and Light 15.2 Experimental Basis of Energy Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    #12;15.1 Preliminaries: Wave Motion and Light #12;#12;#12;15.2 Experimental Basis of Energy the radical concept of energy quantization to explain two of these results. #12;Blackbody Radiation · Every object emits energy through thermal radiation from its surface. · This energy is carried

  18. STRENGTH AND ENERGY DEMANDS FROM THE AUGUST 1999 KOCAELI EARTHQUAKE GROUND MOTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    STRENGTH AND ENERGY DEMANDS FROM THE AUGUST 1999 KOCAELI EARTHQUAKE GROUND MOTIONS A. Sari 1 and L the demands placed on structures during earthquakes one might also employ an energy-based approach, especially such as absorbed energy (Chou and Uang, 2000) and input energy (Chapman, 1999). Understanding seismic demands

  19. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mentesana; Charles P. (Leawood, KS)

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  20. Understanding ammonia selective catalytic reduction kinetics over Cu-SSZ-13 from motion of the Cu ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Kollar, Marton; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios, at 6, 12 and 35, are synthesized with solution ion exchange. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Catalytic properties are examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions. By varying Si/Al ratios and Cu loadings, it is possible to synthesize catalysts with one dominant type of isolated Cu2+ ion species. Prior to full dehydration of the zeolite catalyst, hydrated Cu2+ ions are found to be very mobile as judged from EPR. NO oxidation is catalyzed by O-bridged Cu-dimer species that form at relatively high Cu loadings and in the presence of O2. For NH3 oxidation and standard SCR reactions, transient Cu-dimers even form at much lower Cu loadings; and these are proposed to be the active sites for reaction temperatures ? 350 °C. These dimer species can be viewed as in equilibrium with monomeric Cu ion complexes. Between ~250 and 350 °C, these moieties become less stable causing SCR reaction rates to decrease. At temperatures above 350 °C and at low Cu loadings, Cu-dimers completely dissociate to regenerate isolated Cu2+ monomers that then locate at ion-exchange sites of the zeolite lattice. At low Cu loadings, these Cu species are the high-temperature active SCR catalytic centers. At high Cu loadings, on the other hand, both Cu-dimers and monomers are highly active in the high temperature kinetic regime, yet Cu-dimers are less selective in SCR. Brönsted acidity is also very important for SCR reactivity in the high-temperature regime. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  1. Quantification of disturbance energy due to conductor motion and stability analysis of superconducting composite wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsukamoto, O.; Takao, T.; Honjo, S.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most intricate disturbances causing quenches in high-current-density superconducting magnets is an abrupt conductor motion. There have been very few papers investigating the disturbance energy of the conductor motion and its generally understood that its quantification is very difficult. The authors have proposed a model to quantify the disturbance energy due to conductor motion. The model relates the disturbance energy to mechanical properties of a conductor, electromagnetic force and winding structure. In the paper, stability of a superconducting composite conductor subject to an abrupt conductor motion is analyzed based on the proposed model. It is pointed out that the stability of the conductor is improved by decreasing distance between spacers placed between the conductors. However, it is also pointed out that there is a limit to the improvement of the stability of decreasing the spacer distance, because of limited accuracies of the conductor and spacer dimensions.

  2. Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in moving air into rotational energy, which in turn is converted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in moving air into rotational energy, which in turn of electricity wind can make varies constantly. Sometimes a wind turbine will make no power at all is an indicator of how much energy a particular wind turbine makes in a particular place. Continued on page 2 #12

  3. Motion to Withdraw from Yucca Mountain application | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMayCrossColoradoMotion to Withdraw from Yucca

  4. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels 2010 DOE

  5. Conformal piezoelectric energy harvesting and storage from motions of the heart, lung, and diaphragm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    advances in battery technology have led to substantial reductions in overall sizes and increases in storageConformal piezoelectric energy harvesting and storage from motions of the heart, lung materials and devices that enable high- efficiency mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion from the nat

  6. Energy-Momentum Tensors and Motion in Special Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulini, Domenico

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The notions of "motion" and "conserved quantities", if applied to extended objects, are already quite non-trivial in Special Relativity. This contribution is meant to remind us on all the relevant mathematical structures and constructions that underlie these concepts, which we will review in some detail. Next to the prerequisites from Special Relativity, like Minkowski space and its automorphism group, this will include the notion of a body in Minkowski space, the momentum map, a characterisation of the habitat of globally conserved quantities associated with Poincar\\'e symmetry -- so called Poincar\\'e charges --, the frame-dependent decomposition of global angular momentum into Spin and an orbital part, and, last not least, the likewise frame-dependent notion of centre of mass together with a geometric description of the Moeller Radius, of which we also list some typical values. Two Appendices present some mathematical background material on Hodge duality and group actions on manifolds. This is a contributio...

  7. Barotropic Impacts of Surface Friction on Eddy Kinetic Energy and Momentum Fluxes: An Alternative to the Barotropic Governor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.

    Barotropic Impacts of Surface Friction on Eddy Kinetic Energy and Momentum Fluxes: An Alternative energy decreases, a response that is inconsistent with the conventional barotropic governor mechanism on eddy momentum fluxes and eddy kinetic energy. Analysis of the pseudomomentum budget shows

  8. Ion kinetic energy conservation and magnetic field strength constancy in multi-fluid solar wind Alfv\\'enic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteini, L; Pantellini, F; Velli, M; Schwartz, S J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate properties of the plasma fluid motion in the large amplitude low frequency fluctuations of highly Alfv\\'enic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles, which, owing to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfv\\'en speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform proton velocity into the frame of Alfv\\'enic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfv\\'enic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfv\\'enic turbulence, is at the origin of ...

  9. Analytic results for Gaussian wave packets in four model systems: I. Visualization of the kinetic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. W. Robinett; L. C. Bassett

    2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Gaussian wave packet solutions, we examine how the kinetic energy is distributed in time-dependent solutions of the Schrodinger equation corresponding to the cases of a free particle, a particle undergoing uniform acceleration, a particle in a harmonic oscillator potential, and a system corresponding to an unstable equilibrium. We find, for specific choices of initial parameters, that as much as 90% of the kinetic energy can be localized (at least conceptually) in the `front half' of such Gaussian wave packets, and we visualize these effects.

  10. Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain License

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S.Development ProjectsCompleted Demo Project

  11. Liu UCD Phy9B 07 22 15-5. Energy in Wave Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Liu UCD Phy9B 07 22 15-5. Energy in Wave Motion x txy FtxFy -= ),( ),( t txy x txy FtxvtxFtxP yy -== ),(),( ),(),(),( For any wave on a string, instantaneous rate of energy transfer 1 dimensional: wave on a string #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 23 Energy Transferred by Sinusoidal Wave )cos(),( tkxAtxy -= For a sinusoidal wave )(sin

  12. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  13. Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

  14. Zero electron kinetic energy and photoelectron spectroscopy of the XeI anion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    spectroscopic data we construct model potentials for the anion and three neutral states, which are comparedZero electron kinetic energy and photoelectron spectroscopy of the XeI anion Thomas Lenzer, Michael and the corresponding neutral X1/2, I3/2, and II1/2 electronic states have been studied by means of zero electron

  15. Low-Energy Electron Microscopy Studies of Interlayer Mass Transport Kinetics on TiN(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israeli, Navot

    Low-Energy Electron Microscopy Studies of Interlayer Mass Transport Kinetics on TiN(111) S annealing of three-dimensional (3D) TiN(111) mounds, consisting of stacked 2D islands, at temperatures-limited decay of 2D TiN islands on atomically-flat TiN(111) terraces [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002) 176102

  16. CO2 sticking on Pt(111); the role of kinetic energy and internal degrees of freedom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Mats

    CO2 sticking on Pt(111); the role of kinetic energy and internal, S-412 96, G"oteborg, Sweden Abstract CO2 adsorbed measurements of non-dissociative sticking coefficient, S0, of CO2 on the Pt(111) surfac* *e

  17. Green Growth in Motion: Sharing Korea's Experience | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: Energy ResourcesNews Home > Blogs >Growth

  18. Matrix representation of the nonlocal kinetic energy operator, the spinless Salpeter equation and the Cornell potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulcher, L.P. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403-0224 (United States))

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new procedure for solving the spinless Salpeter equation is developed. This procedure is implemented with the Cornell potential, where all of the required matrix elements can be calculated from analytic expressions in a convenient basis. Beginning with analytic results for the square of the momentum operator, the matrix elements of the nonlocal kinetic energy operator are obtained from an algorithm that computes the square root of the square of the relativistic kinetic energy operator. Results calculated with the spinless Salpeter equation are compared with those obtained from Schroedinger's equation for heavy-quark systems, heavy-light systems, and light-quark systems. In each case the Salpeter energies agree with experiment substantially better than the Schroedinger energies.

  19. Linear free energy relations and reversible stretched exponential kinetics in systems with static or dynamical disorder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlad, M.O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; [Romanian Academy of Sciences, Bucuresti (Romania). Center of Mathematical Statistics; Huber, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics] [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Stretched exponential relaxation is the result of the existence of a large number of relaxation channels, any of them having a very small probability of being open. It is shown that the stretched exponential kinetics obeys a type of linear free energy relation. The configuration entropy generated by the random distribution of channels is a linear function of the activation energy of the channel with the slowest relaxation rate and highest energy barrier. This property of stretched exponential relaxation is used for studying the multichannel first-order relaxation kinetics of reversible processes. By combination of the linear free energy relationship with the principle of detailed balance, a generalized kinetic law of the stretched exponential type is derived, which provides a theoretical justification for its prior use in the literature for fitting experimental data. The theory is extended to reversible processes with dynamical disorder. In this case there is no simple analogue of the free energy relationship suggested for systems with static disorder; however, stretched exponential kinetics can be investigated by using a stochastic Liouville equation. It is shown that for a process with dynamical disorder it is possible that in the long time limit the system evolves toward a nonequilibrium frozen state rather than toward thermodynamic equilibrium. The authors emphasize that the theoretical approach, unlike other theories of stretched exponential relaxation, does not make use of the steepest descent approximation for computing the average kinetic curves: the results are exact in a limit of the thermodynamic type, for which the total number of relaxation channels tends to infinity and the probability that a relaxation channel is open tends to zero, with the constraint that the average number of open channels is kept constant.

  20. Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende NewSowitecAWSAgri-EnergyAmbene Jump to:

  1. Micro Hydro Kinetic Turbines from Smart Hydro Power | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: Energy Resources JumpMicrel Inc Jump to: navigation, search

  2. Extraction of Equilibrium Energy and Kinetic Parameters from Single

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin FilmEquipmentExtracellular Proteins

  3. Relative Proton Affinities from Kinetic Energy Release Distributions for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORV 15051 Modification MO 12Dissociation of

  4. The representation of rainfall drop-size distribution and kinetic energy Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(5), 10011007 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -size distribution and kinetic energy Neil I. Fox Department of Soil, Environmental and Atmospheric Sciences373 Mc To relate observed rainfall rates (R) to the kinetic energy flux (E) that affects soil erosion component of drop velocity. Keywords: drop-size distribution, drop kinetic energy, soil erosion Introduction

  5. Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartmentLieve Laurens standardsDepartmentMotion to

  6. Systematics of Kinetic Freeze-out Properties in High Energy Collisions from STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lokesh Kumar

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program is to explore the QCD phase diagram which includes search for a possible QCD critical point and the phase boundary between QGP and hadronic phase. We report the collision energy and centrality dependence of kinetic freeze-out properties from the measured mid-rapidity ($|y|energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV. The STAR detector, with a large uniform acceptance and excellent particle identification is used in the data collection and analysis. The kinetic freeze-out temperature $T_{\\rm{kin}}$ and average collective velocity $\\langle \\beta \\rangle$ parameters are extracted from blast-wave fits to the identified hadron spectra and systematically compared with the results from other collision energies including those at AGS, SPS and LHC. It is found that all results fall into an anti-correlation band in the 2-dimension ($T_{\\rm{kin}}$, $\\langle \\beta \\rangle$) distribution: the largest value of collective velocity and lowest temperature is reached in the most central collisions at the highest collision energy. The energy dependence of these freeze-out parameters are discussed.

  7. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4CenterPoint Comments7-18-2011Checklist forChemical Kinetic

  8. Enhanced von Weizsäcker Wang-Govind-Carter kinetic energy density functional for semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Ilgyou [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1009 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1009 (United States); Carter, Emily A., E-mail: eac@princeton.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, and Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-5263 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new form of orbital-free (OF) kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) for semiconductors that is based on the Wang-Govind-Carter (WGC99) nonlocal KEDF. We enhance within the latter the semi-local von Weizsäcker KEDF term, which is exact for a single orbital. The enhancement factor we introduce is related to the extent to which the electron density is localized. The accuracy of the new KEDF is benchmarked against Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) by comparing predicted energy differences between phases, equilibrium volumes, and bulk moduli for various semiconductors, along with metal-insulator phase transition pressures. We also compare point defect and (100) surface energies in silicon for a broad test of its applicability. This new KEDF accurately reproduces the exact non-interacting kinetic energy of KSDFT with only one additional adjustable parameter beyond the three parameters in the WGC99 KEDF; it exhibits good transferability between semiconducting to metallic silicon phases and between various III-V semiconductors without parameter adjustment. Overall, this KEDF is more accurate than previously proposed OF KEDFs (e.g., the Huang-Carter (HC) KEDF) for semiconductors, while the computational efficiency remains at the level of the WGC99 KEDF (several hundred times faster than the HC KEDF). This accurate, fast, and transferable new KEDF holds considerable promise for large-scale OFDFT simulations of metallic through semiconducting materials.

  9. Condition on the KohnSham kinetic energy and modern parametrization of the ThomasFermi density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Kieron

    ; published online 20 January 2009 We study the asymptotic expansion of the neutral-atom energy as the atomic-correlation energy, EXC n , must be approximated. But a direct, orbital-free DFT could be constructed if onlyCondition on the Kohn­Sham kinetic energy and modern parametrization of the Thomas­Fermi density

  10. Calculating kinetics parameters and reactivity changes with continuous-energy Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Paul [UNIV. WISCONSIN

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The iterated fission probability interpretation of the adjoint flux forms the basis for a method to perform adjoint weighting of tally scores in continuous-energy Monte Carlo k-eigenvalue calculations. Applying this approach, adjoint-weighted tallies are developed for two applications: calculating point reactor kinetics parameters and estimating changes in reactivity from perturbations. Calculations are performed in the widely-used production code, MCNP, and the results of both applications are compared with discrete ordinates calculations, experimental measurements, and other Monte Carlo calculations.

  11. Nonequilibrium quantum kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielewicz, P.

    1997-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains viewgraphs on non-equilibrium quantum kinetics of nuclear reactions at the intermediate and high energy ranges.

  12. Electromagnetic energy conversion in downstream fronts from three dimensional kinetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenta, Giovanni [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium)] [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium); Goldman, Martin; Newman, David [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States); Markidis, Stefano [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Divin, Andrey [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic energy equation is analyzed term by term in a 3D simulation of kinetic reconnection previously reported by Vapirev et al. [J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 118, 1435 (2013)]. The evolution presents the usual 2D-like topological structures caused by an initial perturbation independent of the third dimension. However, downstream of the reconnection site, where the jetting plasma encounters the yet unperturbed pre-existing plasma, a downstream front is formed and made unstable by the strong density gradient and the unfavorable local acceleration field. The energy exchange between plasma and fields is most intense at the instability, reaching several pW/m{sup 3}, alternating between load (energy going from fields to particles) and generator (energy going from particles to fields) regions. Energy exchange is instead purely that of a load at the reconnection site itself in a region focused around the x-line and elongated along the separatrix surfaces. Poynting fluxes are generated at all energy exchange regions and travel away from the reconnection site transporting an energy signal of the order of about S?10{sup ?3}W/m{sup 2}.

  13. Hamilton's principle: why is the integrated difference of kinetic and potential energy minimized?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto G. Rojo

    2005-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an intuitive answer to an often asked question: why is the integrated difference K-U between the kinetic and potential energy the quantity to be minimized in Hamilton's principle? Using elementary arguments, I map the problem of finding the path of a moving particle connecting two points to that of finding the minimum potential energy of a static string. The mapping implies that the configuration of a non--stretchable string of variable tension corresponds to the spatial path dictated by the Principle of Least Action; that of a stretchable string in space-time is the one dictated by Hamilton's principle. This correspondence provides the answer to the question above: while a downward force curves the trajectory of a particle in the (x,t) plane downward, an upward force of the same magnitude stretches the string to the same configuration x(t).

  14. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Michael W.; Ivanic, Joseph; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H2 +, H2, B2, C2, N2, O2, F2, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation.

  15. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Michael W.; Ruedenberg, Klaus, E-mail: ruedenberg@iastate.edu [Department of Chemistry and Ames Laboratory USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Ivanic, Joseph [Advanced Biomedical Computing Center, Information Systems Program, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland 21702 (United States)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 2}, B{sub 2}, C{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, F{sub 2}, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation.

  16. Phrases of the Kinetic: Dynamic Physicality as a Dimension of the Design Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Hiroshi

    construction and dynamics physics education with children; Kinetic Sketchup, a system for motion construction

  17. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Mel, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  18. The isospin quartic term in the kinetic energy of neutron-rich nucleonic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Bao-Jun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy of a free gas of neutrons and protons is well known to be approximately isospin parabolic with a negligibly small quartic term of only $0.45$ MeV at the saturation density of nuclear matter $\\rho_0=0.16/\\rm{fm}^3$. Using an isospin-dependent single-nucleon momentum distribution including a high (low) momentum tail (depletion) with its shape parameters constrained by recent high-energy electron scattering and medium-energy nuclear photodisintegration experiments as well as the state-of-the-art calculations of the deuteron wave function and the equation of state of pure neutron matter near the unitary limit within several modern microscopic many-body theories, we show for the first time that the kinetic energy of interacting nucleons in neutron-rich nucleonic matter has a significant quartic term of $7.18\\pm2.52\\,\\rm{MeV}$. Such a large quartic term has significant ramifications in determining the equation of state of neutron-rich nucleonic matter using both terrestrial and astrophysical observables.

  19. Electromagnetic radiation, motion of a particle and energy-mass relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Klacka

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Equation of motion of an uncharged arbitrarily shaped dust particle under the effects of (stellar) electromagnetic radiation and thermal emission is derived. The resulting relativistically covariant equation of motion is expressed in terms of standard optical parameters. Relations between energy and mass of the incoming and outgoing radiation are obtained, together with relations between radiation energy and mass of the particle. The role of the diffraction nicely fits the relativistic formulation of the momentum of the outgoing radiation. The inequality 0 < $\\bar{Q}'_{pr, 1} / \\bar{Q}'_{ext}$ < 2 is a simple relativistic consequence for the Poynting-Robertson (P-R) effect ($\\bar{Q}'_{ext}$ and $\\bar{Q}'_{pr, 1}$ are dimensionless efficiency factors for the extinction and radial direction of the radiation pressure, integrated over stellar spectrum). The condition for the P-R effect is $\\vec{p}'_{o}$ = (1 - $\\bar{Q}'_{pr, 1} / \\bar{Q}'_{ext}$) $\\vec{p}'_{i}$, where $\\vec{p}'_{i}$ and $\\vec{p}'_{o}$ are incoming and outgoing radiation momenta (per unit time) measured in the proper frame of reference of the particle. The case of "perfectly absorbing spherical dust particle", within geometrical optics approximation, corresponds to the condition $\\vec{p}'_{o}$ = 0.5 $\\vec{p}'_{i}$. As for arbitrarily shaped dust particle, the condition 0 < $\\bar{C}'_{pr, 1}$ / $\\bar{C}'_{ext}$ < 2 / ($1 ~+~ \\sum_{j=2}^{3} \\bar{C}'_{pr, j} / \\bar{C}'_{pr, 1}$) holds for cross sections of extinction and radiation pressure components. The condition can add a new information to the results obtained from observations, measurements and numerical calculations of the optical properties of the particle.

  20. Direct Measurement of Competing Quantum Effects on the Kinetic Energy of Heavy Water upon Melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanelli, Giovanni; Manolopoulos, David E; Pantalei, Claudia; Senesi, Roberto; Andreani, Carla

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even at room temperature, quantum mechanics plays a major role in determining the quantitative behaviour of light nuclei, changing significantly the values of physical properties such as the heat capacity. However, other observables appear to be only weakly affected by nuclear quantum effects (NQEs): for instance, the melting temperatures of light and heavy water differ by less than 4 K. Recent theoretical work has attributed this to a competition between intra and inter molecular NQEs, which can be separated by computing the anisotropy of the quantum kinetic energy tensor. The principal values of this tensor change in opposite directions when ice melts, leading to a very small net quantum mechanical effect on the melting point. This paper presents the first direct experimental observation of this phenomenon, achieved by measuring the deuterium momentum distributions n(p) in heavy water and ice using Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS), and resolving their anisotropy. Results from the experiments, supple...

  1. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  2. Phrases of the Kinetic: Dynamic Physicality as a Construct of Interaction Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Hiroshi

    , a system for motion construction and dynamics physics education with children; Kinetic Sketchup, a system Backpacks for motion modulation Evaluations Kinetic Sketch-up Design Tools for motion prototyping

  3. 3. A. A. Sadovoi and N. M. Chulkov, "Distribution of kinetic energy dissipation into thermal energy over a spherical shell thickness because of viscosity," in: Calculation Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrov, Victor

    3. A. A. Sadovoi and N. M. Chulkov, "Distribution of kinetic energy dissipation into thermal energy over a spherical shell thickness because of viscosity," in: Calculation Algorithms of Engineering and N. M. Chulkov, "Inertial convergence of cylindrical and spherical shells of incompressible

  4. ON THE KINETIC ENERGY AND RADIATIVE EFFICIENCY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Nicole M. Lloyd-Ronning1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    ON THE KINETIC ENERGY AND RADIATIVE EFFICIENCY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Nicole M. Lloyd-Ronning1 of 17 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the afterglow phase and ac- counting for radiative losses, we the implications of these results for the GRB radiation and jet models. Subject headinggs: gamma rays: bursts

  5. AGN JET KINETIC POWER AND THE ENERGY BUDGET OF RADIO GALAXY LOBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, L. E. H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6102 (Australia)] [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6102 (Australia); Shabala, S. S., E-mail: L.Godfrey@curtin.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results based on the analysis of radio galaxies and their hot X-ray emitting atmospheres suggest that non-radiating particles dominate the energy budget in the lobes of FR I radio galaxies, in some cases by a factor of more than 1000, while radiating particles dominate the energy budget in FR II radio galaxy lobes. This implies a significant difference in the radiative efficiency of the two morphological classes. To test this hypothesis, we have measured the kinetic energy flux for a sample of 3C FR II radio sources using a new method based on the observed parameters of the jet terminal hotspots, and compared the resulting Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation to that obtained for FR I radio galaxies based on X-ray cavity measurements. Contrary to expectations, we find approximate agreement between the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relations determined separately for FR I and FR II radio galaxies. This result is ostensibly difficult to reconcile with the emerging scenario in which the lobes of FR I and FR II radio galaxies have vastly different energy budgets. However, a combination of lower density environment, spectral aging and strong shocks driven by powerful FR II radio galaxies may reduce the radiative efficiency of these objects relative to FR Is and counteract, to some extent, the higher radiative efficiency expected to arise due to the lower fraction of energy in non-radiating particles. An unexpected corollary is that extrapolating the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation determined for low power FR I radio galaxies provides a reasonable approximation for high power sources, despite their apparently different lobe compositions.

  6. Modeling Spike Trains from Area This chapter describes the application of a motion energy model to the dynamic dot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bair, Wyeth

    74 Chapter 6 Modeling Spike Trains from Area MT This chapter describes the application of a motion energy model to the dynamic dot stimulus. We wanted to know whether the precise temporal modulation widely compared to electrophysiological data from both area MT and its V1 inputs (Heeger, 1987; Grzywacz

  7. Energy-Saving Adaptive Robust Motion Control of Single-Rod Hydraulic Cylinders with Programmable Valves 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    - ety's need for energy conservation while without sacrificing the achievable motion control accuracy that the meter-in and meter-out orifices are mechanically linked together in a typical directional control valve of activities in industry on breaking the mechanical linkage between the meter-in and meter-out orifices

  8. Position and energy-resolved particle detection using phonon-mediated microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D. C.; Golwala, S. R.; Cornell, B. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bumble, B.; Day, P. K.; LeDuc, H. G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Zmuidzinas, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate position and energy-resolved phonon-mediated detection of particle interactions in a silicon substrate instrumented with an array of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The relative magnitude and delay of the signal received in each sensor allow the location of the interaction to be determined with < or approx. 1mm resolution at 30 keV. Using this position information, variations in the detector response with position can be removed, and an energy resolution of {sigma}{sub E} = 0.55 keV at 30 keV was measured. Since MKIDs can be fabricated from a single deposited film and are naturally multiplexed in the frequency domain, this technology can be extended to provide highly pixelized athermal phonon sensors for {approx}1 kg scale detector elements. Such high-resolution, massive particle detectors would be applicable to rare-event searches such as the direct detection of dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay, or coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  9. Kinetic energy deficit in the symmetric fission of /sup 259/Md. [Light particle emission in /sup 256/Fm fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragment energies of about 725 coincidence events have now been observed in the spontaneous fission (SF) decay of 105-min /sup 259/Md since its discovery in 1977. The fission of /sup 259/Md is characterized by a symmetric mass distribution, similar to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, but with a broad total kinetic energy (anti TKE) distribution which peaks at about 195 MeV, in contrast to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, for which the anti TKE is about 240 MeV. This kinetic energy deficit, approx. 40 MeV, has been postulated to be due to the emission of hydrogen-like particles by /sup 259/Md at the scission point in a large fraction of the fissions, leaving the residual fissioning nucleus with 100 protons. The residual nucleus would then be able to divide into two ultrastable tin-like fission fragments, but with less kinetic energy than that observed in the SF of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, because of binding-energy losses and a reduction in the Coulomb repulsion of the major fragments. To test this hypothesis, counter-telescope experiments aimed at detecting and identifying these light particles were performed. In 439 SF events 3 + 3 protons of the appropriate energy were observed, too few to account for the kinetic energy deficit in the fission of /sup 259/Md. There seems to be no explanation for this problem within the framework of current fission theory. These results are discussed along with preliminary measurements of light-particle emission in the SF of /sup 256/Fm. 5 figures.

  10. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY VIA OPTIMIZED CHARGE MOTION AND SLURRY FLOW IN PLANT SCALE SAG MILLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Sravan K. Prathy; Trilokyanath Patra

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. mining industry operates approximately 80 semi-autogenesis grinding mills (SAG) throughout the United States. Depending on the mill size the SAG mills draws between 2 MW and 17 MW. The product from the SAG mill is further reduced in size using pebble crushers and ball mills. Hence, typical gold or copper ore requires between 2.0 and 7.5 kWh per ton of energy to reduce the particle size. Considering a typical mining operation processes 10,000 to 100,000 tons per day the energy expenditure in grinding is 50 percent of the cost of production of the metal. A research team from the University of Utah is working to make inroads into saving energy in these SAG mills. In 2003, Industries of the Future Program of the Department of Energy tasked the University of Utah team to build a partnership between the University and the mining industry for the specific purpose of reducing energy consumption in SAG mills. A partnership was formed with Cortez Gold Mines, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation, Process Engineering Resources Inc. and others. In the current project, Cortez Gold Mines played a key role in facilitating the 26-ft SAG mill at Cortez as a test mill for this study. According to plant personnel, there were a number of unscheduled shut downs to repair broken liners and the mill throughput fluctuated depending on ore type. The University team had two softwares, Millsoft and FlowMod to tackle the problem. Millsoft is capable of simulating the motion of charge in the mill. FlowMod calculates the slurry flow through the grate and pulp lifters. Based on this data the two models were fine-tuned to fit the Cortez SAG will. In the summer of 2004 a new design of shell lifters were presented to Cortez and in September 2004 these lifters were installed in the SAG mill. By December 2004 Cortez Mines realized that the SAG mill is drawing approximately 236-kW less power than before while maintaining the same level of production. In the first month there was extreme cycling and operators had to learn more. Now the power consumption is 0.3-1.3 kWh/ton lower than before. The actual SAG mill power draw is 230-370 kW lower. Mill runs 1 rpm lesser in speed on the average. The re-circulation to the cone crusher is reduced by 1-10%, which means more efficient grinding of critical size material is taking place in the mill. All of the savings have resulted in reduction of operating cost be about $0.023-$0.048/ ton.

  11. Dynamical interpretation of average fission-fragment kinetic energy systematics and nuclear scission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadtochy, P.N. [GSI, Plankstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation); Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamical interpretation of the well-known systematics for average total kinetic energy of fission fragments over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter (600 on the Coulomb parameter. The results of dynamical calculations of within three-dimensional Langevin dynamics show that the mean distance between the centers of mass of nascent fragments at the scission configuration increases linearly with the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}. This distance changes approximately from 2.35R{sub 0} for {sup 119}Xe to 2.6R{sub 0} for {sup 256}Fm. In spite of this increase in mean distance between future fragments at scission, the linear dependence of on the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3} remains approximately valid over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}.

  12. Pion yield studies for proton drive beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    data. Pion kinetic energy of 40 MeV corresponds to momentum of 113 MeV/c #12;MARS - dash-dotted lines #12;MARS - dash-dotted lines #12;#12;#12;HARP collaboration conclusion #12;#12;HARP vs HARP-CDP #12 angle pion production · Negative pion yield was studied at 10 GeV/c using JINR 2-m propane bubble

  13. Dark energy and extending the geodesic equations of motion: its construction and experimental constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speliotopoulos, Achilles D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 RESEARCH ARTICLE Dark energy and extending the geodesicWith the discovery of Dark Energy, DE , there is now aextension is set. Keywords Dark energy · Geodesic equations

  14. Zero Kinetic Energy Photofragment Spectroscopy: The Threshold Dissociation of NO2 J. A. Mueller, S. A. Rogers, and Paul L. Houston*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    at the dissociation threshold of, while for higher energies, a new peak occurs as the energy threshold is reachedZero Kinetic Energy Photofragment Spectroscopy: The Threshold Dissociation of NO2 J. A. Mueller, S. A. Rogers, and Paul L. Houston* Department of Chemistry, Cornell UniVersity, Ithaca, New York 14853

  15. Dynamical behavior of the entanglement, purity and energy between atomic qubits in motion under the influence of thermal environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Tan; Y. Q. Zhang; Z. H. Zhu; L. W. Liu

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The entanglement, purity and energy of two isolated two-level atoms which are initially prepared in Bell state and each interacts with a thermal cavity field are investigated by considering the atomic motion and the field-mode structure. We achieve the analytical solutions of the atomic qubits by using the algebraic dynamical approach and the influences of the field-mode structure parameter, the strength of the thermal field and the detuning on the entanglement, purity and energy are discussed. We also investigate the state evolution of the atomic qubits based on the entanglement-purity-energy diagrams. Our results show that the disentanglement process of the atomic qubits accompanies by excitations transferring from atomic subsystem to cavity field modes and atomic state from a pure state convert to the mixed states.

  16. High-performance solution of hierarchical equations of motions for studying energy-transfer in light-harvesting complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Kreisbeck; Tobias Kramer; Mirta Rodriguez; Birgit Hein

    2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Excitonic models of light-harvesting complexes, where the vibrational degrees of freedom are treated as a bath, are commonly used to describe the motion of the electronic excitation through a molecule. Recent experiments point toward the possibility of memory effects in this process and require to consider time non-local propagation techniques. The hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) were proposed by Ishizaki and Fleming to describe the site-dependent reorganization dynamics of protein environments (J. Chem. Phys., 130, p. 234111, 2009), which plays a significant role in photosynthetic electronic energy transfer. HEOM are often used as a reference for other approximate methods, but have been implemented only for small systems due to their adverse computational scaling with the system size. Here, we show that HEOM are also solvable for larger systems, since the underlying algorithm is ideally suited for the usage of graphics processing units (GPU). The tremendous reduction in computational time due to the GPU allows us to perform a systematic study of the energy-transfer efficiency in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex at physiological temperature under full consideration of memory-effects. We find that approximative methods differ qualitatively and quantitatively from the HEOM results and discuss the importance of finite temperature to achieve high energy-transfer efficiencies.

  17. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of

  18. Hydrostatic Level Sensors as High Precision Ground Motion Instrumentation for Tevatron and Other Energy Frontier Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, James; Hansen, Sten; Johnson, Todd; Jostlein, Hans; Kiper, Terry; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Chupyra, Andrei; Kondaurov, Mikhail; Medvedko, Anatoly; Parkhomchuk, Vasily; Singatulin, Shavkat

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle accelerators require very tight tolerances on the alignment and stability of their elements: magnets, accelerating cavities, vacuum chambers, etc. In this article we describe the Hydrostatic Level Sensors (HLS) for very low frequency measurements used in a variety of facilities at Fermilab. We present design features of the sensors, outline their technical parameters, describe their test and calibration procedures, discuss different regimes of operation and give few illustrative examples of the experimental data. Detail experimental results of the ground motion measurements with these detectors will be presented in subsequent papers.

  19. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of1 DOE Hydrogen

  20. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of1 DOE Hydrogen0

  1. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of1 DOE

  2. Chemical Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of1 DOEKinetics

  3. Bibliography 1. Motion Perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Penny

    and Patrick R. Green (1990), Visual Perception: Physiology, Psychology, and Ecology, 2nd edition, LawrenceBibliography 1. Motion Perception E. H. Adelson and J. R. Bergen. Spatiotemporal energy models for the perception of motion. Journal of the Optical Society of America, A, 2:284-299, February 1985. O. Braddick

  4. DOE Opposes Injunction Motion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 23, 2010, the Department of Energy opposed the State of Washington’s motion to enjoin the Department's efforts to wind down the Yucca Mountain Program. The Department's filing, made in the...

  5. Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sontakke, Atul D.; Annapurna, K. [Glass Science and Technology Section, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata - 700 032 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

  6. Technoeconomic analysis of biorefinery based on multistep kinetics and integration of geothermal energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sudhanya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??In this work, a technoeconomic study is conducted to assess the feasibility of integrating geothermal energy into a biorefinery for biofuel production. The biorefinery is… (more)

  7. NVU dynamics. I. Geodesic motion on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trond S. Ingebrigtsen; Søren Toxvaerd; Ole J. Heilmann; Thomas B. Schrøder; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2011-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An algorithm is derived for computer simulation of geodesics on the constant potential-energy hypersurface of a system of N classical particles. First, a basic time-reversible geodesic algorithm is derived by discretizing the geodesic stationarity condition and implementing the constant potential energy constraint via standard Lagrangian multipliers. The basic NVU algorithm is tested by single-precision computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones liquid. Excellent numerical stability is obtained if the force cutoff is smoothed and the two initial configurations have identical potential energy within machine precision. Nevertheless, just as for NVE algorithms, stabilizers are needed for very long runs in order to compensate for the accumulation of numerical errors that eventually lead to "entropic drift" of the potential energy towards higher values. A modification of the basic NVU algorithm is introduced that ensures potential-energy and step-length conservation; center-of-mass drift is also eliminated. Analytical arguments confirmed by simulations demonstrate that the modified NVU algorithm is absolutely stable. Finally, simulations show that the NVU algorithm and the standard leap-frog NVE algorithm have identical radial distribution functions for the Lennard-Jones liquid.

  8. Principle of Local Conservation of Energy-Momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garret Sobczyk; Tolga Yarman

    2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with Einstein's theory of special relativity and the principle that whenever a celestial body or an elementary particle, subjected only to the fundamental forces of nature, undergoes a change in its kinetic energy then the mass-energy equivalent of that kinetic energy must be subtracted from the rest-mass of the body or particle, we derive explicit equations of motion for two falling bodies. In the resulting mathematical theory we find that there are no singularities and consequently no blackholes.

  9. Simulations of Kinetic Events at the Atomic Scale | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartment of

  10. Active Brownian Motion Models and Applications to Ratchets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Fiasconaro; Werner Ebeling; Ewa Gudowska-Nowak

    2008-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an overview over recent studies on the model of Active Brownian Motion (ABM) coupled to reservoirs providing free energy which may be converted into kinetic energy of motion. First, we present an introduction to a general concept of active Brownian particles which are capable to take up energy from the source and transform part of it in order to perform various activities. In the second part of our presentation we consider applications of ABM to ratchet systems with different forms of differentiable potentials. Both analytical and numerical evaluations are discussed for three cases of sinusoidal, staircase-like and Mateos ratchet potentials, also with the additional loads modeled by tilted potential structure. In addition, stochastic character of the kinetics is investigated by considering perturbation by Gaussian white noise which is shown to be responsible for driving the directionality of the asymptotic flux in the ratchet. This \\textit{stochastically driven directionality} effect is visualized as a strong nonmonotonic dependence of the statistics of the right versus left trajectories of motion leading to a net current of particles. Possible applications of the ratchet systems to molecular motors are also briefly discussed

  11. Ranges and kinetic energies of fragments from 14.5-mev neutrons induced fission of ²³?U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Rajanikant Dattatraya

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    for two hours were 7. 3 x 10 n/cm -sec and 4. 0 x 10 n/cm ? sec, respectively. 8 2 8 2 Absolute neutron flux can be measured if one deter- mines the absolute activity of copper monitor at the end 0 of irradiation for a known time. The A activity is re...); the semiconductor detector measurement of the energies for the charged-particle-in- duced fission of Ra and Th (5); and time-of-flight measurement of energies and velocities of fragments from U, 2 U and 3 Pu (6). One of the interesting aspects...

  12. In conventional accelerators, energy from RF electro-magnetic waves in vacuum is transformed into kinetic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    In conventional accelerators, energy from RF electro- magnetic waves in vacuum is transformed for accelerating and storing countercirculating beams of 7-TeV protons, has a stored beam energy exceeding 300 MJ. Accelerator-based light sources rely on the fact that when beams of GeV electrons interact with magnetic

  13. Motion to Intervene Out of Time and Comments of FirstEnergy Service Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev. 05Department

  14. Motion to Intervene Out of Time of Sumas Energy 2, Inc on Proposed

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev. 05DepartmentOpen-Access Requirement

  15. Motion to intervene and comments of the energy services group of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev. 05DepartmentOpen-AccessHydro-Quebec and H.Q.

  16. Motion to intervene of Consumers Energy Company. FE Docket No. 99-1 |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev. 05DepartmentOpen-AccessHydro-Quebec and

  17. Measurement of a Complete Set of Nuclides, Cross Sections and Kinetic Energies in Spallation of 238

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of a peaceful future. In the scenario improved systems of fast reactors, of high temperature gas-cooled reactors ­ 50 mA, proton beam at 1 GeV is coupled with a reactor core. The latter is run either with fast more energy. Further burning of coal, oil and gas produces still more CO2 producing deterioration

  18. From Proceedings from the Workshop on Motion: Representation and Analysis (pp. 151-155), Charleston, SC, May 7-9 (1986). The extraction of Spatio-temporal Energy in Human and Machine Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelson, Edward

    systems. Spatio-temporal energy analysis is a useful tool for understanding and developing motion systemsFrom Proceedings from the Workshop on Motion: Representation and Analysis (pp. 151-155), Charleston, SC, May 7-9 (1986). The extraction of Spatio-temporal Energy in Human and Machine Vision Edward H

  19. Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    1 Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships Tor A. Johansen in order to implement energy storage in the kinetic and potential energy of the ship motion using the DP in order to relate the dynamic energy storage capacity to the maximum allowed ship position deviation

  20. Zero Energy Travel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Othman Ahmad; Aroland Kiring; Ali Chekima

    2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    It is fundamentally possible to travel with zero energy based on Newton Laws of Motion. According to the first law of motion, a body will continue to travel for infinite distance unless it is acted upon by another force. For a body in motion, the force which stops perpetual motion is friction. However, there are many circumstances that friction is zero, for example in space, where there is vacuum. On earth, gravity makes objects to be in constant contact with each other generating friction but technology exists to separate them in the air using powerful magnetic forces. At low speeds, the friction caused by air is minimal but we can create vacuum even on land for high speed travel. Another condition for travelling is for it to stop at its destination. On land, we can recover the kinetic energy back into electrical energy using brushless permanent magnet generators. These generators can also convert electric energy into kinetic energy in order to provide motion. This article reviews technologies that will allow us to travel with zero energy. It is easier to do it on land but in the air, it is not obvious.

  1. Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O Nanoscale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3.WinterCrystal StructurewithMonolayer. |Films

  2. A master equation approach to the dynamics of zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) states and ZEKE spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi-Hsieh [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Mineo, H.; Chao, S. D. [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Selzle, H. L.; Neusser, H. J.; Schlag, E. W. [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstr. 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Teranishi, Y. [Institute of Applied Chemistry, Institute of Molecular Science, Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Lin, S. H. [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Institute of Applied Chemistry, Institute of Molecular Science, Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have theoretically studied important dynamic processes involved in zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy using the density matrix method with the inverse Born-Oppenheimer approximation basis sets. In ZEKE spectroscopy, the ZEKE Rydberg states are populated by laser excitation (either a one- or two-photon process), which is followed by autoionizations and l-mixing due to a stray field. The discrimination field is then applied to ionize loosely bound electrons in the ZEKE states. This is followed by using the extraction field to extract electrons from the ZEKE levels which have a strength comparable to that of the extraction field. These extracted electrons are measured for the relative intensities of the ion states under investigation. The spectral positions are determined by the applied laser wavelength and modified by the extraction electric field. In this paper, all of these processes are conducted within the context of the density matrix method. The density matrix method can provide not only the dynamics of system's population and coherence (or phase) but also the rate constants of the processes involved in the ZEKE spectroscopy. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the theoretical treatments.

  3. Energy conservation in dissipative processes: Teacher expectations and strategies associated with imperceptible thermal energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daane, Abigail R; Vokos, Stamatis; Scherr, Rachel E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research has demonstrated that many students and some teachers do not consistently apply the conservation of energy principle when analyzing mechanical scenarios. In observing elementary and secondary teachers engaged in learning activities that require tracking and conserving energy, we find that challenges to energy conservation often arise in dissipative scenarios in which kinetic energy transforms into thermal energy (e.g., a ball rolls to a stop). We find that teachers expect that when they can see the motion associated with kinetic energy, they should be able to perceive the warmth associated with thermal energy. Their expectations are violated when the warmth produced is imperceptible. In these cases, teachers reject the idea that the kinetic energy transforms to thermal energy. Our observations suggest that apparent difficulties with energy conservation may have their roots in a strong and productive association between forms of energy and their perceptible indicators. We see teachers resolve these ch...

  4. Measurement of the complete nuclide production and kinetic energies of the system 136Xe + hydrogen at 1 GeV per nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Napolitani; K. -H. Schmidt; L. Tassan-Got; P. Armbruster; T. Enqvist; A. Heinz; V. Henzl; D. Henzlova; A. Kelic; R. Pleskac; M. V. Ricciardi; C. Schmitt; O. Yordanov; L. Audouin; M. Bernas; A. Lafriaskh; F. Rejmund; C. Stephan; J. Benlliure; E. Casarejos; M. Fernandez Ordonez; J. Pereira; A. Boudard; B. Fernandez; S. Leray; C. Villagrasa; C. Volant

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extensive overview of production cross sections and kinetic energies for the complete set of nuclides formed in the spallation of 136Xe by protons at the incident energy of 1 GeV per nucleon. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics at the FRagment Separator (GSI, Darmstadt). Slightly below the Businaro-Gallone point, 136Xe is the stable nuclide with the largest neutron excess. The kinematic data and cross sections collected in this work for the full nuclide production are a general benchmark for modelling the spallation process in a neutron-rich nuclear system, where fission is characterised by predominantly mass-asymmetric splits.

  5. Ris Report No. 285 Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X / Risø Report No. 285 c Danish Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment Risø On the Kinetic Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Motions in the Planetary Boundary Layer by Erik Lundtarg Petersen January 1975 Sola (Uitrlpuon: ivA. OJfttorap, 17, M v p * , DK-1W7 Afotloblt on txekangtfrom: Library, Dtt

  6. Molecular Beam Kinetics | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes to AvoidKinetics Molecular Beam Kinetics

  7. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  8. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & coordinate DOE research efforts (CLEERS Coordination) * Develop detailed technical data required to simulate energy efficient emission controls (LNT & SCR Kinetics, Sulfur &...

  9. Brownian Motion of Black Holes in Dense Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt; Peter Berczik; Frederik Laun

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the Brownian motion of a massive particle ("black hole") at the center of a galaxy using N-body simulations. Our galaxy models have power-law central density cusps like those observed at the centers of elliptical galaxies. The simulations show that the black hole achieves a steady-state kinetic energy that is substantially different than would be predicted based on the properties of the galaxy model in the absence of the black hole. The reason appears to be that the black hole responds to stars whose velocities have themselves been raised by the presence of the black hole. Over a wide range of density slopes and black hole masses, the black hole's mean kinetic energy is equal to what would be predicted under the assumption that it is in energy equipartition with stars lying within a distance ~r_h/2 from it, where r_h is the black hole's influence radius. The dependence of the Brownian velocity on black hole mass is approximately ~ 1/M^{1/(3-gamma)} with gamma the power-law index of the stellar density profile, rho~1/r^gamma. This is less steep than the 1/M dependence predicted in a model where the effect of the black hole on the stellar velocities is ignored. The influence of a stellar mass spectrum on the black hole's Brownian motion is also evaluated and found to be consistent with predictions from Chandrasekhar's theory. We use these results to derive a probability function for the mass of the Milky Way black hole based on a measurement of its proper motion velocity. Interesting constraints on M will require a velocity resolution exceeding 0.5 km/s.

  10. Topobo : a 3-D constructive assembly system with kinetic memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffle, Hayes Solos, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce Topobo, a 3-D constructive assembly system em- bedded with kinetic memory, the ability to record and playback physical motion. Unique among modeling systems is Topobo's coincident physical input and output ...

  11. Depth, and Motion inVision CMSC 436/636

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Penny

    , perceived depth related #12;Head Motion Parallax Bruce and Green 90, p. 231. Kinetic Depth Effect Bruce displacement) #12;Structure from Motion Bruce and Green 90, pg. 328. #12;Image Segmentation Discontinuities Representation techniques parameters #12;Experimental Findings Control necessary for development Held

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash kinetics mechanism Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Some of these ash particles may contribute to surface sealing if rainfall kinetic energy is sufficient... ......

  13. Diagnosing residual motion via the x-ray self emission from indirectly driven inertial confinement implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, A., E-mail: pak5@llnl.gov; Field, J. E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Knauer, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In an indirectly driven implosion, non-radial translational motion of the compressed fusion capsule is a signature of residual kinetic energy not coupled into the compressional heating of the target. A reduction in compression reduces the peak pressure and nuclear performance of the implosion. Measuring and reducing the residual motion of the implosion is therefore necessary to improve performance and isolate other effects that degrade performance. Using the gated x-ray diagnostic, the x-ray Bremsstrahlung emission from the compressed capsule is spatially and temporally resolved at x-ray energies of >8.7 keV, allowing for measurements of the residual velocity. Here details of the x-ray velocity measurement and fitting routine will be discussed and measurements will be compared to the velocities inferred from the neutron time of flight detectors.

  14. Collective motion in Ar+Pb collision at beam energies between 400 and 1800 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavis, D.; Bock, R.; Brockmann, R.; Danielewicz, P.; Fung, S.Y.; Harris, J.W.; Keane, D.; Liu, Y.M.; Odyniec, G.; Pugh, H.G.; Renfordt, R.E.; Sandoval, A.; Schall, D.; Schroeder, L.S.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H.; Vient, M.A. (Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States) Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D6100 Darmstadt (Germany) National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Physics Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States) Fachbereich Physik, Universitat Frankfurt/Main (Germany))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy dependence of rapidity distributions and flow effects was studied in central Ar+Pb collisions at 400, 800, and 1800 MeV/nucleon using a streamer chamber. Rapidity distributions for proton and pions are found to have a Gaussian shape whereas those for deuterons exhibit a two-peak structure at the two higher energies. The average in-plane transverse momentum per/nucleon and per/event shows saturation of flow around 800 MeV/nucleon for this asymmetric system. The aspect ratio of the sphericity tensor is closely correlated with the flow angle. This correlation appears to be independent of beam energy. The number of participating nucleons in central collisions varies from 213 at 400 to 135 at 1800 MeV/nucleon indicating that at the lowest energy almost the entire target nucleus participates in the collision.

  15. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  16. Energy-Harvesting Shock Absorber with a Mechanical Motion Zhongjie Li, Lei Zuo*, Jian Kuang, and George Luhrs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Lei

    Kuang, and George Luhrs Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Stony energy harvesting such as from tall buildings or long bridges. 1. Introduction The transportation counts for 70% of fuel consumption in the United States and over three quarters of which is for road vehicles [1

  17. Constrained geometric dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex: The role of correlated motion in reducing uncertainty in excitation energy transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander S. Fokas; Daniel J. Cole; Alex W. Chin

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fenna Mathews Olson (FMO) complex of green sulphur bacteria is an example of a photosynthetic pigment protein complex, in which the electronic properties of the pigments are modified by the protein environment to promote efficient excitonic energy transfer from antenna complexes to the reaction centres. Many of the electronic properties of the FMO complex can be extracted from knowledge of the static crystal structure. However, the recent observation and analysis of long lasting quantum dynamics in the FMO complex point to protein dynamics as a key factor in protecting and generating quantum coherence under laboratory conditions. While fast inter and intra molecular vibrations have been investigated extensively, the slow dynamics which effectively determine the optical inhomogeneous broadening of experimental ensembles has received less attention. Our study employs constrained geometric dynamics to study the flexibility in the protein network by efficiently generating the accessible conformational states from the published crystal structure. Statistical and principle component analysis reveal highly correlated low frequency motions between functionally relevant elements, including strong correlations between pigments that are excitonically coupled. Our analysis reveals a hierarchy of structural interactions which enforce these correlated motions, from the level of monomer monomer interfaces right down to the alpha helices, beta sheets and pigments. In addition to inducing strong spatial correlations across the conformational ensemble, we find that the overall rigidity of the FMO complex is exceptionally high. We suggest that these observations support the idea of highly correlated inhomogeneous disorder of the electronic excited states, which is further supported by the remarkably low variance of the excitonic couplings of the conformational ensemble.

  18. Technology Transfer Success Stories, Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    converts the power of motion into electrical generation and battery charging. It uses a micro-generator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries...

  19. Motion Planning Jana Kosecka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosecka, Jana

    Slides thanks to http://cs.cmu.edu/~motionplanning, Jyh-Ming Lien Hard Motion Planning · Configuration Geometric Models S Sampling Based Motion Planner Discrete Search C-space planning Idea : Generate random

  20. Test particle motion in modified gravity theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmood Roshan

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the equations of motion of an electrically neutral test particle for modified gravity theories in which the covariant divergence of the ordinary matter energy-momentum tensor dose not vanish (i.e. $\

  1. Kinetic decoupling of WIMPs: analytic expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visinelli, Luca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.

  2. Motion in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karim Noui

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We tackle the question of motion in Quantum Gravity: what does motion mean at the Planck scale? Although we are still far from a complete answer we consider here a toy model in which the problem can be formulated and resolved precisely. The setting of the toy model is three dimensional Euclidean gravity. Before studying the model in detail, we argue that Loop Quantum Gravity may provide a very useful approach when discussing the question of motion in Quantum Gravity.

  3. The Motion Capture Pipeline.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmboe, Dennis

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Motion Capture is an essential part of a world full of digital effects in movies and games. Understanding the pipelines between software is a… (more)

  4. Motion-Based Generators for Industrial Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterken, T; Puers, R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling down of electronic systems has generated a large interest in the research on miniature energy sources. In this paper a closer look is given to the use of vibration based scavengers in industrial environments, where waste energy is abundantly available as engine related vibrations or large amplitude motions. The modeling of mechanical generators resulted in the design and realization of two prototypes, based on electromagnetic and electrostatic conversion of energy. Although the prototypes are not yet optimized against size and efficiency, a power of 0.3 mW has been generated in a 5 Hz motion with a 0.5 meter amplitude.

  5. Kinetic-energy-angle differential distribution of photofragments in multiphoton above-threshold dissociation of D{sub 2}{sup +} by linearly polarized 400-nm intense laser fields: Effects of highly excited electronic states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Basir Ahamed; Saha, Samir; Bhattacharyya, S. S. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Section, Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a detailed calculation of the double-differential angular-kinetic-energy distribution of photofragments in above threshold dissociation (ATD) of D{sub 2}{sup +} from initial vibrational-rotational levels v{sub i}=4,5 and J{sub i}=0,1 in an intense linearly polarized laser field of wavelength 400 nm and intensity 3x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The calculation used a time-independent close-coupling (CC) formalism with eight (ten) electronic states included in the basis-set expansion of the molecular wave function. The molecular electronic states included, apart from the two lowest 1s{sigma}{sub g} and 2p{sigma}{sub u} states, were 2p{pi}{sub u}{sup {+-}}, 2s{sigma}{sub g}, 3p{sigma}{sub u}, 3d{sigma}{sub g}, 3d{pi}{sub g}{sup {+-}}, and 4f{sigma}{sub u}. All the higher electronic states dissociate to the atomic state D(2l). A sufficient number of photon absorption channels, n=0-7, and molecular rotational quantum numbers J=0-11 were taken into account to ensure the convergence of the multiphoton ATD probability. Altogether 198 coupled channels had to be considered in the calculation. The calculations reveal signatures of significant ejection of the photodissociation fragments away from the laser polarization direction due to the inclusion of the higher excited electronic states. The ratio of the photofragments perpendicular to and along the polarization axis shows good quantitative agreement with the experimental result. The angular distributions show considerable structures depending on the relative kinetic energies of the photofragments, and the fragments with different kinetic energies show peaks at different dissociation angles.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomistic kinetic monte Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science ; Physics 5 Mesoscopic model for dynamic simulations of carbon nanotubes Leonid V. Zhigilei* Summary: of the potential energy and kinetic energy of a 395...

  7. Theory of Chemical Kinetics and Charge Transfer based on Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    Advances in the fields of catalysis and electrochemical energy conversion often involve nanoparticles, which can have kinetics surprisingly different from the bulk material. Classical theories of chemical kinetics assume ...

  8. Hydrogen Atom in Relativistic Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Jarvinen

    2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lorentz contraction of bound states in field theory is often appealed to in qualitative descriptions of high energy particle collisions. Surprisingly, the contraction has not been demonstrated explicitly even in simple cases such as the hydrogen atom. It requires a calculation of wave functions evaluated at equal (ordinary) time for bound states in motion. Such wave functions are not obtained by kinematic boosts from the rest frame. Starting from the exact Bethe-Salpeter equation we derive the equal-time wave function of a fermion-antifermion bound state in QED, i.e., positronium or the hydrogen atom, in any frame to leading order in alpha. We show explicitly that the bound state energy transforms as the fourth component of a vector and that the wave function of the fermion-antifermion Fock state contracts as expected. Transverse photon exchange contributes at leading order to the binding energy of the bound state in motion. We study the general features of the corresponding fermion-antifermion-photon Fock states, and show that they do not transform by simply contracting. We verify that the wave function reduces to the light-front one in the infinite momentum frame.

  9. Physics 321 Energy Conservation Potential Energy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Physics 321 Hour 7 Energy Conservation ­ Potential Energy in One Dimension Work-Energy Theorem = 1 work increases kinetic energy, negative work decreases kinetic energy Gravity Depending on initial is independent of path. If we know we also know . 1 2 y x Potential Energy If T is dependent only on the end

  10. Energy 101: Hydropower

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our homes and businesses.

  11. Energy 101: Hydropower

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our homes and businesses.

  12. Self-organization at low Reynolds numbers in randomly forced isotropic fluid motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McComb, W D; Berera, A; Yoffe, S R; Jankauskas, B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe the formation at long times of a self-organized state in direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equation with random, isotropic forcing. In this state the kinetic energy is contained only in modes at the lowest resolved wavenumber, the skewness vanishes, and visualization of the flows shows a lack of small-scale structure. Accordingly we conclude that the state is not turbulent. Furthermore, we observe that this state is maximally helical. That is, the velocity field is an eigenfunction of the curl operator and is thus a Beltrami field. We put forward numerical evidence suggesting the presence of critical behavior, and outline arguments to support the existence of an upper Reynolds number bound for the occurrence of such self-organized states in forced isotropic fluid motion.

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets Valery I. Shematovich Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences Modeling Atmospheric Escape Workshop - Spring 2012 University are populated by the atoms and molecules with both thermal and suprathermal kinetic energies (Johnson et al

  14. MCAMC: An Advanced Algorithm for Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations: from Magnetization Switching to Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Novotny; Shannon M. Wheeler

    2002-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Monte Carlo with Absorbing Markov Chains (MCAMC) method for extremely long kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The MCAMC algorithm does not modify the system dynamics. It is extremely useful for models with discrete state spaces when low-temperature simulations are desired. To illustrate the strengths and limitations of this algorithm we introduce a simple model involving random walkers on an energy landscape. This simple model has some of the characteristics of protein folding and could also be experimentally realizable in domain motion in nanoscale magnets. We find that even the simplest MCAMC algorithm can speed up calculations by many orders of magnitude. More complicated MCAMC simulations can gain further increases in speed by orders of magnitude.

  15. In Press: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit Machine vision analysis of the energy efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    , recover kinetic energy of moving trains, energy efficient design of railway vehicles, more efficient

  16. Model Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New Abelian vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by {epsilon} {approx}< 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.

  17. Kinetic theory viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the viscous evolution of Keplerian accretion discs can be understood in terms of simple kinetic theory. Although standard physics texts give a simple derivation of momentum transfer in a linear shear flow using kinetic theory, many authors, as detailed by Hayashi & Matsuda 2001, have had difficulties applying the same considerations to a circular shear flow. We show here how this may be done, and note that the essential ingredients are to take proper account of, first, isotropy locally in the frame of the fluid and, second, the geometry of the mean flow.

  18. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  19. RIS-M-2216 CHEMICAL KINETICS IN THE GAS PHASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KINETICS, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, GASES, HYDROGEN SULFIDES, PULSED IRRADIATION, RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOLYSIS is subjected to high energy radiation (e.g. a- particles, Y-radiation or fast electrons), the primary products

  20. Motion Planning ! Jana Kosecka!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosecka, Jana

    1! Motion Planning ! Jana Kosecka! Department of Computer Science! ·Discrete planning, graph search://cs.cmu.edu/~motionplanning, Jyh-Ming Lien! Discrete Planning! · Review of some discrete planning methods! · Given state space is discrete) ! · Use well developed search and graph traversal algorithms to find the path! · Path: set

  1. Motion Planning Jana Kosecka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosecka, Jana

    1 Motion Planning Jana Kosecka Department of Computer Science · Discrete planning, graph search://cs.cmu.edu/~motionplanning, Jyh-Ming Lien State space · Set of all possible states is represented as graph · Nodes states, links planning ­ generate a set of actions, if the solution exists it must be found in the finite time · Search

  2. Study of the ArBr-, AC, and Krl-anions and the corresponding neutral van der Waals complexes by anion zero electron kinetic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    rotational transitions. From our data, we construct the potential energy curve for each neutral state as well energy functions between open and closed shell species or between neutrals and ions are gener- ally muchStudy of the ArBr-, AC, and Krl- anions and the corresponding neutral van der Waals complexes

  3. Energy Blog | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what had only been a motion detection before. The new sensor combines an...

  4. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the TKE to follow 1/t. With an adiabatic condition at the wall it predicts the logarithmic law with von Karman's constant as 1/\\sqrt{2 pi} = 0.399. Likewise rotating couples form dissipat...

  5. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  6. Study of the kinetics of the gas-phase, iodine catalyzed elimination of HBr from isobutylbromide: the tertiary C-H bond dissociation energy in isobutylbromide.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirustithipong, Pongsiri

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    , (with the possible exception of the very electronegative F atom) unless the substituent can delocalize the odd electron such as with the vinyI substituent, i. e. the allyl radical. The stabi'Iization energy is defined as the difference between... of formation of the radical. f s indicated in section (II); the stabilization energy of bromine bridged radical by the delocalization of tne odd electron can be obtained by comparisior, with a localized free radical. Thus, the stabi11zat1on energy...

  7. Kinetics of Silica Polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, Oleh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. E Tardiff, "The LLL Geothermal Energy Program St s Reportmal Effluent Inj ection", Geothermal Energy Novelty Becomesfor Injection", Geothermal Energy Novelty Becomes Resource:

  8. ahumada motion detector: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We show data from a new type of detector that can be used to determine the neutron flux, the energy distribution, and the direction of motion neutron for both fast and thermal...

  9. Concept of the effective potential in describing the motion of ions in a quadrupole mass filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudakov, M. Yu., E-mail: m.soudakov@gmail.com; Apatskaya, M. V. [Ryazan State Radio Engineering University (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a generalization of the effective potential theory for the motion of particles in a rapidly oscillating electric field for the stability parameters lying near the boundary of the diagram where the standard effective potential theory is inapplicable. We derive the dynamic equations describing the variation of the envelope of ion oscillations for the motion of ions near the stability vertex of the first zone of the quadrupole mass filter. We reduce them to the form of the Hamilton equations for oscillations of a material particle in the field of potential forces. We obtain expressions for the effective potential well. It is shown that in spite of the high kinetic energy of oscillations, the depth of the effective potential well for ions in the quadrupole is less than 1 eV in the case of filtration with a mass resolution exceeding 200 units. The acceptance of the mass filter is calculated as a function of the stability parameters and the resolving power.

  10. Quasar Proper Motions and Low-Frequency Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl R. Gwinn; T. Marshall Eubanks; Ted Pyne; Mark Birkinshaw; Demetrios N. Matsakis

    1996-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observational upper limits on the mass-energy of the cosmological gravitational-wave background, from limits on proper motions of quasars. Gravitational waves with periods longer than the time span of observations produce a simple pattern of apparent proper motions over the sky, composed primarily of second-order transverse vector spherical harmonics. A fit of such harmonics to measured motions yields a 95%-confidence limit on the mass-energy of gravitational waves with frequencies <2e-9 Hz, of <0.11/h*h times the closure density of the universe.

  11. Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling &...

  12. DOI: 10.1002/ejic.200600960 Synthesis and Sublimation Kinetics of a Highly Volatile Asymmetric Iron(II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FULL PAPER DOI: 10.1002/ejic.200600960 Synthesis and Sublimation Kinetics of a Highly Volatile: Asymmetric iron(II) amidinate / Bridging ligands / Metathesis / Sublimation kinetics / Thermochemistry properties have been the subject of intense investigations in chemistry, electronics, optics, energy

  13. Operationalization of Relativistic Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Hartmann

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the Helmholtz program of basic measurements to relativistic motion. We define a spatiotemporal order by practical comparison: "longer than" if one object or process covers the other. To express its value also numerically (how many times more) we cover them by a locally regular grid of light clocks. We define basic measures from physical operations. Interrelation of measurement operations by different observers reveals a genetic derivation of formal Lorentz transformation. Operationally impracticable configurations for accelerating observers clarify the way out of apparent Twin paradox. From simple measurement-methodical principles - without mathematical presuppositions - we derive all equations of relativistic Kinematics (and next same for classical and relativistic Dynamics).

  14. Motion capture och skräck; Motion capture and horror.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Åsén, Kristina Helene

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Det här arbetet syftade till att undersöka om de skakningar och ryck som uppstår vid en dålig motion capture-inspelning, kan användas till fördel i… (more)

  15. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  16. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to report the development of the flexible object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulation code KSOME (kinetic simulation of microstructure evolution) which can be used to simulate microstructure evolution of complex systems under irradiation. In this report we briefly describe the capabilities of KSOME and present preliminary results for short term annealing of single cascades in tungsten at various primary-knock-on atom (PKA) energies and temperatures.

  17. Study of exclusive one-pion and one-eta production using hadron and dielectron channels in pp reactions at kinetic beam energies of 1.25 GeV and 2.2 GeV with HADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agakishiev, G; Balanda, A; Bassini, R; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Cabanelas, P; Chernenko, S; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Eberl, T; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O; Finocchiaro, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gilardi, C; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Iori, I; Ierusalimov, A; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Kanaki, K; Karavicheva, T; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Kozuch, A; Krizek, F; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Lang, S; Lapidus, K; Liu, T; Maier, L; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Morinière, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Roy-Stephan, M; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Sailer, B; Salabura, P; Sánchez, M; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Toia, A; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Wagner, V; Wisniowski, M; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of exclusive \\pi^{+,0} and \\eta\\ production in pp reactions at 1.25 GeV and 2.2 GeV beam kinetic energy in hadron and dielectron channels. In the case of \\pi^+ and \\pi^0, high-statistics invariant-mass and angular distributions are obtained within the HADES acceptance as well as acceptance corrected distributions, which are compared to a resonance model. The sensitivity of the data to the yield and production angular distribution of \\Delta(1232) and higher lying baryon resonances is shown, and an improved parameterization is proposed. The extracted cross sections are of special interest in the case of pp \\to pp \\eta, since controversial data exist at 2.0 GeV; we find \\sigma =0.142 \\pm 0.022 mb. Using the dielectron channels, the \\pi^0 and \\eta\\ Dalitz decay signals are reconstructed with yields fully consistent with the hadronic channels. The electron invariant masses and acceptance corrected helicity angle distributions are found in good agreement with model predictions.

  18. Study of exclusive one-pion and one-eta production using hadron and dielectron channels in pp reactions at kinetic beam energies of 1.25 GeV and 2.2 GeV with HADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; H. Alvarez-Pol; A. Balanda; R. Bassini; M. Böhmer; H. Bokemeyer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; T. Eberl; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; K. Kanaki; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; A. Kozuch; F. Krizek; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Maier; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; E. Morinière; J. Mousa; M. Münch; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; T. Pérez Cavalcanti; J. Pietraszko; V. Pospísil; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; M. Roy-Stephan; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; B. Sailer; P. Salabura; M. Sánchez; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; A. Toia; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; P. Zumbruch

    2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of exclusive \\pi^{+,0} and \\eta\\ production in pp reactions at 1.25 GeV and 2.2 GeV beam kinetic energy in hadron and dielectron channels. In the case of \\pi^+ and \\pi^0, high-statistics invariant-mass and angular distributions are obtained within the HADES acceptance as well as acceptance corrected distributions, which are compared to a resonance model. The sensitivity of the data to the yield and production angular distribution of \\Delta(1232) and higher lying baryon resonances is shown, and an improved parameterization is proposed. The extracted cross sections are of special interest in the case of pp \\to pp \\eta, since controversial data exist at 2.0 GeV; we find \\sigma =0.142 \\pm 0.022 mb. Using the dielectron channels, the \\pi^0 and \\eta\\ Dalitz decay signals are reconstructed with yields fully consistent with the hadronic channels. The electron invariant masses and acceptance corrected helicity angle distributions are found in good agreement with model predictions.

  19. Motion capture based motion analysis and motion synthesis for human-like character animation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Zhidong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Motion capture technology is recognised as a standard tool in the computer animation pipeline. It provides detailed movement for animators; however, it also introduces problems… (more)

  20. Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-wind-turbines-2014-update Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns...

  1. Motion Capture Technologies Jessica Hodgins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treuille, Adrien

    a few dof) #12;Production Pipeline #12;What is captured? · Dynamic motions? House of Moves #12;What is captured? · Scale? Motion Analysis #12;What is captured? · Non-rigid objects? House of Moves #12;What is captured? · Props often cause problems ­ Ball in pingpong ­ Fly fishing ­ Sword · Passive behaviors

  2. Tactual Motion Adaptation Phenomenon Junji Watanabe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    processing in the brain without imaging or neurophysiology. Especially, human visual perception of motion has ABSTRACT Tactual motion perception is one of the most important functions for realizing a delicate for investigating not only visual but also tactual motion processing. Keywords: Tactile motion perception, Motion

  3. Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houshmandyar, Saeid [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

  4. Energy flux fluctuations in a finite volume of turbulent flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh Bandi; Walter Goldburg; John Cressman Jr.; Alain Pumir

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The flux of turbulent kinetic energy from large to small spatial scales is measured in a small domain B of varying size R. The probability distribution function of the flux is obtained using a time-local version of Kolmogorov's four-fifths law. The measurements, made at a moderate Reynolds number, show frequent events where the flux is backscattered from small to large scales, their frequency increasing as R is decreased. The observations are corroborated by a numerical simulation based on the motion of many particles and on an explicit form of the eddy damping.

  5. Kinetic dielectric decrement revisited: phenomenology of finite ion concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcello Sega; Sofia Kantorovich; Axel Arnold

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With the help of a recently developed non-equilibrium approach, we investigate the ionic strength dependence of the Hubbard--Onsager dielectric decrement. We compute the depolarization of water molecules caused by the motion of ions in sodium chloride solutions from the dilute regime (0.035 M) up close to the saturation concentration (4.24 M), and find that the kinetic decrement displays a strong nonmonotonic behavior, in contrast to the prediction of available models. We introduce a phenomenological modification of the Hubbard--Onsager continuum theory, that takes into account the screening due to the ionic cloud at mean field level, and, is able to describe the kinetic decrement at high concentrations including the presence of a pronounced minimum.

  6. Danotek Motion Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC JumpCrow Lake Wind107 CX at NorthDaly InternationalDanotek

  7. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    processes. deer09aceves.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Simulation of High...

  8. [Grain boundary and interface kinetics during ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, H.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed here is renewed support of a research program focused on interface motion and phase transformation during ion irradiation, with emphasis on elemental semiconductors. Broadly speaking, the aims of this program are to explore defect kinetics in amorphous and crystalline semiconductors, and to relate defect dynamics to interface motion and phase transformations. Over the last three years, we initiated a program under DOE support to explore crystallization and amorphization of elemental semiconductors under irradiation. This research has enabled new insights about the nature of defects in amorphous semiconductors and about microstructural evolution in the early stages of crystallization. In addition, we have demonstrated almost arbitrary control over the relative rates of crystal nucleation and crystal growth in silicon. As a result, the impinged grain microstructure of thin (100 nm) polycrystalline films crystallized under irradiation can be controlled with grain sizes ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers, which may have interesting technological implications.

  9. (Grain boundary and interface kinetics during ion irradiation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, H.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed here is renewed support of a research program focused on interface motion and phase transformation during ion irradiation, with emphasis on elemental semiconductors. Broadly speaking, the aims of this program are to explore defect kinetics in amorphous and crystalline semiconductors, and to relate defect dynamics to interface motion and phase transformations. Over the last three years, we initiated a program under DOE support to explore crystallization and amorphization of elemental semiconductors under irradiation. This research has enabled new insights about the nature of defects in amorphous semiconductors and about microstructural evolution in the early stages of crystallization. In addition, we have demonstrated almost arbitrary control over the relative rates of crystal nucleation and crystal growth in silicon. As a result, the impinged grain microstructure of thin (100 nm) polycrystalline films crystallized under irradiation can be controlled with grain sizes ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers, which may have interesting technological implications.

  10. Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Learn how hydroelectric power, or hydropower, captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns it into electricity for our homes and businesses.

  11. 06241 Abstracts Collection Human Motion -Understanding, Modeling,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    06241 Abstracts Collection Human Motion - Understanding, Modeling, Capture and Animation. 13th Summary Human Motion - Understanding, Modeling, Capture and Animation. 13th Workshop Reinhard Klette 06241 Human Motion - Understanding, Modeling, Capture and Animation. 13th Workshop "Theoretical

  12. Motion Compensation Via Redundant-Wavelet Multihypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, James E.

    -based implementation. Index Terms-- multihypothesis motion compensation, redun- dant wavelet transform, phaseMotion Compensation Via Redundant-Wavelet Multihypothesis James E. Fowler, Senior Member, IEEE, Suxia Cui, Member, IEEE, and Yonghui Wang, Member, IEEE Abstract-- Multihypothesis motion compensation

  13. Kinetics and morphology of erbium silicide formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.; Wu, C.S.; Lau, S.S.

    1985-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth kinetics and surface morphology of erbium silicide formation from Er layers on Si(100) substrates are examined using both fast e-beam annealing and furnace annealing. Very smooth erbium silicide layers have been grown using a line-source e beam to heat and react the Er overlayers with the substrate. This contrasts to the severe pitting observed when Er layers are reacted with Si in conventional furnace annealing. The pitting phenomenon can be explained by a thin contaminant layer at the interface between Er and Si. Our results suggest the contamination barrier is not due to oxygen, as usually assumed, but may be related to the presence of carbon. Rapid e-beam heating to reaction temperatures of approx.1200 K permits dispersion of the barrier layer before substantial silicide growth can occur, allowing smooth silicide growth. Heating to shorter times to just disperse the interface barrier allows uniform layer growth by subsequent furnace annealing and has permitted measurement of the kinetics of erbium silicide formation on crystalline Si. The reaction obeys (time)/sup 1//sup ///sup 2/ kinetics but is shown to be not totally diffusion limited by the ability to sustain multiple interface growth from a single Si source. The growth rates are nearly an order of magnitude slower for the Er/Si(100) interface than for the Er/amorphous-Si, but with a similar activation energy near 1.75 eV in both cases.

  14. Reciprocal Relations Between Kinetic Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yablonsky, G S; Constales, D; Galvita, V; Marin, G B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study coupled irreversible processes. For linear or linearized kinetics with microreversibility, $\\dot{x}=Kx$, the kinetic operator $K$ is symmetric in the entropic inner product. This form of Onsager's reciprocal relations implies that the shift in time, $\\exp (Kt)$, is also a symmetric operator. This generates reciprocity relations between kinetic curves. For example, for the Master equation, if we start the process from the $i$th pure state and measure the probability $p_j(t)$ of the $j$th state ($j\

  15. A. La Rosa Lecture Notes ENERGY CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    ________________________________________________________________________ ENERGY CONSERVATION The Fisrt Law of Thermodynamics and the Work/Kinetic-Energy Theorem/kinetic-energy theorem Fundamental Energy Conservation Law Inelastic collision (revisited) Case: Pure Thermodynamics the potential energy TRANSFER of ENERGY Heat-transfer Q Macroscopic external Work W ' done on a system ENERGY

  16. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  17. The effect of heart motion on parameter bias in dynamic cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, S.G.; Gullberg, G.T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Huesman, R.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic cardiac SPECT can be used to estimate kinetic rate parameters which describe the wash-in and wash-out of tracer activity between the blood and the myocardial tissue. These kinetic parameters can in turn be correlated to myocardial perfusion. There are, however, many physical aspects associated with dynamic SPECT which can introduce errors into the estimates. This paper describes a study which investigates the effect of heart motion on kinetic parameter estimates. Dynamic SPECT simulations are performed using a beating version of the MCAT phantom. The results demonstrate that cardiac motion has a significant effect on the blood, tissue, and background content of regions of interest. This in turn affects estimates of wash-in, while it has very little effect on estimates of wash-out. The effect of cardiac motion on parameter estimates appears not to be as great as effects introduced by photon noise and geometric collimator response. It is also shown that cardiac motion results in little extravascular contamination of the left ventricle blood region of interest.

  18. Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy: Reservoirs, Sources,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    as a Review in Advance on August 18, 2008 The Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics is online at fluid.annualreviews.org This article's doi: 10.1146/annurev.fluid.40.111406.102139 Copyright c 2009 by Annual Reviews. All rights to Annual Reviews content online, including: · Other articles in this volume · Top cited articles · Top

  19. AER NY Kinetics LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,Information Of TheFixed Logo:UseAEE Solar Name:

  20. Kinetic Wave Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:Keystone Clean Air Jump to:

  1. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Z. Baumert

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the TKE to follow 1/t. With an adiabatic condition at the wall it predicts the logarithmic law with von Karman's constant as 1/\\sqrt{2 pi} = 0.399. Likewise rotating couples form dissipative patches almost at rest ($\\rightarrow$ intermittency) wherein the spectrum evolves like an "Apollonian gear" as discussed first by Herrmann, 1990. On this basis the prefactor of the 3D-wavenumber spectrum is predicted as (1/3)(4 pi)^{2/3}=1.8; in the Lagrangian frequency spectrum it is simply 2. The results are situated well within the scatter range of observational, experimental and DNS results.

  2. Virtual Test Environment for Motion Capture Shoots.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redavid, Claudio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? This master thesis presents the design of an implementation of a working prototype for an augmented motion capture acting environment. Motion capture (MoCap), the… (more)

  3. Nonequilibrium free energy, H theorem and self-sustained oscillations for Boltzmann-BGK descriptions of semiconductor superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Alvaro; L L Bonilla

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor superlattices (SL) may be described by a Boltzmann-Poisson kinetic equation with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collision term which preserves charge, but not momentum or energy. Under appropriate boundary and voltage bias conditions, these equations exhibit time-periodic oscillations of the current caused by repeated nucleation and motion of charge dipole waves. Despite this clear nonequilibrium behavior, if we `close' the system by attaching insulated contacts to the superlattice and keeping its voltage bias to zero volts, we can prove the H theorem, namely that a free energy $\\Phi(t)$ of the kinetic equations is a Lyapunov functional ($\\Phi\\geq 0$, $d\\Phi/dt\\leq 0$). Numerical simulations confirm that the free energy decays to its equilibrium value for a closed SL, whereas for an `open' SL under appropriate dc voltage bias and contact conductivity $\\Phi(t)$ oscillates in time with the same frequency as the current self-sustained oscillations.

  4. Defect motion and lattice pinning barriers in Josephson-junction ladders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, H.; Lim, Jong Soo [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Fortin, J.-Y. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite Louis Pasteur, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Choi, J. [Department of Physics, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, M. Y. [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the motion of domain wall defects in a fully frustrated Josephson-junction ladder system, driven by small applied currents. For small system sizes, the energy barrier E{sub B} to the defect motion is computed analytically via symmetry and topological considerations. More generally, we perform numerical simulations directly on the equations of motion, based on the resistively-shunted junction model, to study the dynamics of defects, varying the system size. Coherent motion of domain walls is observed for large system sizes. In the thermodynamical limit, we find E{sub B}=0.1827 in units of the Josephson coupling energy.

  5. Electron kinetics in a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levko, Dmitry [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)] [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron kinetics during a microdischarge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell/Monte Carlo Collisions model. It is obtained that the electron energy distribution function can be divided into three parts, namely, the non-equilibrium low-energy part, the Maxwellian function at moderate energies, and the high-energy tail. Simulation results showed that the role of the high-energy tail of electron energy distribution increases, when the distance between electrodes increases.

  6. Microscopic chaos from Brownian motion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. P. Dettmann; E. G. D. Cohen; H. van Beijeren

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent experiment on Brownian motion has been interpreted to exhibit direct evidence for microscopic chaos. In this note we demonstrate that virtually identical results can be obtained numerically using a manifestly microscopically nonchaotic system.

  7. Motion at low Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Daniel See Wai, 1980-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this thesis centers on inertialess motion at low Reynolds numbers at the crossroad between biofluids and microfluids. Here we address questions regarding locomotion of micro-swimmers, transport of ...

  8. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocation of Shewanella Oneidensis OuterDirect Kinetic

  9. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel prices topDirect Kinetic

  10. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel prices topDirect KineticDirect

  11. Phase-field Model for Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics and Thermodynamic and Kinetic Models of Irradiated Fe-Cr Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructure evolution kinetics in irradiated materials has strongly spatial correlation. For example, void and second phases prefer to nucleate and grow at pre-existing defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and cracks. Inhomogeneous microstructure evolution results in inhomogeneity of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. Therefore, the simulation capability for predicting three dimensional (3-D) microstructure evolution kinetics and its subsequent impact on material properties and performance is crucial for scientific design of advanced nuclear materials and optimal operation conditions in order to reduce uncertainty in operational and safety margins. Very recently the meso-scale phase-field (PF) method has been used to predict gas bubble evolution, void swelling, void lattice formation and void migration in irradiated materials,. Although most results of phase-field simulations are qualitative due to the lake of accurate thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects, possible missing of important kinetic properties and processes, and the capability of current codes and computers for large time and length scale modeling, the simulations demonstrate that PF method is a promising simulation tool for predicting 3-D heterogeneous microstructure and property evolution, and providing microstructure evolution kinetics for higher scale level simulations of microstructure and property evolution such as mean field methods. This report consists of two parts. In part I, we will present a new phase-field model for predicting interstitial loop growth kinetics in irradiated materials. The effect of defect (vacancy/interstitial) generation, diffusion and recombination, sink strength, long-range elastic interaction, inhomogeneous and anisotropic mobility on microstructure evolution kinetics is taken into account in the model. The model is used to study the effect of elastic interaction on interstitial loop growth kinetics, the interstitial flux, and sink strength of interstitial loop for interstitials. In part II, we present a generic phase field model and discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in phase-field models including the reaction kinetics of radiation defects and local free energy of irradiated materials. In particular, a two-sublattice thermodynamic model is suggested to describe the local free energy of alloys with irradiated defects. Fe-Cr alloy is taken as an example to explain the required thermodynamic and kinetic properties for quantitative phase-field modeling. Finally the great challenges in phase-field modeling will be discussed.

  12. Computer simulation of submarine motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurflueh, Jeffery Alan

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject: Mechanical Engineering COMPUTER SIMULATION OF SUBMARINE MOTION A Thesis by JEFFERY ALAN ZURFLUEH Approved as to style and content by: Make McDermott, Jr. ( Chair of Committee ) Glen Williams ( Member ) Lo 4verett ( Member ) gu r Walter...COMPUTER SIMULATION OF SUBMARINE MOTION A Thesis by JEFFERY ALAN ZURFLUEH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major...

  13. Solar Radiation and Asteroidal Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Klacka

    2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of solar wind and solar electromagnetic radiation on motion of asteroids are discussed. The results complete the statements presented in Vokrouhlick\\'{y} and Milani (2000). As for the effect of electromagnetic radiation, the complete equation of motion is presented to the first order in $v/c$ -- the shape of asteroid (spherical body is explicitly presented) and surface distribution of albedo should be taken into account. Optical quantities must be calculated in proper frame of reference.

  14. Kinetic models of opinion formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Toscani

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and discuss certain kinetic models of (continuous) opinion formation involving both exchange of opinion between individual agents and diffusion of information. We show conditions which ensure that the kinetic model reaches non trivial stationary states in case of lack of diffusion in correspondence of some opinion point. Analytical results are then obtained by considering a suitable asymptotic limit of the model yielding a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of opinion among individuals.

  15. Nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Derrell W.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KTRIC AMPLIFICATION IN THE JACOBSEN HYDROLYTIC KINET RESOLUTION OF RACEMIC EPOXIDES 20 Applicability of Homocompetitive Reaction Kinetics to the Jacobsen HKR Effect of Catalyst EE and Choice of Epoxide on Amplification in the Jacobsen HKR.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Effect of Temperature on Amplification and Reaction Rate in the Jacobsen HKR . Effect of Low EE Catalyst Generation on Amplification in the Jacobsen HKR. . . . 21 21 25 26 27 30 31 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CHAPTER Page V AS...

  16. Pebble-bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This report presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to determine the contact forces and the lengths of motion in contact. This information combined with the proper wear coefficients can be used to determine the dust production from mechanical wear. These new capabilities enhance the understanding of PBRs, and the capabilities of the code will allow future improvements in understanding.

  17. Intrinsic Primary and Secondary Hydrogen Kinetic Isotope Effects for Alanine Racemase from Global Analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toney, Michael

    Intrinsic Primary and Secondary Hydrogen Kinetic Isotope Effects for Alanine Racemase from Global of the intrinsic primary kinetic isotope effects, the lower boundary on the energy of the quinonoid intermediate, making alanine racemase an attractive target for antibacterials. Global analysis of protiated

  18. Transient Kinetic Analysis | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina ButlerTodayTransForumEnergy

  19. Unconventional motional narrowing in the optical spectrum of a semiconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    observed for nuclear magnetic resonance. I n the seminal work on motional narrowing1 , relaxation effects. The fluctuation of the quantum-dot environment thus randomizes the emission energy over a range of spectral. A textbook example is found in nuclear magnetic resonance, where the fluctuating local magnetic fields

  20. Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns...

  1. Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    terms Search Retain current filters Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Video Energy 101: Hydroelectric Power Learn how hydropower captures the kinetic energy of flowing water and turns...

  2. Motion Processing and From-from-Apparent-Motion in Infancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirshkowitz, Amy

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    /VPC) and discrimination paradigms. Infants in both paradigms extracted shape from apparent motion given luminance cues alone, and color and luminance cues co-varying; but failed to extract shape given color cues alone (Studies 1-2). Given only color cues, infants required...

  3. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  4. Sensitivity of the Earthquake Response of Tall Steel Moment Frame Buildings to Ground Motion Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Swaminathan

    the skyline of many cities in the western US exposed to serious seismicity from a variety of sources. Consider with a simple energy balance analysis. The collapse initiation regime expands to lower ground motion periods are the ground motion features that could collapse these massive structures. Real-world data that could provide

  5. astroph/9610086 Quasar Proper Motions and LowFrequency Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    astro­ph/9610086 11 Oct 1996 Quasar Proper Motions and Low­Frequency Gravitational Waves Carl R observational upper limits on the mass­energy of the cosmological gravitational­wave background, from limits on proper motions of quasars. Gravitational waves with periods longer than the time span of observations

  6. Motion Detection Circuits for a Time-To-Travel Rico Moeckel and Shih-Chii Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shih-Chii

    on motion energy models, token-based models, correlation-based models, or optical flow models [1-8]. Some motion. The benefits of these sensors ­ low-power consumption, parallel, collective computation, light weight ­ make them attractive for mobile, battery-powered platforms, especially for autonomous micro

  7. ONE-DIMENSIONAL PSEUDO-HOMOGENEOUS PACKED BED REACTOR MODELING INCLUDING NO-CO KINETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Anand

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    the chemical species and energy equations for dynamically incompressible flow in one-dimension. Furthermore, the chemical kinetics on the reduction reaction of nitric oxide by carbon monoxide over rhodium-alumina and platinum-alumina catalysts is investigated...

  8. Visually simulating realistic fluid motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naithani, Priyanka

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's second law of motion and Conservation of Mass, which leads to the continuity equation. Newton's second law states that the total force F, acting on an element equals mass m times the element's acceleration a. In the case of fluids we do not consider...

  9. Smoothing of respiratory motion traces for motion-compensated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Floris; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, Luebeck SH 23538 (Germany)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The CyberKnife system has been used successfully for several years to radiosurgically treat tumors without the need for stereotactic fixation or sedation of the patient. It has been shown that tumor motion in the lung, liver, and pancreas can be tracked with acceptable accuracy and repeatability. However, highly precise targeting for tumors in the lower abdomen, especially for tumors which exhibit strong motion, remains problematic. Reasons for this are manifold, like the slow tracking system operating at 26.5 Hz, and using the signal from the tracking camera ''as is''. Since the motion recorded with the camera is used to compensate for system latency by prediction and the predicted signal is subsequently used to infer the tumor position from a correlation model based on x-ray imaging of gold fiducials around the tumor, camera noise directly influences the targeting accuracy. The goal of this work is to establish the suitability of a new smoothing method for respiratory motion traces used in motion-compensated radiotherapy. The authors endeavor to show that better prediction--With a lower rms error of the predicted signal--and/or smoother prediction is possible using this method. Methods: The authors evaluated six commercially available tracking systems (NDI Aurora, PolarisClassic, Polaris Vicra, MicronTracker2 H40, FP5000, and accuTrack compact). The authors first tracked markers both stationary and while in motion to establish the systems' noise characteristics. Then the authors applied a smoothing method based on the a trous wavelet decomposition to reduce the devices' noise level. Additionally, the smoothed signal of the moving target and a motion trace from actual human respiratory motion were subjected to prediction using the MULIN and the nLMS{sub 2} algorithms. Results: The authors established that the noise distribution for a static target is Gaussian and that when the probe is moved such as to mimic human respiration, it remains Gaussian with the exception of the FP5000 and the Aurora systems. The authors also showed that the proposed smoothing method can indeed be used to filter noise. The signal's jitter dropped by as much as 95% depending on the tracking system employed. Subsequently, the 3D prediction error (rms) for a prediction horizon of 150 ms on a synthetic signal dropped by up to 37% when using a normalized LMS prediction algorithm (nLMS{sub 2}) and hardly changed when using a MULIN algorithm. When smoothing a real signal obtained in our laboratory, the improvement of prediction was similar: Up to 30% for both the nLMS{sub 2} and the best MULIN algorithm. The authors also found a noticeable increase in smoothness of the predicted signal, the relative jitter dropped by up to 95% on the real signal, and on the simulated signal. Conclusions: In conclusion, the authors can say that preprocessing of marker data is very useful in motion-compensated radiotherapy since the quality of prediction increases. This will result in better performance of the correlation model. As a side effect, since the prediction of a preprocessed signal is also less noisy, the authors expect less robot vibration resulting in better targeting accuracy and less strain on the robot gears.

  10. Interaction of two walkers: Wave-mediated energy and force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borghesi, Christian; Labousse, Matthieu; Eddi, Antonin; Fort, Emmanuel; Couder, Yves

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bouncing droplet, self-propelled by its interaction with the waves it generates, forms a classical wave-particle association called a "walker." Previous works have demonstrated that the dynamics of a single walker is driven by its global surface wave field that retains information on its past trajectory. Here, we investigate the energy stored in this wave field for two coupled walkers and how it conveys an interaction between them. For this purpose, we characterize experimentally the "promenade modes" where two walkers are bound, and propagate together. Their possible binding distances take discrete values, and the velocity of the pair depends on their mutual binding. The mean parallel motion can be either rectilinear or oscillating. The experimental results are recovered analytically with a simple theoretical framework. A relation between the kinetic energy of the droplets and the total energy of the standing waves is established.

  11. The Impact of Alternative Fuels on Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The research targets the development of detailed kinetic models to quantitatively characterize the impact of alternative fuels on the performance of Navy turbines and diesel engines. Such impacts include kinetic properties such as cetane number, flame speed, and emissions as well as physical properties such as the impact of boiling point distributions on fuel vaporization and mixing. The primary focus will be Fischer-Tropsch liquids made from natural gas, coal or biomass. The models will include both the effects of operation with these alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional petroleum-based fuels. The team will develop the requisite kinetic rules for specific reaction types and incorporate these into detailed kinetic mechanisms to predict the combustion performance of neat alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional fuels. Reduced kinetic models will be then developed to allow solution of the coupled kinetics/transport problems. This is a collaboration between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CSM/LLNL team plans to build on the substantial progress made in recent years in developing accurate detailed chemical mechanisms for the oxidation and pyrolysis of conventional fuels. Particular emphasis will be placed upon reactions of the isoalkanes and the daughter radicals, especially tertiary radicals, formed by abstraction from the isoalkanes. The various components of the program are described. We have been developing the kinetic models for two iso-dodecane molecules, using the same kinetic modeling formalisms that were developed for the gasoline and diesel primary reference fuels. These mechanisms, and the thermochemical and transport coefficient submodels for them, are very close to completion at the time of this report, and we expect them to be available for kinetic simulations early in the coming year. They will provide a basis for prediction and selection of desirable F-T molecules for use in jet engine simulations, where we should be able to predict the ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics of proposed fuel components. These mechanisms include the reactions and chemical species needed to describe high temperature phenomena such as shock tube ignition and flammability behavior, and they will also include low temperature kinetics to describe other ignition phenomena such as compression ignition and knocking. During the past years, our hydrocarbon kinetics modeling group at LLNL has focused a great deal on fuels typical of gasoline and diesel fuel. About 10 years ago, we developed kinetic models for the fuel octane primary reference fuels, n-heptane [1] and iso-octane [2], which have 7 and 8 carbon atoms and are therefore representative of typical gasoline fuels. N-heptane represents the low limit of knock resistance with an octane number of 0, while iso-octane is very knock resistant with an octane number of 100. High knock resistance in iso-octane was attributed largely to the large fraction of primary C-H bonds in the molecule, including 15 of the 18 C-H bonds, and the high bond energy of these primary bonds plays a large role in this knock resistance. In contrast, in the much more ignitable n-heptane, 10 of its 16 C-H bonds are much less strongly bound secondary C-H bonds, leading to its very low octane number. All of these factors, as well as a similarly complex kinetic description of the equally important role of the transition state rings that transfer H atoms within the reacting fuel molecules, were quantified and collected into large kinetic reaction mechanisms that are used by many researchers in the fuel chemistry world.

  12. Note on numerical study of the beam energy spread in NDCX-I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vay, J.-L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of beam current, (d) kinetic energy history by of beam macroF I G . 3. N D C X - I beam energy history from (left) Warpplate and their kinetic energy history is plotted in F i g .

  13. Kinetic Modeling and Thermodynamic Closure Approximation of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 5, 2007 ... Kinetic Modeling and Thermodynamic Closure. Approximation of Liquid Crystal Polymers. Haijun Yu. Program in Applied and Computational ...

  14. Practical Color-Based Motion Capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Robert

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion capture systems have been widely used for high quality content creation and virtual reality but are rarely used in consumer applications due to their price and setup cost. In this paper, we propose a motion capture ...

  15. Video looping of human cyclic motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hye Mee

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, a system called Video Looping is developed to analyze human cyclic motions. Video Looping allows users to extract human cyclic motion from a given video sequence. This system analyzes similarities from a large amount of live footage...

  16. The effects of wave groups on the nonlinear simulation of ship motion in random seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richer, Jeffrey A.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, the analysis of ship motion and loading responses has been performed in the frequency domain with both linear response amplitude operators and wave energy density spectra. This method, therefore, did not account for the nonlinear...

  17. Experimental wave effect on vertical relative motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, Rajith

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the most probable peak value of the different modes of motion indicates that the linear theory tends to overpredict....

  18. Colloidal Micromotors: Controlled Directed Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baraban, Larysa; Makarov, Denys; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we demonstrate a synthetic micro-engine, based on long-range controlled movement of colloidal particles, which is induced by a local catalytic reaction. The directed motion at long timescales was achieved by placing specially designed magnetic capped colloids in a hydrogen peroxide solution at weak magnetic fields. The control of the motion of the particles was provided by changes of the concentration of the solution and by varying the strength of the applied magnetic field. Such synthetic objects can then be used not only to understand the fundamental driving processes but also be employed as small motors in biological environments, for example, for the transportation of molecules in a controllable way.

  19. Colloidal Micromotors: Controlled Directed Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larysa Baraban; Christian Kreidler; Denys Makarov; Paul Leiderer; Artur Erbe

    2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we demonstrate a synthetic micro-engine, based on long-range controlled movement of colloidal particles, which is induced by a local catalytic reaction. The directed motion at long timescales was achieved by placing specially designed magnetic capped colloids in a hydrogen peroxide solution at weak magnetic fields. The control of the motion of the particles was provided by changes of the concentration of the solution and by varying the strength of the applied magnetic field. Such synthetic objects can then be used not only to understand the fundamental driving processes but also be employed as small motors in biological environments, for example, for the transportation of molecules in a controllable way.

  20. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  1. Solid state engine with alternating motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golestaneh, A.A.

    1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat energy is converted to mechanical motion utilizing apparatus including a cylinder, a piston having openings therein reciprocable in the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for warm water at one end of the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for cool water at the other end of the cylinder, gates movable with the piston and slidably engaging the cylinder wall to alternately open and close the warm and cool water ports, a spring bearing against the warm water side of the piston and a double helix of a thermal shape memory material attached to the cool end of the cylinder and to the piston. The piston is caused to reciprocate by alternately admitting cool water and warm water to the cylinder.

  2. Solid state engine with alternating motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golestaneh, Ahmad A. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat energy is converted to mechanical motion utilizing apparatus including a cylinder, a piston having openings therein reciprocable in the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for warm water at one end of the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for cool water at the other end of the cylinder, gates movable with the piston and slidably engaging the cylinder wall to alternately open and close the warm and cool water ports, a spring bearing against the warm water side of the piston and a double helix of a thermal shape memory material attached to the cool end of the cylinder and to the piston. The piston is caused to reciprocate by alternately admitting cool water and warm water to the cylinder.

  3. Imaging System to Measure Kinetics of Material Cluster Ejection During Exit-Surface Damage Initiation and Growth in Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, R N; Negres, R A; Demos, S G

    2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced damage on the surface of optical components typically is manifested by the formation of microscopic craters that can ultimately degrade the optics performance characteristics. It is believed that the damage process is the result of the material exposure to high temperatures and pressures within a volume on the order of several cubic microns located just below the surface. The response of the material following initial localized energy deposition by the laser pulse, including the timeline of events and the individual processes involved during this timeline, is still largely unknown. In this work we introduce a time-resolved microscope system designed to enable a detailed investigation of the sequence of dynamic events involved during surface damage. To best capture individual aspects of the damage timeline, this system is employed in multiple imaging configurations (such as multi-view image acquisition at a single time point and multi-image acquisition at different time points of the same event) and offers sensitivity to phenomena at very early delay times. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated with preliminary results from the study of exit-surface damage in fused silica. The time-resolved images provide information on the material response immediately following laser energy deposition, the processes later involved during crater formation or growth, the material ejecta kinetics, and overall material motion and transformation. Such results offer insight into the mechanisms governing damage initiation and growth in the optical components of ICF class laser systems.

  4. Relativistic Motion with Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felicetti, S; Fuentes, I; Lamata, L; Romero, G; Solano, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the dynamical modulation of the qubit-field coupling strength in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture mimics the motion of the qubit at relativistic speeds. This allows us to propose a realistic experiment to detect microwave photons coming from simulated acceleration radiation. Moreover, by combining this technique with the dynamical Casimir physics, we enhance the toolbox for studying relativistic phenomena in quantum field theory with superconducting circuits.

  5. Learning Motion Style Synthesis from Perceptual Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bregler, Christoph

    that the learned model can apply a variety of motion styles to pre-recorded motion sequences and it can extrapolate models that are unable to fully capture the subtleties and complexities of human movement based on learned parametric models. The aim is to maintain the animated preci- sion of motion capture

  6. RHIC stochastic cooling motion control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassner, D.; DeSanto, L.; Olsen, R.H.; Fu, W.; Brennan, J.M.; Liaw, CJ; Bellavia, S.; Brodowski, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams are subject to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) that causes an emittance growth in all three-phase space planes. The only way to increase integrated luminosity is to counteract IBS with cooling during RHIC stores. A stochastic cooling system for this purpose has been developed, it includes moveable pick-ups and kickers in the collider that require precise motion control mechanics, drives and controllers. Since these moving parts can limit the beam path aperture, accuracy and reliability is important. Servo, stepper, and DC motors are used to provide actuation solutions for position control. The choice of motion stage, drive motor type, and controls are based on needs defined by the variety of mechanical specifications, the unique performance requirements, and the special needs required for remote operations in an accelerator environment. In this report we will describe the remote motion control related beam line hardware, position transducers, rack electronics, and software developed for the RHIC stochastic cooling pick-ups and kickers.

  7. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Abstract: Many...

  8. Challenges and Progress Toward a Commercial Kinetic Hydropower System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Challenges and Progress Toward a Commercial Kinetic Hydropower System for its kinetic hydropower devices, and has made precise measurements

  9. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wang, Z. R.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  10. MHK Projects/Ogdensburg Kinetic Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation,Trials

  11. Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M. (Saline, MI); Raghavan, Kamaldev (Houston, TX)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

  12. Beilstein-Institut Reflections on Energy Conversion in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Abstract In principle any form of energy (light, electrical, potential, chemical, kinetic energy potential energy, kinetic energy and electrical energy can be made directly, and with high efficiency understanding of thermody- namics. In reality, harnessing the chemical energy contained in an ATP molecule

  13. Master equation approach to protein folding and kinetic traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Cieplak; Malte Henkel; Jan Karbowski; Jayanth R. Banavar

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The master equation for 12-monomer lattice heteropolymers is solved numerically and the time evolution of the occupancy of the native state is determined. At low temperatures, the median folding time follows the Arrhenius law and is governed by the longest relaxation time. For good folders, significant kinetic traps appear in the folding funnel whereas for bad folders, the traps also occur in non-native energy valleys.

  14. Gravitational energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Katz

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Observers at rest in a stationary spacetime flat at infinity can measure small amounts of rest-mass+internal energies+kinetic energies+pressure energy in a small volume of fluid attached to a local inertial frame. The sum of these small amounts is the total "matter energy" for those observers. The total mass-energy minus the matter energy is the binding gravitational energy. Misner, Thorne and Wheeler evaluated the gravitational energy of a spherically symmetric static spacetime. Here we show how to calculate gravitational energy in any static and stationary spacetime for isolated sources with a set of observers at rest. The result of MTW is recovered and we find that electromagnetic and gravitational 3-covariant energy densities in conformastatic spacetimes are of opposite signs. Various examples suggest that gravitational energy is negative in spacetimes with special symmetries or when the energy-momentum tensor satisfies usual energy conditions.

  15. Method and an apparatus to control the lateral motion of a long metal bar being formed by a mechanical process such as rolling or drawing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh (Ann Arbor, MI); Huang, Hsun-Hau (Ann Arbor, MI); Lin, Chang-Hung (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An adjustable guide, includes two or more mechanisms each having a rotatable retaining element containing a retaining groove with a variable radius in its perimeter surface. The grooves form a guidance path to control the lateral, i.e. non-axial, motion of a long bar moving along a longitudinal axis during a production process.The diameter of the guidance path varies according to the variable radii of the grooves. The guidance path increases in size at a predetermined rate, from a point of origin to an end point on the retaining groove. Rotating the retaining elements causes the diameter of the retaining grooves to change so that the size of the guidance path can be changed to match the diameter of the bar being rolled, size of the guidance path can be changed to fit the diameter of a new bar rolled without having to exchange the guide for a different sized guide, reduce fiction between the bar and the guide, a media, such as compressed air, can be injected between the retaining elements via orifices.Each retaining element is attached to a mounting apparatus. The mounting apparatus can be fixed or flexible. The flexible mounting apparatus includes one or more springs and one or more shock absorbers. A force neutral position of the flexible mounting apparatus is designed to be located on the predetermined ideal bar path line. The flexible mounting apparatus dissipates kinetic energy from the bar thereby reducing the bar's lateral motion relative to the ideal bar path line.The damping ratio of the mounting apparatus can be adjustable to alter the product's vibration mode to enable better control of the bar's lateral motion.

  16. Thermodynamics of Potassium Exchange in Soil Using a Kinetics Approach1 D. L. SPARKS AND P. M. JARDINEZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Thermodynamics of Potassium Exchange in Soil Using a Kinetics Approach1 D. L. SPARKS AND P. M. JARDINEZ ABSTRACT Thermodynamics of potassium (K) exchange using a kinetics ap- proach was investigated that more energy was needed to desorb K than to adsorb K. Thermodynamic and pseudother- modynamic parameters

  17. Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

  18. Effect of radiation flux on test particle motion in the Vaidya spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Andrea Geralico; Robert T. Jantzen; Oldrich Semerák

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion of massive test particles in the nonvacuum spherically symmetric radiating Vaidya spacetime is investigated, allowing for physical interaction of the particles with the radiation field in terms of which the source energy-momentum tensor is interpreted. This "Poynting-Robertson-like effect" is modeled by the usual effective term describing a Thomson-type radiation drag force. The equations of motion are studied for simple types of motion including free motion (without interaction), purely radial and purely azimuthal (circular) motion, and for the particular case of "static" equilibrium; appropriate solutions are given where possible. The results---mainly those on the possible existence of equilibrium positions---are compared with their counterparts obtained previously for a test spherically symmetric radiation field in a vacuum Schwarzschild background.

  19. Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

    2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

  20. Coupled simulation of kinetic pedestal growth and MHD ELM crash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, G. [New York University; Cummings, J. [California Institute of Technology, University of California, Davis; Chang, C. S. [New York University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Ku, S. [New York University; Podhorszki, Norbert [University of California, Davis; Pankin, A. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Samtaney, Ravi [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Snyder, P. [General Atomics, San Diego; Strauss, H. [New York University; Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); CPES Team, the [SciDAC Prototype FSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edge pedestal height and the accompanying ELM crash are critical elements of ITER physics yet to be understood and predicted through high performance computing. An entirely self-consistent first principles simulation is being pursued as a long term research goal, and the plan is planned for completion in time for ITER operation. However, a proof-of-principle work has already been established using a computational tool that employs the best first principles physics available at the present time. A kinetic edge equilibrium code XGC0, which can simulate the neoclassically dominant pedestal growth from neutral ionization (using a phenomenological residual turbulence diffusion motion superposed upon the neoclassical particle motion) is coupled to an extended MHD code M3D, which can perform the nonlinear ELM crash. The stability boundary of the pedestal is checked by an ideal MHD linear peeling-ballooning code, which has been validated against many experimental data sets for the large scale (type I) ELMs onset boundary. The coupling workflow and scientific results to be enabled by it are described.

  1. The 700-1500 cm{sup ?1} region of the S{sub 1} (A{sup ~1}B{sub 2}) state of toluene studied with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy, and time-resolved slow-electron velocity-map imaging (tr-SEVI) spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Green, Alistair M.; Tamé-Reyes, Victor M.; Reid, Katharine L.; Davies, Julia A.; Parkes, Victoria H. K.; Wright, Timothy G., E-mail: Tim.Wright@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report (nanosecond) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), (nanosecond) zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) and (picosecond) time-resolved slow-electron velocity map imaging (tr-SEVI) spectra of fully hydrogenated toluene (Tol-h{sub 8}) and the deuterated-methyl group isotopologue (?{sub 3}-Tol-d{sub 3}). Vibrational assignments are made making use of the activity observed in the ZEKE and tr-SEVI spectra, together with the results from quantum chemical and previous experimental results. Here, we examine the 700–1500 cm{sup ?1} region of the REMPI spectrum, extending our previous work on the region ?700 cm{sup ?1}. We provide assignments for the majority of the S{sub 1} and cation bands observed, and in particular we gain insight regarding a number of regions where vibrations are coupled via Fermi resonance. We also gain insight into intramolecular vibrational redistribution in this molecule.

  2. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    improved gasoline surrogate fuels for HCCI engines * Development of very efficient software to reduce the size of detailed chemical kinetic models for transportation fuels...

  3. Kinetic bounding volume hierarchies for deformable objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Zachmann; Tu Clausthal

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present novel algorithms for updating bounding volume hierarchies of objects undergoing arbitrary deformations. Therefore, we introduce two new data structures, the kinetic AABB tree and the kinetic BoxTree. The event-based approach of the kinetic data structures framework enables us to show that our algorithms are optimal in the number of updates. Moreover, we show a lower bound for the total number of BV updates, which is independent of the number of frames. We used our kinetic bounding volume hierarchies for collision detection and performed a comparison with the classical bottomup update method. The results show that our algorithms perform up to ten times faster in practically relevant scenarios.

  4. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  5. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data - Pres. 1: Coordination of CLEERS Project; Pres. 2: ORNL Research on LNT Sulfation & Desulfation CLEERS...

  6. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  7. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  8. Implementation of motion capture support in smartphones.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinsson, Johannes

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis investigates the feasibility of developing cross-platform smart phone applications that utilize the Qualisys motion capture system. An Application Programming Interface that implements an… (more)

  9. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the fourth year of a research project conducted under the University Coal Research Program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (water, carbon dioxide, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the fourth year of the project, an analysis of experimental data collected during the second year of this project was performed. Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing product distributions from 27 mass balances. During the reporting period two kinetic models were employed: a comprehensive kinetic model of Dr. Li and co-workers (Yang et al., 2003) and a hydrocarbon selectivity model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) The kinetic model of Yang et al. (2003) has 24 parameters (20 parameters for hydrocarbon formation, and 4 parameters for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction). Kinetic parameters for the WGS reaction and FTS synthesis were estimated first separately, and then simultaneously. The estimation of these kinetic parameters employed the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method and the trust-region reflective Newton large-scale (LS) method. A genetic algorithm (GA) was incorporated into estimation of parameters for FTS reaction to provide initial estimates of model parameters. All reaction rate constants and activation energies were found to be positive, but at the 95% confidence level the intervals were large. Agreement between predicted and experimental reaction rates has been fair to good. Light hydrocarbons are predicted fairly accurately, whereas the model underpredicts values of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. Van der Laan and Beenackers hydrocarbon selectivity model provides a very good fit of the experimental data for hydrocarbons up to about C{sub 20}. However, the experimental data shows higher paraffin formation rates in C{sub 12}-C{sub 25} region which is likely due to hydrocracking or other secondary reactions. The model accurately captures the observed experimental trends of decreasing olefin to paraffin ratio and increasing {alpha} (chain growth length) with increase in chain length.

  10. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  11. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  12. Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Kun

    Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow. For the non-equilibrium flow computations, i.e., the nozzle flow and hypersonic rarefied flow over flat plate-kinetic method; Hypersonic and rarefied flows 1. Introduction The development of aerospace technology has

  13. Kinetic study of bitumen release from heated shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, E.B.; Barker, C.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With rising temperature shales evolve hydrocarbons discontinuously. At low temperatures, bitumens are thermally distilled (Peak 1) while at higher temperatures kerogen is pyrolyzed to lower molecular weight products (Peak 2). Hydrocarbon release occurring between these two peaks is less well understood. They have studied the kinetics of thermal bitumen release (Peak 1) from samples of the Excello and Woodford Shales and find that they are second order with activation energies of 19,000 cals/mole and 17,048 cals/ mole, respectively. The thermal release of nC/sub 26/ adsorbed on a siliceous support also followed second order kinetics. Activation energies, along with the determined Arrhenius A factor, permits the calculation of Peak 1 shape so that its contribution can be subtracted from the total hydrocarbon release. The residual curve shows two smaller peaks between the bitumen and kerogen peaks. These are tentatively assigned to adsorption on the mineral matrix and adsorption on kerogen. An important consequence of second order kinetics is that the temperature for the Peak 1 maximum varies with the amount of bitumen in the rock.

  14. Cross-fixation transfer of motion aftereffects with expansion motion Xin Meng a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    by expanding random-dots stimuli. We also used rightward translational motion for comparison. Subjects adapted, a test pattern without net motion elicits more response in the opposite direction than the adapted

  15. Answers for Homework Handout for unit 4 Work and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansell, Edward "Ted"

    potential energy spinning top: (rotational) kinetic energy pot of hot water: thermal (kinetic) energy x-rays: electromagnetic energy (not really "storage" per se, however) 6. From the top to the bottom, the gymnast's centerAnswers for Homework Handout for unit 4 Work and Energy 1. Here we use W = F D = FD cos : a) W

  16. Universal constants and equations of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spirit of Prandtl [1926], for turbulence at high Reynolds number we present an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, with dipoles made of Thorpe's [1977] quasi-solid vortex tubes as frictionless, incompressible but deformable quasi-particles. Their movements are governed by Helmholtz' elementary vortex rules applied locally. A contact interaction or 'collision' leads either to random scatter of a trajectory or to the formation of two likewise rotating, fundamentally unstable whirls forming a dissipative patch slowly rotating around its center of mass which is almost at rest. This approach predicts von Karman's constant as 1/sqrt(2 pi) = 0.399 and the spatio-temporal dynamics of energy-containing time and length scales controlling turbulent mixing Baumert [2009]. A link to turbulence spectra was missing so far. In the present paper it is shown that the above image of random vortex-dipole movements is compatible with Kolmogorov's turbulence spectra if dissipative patches, beginning as two likewise ro...

  17. Nonequilibrium sensing and its analogy to kinetic proofreading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartich, David; Seifert, Udo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a paradigmatic model of chemotaxis, we analyze the effect how a nonzero affinity driving receptors out of equilibrium affects sensitivity. This affinity arises whenever changes in receptor activity involve ATP hydrolysis. The sensitivity integrated over a ligand concentration range is shown to be enhanced by the affinity, providing a measure of how much energy consumption improves sensing. With this integrated sensitivity we can establish an intriguing analogy between sensing with nonequilibrium receptors and kinetic proofreading: the increase in integrated sensitivity is equivalent to the decrease of the error in kinetic proofreading. The influence of the occupancy of the receptor on the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reaction rates is shown to be crucial for the relation between integrated sensitivity and affinity. This influence can even lead to a regime where a nonzero affinity decreases the integrated sensitivity, which corresponds to anti-proofreading.

  18. COMSOL-based Nuclear Reactor Kinetics Studies at the HFIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computational ability to accurately predict the dynamic behavior of a nuclear reactor core in response to reactivity-induced perturbations is an important subject in reactor physics. Space-time and point kinetics methodologies were developed for the purpose of studying the transient-induced behavior of the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) compact core. The space-time simulations employed the three-energy-group neutron diffusion equations, and transients initiated by control cylinder and hydraulic tube rabbit ejections were studied. The work presented here is the first step towards creating a comprehensive multiphysics methodology for studying the dynamic behavior of the HFIR core during reactivity perturbations. The results of these studies show that point kinetics is adequate for small perturbations in which the power distribution is assumed to be time-independent, but space-time methods must be utilized to determine localized effects.

  19. Kinetics of gasification of black liquor char by steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; van Heiningen, A.R.P. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, McGill Univ., Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Montreal, Quebec (CA))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the steam gasification kinetics of kraft black liquor char that were studied in a thermogravimetric analysis reactor. The effect of steam and hydrogen concentration on gasification rate can be described by Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetics. An activation energy of 210 kJ/mol was obtained. Methane formation was negligible, and H{sub 2}S was the major gaseous sulfur-containing product obtained over the temperature range studied, 873-973 K. The CO{sub 2} concentration was higher than calculated for the water-shift reaction at equilibrium. A gasification mechanism is proposed whereby CO{sub 2} is one of the primary gasification products.

  20. Violent Wave Motion due to Impact Violent Wave Motion due to Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Violent Wave Motion due to Impact Violent Wave Motion due to Impact Mark J. Cooker School of Mathematics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, England. m.cooker@uea.ac.uk Theory of Water Waves, Cambridge Motion due to Impact 2. Pressure-Impulse Theory 214 M.J. COOKER AND D.H. PEREGRINE Y; O: .-- I mpact zone

  1. NAAP Motions of the Sun 1/7 Motions of the Sun Student Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Name: NAAP ­ Motions of the Sun 1/7 Motions of the Sun ­ Student Guide Seasonal Motion Work through in these pages are used in the Paths of the Sun Simulator. Question 1: For each of the following statements questions. (A) On May 25th , the sun is in the constellation of ___________________. (B) What would

  2. Kinetic Theory of Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. van Zon; H. van Beijeren; J. R. Dorfman

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed that the dynamics of simple fluids can be considered to be chaotic, at least to the extent that they can be modeled as classical systems of particles interacting with short range, repulsive forces. Here we give a brief introduction to those parts of chaos theory that are relevant for understanding some features of non-equilibrium processes in fluids. We introduce the notions of Lyapunov exponents, Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and related quantities using some simple low-dimensional systems as "toy" models of the more complicated systems encountered in the study of fluids. We then show how familiar methods used in the kinetic theory of gases can be employed for explicit, analytical calculations of the largest Lyapunov exponent and KS entropy for dilute gases composed of hard spheres in d dimensions. We conclude with a brief discussion of interesting, open problems.

  3. ADVANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL REACTION KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    1262 ADVANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL REACTION KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS: LONG-TERM FATE thermodynamic and kinetic data is available with regard to the formation of these mixed metal precipitate phases to six months from the initial addition of aqueous nickel. Additionally, we have determined thermodynamic

  4. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  5. A. La Rosa Lecture Notes ENERGY CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ________________________________________________________________________ ENERGY CONSERVATION The Fisrt Law of Thermodynamics and the Classical Work Kinetic-Energy (CWE) Theorem I on a system II.4.B2 Heat-transfer Q II.4.C Fundamental Energy Conservation Law Generalization of the classic

  6. Free-Form Motion Processing Scott Kircher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garland, Michael

    Free-Form Motion Processing Scott Kircher University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Michael Descriptors: I.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism--Animation General Terms are typical of several common motion sources, including physical simulations of non-rigid objects (e.g., cloth

  7. Compressive Computation in Analog VLSI Motion Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutschmann, Rainer

    Compressive Computation in Analog VLSI Motion Sensors Rainer A. Deutschmann1 and Oliver G. Wenisch2 analog VLSI mo- tion sensors developed in the past. We show how their pixel-parallel architecture can is best suited to perform the algorithm even at high noise levels. 1 Analog VLSI Motion Sensors Inthe past

  8. The apsidal motion in close binary stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is usually accepted to consider an apsidal motion in binary stars as a direct confirmation that a substance inside stars is not uniformly distributed. It is shown in this paper that the apsidal motion in binary systems observation data is in a good agreement with an existence of uniform plasma cores inside stars if they consist of hydrogen-deuterium-helium mixture.

  9. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harben, Philip E. (Oakley, CA); Rodgers, Peter W. (Santa Barbara, CA); Ewert, Daniel W. (Patterson, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic switching device that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period.

  10. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

  11. Simulating galactic outflows with kinetic supernova feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Dalla Vecchia; Joop Schaye

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback from star formation is thought to play a key role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, but its implementation in cosmological simulations is currently hampered by a lack of numerical resolution. We present and test a sub-grid recipe to model feedback from massive stars in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The energy is distributed in kinetic form among the gas particles surrounding recently formed stars. The impact of the feedback is studied using a suite of high-resolution simulations of isolated disc galaxies embedded in dark halos with total mass 10^{10} and 10^{12} Msol/h. We focus in particular on the effect of pressure forces on wind particles within the disc, which we turn off temporarily in some of our runs to mimic a recipe that has been widely used in the literature. We find that this popular recipe gives dramatically different results because (ram) pressure forces on expanding superbubbles determine both the structure of the disc and the development of large-scale outflows. Pressure forces exerted by expanding superbubbles puff up the disc, giving the dwarf galaxy an irregular morphology and creating a galactic fountain in the massive galaxy. Hydrodynamic drag within the disc results in a strong increase of the effective mass loading of the wind for the dwarf galaxy, but quenches much of the outflow in the case of the high-mass galaxy.

  12. A comprehensive kinetics model for CO oxidation during char combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haussmann, G.; Kruger, C.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most important parameter in representing energy feedback to a particle during char combustion concerns the oxidation of CO to CO/sub 2/. If substantial oxidation of CO occurs near a particle, then the greater heat of combustion for the complete oxidation of carbon to CO/sub 2/ (94.1 kcal/mole vs. 26.4 kcal/mole for oxidation to CO) is available for energy feedback mechanisms. ''Energy feedback'' is here defined as any situation in which an individual particle receives a significant fraction of its heat of combustion directly, through the localized oxidation of emitted combustible species, i.e. CO. Conversely, if the oxidation of CO does not occur near a particle, then energy feedback will occur only indirectly, through heating of the bulk gas. The primary reaction product at the particle surface during char combustion is generally considered to be CO, and the location of the subsequent CO oxidation zone plays a very important role in determining the particle temperature. Ayling and Smith performed experimental and modeling work which indicates that CO oxidation is not of major importance under the conditions they investigated, although they noted the need for improved accuracy in measuring char reactivities, as well as for better modeling of the gas phase CO oxidation kinetics. The modeling work presented in this paper attempts to develop an improved understanding of the boundary layer oxidation of CO through the use of a comprehensive set of kinetic expressions.

  13. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, John Kyle P [ORNL] [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL] [ORNL; Farquhar, Ethan [ORNL] [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

  14. Optimization of running strategies based on anaerobic energy and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amandine Aftalion

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 13, 2013 ... We extend this analysis, based on the equation of motion and aerobic energy, to include a balance of anaerobic energy (or accumulated ...

  15. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

  16. Long-term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under Advective Conditions. Long-term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under Advective Conditions. Abstract: Long-term...

  17. Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium Deposition by in situ Electrochemical Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium...

  18. Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation. Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation. Abstract: Molecular simulation techniques...

  19. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments. Abstract: A...

  20. Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALHUSSEINI, ZAYNA ISHAQ

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model; 3-D; Monolith; Reactor; Optimization Introduction TheAngeles Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and KineticGlobal Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic

  1. Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation in the sediments under alkaline and saline conditions . Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and...

  2. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling 2010 DOE...

  3. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling 2009 DOE...

  4. Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes 2010 DOE...

  5. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Rangeof Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic...

  6. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  7. A Monte Carlo simulation for kinetic chemotaxis models: an application to the traveling population wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuda, Shugo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Monte Carlo simulation for the chemotactic bacteria is developed on the basis of the kinetic modeling, i.e., the Boltzmann transport equation, and applied to the one-dimensional traveling population wave in a micro channel.In this method, the Monte Carlo method, which calculates the run-and-tumble motions of bacteria, is coupled with a finite volume method to solve the macroscopic transport of the chemical cues in the field. The simulation method can successfully reproduce the traveling population wave of bacteria which was observed experimentally. The microscopic dynamics of bacteria, e.g., the velocity autocorrelation function and velocity distribution function of bacteria, are also investigated. It is found that the bacteria which form the traveling population wave create quasi-periodic motions as well as a migratory movement along with the traveling population wave. Simulations are also performed with changing the sensitivity and modulation parameters in the response function of bacteria. It is found th...

  8. Energy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS;/:4,4 (; . 1.;Suire

  9. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  10. Brownian Motion of Boomerang Colloidal Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayan Chakrabarty; Andrew Konya; Feng Wang; Jonathan V. Selinger; Kai Sun; Qi-Huo Wei

    2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the Brownian motion of boomerang colloidal particles confined between two glass plates. Our experimental observations show that the mean displacements are biased towards the center of hydrodynamic stress (CoH), and that the mean-square displacements exhibit a crossover from short time faster to long time slower diffusion with the short-time diffusion coefficients dependent on the points used for tracking. A model based on Langevin theory elucidates that these behaviors are ascribed to a superposition of two diffusive modes: the ellipsoidal motion of the CoH and the rotational motion of the tracking point with respect to the CoH.

  11. Ultra-wideband radar motion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A motion sensor is based on ultra-wideband (UWB) radar. UWB radar range is determined by a pulse-echo interval. For motion detection, the sensors operate by staring at a fixed range and then sensing any change in the averaged radar reflectivity at that range. A sampling gate is opened at a fixed delay after the emission of a transmit pulse. The resultant sampling gate output is averaged over repeated pulses. Changes in the averaged sampling gate output represent changes in the radar reflectivity at a particular range, and thus motion. 15 figs.

  12. Kinetic limits of dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Marklof

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the pioneering work of Maxwell and Boltzmann in the 1860s and 1870s, a major challenge in mathematical physics has been the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations from the fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. Macroscopic transport equations lie at the heart of many important physical theories, including fluid dynamics, condensed matter theory and nuclear physics. The rigorous derivation of macroscopic transport equations is thus not only a conceptual exercise that establishes their consistency with the fundamental laws of physics: the possibility of finding deviations and corrections to classical evolution equations makes this subject both intellectually exciting and relevant in practical applications. The plan of these lectures is to develop a renormalisation technique that will allow us to derive transport equations for the kinetic limits of two classes of simple dynamical systems, the Lorentz gas and kicked Hamiltonians (or linked twist maps). The technique uses the ergodic theory of flows on homogeneous spaces (homogeneous flows for short), and is based on joint work with Andreas Str\\"ombergsson.

  13. Consistent neutron kinetics data generation for nodal transient calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdeniz, B. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mueller, E.; Panayotov, D. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, SE - 721 63 Vaesteraas (Sweden); Ivanov, K. N. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current three-dimensional transient codes for thermal reactors are mostly based on two-group diffusion-theory nodal models. In the two-group approach no explicit distinction is made between prompt fission neutrons and delayed neutrons. Consequently, effective delayed neutron fractions have traditionally been used in an attempt to compensate for this shortcoming. A fundamentally better approach would be to solve the nodal kinetics equations in a sufficient number of energy groups to explicitly capture neutron emission spectrum effects. However, this would require the availability of a multi-group nodal transient code as well as a lattice code to generate the appropriate multi-group nodal data for the simulator. One such simulator is the PARCS nodal transient code, which is widely used and recognized as representative of the current state-of-the-art. Unfortunately, a proper nodal data preparation path between PARCS and a lattice code is not available. Even though several industrial lattice codes could be considered as candidates, most of them are tailored to producing two-group nodal data and would require modifications to produce multi-group prompt and delayed neutron emission spectra. In this paper, the particular modifications required to match the TransLAT lattice code and the PARCS nodal transient code for BWR transient applications are reported. Some modifications to PARCS were also required to make two-group and multi-group applications fully consistent. Numerical results are presented both to verify the proper functioning of these modifications and to illuminate the impact of various nodal kinetics data approximations in a selected transient calculation. In particular, the significance of blending rodded and un-rodded kinetics data in partially rodded nodes is demonstrated. It is also confirmed that the use of delayed neutron importance factors in two-group calculations notably reduces the differences between two-group and multi-group kinetics calculations. (authors)

  14. INTRODUCTION Energy harvesting is the transformation of ambient energy present in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    into electrical energy. This energy is derived from different external sources such as solar power, thermal energyINTRODUCTION Energy harvesting is the transformation of ambient energy present in the environment, wind energy, salinity gradient and kinetic energy. Harvesting energy from ambient vibration has

  15. Universal constants and equations of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Z. Baumert

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spirit of Prandtl's conjecture of 1926, for turbulence at high Reynolds number we present an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, with dipoles made of quasi-rigid and 'dressed' vortex tubes as frictionless, incompressible but deformable quasi-particles. Their movements are governed by Helmholtz' elementary vortex rules applied locally. A contact interaction or 'collision' leads either to random scatter of a trajectory or to the formation of two likewise rotating, fundamentally unstable whirls forming a dissipative patch slowly rotating around its center of mass which is almost at rest. This approach predicts von Karman's constant as 1/sqrt(2 pi) = 0.399 and the spatio-temporal dynamics of energy-containing time and length scales controlling turbulent mixing [Baumert 2009]. A link to turbulence spectra was missing so far. In the present paper it is shown that the above image of random vortex-dipole movements is compatible with Kolmogorov's turbulence spectra if dissipative patches, beginning as two likewise rotating eddies, evolve locally into a space-filling bearing in the sense of Herrmann [1990], i.e. into an "Apollonian gear". Its parts and pieces are incompressible and flexibly deformable vortex tubes which are frictionless, excepting the dissipative scale of size zero. For steady and locally homogeneous conditions our approach predicts the dimensionless pre-factor in the 3D Eulerian wavenumber spectrum as [(4 pi)^2/3]/3 = 1.8, and in the Lagrangian frequency spectrum as 2. Our derivations rest on geometry, methods from many-particle physics, and on elementary conservation laws.

  16. Notes 03. Kinematics of motion in cylindrical journal bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reynolds equation for cylindrical journal bearings. Kinematics of motion and film thickness. Distinction between fixed and rotating coordinates. The pure squeeze velocity vector. Examples of journal motion....

  17. advanced motion control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 MARCH 2012 | DOI: 10.1038NPHYS2269 Attosecond control of collective electron motion Materials Science Websites Summary: electron motion in plasmas Antonin Borot1 , Arnaud...

  18. A model of ATL ground motion for storage rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej; Walker, Nicholas J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MODEL OF ATL GROUND MOTION FOR STORAGE RINGS A. WolskiMODEL OF ATL GROUND MOTION FOR STORAGE RINGS* A. Wolski # ,

  19. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Abstract: Hydrogen...

  20. Electromigration kinetics and critical current of Pb-free interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Minhua; Rosenberg, Robert [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromigration kinetics of Pb-free solder bump interconnects have been studied using a single bump parameter sweep technique. By removing bump to bump variations in structure, texture, and composition, the single bump sweep technique has provided both activation energy and power exponents that reflect atomic migration and interface reactions with fewer samples, shorter stress time, and better statistics than standard failure testing procedures. Contact metallurgies based on Cu and Ni have been studied. Critical current, which corresponds to the Blech limit, was found to exist in the Ni metallurgy, but not in the Cu metallurgy. A temperature dependence of critical current was also observed.

  1. Non-minimal Kinetic coupling to gravity and accelerated expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. N. Granda

    2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a scalar field with kinetic term coupled to itself and to the curvature, as a source of dark energy, and analyze the role of this new coupling in the accelerated expansion at large times. In the case of scalar field dominance, the scalar field and potential giving rise to power-law expansion are found in some cases, and a dynamical equation of state is calculated for a given solution of the field equations. A behavior very close to that of the cosmological constant was found.

  2. A kinetic model for the liquefaction of Texas lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, Sandra Kay

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shortages in the United States has led to investigations in alternative energy sources. Of particular interest is the lignite resource in Texas which is mainly situated in the east and central regions north of the Colorado River. There is an estimated...A KINETIC MODEL FOR THE LIQUEFACTION OF TEXAS LIGNITE 4 Thesis by SANDRA KAY BALKY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE y 1980 Major Subject...

  3. Kinetic Theory of Turbulent Multiphase Flow | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathan PershingrelocatesKayeAnalysis of MicrobialKinetic

  4. Kinetic description of mixtures of anisotropic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Florkowski; Oskar Madetko

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple system of coupled kinetic equations for quark and gluon anisotropic systems is solved numerically. The solutions are compared with the predictions of the anisotropic hydrodynamics describing a mixture of anisotropic fluids. We find that the solutions of the kinetic equations can be well reproduced by anisotropic hydrodynamics if the initial distribution are oblate for both quarks and gluons. On the other hand, the solutions of the kinetic equations have a different qualitative behavior from those obtained in anisotropic hydrodynamics if the initial configurations are oblate-prolate or prolate-prolate. This suggests that an extension of the anisotropic hydrodynamics scheme for the mixture of anisotropic fluids is needed, where higher moments of the kinetic equations are used and present simplifications are avoided.

  5. The Design of Shape from Motion Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caine, Michael E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a set of representations methodologies and tools for the purpose of visualizing, analyzing and designing functional shapes in terms of constraints on motion. The core of the research is an interactive ...

  6. Slow motion responses of compliant offshore structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Peimin

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method is developed to predict slow motion responses of slender compliant offshore structures in the unidirectional irregular waves and currents. The environmental loads are computed using the modified Morison equation based on slender...

  7. Generalized Sampling-Based Feedback Motion Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Sandip

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    states. In the deterministic robotics motion planning community, sampling based algorithms like probabilistic roadmaps (PRM) and rapidly exploring random trees (RRTs) have been successful in solving very high dimensional deterministic problem. However...

  8. Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for RecusalDisqualification Yucca Mountain - U.S. Department of Energy's Response to the Motion for Recusal...

  9. Mechanistic studies using kinetic isotope effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulmeier, Brian E.

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    MECHANISTIC STUDIES USING KINETIC ISOTOPE EFFECTS A Thesis by BRIAN E. SCHULMFIER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requtrements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1999 Major Subject: Chemistry MECHANISTIC STUDIES USING KINETIC ISOTOPE EFFECTS A Thesis by BRIAN E. SCHULMEIER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

  10. Simulating plant motion with levels of detail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flannery, Rebecca Lynn

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k. Academic Scholarships Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2003 Group: Engineering & Physics I SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships...

  11. Ground motion: An introduction for accelerator builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this seminar we will review some of the characteristics of the major classes of ground motion in order to determine whether their effects must be considered or place fundamental limits on the sitting and/or design of modern storage rings and linear colliders. The classes discussed range in frequency content from tidal deformation and tectonic motions through earthquakes and microseisms. Countermeasures currently available are briefly discussed.

  12. Range of joint motion in college males

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houy, David Richard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . These include the fact that there is little agreement as to the definition and limits of normal f1exibility. It was also found that the range of joint motion is highly specific and that measurement of one body joint cannot be used to predict the range... many of the problems outlined by Holland. There have been several techniques developed for measuring range of' joint motion. Adrian (1968), The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (1968), Ayoub (1972), Clarke (1975), Dempster (1955), Garrett...

  13. On the Kinematics of Undulator Girder Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, J; /SLAC; ,

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of rigid body kinematics is used to derive equations that govern the control and measurement of the position and orientation of undulator girders. The equations form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system. The equations are linear for small motion and easily inverted as desired. For reference, some relevant girder geometrical data is also given. Equations 6-8 relate the linear potentiometer readings to the motion of the girder. Equations 9-11 relate the cam shaft angles to the motion of the girder. Both sets are easily inverted to either obtain the girder motion from the angles or readings, or, to find the angles and readings that would give a desired motion. The motion of any point on the girder can be calculated by applying either sets of equations to the two cam-planes and extrapolating in the z coordinate using equation 19. The formulation of the equations is quite general and easily coded via matrix and vector methods. They form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system.

  14. Nonlinear evolution of the magnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: From fluid to kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, BP 4229 06304, Nice Cedex 4 (France); Cerri, S. S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Rossi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); LPP-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Université Paris VI, Université Paris XI, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Faganello, M. [International Institute for Fusion Science/PIIM, UMR 7345 CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, 13397 Marseille (France)] [International Institute for Fusion Science/PIIM, UMR 7345 CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, 13397 Marseille (France); Šebek, O. [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague, Czech Republic and Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, B?ehová 7, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic)] [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague, Czech Republic and Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, B?ehová 7, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Trávní?ek, P. M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic); Hellinger, P. [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic)] [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless plasmas is typically a multi-scale process, where the energy is injected at large, fluid scales and dissipated at small, kinetic scales. Accurately modelling the global evolution requires to take into account the main micro-scale physical processes of interest. This is why comparison of different plasma models is today an imperative task aiming at understanding cross-scale processes in plasmas. We report here the first comparative study of the evolution of a magnetized shear flow, through a variety of different plasma models by using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall-MHD, two-fluid, hybrid kinetic, and full kinetic codes. Kinetic relaxation effects are discussed to emphasize the need for kinetic equilibriums to study the dynamics of collisionless plasmas in non trivial configurations. Discrepancies between models are studied both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime of the magnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, to highlight the effects of small scale processes on the nonlinear evolution of collisionless plasmas. We illustrate how the evolution of a magnetized shear flow depends on the relative orientation of the fluid vorticity with respect to the magnetic field direction during the linear evolution when kinetic effects are taken into account. Even if we found that small scale processes differ between the different models, we show that the feedback from small, kinetic scales to large, fluid scales is negligible in the nonlinear regime. This study shows that the kinetic modeling validates the use of a fluid approach at large scales, which encourages the development and use of fluid codes to study the nonlinear evolution of magnetized fluid flows, even in the collisionless regime.

  15. Viability of Using Markerless Motion Capture; Lönsamheten av att använda Markerless Motion Capture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattsson, Viktor

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? This thesis presents a study on how to create a production pipeline using a markerless motion capture system for the creation of animations in… (more)

  16. 22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 1 Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 1 Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Zonca, Liu Chen and Zhiyong Qiu #12;22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 2 Chen and Zhiyong Qiu #12;22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 3 2 Linear

  17. Motion to Withdraw.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32Department of EnergyDepartmentJuly

  18. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for37 East and WestLydiaEnabling timeEnergeticsEnergy

  19. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI Home It is the|ResourcesCareersEmploymentEnergy

  20. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of a Molecular Motor Ensemble Josh E. Baker* and David D. Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Thermodynamics and Kinetics of a Molecular Motor Ensemble Josh E. Baker* and David D. Thomas is transferred to work is accelerated by the free energy of a motor-catalyzed reaction. This thermodynamic model cargo at useful rates along long polymer tracks, and, in this paper, we develop a minimal thermodynamic

  1. Crustal motion in Indonesia from Global Positioning System measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaffrey, Robert

    Crustal motion in Indonesia from Global Positioning System measurements Y. Bock,1 L. Prawirodirdjo: crustal motion, Indonesia tectonics, GPS, current plate motions, Southeast Asia Citation: Bock, Y., L, Crustal motion in Indonesia from Global Positioning System measurements, J. Geophys. Res., 108(B8), 2367

  2. 7-Gate Kinetic AMPA Model Kinetics to match EPSCs from calyx of Held

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Bruce

    7-Gate Kinetic AMPA Model · Kinetics to match EPSCs from calyx of Held · Multiple closed, open and EPSC amplitude Bruce Graham Department of Computing Science and Mathematics, University of Stirling, U, including the calyx of Held in the mammalian auditory system. Such depression may be mediated

  3. Can We Distinguish Biological Motions of Virtual Humans? Perceptual Study With Captured Motions of Weight Lifting.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Information Systems-- Animations ­ Artificial, augmented, and virtual realities Keywords: Human Motions of Weight Lifting. Ludovic Hoyet IRISA - INRIA Bunraku Team, Rennes Franck Multon Mouvement Sport Sant of Edinburgh Figure 1: Subject lifting a 6kg dumbbell: video of a real motion (up) and corresponding captured

  4. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  5. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardiner, Bennett P J; Dallaston, Michael C; Moroney, Timothy J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularisation on the interface is not provided by surface tension, but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalise high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularised solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this 'selection' of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analogue with surface tens...

  6. Lorentz violation and perpetual motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Eling; Brendan Z. Foster; Ted Jacobson; Aron C. Wall

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that any Lorentz violating theory with two or more propagation speeds is in conflict with the generalized second law of black hole thermodynamics. We do this by identifying a classical energy-extraction method, analogous to the Penrose process, which would decrease the black hole entropy. Although the usual definitions of black hole entropy are ambiguous in this context, we require only very mild assumptions about its dependence on the mass. This extends the result found by Dubovsky and Sibiryakov, which uses the Hawking effect and applies only if the fields with different propagation speeds interact just through gravity. We also point out instabilities that could interfere with their black hole {\\it perpetuum mobile}, but argue that these can be neglected if the black hole mass is sufficiently large.

  7. Testing a dissipative kinetic k-essence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardenas, V H; Villanueva, J R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a study of a purely kinetic k-essence model, characterized basically by a parameter $\\alpha$ in presence of a bulk dissipative term, whose relationship between viscous pressure $\\Pi$ and energy density $\\rho$ of the background follows a polytropic type law $\\Pi \\propto \\rho^{\\lambda+1/2}$, where $\\lambda$, in principle, is a parameter without restrictions. Analytical solutions for the energy density of the k-essence field are found in two specific cases: $\\lambda=1/2$ and $\\lambda=(1-\\alpha)/2\\alpha$, and then we show that these solutions posses the same functional form than the non-viscous counterpart. Finally, both approach are contrasted with observational data from type Ia supernova, and the most recent Hubble parameter measurements, and therefore, the best values for the parameters of the theory are founds.

  8. Kinetic and Fluid Ballooning Stability with Anisotropic Energetic Electron Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, W. A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A kinetic ballooning mode theory is developed from the gyrokinetic equation in the frequency range for which the ions are fluid, the thermal electron response is adiabatic and the hot electrons are non-interacting due to their large drift velocity. Trapped particle effects are ignored, The application of the quasineutrality condition together with the parallel and binomial components of Ampere's Law reduces the gyrokinetic equation to a second order ordinary differential equation along the equilibrium magnetic field lines. The instability dynamics are dominated by the pressure gradients of the thermal species in the fluid magnetohydrodynamic limit. The resulting equation combines features of both the Kruskal-Oberman energy principle and the rigid hot particle energy principle proposed by Johnson et al. to model the Astron device.

  9. Energy & technology review, April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bookless, W.A.; Stull, S. [eds.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents research overviews on projects from the Lawrence Livermore laboratory. This issue provides information on microsphere targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments; laser fabrication of berllium components; and the kinetic energy interceptor.

  10. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  11. An analysis of guard cell motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hsin-i

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ANALYSIS OF GUARD CELL MOTION A Thesis by BSIN-I WU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December, 1977 Ma]or Sub]ect: Industrial... Engineering AN ANALYSIS OF GUARD CELL MOTION A Thesis by HSIN-I WU Approved as to style and content by: L. Curry (I. En. ) Newton C. Ellis (I. En. ) c' eter J. H. Sharpe (B. E. ) Dar d J. Ha tfiel (Math) December 1977 I &'(2(i& R) ABSTRACT...

  12. Thermodynamic theory of kinetic overshoots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Gorban; G. S. Yablonsky

    2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Everything that is not prohibited is permissible. So, what is prohibited in the course of chemical reactions, heat transfer and other dissipative processes? Is it possible to "overshoot" the equilibrium, and if yes, then how far? Thermodynamically allowed and prohibited trajectories of processes are discussed by the example of effects of equilibrium encircling. The complete theory of thermodynamically accessible states is presented. The space of all thermodynamically admissible paths is presented by projection on the "thermodynamic tree", that is the tree of the related thermodynamic potential (entropy, free energy, free enthalpy) in the balance polyhedron. The stationary states and limit points for open systems are localized too.

  13. Chemical Kinetics of Combustion Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck In &

  14. Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1 Members Theme 1 Members Volker Studies in

  15. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  16. The aging of tungsten filaments and its effect on wire surface kinetics in hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    desorption kinetics. In particular, the Si signal exhibits a high temperature activation energy consistent vapor deposition growth have been measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry. New wires produce Si with previous measurements; the activation energy for the SiH3 signal suggests its formation is catalyzed. Aged

  17. Energy harvesting of random wide-band vibrations with applications to an electro-magnetic rotational energy harvester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, A. Zachary

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, vibration energy harvesting is the scavenging of ambient vibration by transduction of mechanical kinetic energy into electrical energy. Many mechanical or electro-mechanical systems produce mechanical vibrations. ...

  18. Widening the Axion Window via Kinetic and St\\"uckelberg Mixings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiu, Gary; Ye, Fang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out that kinetic and St\\"uckelberg mixings that are generically present in the low energy effective action of axions can significantly widen the window of axion decay constants. We show that an effective super-Planckian decay constant can be obtained even when the axion kinetic matrix has only sub-Planckian entries. Our minimal model involves only two axions, a St\\"uckelberg U(1) and a modest rank instanton generating non-Abelian group. Below the mass of the St\\"uckelberg U(1), there is only a single axion with a non-perturbatively generated potential. In contrast to previous approaches, the enhancement of the axion decay constant is not tied to the number of degrees of freedom introduced. We also discuss how kinetic mixings can lower the decay constant to the desired axion dark matter window. String theory embeddings of this scenario and their phenomenological features are briefly discussed.

  19. Kinetics of the [beta]-[delta]phase transition in PBX9501.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smilowitz, L. B. (Laura B.); Henson, B. F. (Bryan F.); Asay, B. W. (Blaine W.); Dickson, P. M. (Peter M.); Robinson, J. M. (Jeanne M.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial step in the thermal decomposition of HMX is the solid state phase transition from the centrosymmetric beta form to the noncentrosymmetric delta form. The symmetry change makes the phase transition amenable to the application of second harmonic generation (SHG) as a probe of transition kinetics. We have used SHG to study the temperature dependence of the kinetics for unconfined PBX9501 and HMX. Spatially resolved SHG measurements have shown a nucleation and growth mechanism for the solid state phase transition. We have measured the transition rate as a function of temperature in order to obtain the activation energy and entropy of transition, which determine the phase transition kinetics. Additionally, we have observed temperature dependent reversion of the delta phase to beta phase and have fimd that we can control the reversion rate by controlling the cooling.

  20. Kinetics of liquid phase catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogate, M.R.; Lee, B.G.; Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Kulik, C.J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the kinetics of the liquid phase catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether investigated. The experiments were carried out under low concentrations of feed in a 1-L stirred autoclave, according to a statistical experimental design. The inert liquid phase used for this investigation was a 78:22 blend of paraffinic and naphthenic mineral oils. A complete thermodynamic analysis was carried out in order to determine the liquid phase concentrations of the dissolved species. A global kinetic model was developed for the rate of dimethyl ether synthesis in terms of the liquid phase concentration of methanol. The activation energy of the reaction was found to be 18,830 cal/gmol. Based on a step-wise linear regression analysis of the kinetic data, the order of the reaction which gave the best fit was 0.28 with respect to methanol.

  1. Energy

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment > Voluntary826Industry forEmergingM

  2. ENERGY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement ||More EmphasisofEMABTank WasteEnvironmental

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - age-specific kinetic model Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Kinetic StabilizationNSTX Simple model... - Kinetic StabilizationNSTX Kinetic model: collisions decrease stability collision frequency (note... dissipation of mode...

  4. South Africa’s peaceful use of nuclear energy under the nuclear non-proliferation treaty and related treaties .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qasaymeh, Khaled Ahmed

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Energy is the natural power stored in matter which can be potential and kinetic energy. This occurs in nature in various forms such as chemical… (more)

  5. On the Topic of Motion Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertinato, Christopher

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An integral of motion is a function of the states of a dynamical system that is constant along the system’s trajectories. Integrals are known for their utility as a means of reducing the dimension of a system, effectively leaving only one...

  6. Motion in Bimetric Type Theories of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahil, M E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of motion for different test particles, charged and spinning objects of constant spinning tensor in different versions of bimetric theory of gravity is obtained by deriving their corresponding path and path deviation equations, using a modified Bazanski in presence of Riemannian geometry. This method enables us to find path and path deviation equations of different objects orbiting very strong gravitational fields.

  7. Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions Ruina Ma, Damien Chablat, Fouad Bennis, and Liang Ma Abstract Human muscle fatigue is considered to be one of the main reasons for Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD). Recent models have been introduced to define muscle fatigue for static postures. However, the main

  8. N000149510521 Estimating Relative Vehicle Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markovitch, Shaul

    CAR­TR­881 CS­TR­3882 N00014­95­1­0521 March 1998 Estimating Relative Vehicle Motions in Traffic for Automation Research University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742­3275 2 Computer Science Department George of Technology Haifa, Israel 32000 Abstract Autonomous operation of a vehicle on a road calls for understanding

  9. Motion Control of Robot Manipulators with MATLAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siena, Università di

    Motion Control of Robot Manipulators with MATLAB · By Francesco Chinello, Stefano Scheggi, Fabio Morbidi, and Domenico Prattichizzo 1070-9932/11/$26.00ª2011 IEEE DECEMBER 2011 · IEEE ROBOTICS robot manipulators. The KUKA Control Toolbox (KCT) is a collection of MATLAB functions developed

  10. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  11. Motion Perception Model and Its Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliva, Aude

    of the blind, and brain-computer interface system etc. Furthermore, brain-like motion detection algorithms also a meaningful challenge to be solved. This thesis first introduces the psychophysical experiments on human applica- tions. Main contributions of this thesis are listed as follows. #12; First of all, we collect

  12. Strong-Motion Instrumentation Programs in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    western Taiwan, with high- rise buildings as a consequence of developing economy, is vulnerable-Motion Accelerograph Array in Taiwan, Phase 1 (SMART-1 Array) SMART-1 Array was set up in Lotung in 1980 and closed and University of California, Berkeley. The SMART-1 Array consisted of a central site and accelerographs in three

  13. Chemistry in Motion: Tiny Synthetic Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter H. Colberg; Shang Yik Reigh; Bryan Robertson; Raymond Kapral

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Account, we describe how synthetic motors that operate by self-diffusiophoresis make use of a self-generated concentration gradient to drive motor motion. A description of propulsion by self-diffusiophoresis is presented for Janus particle motors comprising catalytic and noncatalytic faces. The properties of the dynamics of chemically powered motors are illustrated by presenting the results of particle-based simulations of sphere-dimer motors constructed from linked catalytic and noncatalytic spheres. The geometries of both Janus and sphere-dimer motors with asymmetric catalytic activity support the formation of concentration gradients around the motors. Because directed motion can occur only when the system is not in equilibrium, the nature of the environment and the role it plays in motor dynamics are described. Rotational Brownian motion also acts to limit directed motion, and it has especially strong effects for very small motors. We address the following question: how small can motors be and still exhibit effects due to propulsion, even if only to enhance diffusion? Synthetic motors have the potential to transform the manner in which chemical dynamical processes are carried out for a wide range of applications.

  14. Precursors to Space Flight! Orbital Motion!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stengel, Robert F.

    " Industrial Revolution" #12;Industrial Revolution and Government Science" Long-Distance Communication" #12://www.princeton.edu/~stengel/FRS.html! ·! Prophets with Some Honor" ·! The Human Seed and Social Soil: Rocketry and Revolution" ·! Orbital Motion minitial mfinal The Human Seed and Social Soil: Rocketry and Revolution! #12;Early 20th Century Rocket

  15. Motional Spin Relaxation in Large Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Riccardo; Filippone, B W

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the precession of spin-polarized Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms in uniform and static magnetic and electric fields and calculate the spin relaxation effects from motional $v\\times E$ magnetic fields. Particle motion in an electric field creates a motional $v\\times E$ magnetic field, which when combined with collisions, produces variations of the total magnetic field and results in spin relaxation of neutron and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ samples. The spin relaxation times $T_{1}$ (longitudinal) and $T_{2}$ (transverse) of spin-polarized UCN and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms are important considerations in a new search for the neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS \\emph{nEDM} experiment. We use a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the relaxation of spins due to the motional $v\\times E$ field for UCN and for $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms at temperatures below $600 \\mathrm{mK}$. We find the relaxation times for the neutron due to the $v\\times E$ effect to be long compared to the neutron lifetime, ...

  16. Motional Spin Relaxation in Large Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Schmid; B. Plaster; B. W. Filippone

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the precession of spin-polarized Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) and $^{3}$He atoms in uniform and static magnetic and electric fields and calculate the spin relaxation effects from motional $v\\times E$ magnetic fields. Particle motion in an electric field creates a motional $v\\times E$ magnetic field, which when combined with collisions, produces variations of the total magnetic field and results in spin relaxation of neutron and $^{3}$He samples. The spin relaxation times $T_{1}$ (longitudinal) and $T_{2}$ (transverse) of spin-polarized UCN and $^{3}$He atoms are important considerations in a new search for the neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS \\emph{nEDM} experiment. We use a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the relaxation of spins due to the motional $v\\times E$ field for UCN and for $^{3}$He atoms at temperatures below $600,\\mathrm{mK}$. We find the relaxation times for the neutron due to the $v\\times E$ effect to be long compared to the neutron lifetime, while the $^{3}$He relaxation times may be important for the \\emph{nEDM} experiment.

  17. Ship Motion Prediction for Maritime Flight Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    prediction model, resulting from complicated wave-excitation dynamics caused by the local stochastic sea and stochastic sea state disturbances. An appropriate model aiming to feature the characteristics of the dynamic estimation model in the presence of uncertain stochastic processes (e.g. wind, sea wave), unknown ship motion

  18. Interpreting the Aggregation Kinetics of Amyloid Peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    Amyloid fibrils are insoluble mainly -sheet aggregates of proteins or peptides. The multi-step process) and amyloid-protected states, is used to investigate the kinetics of aggregation and the pathways of fibril state. The minimal-size aggregate able to form a fibril is generated by collisions of oligomers

  19. Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

    2007-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

  20. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    CHEM 6471 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings 9:35 ­ 10:55 am, Tuesday and Thursday of October 22-26 Textbooks Molecular Thermodynamics by D.A McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, University Science Books the laws of classical thermodynamics and some of their chemical applications. It also covers basic

  1. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of transcriptional pausing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    in the cotranscriptional RNA secondary structure upstream of the RNA exit channel. The calculations involve no adjustable of recovery of backtracked paused complexes. A crucial ingredient of our model is the incorporation of kinetic secondary structure, an aspect not included explicitly in previous attempts at modeling the transcrip- tion

  2. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS AARON R. DINNER New Chemistry Laboratory for Protein Folding: Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 120. Edited by Richard A. Friesner. Series Editors Experimental and theoretical studies have led to the emergence of a unified general mechanism for protein

  3. Department of Energy Files Motion to Withdraw Yucca Mountain...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    nuclear waste repository, the President directed Secretary Chu to establish the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future to conduct a comprehensive review of...

  4. Widget:Motion Chart Visualizations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: SaltTroyerGetRecommendationsChart Visualizations Jump to:

  5. Wind for Schools Portal Motion Chart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEdit JumpWill County, Illinois:4 SectorWind for Schools

  6. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

  7. Direct kinetic correlation of carriers and ferromagnetism in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kinetic correlation of carriers and ferromagnetism in Co2+ : ZnO. Direct kinetic correlation of carriers and ferromagnetism in Co2+ : ZnO. Abstract: We report the use of controlled...

  8. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110). Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110). Abstract: The adsorption, desorption, and...

  9. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenation into styrene: kinetic modeling and reactor simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Won Jae

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    detailed kinetic model for coke formation and gasification, which was coupled to the kinetic model for the main reactions. The calculation of the dynamic equilibrium coke content provided a crucial guideline for the selection of the steam to ethylbenzene...

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. XX, NO. XX, MONTH 2012 1 Co-Optimization of Communication and Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    , simplified path loss models are utilized to model the communication channels. In [14], we design an optimum, as it travels along a pre-defined trajectory, and while minimizing its motion and communication energy costs. We that in order to save energy, the robot should move faster (slower) and send less (more) bits at the locations

  11. Kinetics of ion and prompt electron emission from laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Ding, H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated ion emission dynamics of laser-produced plasma from several elements, comprised of metals and non-metals (C, Al, Si, Cu, Mo, Ta, W), under vacuum conditions using a Faraday cup. The estimated ion flux for various targets studied showed a decreasing tendency with increasing atomic mass. For metals, the ion flux is found to be a function of sublimation energy. A comparison of temporal ion profiles of various materials showed only high-Z elements exhibited multiple structures in the ion time of flight profile indicated by the observation of higher peak kinetic energies, which were absent for low-Z element targets. The slower ions were seen regardless of the atomic number of target material propagated with a kinetic energy of 1–5 keV, while the fast ions observed in high-Z materials possessed significantly higher energies. A systematic study of plasma properties employing fast photography, time, and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and electron analysis showed that there existed different mechanisms for generating ions in laser ablation plumes. The origin of high kinetic energy ions is related to prompt electron emission from high-Z targets.

  12. Physics of Microswimmers - Single Particle Motion and Collective Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Elgeti; Roland G. Winkler; Gerhard Gompper

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Locomotion and transport of microorganisms in fluids is an essential aspect of life. Search for food, orientation toward light, spreading of off-spring, and the formation of colonies are only possible due to locomotion. Swimming at the microscale occurs at low Reynolds numbers, where fluid friction and viscosity dominates over inertia. Here, evolution achieved propulsion mechanisms, which overcome and even exploit drag. Prominent propulsion mechanisms are rotating helical flagella, exploited by many bacteria, and snake-like or whip-like motion of eukaryotic flagella, utilized by sperm and algae. For artificial microswimmers, alternative concepts to convert chemical energy or heat into directed motion can be employed, which are potentially more efficient. The dynamics of microswimmers comprises many facets, which are all required to achieve locomotion. In this article, we review the physics of locomotion of biological and synthetic microswimmers, and the collective behavior of their assemblies. Starting from individual microswimmers, we describe the various propulsion mechanism of biological and synthetic systems and address the hydrodynamic aspects of swimming. This comprises synchronization and the concerted beating of flagella and cilia. In addition, the swimming behavior next to surfaces is examined. Finally, collective and cooperate phenomena of various types of isotropic and anisotropic swimmers with and without hydrodynamic interactions are discussed.

  13. Track 2: Sustainable Energy I. Renewable Energy: Wind and Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Pulse uses an oscillating hydrofoil for energy capture: horizontal wing-shaped blades move up and down in the water column, much like a whale's tail. This oscillating motion is converted to electricity through

  14. Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Correlation and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Topic 4 Correlation and Regression Transformed Variables 1 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Outline Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Lineweaver-Burke double reciprocal plot 2 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production

  15. The Inverse Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Inverse Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Garnas ABSTRACT Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Garnas B.S. General

  16. Kinetic relaxation models for energy transport , Peter MARKOWICH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markowich, Peter A.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 3 Monotonic functions FBE() and RBE() and procedure of inversion

  17. Spectral Cascade and Energy Dissipation in Kinetic Alfven Wave Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    zhihongl@uci.edu Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 magnetic field (Bieber, J. W. et al 1996; Podesta, J. J. 2009). Consistent with observations in the solar

  18. MHK Technologies/Kinetic Hydropower System KHPS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE <AirWECHelix <IWAVE < MHKKESCKHPS <

  19. Kinetics of Lithium Insertion into Silicon Adodes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoff Meeting for New

  20. Intuitive Generation of Realistic Motions for Articulated Human Characters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Jianyuan

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    create and control life-like human motions. This dissertation focuses on exploring theory, algorithms and applications that enable novice users to quickly and easily create and control natural-looking motions, including both full-body movement and hand...

  1. Robust hybrid control for autonomous vehicle motion planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazzoli, Emilio, 1970-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the problem of motion planning for agile autonomous vehicles. In realistic situations, the motion planning problem must be solved in real-time, in a dynamic and uncertain environment. The ...

  2. absolute proper motions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. Lenhardt; H. Schwan 2000-07-21 25 Lick Northern Proper Motion Program. III. Lick NPM2 Catalog Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: The Lick Northern Proper Motion (NPM) program, a...

  3. apparent proper motion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with a... Hirshkowitz, Amy 2014-08-05 46 Lick Northern Proper Motion Program. III. Lick NPM2 Catalog Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: The Lick Northern Proper Motion (NPM) program, a...

  4. Frequency analysis and sheared reconstruction for rendering motion blur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egan, Kevin

    Motion blur is crucial for high-quality rendering, but is also very expensive. Our first contribution is a frequency analysis of motion-blurred scenes, including moving objects, specular reflections, and shadows. We show ...

  5. Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenezy, Mohammed D.

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-parameter computational model is proposed for the study of the regional motion of the left ventricle (LV) wall using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) data. In this model, the LV wall motion is mathematically ...

  6. Perception and processing of self-motion cues 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Michael Thomas

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The capacity of animals to navigate through familiar or novel environments depends crucially on the integration of a disparate set of self motion cues. The study begins with one of the most simple, planar visual motion, ...

  7. Physics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , Vibrations and Waves (W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 1971). First, we compute the kinetic energyPhysics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String Consider the kinetic energy and the potential energy of this string segment due to the passage of a traveling wave

  8. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bylaska, Eric J.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many different degradation reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons are possible in natural ground waters. In order to identify which degradation reactions are important, a large number of possible reaction pathways must be sorted out. Recent advances in ab initio electronic structure methods have the potential to help identify relevant environmental degradation reactions by characterizing the thermodynamic properties of all relevant contaminant species and intermediates for which experimental data is usually not available, as well as provide activation energies for relevant pathways. In this paper, strategies based on ab initio electronic structure methods for estimating thermochemical and kinetic properties of reactions with chlorinated hydrocarbons are presented. Particular emphasis is placed on strategies that are computationally fast and can be used for large organochlorine compounds such as 4,4?-DDT.

  9. Kinetically determined shapes of grain boundaries in CVD graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bets, Ksenia V; Yakobson, Boris I

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the shape of grain boundaries is essential to control results of the growth of large graphene crystals. A global energy minimum search predicting the most stable final structure contradicts experimental observations. Here we present Monte Carlo simulation of kinetic formation of grain boundaries (GB) in graphene during collision of two growing graphene flakes. Analysis of the resulting GBs for the full range of misorientation angles $\\alpha$ allowed us to identify a hidden (from post facto analysis such as microscopy) degree of freedom - the edge misorientation angle $\\beta$. Edge misorientation characterizes initial structure rather than final structure and therefore provides more information about growth conditions. Use of $\\beta$ enabled us to explain disagreements between the experimental observations and theoretical work. Finally, we report an analysis of an interesting special case of zero-tilt GBs for which structure is determined by two variables describing the relative shift of initial isl...

  10. Detection of first and second order motion Alexander Grunewald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Heiko

    Neuroinformatik Vniversitat VIm 89069 VIm Germany hneumann@neuro.informatik.uni-ulm.de Abstract A model of motion

  11. Ground motion data for International Collider models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

  12. Isovector pairing collective motion: Generator-coordinate-method approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyotoku, M.; Chen, H.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isovector pairing collective motion is treated by means of the generator coordinate method. In this scheme, the isospin and number projection is performed analytically by the recognition of symmetry properties in the generalized Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer wave functions. Among the results obtained, our generator-coordinate-method values of energy and spectroscopic amplitude are shown to be comparable to those of shell model calculations. This is indeed encouraging, especially in view of the fact that they were reached using a simple approximation. The great simplicity of the present method, as compared with earlier complicated versions, suggests that they might prove useful in the study of isovector pairing collective states which are strongly populated by pair transfer reactions in medium weight nuclei.

  13. On Geodesic Motion in Horava-Lifshitz Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Esmaeil Mosaffa

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an action for a free particle in Horava-Lifshitz gravity based on Foliation Preserving Diffeomorphisms. The action reduces to the usual relativistic action in the low energy limit and allows for subluminal and superluminal motions with upper and lower bounds on velocity respectively. We find that deviation from general relativity is governed by a position dependent coupling constant which also depends on the mass of the particle. As a result, light-like geodesics are not affected whereas massive particles follow geodesics that become mass dependent and hence the equivalence principle is violated. We make an exact study for geodesics in flat space and a qualitative analysis for those in a spherically symmetric curved background.

  14. de Sitter geodesics: reappraising the notion of motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. G. Pereira; A. C. Sampson

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The de Sitter spacetime is transitive under a combination of translations and proper conformal transformations. Its usual family of geodesics, however, does not take into account this property. As a consequence, there are points in de Sitter spacetime which cannot be joined to each other by any one of these geodesics. By taking into account the appropriate transitivity properties in the variational principle, a new family of maximizing trajectories is obtained, whose members are able to connect any two points of the de Sitter spacetime. These geodesics introduce a new notion of motion, given by a combination of translations and proper conformal transformations, which may possibly become important at very-high energies, where conformal symmetry plays a significant role.

  15. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiguo Xu; Chuandong Lin; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To probe both the Hydrodynamic Non-Equilibrium (HNE) and Thermodynamic Non-Equilibrium (TNE) in the combustion process, a two-dimensional Multiple-Relaxation-Time (MRT) version of Lattice Boltzmann Kinetic Model(LBKM) for combustion phenomena is presented. The chemical energy released in the progress of combustion is dynamically coupled into the system by adding a chemical term to the LB kinetic equation. Beside describing the evolutions of the conserved quantities, the density, momentum and energy, which are what the Navier-Stokes model describes, the MRT-LBKM presents also a coarse-grained description on the evolutions of some non-conserved quantities. The current model works for both subsonic and supersonic flows with or without chemical reaction. In this model both the specific-heat ratio and the Prandtl number are flexible, the TNE effects are naturally presented in each simulation step. The model is verified and validated via well-known benchmark tests. As an initial application, various non-equilibrium behaviours, including the complex interplays between various HNEs, between various TNEs and between the HNE and TNE, around the detonation wave in the unsteady and steady one-dimensional detonation processes are preliminarily probed. It is found that the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) decreases the local TNE, but increase the global TNE around the detonation wave, that even locally, the system viscosity (or heat conductivity) results in two kinds of competing trends, to increase and to decrease the TNE effects. The physical reason is that the viscosity (or heat conductivity) takes part in both the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses.

  16. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann kinetic model for combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiguo Xu; Chuandong Lin; Guangcai Zhang; Yingjun Li

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To probe both the Mechanical Non-Equilibrium (MNE) and Thermodynamic Non-Equilibrium (TNE) in the combustion procedure, a two-dimensional Multiple-Relaxation-Time (MRT) version of the Lattice Boltzmann Kinetic Model(LBKM) for combustion phenomena is presented. The chemical energy released in the progress of combustion is dynamically coupled into the system by adding a chemical term to the LB kinetic equation. The LB model is required to recover the Navier-Stokes equations with chemical reaction in the hydrodynamic limit. To that aim, we construct a discrete velocity model with $24$ velocities divided into $3$ groups. In each group a flexible parameter is used to control the size of discrete velocities and a second parameter is used to describe the contribution of the extra degrees of freedom. The current model works for both subsonic and supersonic flows with or without chemical reaction. In this model both the specific-heat ratio and the Prandtl number are flexible, the TNE effects are naturally presented in each simulation step. Via the MRT model, it is more convenient to track the effects of TNE and how the TNE influence the MNE behaviors. The model is verified and validated via well-known benchmark tests. It is found that around the detonation wave there are competition between the viscous effect, thermal diffusion effect and the gradient effects of physical quantities. Consequently, with decreasing the collision parameters, (i) the nonequilibrium region becomes wider and the gradients of physical quantities decrease; (ii) the position where the internal energy in the shocking degree of freedom equals the one averaged over all degrees of freedom moves away from the position for the von Neumann peak.

  17. Compression of ground-motion data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.W.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground motion data has been recorded for many years at Nevada Test Site and is now stored on thousands of digital tapes. The recording format is very inefficient in terms of space on tape. This report outlines a method to compress the data onto a few hundred tapes while maintaining the accuracy of the recording and allowing restoration of any file to the original format for future use. For future digitizing a more efficient format is described and suggested.

  18. Inverted gravity, not inverted shape impairs biological motion perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troje, Nikolaus

    Inverted gravity, not inverted shape impairs biological motion perception Nikolaus Trojetroje. Scrambling should therefore impair perception even more than inversion. Upright and inverted scrambled motion). Is the cause of the inversion effect inverted gravity? If this is the case upright scrambled motion should

  19. A Code Motion Framework for Global Instruction Scheduling ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajiv

    of the program; and a transformation step in which the code motion is performed along with compensation code placement and application of code optimizations enabled by code motion. The framework is powerful elimination and partial dead code elimination optimizations with the code motion transformations

  20. Motion Prediction for Moving Objects: a Statistical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Motion Prediction for Moving Objects: a Statistical Approach Dizan Vasquez & Thierry Fraichard with those objects requires the ability to predict their future motion (e.g. for predator evasion, prey hunting, collision avoidance, etc.). Motion prediction is a research area with applications in many

  1. Controlled Lagrangian Methods and Tracking of Accelerated Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Jerrold

    Controlled Lagrangian Methods and Tracking of Accelerated Motions Dmitry V. Zenkov* Department of uniformly accelerated motions of mechanical systems with symmetry. The theory is illustrated with a simple- grangians to the problem of stabilization of accelerated motions of Lagrangian mechanical systems with symme

  2. Controlled Lagrangian Methods and Tracking of Accelerated Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zenkov, Dmitry

    Controlled Lagrangian Methods and Tracking of Accelerated Motions Dmitry V. Zenkov* Department of uniformly accelerated motions of mechanical systems with symmetry. The theory is illustrated with a simple- grangians to the problem of stabilization of accelerated motions of Lagrangian mechanical systems

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - approximate kinetic equations Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    equation. Reactor kinetics and Summary: equations, prompt jump approximation; subcritical reactor kinetics, circulating fuel reactor dynamics 5... solution to neutron...

  4. Intelligent Motion Planning and Analysis with Probabilistic Roadmap Methods for the Study of Complex and High-Dimensional Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapia, Lydia

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    robots and proteins is highly dependent on their motions. In order to study motions in these two divergent domains, the same underlying algorithmic framework can be applied. This method is derived from probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs) originally...

  5. ON HYDRODYNAMIC MOTIONS IN DEAD ZONES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oishi, Jeffrey S. [Department of Astronomy, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark, E-mail: jsoishi@astro.berkeley.ed, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.or [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate fluid motions near the midplane of vertically stratified accretion disks with highly resistive midplanes. In such disks, the magnetorotational instability drives turbulence in thin layers surrounding a resistive, stable dead zone. The turbulent layers in turn drive motions in the dead zone. We examine the properties of these motions using three-dimensional, stratified, local, shearing-box, non-ideal, magnetohydrodynamical simulations. Although the turbulence in the active zones provides a source of vorticity to the midplane, no evidence for coherent vortices is found in our simulations. It appears that this is because of strong vertical oscillations in the dead zone. By analyzing time series of azimuthally averaged flow quantities, we identify an axisymmetric wave mode particular to models with dead zones. This mode is reduced in amplitude, but not suppressed entirely, by changing the equation of state from isothermal to ideal. These waves are too low frequency to affect sedimentation of dust to the midplane, but may have significance for the gravitational stability of the resulting midplane dust layers.

  6. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sircar, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of el...

  7. Kinetics of atoms in a bichromatic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudnikov, O. N., E-mail: llf@laser.nsc.ru [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Baklanov, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Taichenachev, A. V. [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)] [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Tumaikin, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Yudin, V. I. [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)] [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of atoms in a bichromatic field is considered. Analytic solutions are obtained for the force, friction coefficient, and diffusion coefficient in the model of a two-level atom without limitations imposed on the intensity of light fields. This effect is observed in the domain of global minima and maxima of the optical potential (i.e., at points where the relative phase of two standing waves is Greek-Phi-Symbol = 0, {pi}/2.

  8. Thermodynamics of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neven Bilic

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic properties of dark energy are discussed assuming that dark energy is described in terms of a selfinteracting complex scalar. We first show that, under certain assumptions, selfinteracting complex scalar field theories are equivalent to purely kinetic k-essence models. Then we analyze the themal properties of k-essence and in particular we show that dark-energy in the phantom regime does not necessarily yield negative entropy.

  9. A Position Sensitive X-ray Spectrophotometer using Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin A. Mazin; Megan E. Eckart; Bruce Bumble; Sunil Golwala; Peter K. Day; Jonas Zmuidzinas; Fiona A. Harrison

    2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface impedance of a superconductor changes when energy is absorbed and Cooper pairs are broken to produce single electron (quasiparticle) excitations. This change may be sensitively measured using a thin-film resonant circuit called a microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID). The practical application of MKIDs for photon detection requires a method of efficiently coupling the photon energy to the MKID. We present results on position sensitive X-ray detectors made by using two aluminum MKIDs on either side of a tantalum photon absorber strip. Diffusion constants, recombination times, and energy resolution are reported. MKIDs can easily be scaled into large arrays.

  10. Isothermal kinetics of new Albany oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, S.D.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the development of technologies for the utilization of eastern U.S. oil shales, fluidized bed pyrolysis technology is emerging as one of the most promising in terms of oil yield, operating cost, and capital investment. Bench-scale testing of eastern shales has reached a level where scale-up represents the next logical step in the evolution of this technology. A major consideration in this development and an essential part of any fluidized bed reactor scale-up effort--isothermal kinetics-- has largely been ignored for eastern US shale with the exception of a recent study conducted by Richardson et al. with a Cleveland shale. The method of Richardson et al. was used previously by Wallman et al. with western shale and has been used most recently by Forgac, also with western shale. This method, adopted for the present study, entails injecting a charge of shale into a fluidized bed and monitoring the hydrocarbon products with a flame ionization detector (FID). Advantages of this procedure are that fluidized bed heat-up effects are simulated exactly and real-time kinetics are obtained due to the on-line FID. Other isothermal methods have suffered from heat-up and cool-down effects making it impossible to observe the kinetics at realistic operating temperatures. A major drawback of the FID approach, however, is that no differentiation between oil and gas is possible.

  11. Feasibility of passive electromagnetic dampers as energy harvesters in large structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrix, Christopher (Christopher M.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a trend in structural design toward energy efficient design and motion based design. The strategy of motion based design is controlling the movement of structures to meet certain dynamic response requirements ...

  12. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of a Go Proteinlike Heteropolymer Model with Two-State Folding Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Kallias; Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of Monte Carlo computer simulations of a coarse-grained hydrophobic-polar Go-like heteropolymer model and discuss thermodynamic properties and kinetics of an exemplified heteropolymer, exhibiting two-state folding behavior. It turns out that general, characteristic folding features of realistic proteins with a single free-energy barrier can also be observed in this simplified model, where the folding transition is primarily driven by the hydrophobic force.

  13. LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY In this lab you will begin to use the principle of conservation of energy to determine the motion resulting from interactions that are difficult to analyze using force concepts alone. You will explore how conservation of energy is applied to real interactions. Keep

  14. Dynamic coupling between the LID and NMP domain motions in the catalytic conversion of ATP and AMP to ADP by adenylate kinase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jana, Biman; Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The catalytic conversion of ATP and AMP to ADP by adenylate kinase (ADK) involves large amplitude, ligand induced domain motions, involving the opening and the closing of LID and NMP domains, during the repeated catalytic cycle. We discover and analyze an interesting dynamical coupling between the motions of the two domains during the opening, using large scale atomistic molecular dynamics trajectory analysis, covariance analysis and multi-dimensional free energy calculations with explicit water. Initially, the LID domain must open by a certain amount before the NMP domain can begin to open. Dynamical correlation map shows interesting cross-peak between LID and NMP domain which suggests the presence of correlated motion between them. This is also reflected in our calculated two dimensional free energy surface contour diagram which has an interesting elliptic shape, revealing a strong correlation between the opening of the LID domain and that of the NMP domain. Our free energy surface of the LID domain motion ...

  15. Stepping and crowding of molecular motors: statistical kinetics from an exclusion process perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Ciandrini; M. Carmen Romano; A. Parmeggiani

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerisation (e.g. RNA polymerases and ribosomes) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics still remains unclear. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend the current statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of co-moving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions.

  16. Kinetic Modeling of Toluene Oxidation for Surrogate Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frassoldati, A; Mehl, M; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    New environmental issues, like the effect of combustion-generated greenhouse gases, provide motivation to better characterize oxidation of hydrocarbons. Transportation, in particular, significantly contributes to energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Kinetic studies about the combustion of fuels under conditions typical of internal combustion engines provides important support to improve mechanism formulation and to eventually provide better computational tools that can be used to increase the engine performance. It is foreseeable that at least in the next 30 years the main transportation fuels will be either gasoline or diesel. Unfortunately, these fuels are very complex mixtures of many components. Moreover, their specifications and performance requirements significantly change the composition of these fuels: gasoline and diesel mixtures are different if coming from different refineries or they are different from winter to summer. At the same time a fuel with a well defined and reproducible composition is needed for both experimental and modeling work. In response to these issues, surrogate fuels are proposed. Surrogate fuels are defined as mixtures of a small number of hydrocarbons whose relative concentrations is adjusted in order to approximate the chemical and physical properties of a real fuel. Surrogate fuels are then very useful both for the design of reproducible experimental tests and also for the development of reliable kinetic models. The primary reference fuels (PRF) are a typical and old example of surrogate fuel: n-heptane and iso-octane mixtures are used to reproduce antiknock propensity of complex mixtures contained in a gasoline. PRFs are not able to surrogate gasoline in operating conditions different from standard ones and new surrogates have been recently proposed. Toluene is included in all of them as a species able to represent the behavior of aromatic compounds. On the other side, the toluene oxidation chemistry is not so well established and uncertainties still remain in the mechanism. This is especially true in the low temperature regime (< 850K). In these conditions, the toluene reactivity is too low to be conveniently investigated. Nonetheless, gasoline surrogates work in the engine at low temperatures, because of the presence of very reactive alkanes. The effect of these component interactions have to be taken into account. This work's aim is to present the model activity carried out by two different research groups, comparing the main pathways and results, matching data carried out in different devices both for pure toluene and mixtures. This is the starting point for a further activity to improve the two kinetic schemes.

  17. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460?°C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51?±?3 and 87?±?5?kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475?°C and E{sub d} of 110?±?5?kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585?°C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62?±?3 and 270?±?10?kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited an additional high temperature peak at 910?°C with E{sub d}?=?370?±?10?kJ/mol that is consistent with both the dehydrogenation of surface AlOH species and H{sub 2} assisted sublimation of AlN. Similarly, N{sub 2} exhibited a similar higher temperature desorption peak with E{sub d}?=?535?±?40?kJ/mol that is consistent with the activation energy for direct sublimation of AlN.

  18. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guangye

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For decades, the Vlasov-Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Here, we explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space-time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. The algorithm conserves total energy, local charge, canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large time steps and cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy consid...

  19. Quantization of singular systems and incomplete motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. P. Landsman

    1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for a mathematically rigorous quantization procedure of singular spaces and incomplete motions is pointed out in connection with quantum cosmology. We put our previous suggestion for such a procedure, based on the theory of induced representations of C*-algebras, in the light of L. Schwartz' theory of Hilbert subspaces. This turns out to account for the freedom in the induction procedure, at the same time providing a basis for generalized eigenfunction expansions pertinent to the needs of quantum cosmology. Reinforcing our previous proposal for the wave-function of the Universe, we are now able to add a concrete prescription for its calculation.

  20. Casimir friction: Relative motion more generally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan S. Høye; Iver Brevik

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper extends our recent study on Casimir friction forces for dielectric plates moving parallel to each other [J. S. H{\\o}ye and I. Brevik, Eur. Phys. J. D {\\bf 68}, 61 (2014)], to the case where the plates are no longer restricted to rectilinear motion. Part of the mathematical formalism thereby becomes more cumbersome, but reduces in the end to the form that we could expect to be the natural one in advance. As an example, we calculate the Casimir torque on a planar disc rotating with constant angular velocity around its vertical symmetry axis next to another plate.

  1. Soret Motion of a Charged Spherical Colloid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyyed Nader Rasuli; Ramin Golestanian

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermophoretic motion of a charged spherical colloidal particle and its accompanying cloud of counterions and co-ions in a temperature gradient is studied theoretically. Using the Debye-Huckel approximation, the Soret drift velocity of a weakly charged colloid is calculated analytically. For highly charged colloids, the nonlinear system of electrokinetic equations is solved numerically, and the effects of high surface potential, dielectrophoresis, and convection are examined. Our results are in good agreement with some of the recent experiments on highly charged colloids without using adjustable parameters.

  2. The equation of motion of an electron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 and The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Sessler, A.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the current status of understanding of the equation of motion of an electron. Classically, a consistent, linearized theory exists for an electron of finite extent, as long as the size of the electron is larger than the classical electron radius. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics seems to offer a fine theory even in the point particle limit. Although there is as yet no convincing calculation, it is probable that a quantum electrodynamical result will be at least as well-behaved as is the nonrelativistic quantum mechanical results. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. The equation of motion of an electron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.-J.

    1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the current status of understanding of the equation of motion of an electron. Classically, a consistent linearized theory exists for an electron of finite extent, as long as the size of the electron is larger than the classical electron radius. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics seems to offer a fine theory even in the point particle limit. Although there is as yet no convincing calculation, it is probable that a quantum electrodynamical result will be at least as well-behaved as is the nonrelativistic quantum mechanical results.

  4. Does the Equivalence between Gravitational Mass and Energy Survive for a Composite Quantum Body?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei G. Lebed

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We define passive and active gravitational mass operators of the simplest composite quantum body - a hydrogen atom. Although they do not commute with its energy operator, the equivalence between the expectation values of passive and active gravitational masses and energy is shown to survive for stationary quantum states. In our calculations of passive gravitational mass operator, we take into account not only kinetic and Coulomb potential energies but also the so-called relativistic corrections to electron motion in a hydrogen atom. Inequivalence between passive and active gravitational masses and energy at a macroscopic level is demonstrated to reveal itself as time dependent oscillations of the expectation values of the gravitational masses for superpositions of stationary quantum states. Breakdown of the equivalence between passive gravitational mass and energy at a microscopic level reveals itself as unusual electromagnetic radiation, emitted by macroscopic ensemble of hydrogen atoms, moved by small spacecraft with constant velocity in the Earth's gravitational field. We suggest the corresponding experiment on the Earth's orbit to detect this radiation, which would be the first direct experiment where quantum effects in general relativity are observed.

  5. TpPt(IV)Me(H)2 Forms a -CH4 Complex That Is Kinetically Resistant to Methane Liberation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Ehud

    TpPt(IV)Me(H)2 Forms a -CH4 Complex That Is Kinetically Resistant to Methane Liberation H demonstra- tion that methane can be catalytically activated by an organometallic complex of Pt(II).2 report that although 1 has a very high energy barrier for the liberation of methane, it readily forms

  6. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  7. Benchmarks for the point kinetics equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapol, B. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (United States); Picca, P. [Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona (United States); Previti, A.; Mostacci, D. [Laboratorio di Montecuccolino Alma Mater Studiorum, Universita di Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new numerical algorithm is presented for the solution to the point kinetics equations (PKEs), whose accurate solution has been sought for over 60 years. The method couples the simplest of finite difference methods, a backward Euler, with Richardsons extrapolation, also called an acceleration. From this coupling, a series of benchmarks have emerged. These include cases from the literature as well as several new ones. The novelty of this presentation lies in the breadth of reactivity insertions considered, covering both prescribed and feedback reactivities, and the extreme 8- to 9- digit accuracy achievable. The benchmarks presented are to provide guidance to those who wish to develop further numerical improvements. (authors)

  8. Kinetic Bounding Volume Hierarchies for Collision Detection of Deformable Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Zachmann; Rene Weller

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present novel algorithms for updating bounding volume hierarchies of objects undergoing arbitrary deformations. Therefore, we introduce two new data structures, the kinetic AABB tree and the kinetic BoxTree. The event-based approach of the kinetic data structures framework enables us to show that our algorithms are optimal in the number of updates. Moreover, we show a lower bound for the total number of BV updates, which is independent of the number of frames. Furthermore, we present a kinetic data structures which uses the kinetic AABB tree for collision detection and show that this structure can be easily extended for continuous collision detection of deformable objects. We performed a comparison of our kinetic approaches with the classical bottom-up update method. The results show that our algorithms perform up to ten times faster in practically relevant scenarios.

  9. Simulations of magnetic nanoparticle Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel B Reeves; John B Weaver

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful in many medical applications because they interact with biology on a cellular level thus allowing microenvironmental investigation. An enhanced understanding of the dynamics of magnetic particles may lead to advances in imaging directly in magnetic particle imaging (MPI) or through enhanced MRI contrast and is essential for nanoparticle sensing as in magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion (MSB). Moreover, therapeutic techniques like hyperthermia require information about particle dynamics for effective, safe, and reliable use in the clinic. To that end, we have developed and validated a stochastic dynamical model of rotating Brownian nanoparticles from a Langevin equation approach. With no field, the relaxation time toward equilibrium matches Einstein's model of Brownian motion. In a static field, the equilibrium magnetization agrees with the Langevin function. For high frequency or low amplitude driving fields, behavior characteristic of the linearized Debye approximation is reproduced. In a higher field regime where magnetic saturation occurs, the magnetization and its harmonics compare well with the effective field model. On another level, the model has been benchmarked against experimental results, successfully demonstrating that harmonics of the magnetization carry enough information to infer environmental parameters like viscosity and temperature.

  10. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  11. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.A. Schekochihin, S.C. Cowley, W. Dorland, G.W. Hammett, G.G. Howes, E. Quataert, and T. Tatsuno

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations become the slow and entropy modes of the conventional MHD). In the "dissipation range" below ion gyroscale, there are again two cascades: the kinetic-Alfven-wave (KAW) cascade governed by two fluid-like Electron Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (ERMHD) equations and a passive cascade of ion entropy fluctuations both in space and velocity. The latter cascade brings the energy of the inertial-range fluctuations that was Landau-damped at the ion gyroscale to collisional scales in the phase space and leads to ion heating. The KAWenergy is similarly damped at the electron gyroscale and converted into electron heat. Kolmogorov-style scaling relations are derived for all of these cascades. The relationship between the theoretical models proposed in this paper and astrophysical applications and observations is discussed in detail.

  12. Gasification characteristics and kinetics for an Eastern oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification reactivity of an Eastern oil shale was studied in a three-year research project under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, and HYCRUDE Corp. to expand the data base on the hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Gasification tests were conducted with the Indiana New Albany oil shale during the first year of the program. A total of six Eastern oil shales are planned to be tested during the program. A laboratory thermobalance and a 2-inch diameter fluidized bed were used to conduct gasification tests with Indiana New Albany oil shale. Temperature and pressure ranges used were 1600 to 1900/sup 0/F and 15 to 500 psig, respectively. Fifteen thermobalance tests were made in hydrogen/steam and synthesis gas/steam mixtures. Six fluidized-bed tests were made in the same synthesis gas/steam mixture. Carbon conversions as high as 95% were achieved. Thermobalance test results and a kinetic description of weight loss during hydrogen/steam gasification are presented. 14 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Weakly Ionized Plasmas in Hypersonics: Fundamental Kinetics and Flight Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macheret, Sergey [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, D-418 Engineering Quadrangle, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews some of the recent studies of applications of weakly ionized plasmas to supersonic/hypersonic flight. Plasmas can be used simply as means of delivering energy (heating) to the flow, and also for electromagnetic flow control and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation. Plasma and MHD control can be especially effective in transient off-design flight regimes. In cold air flow, nonequilibrium plasmas must be created, and the ionization power budget determines design, performance envelope, and the very practicality of plasma/MHD devices. The minimum power budget is provided by electron beams and repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulses, and the paper describes theoretical and computational modeling of plasmas created by the beams and repetitive pulses. The models include coupled equations for non-local and unsteady electron energy distribution function (modeled in forward-back approximation), plasma kinetics, and electric field. Recent experimental studies at Princeton University have successfully demonstrated stable diffuse plasmas sustained by repetitive nanosecond pulses in supersonic air flow, and for the first time have demonstrated the existence of MHD effects in such plasmas. Cold-air hypersonic MHD devices are shown to permit optimization of scramjet inlets at Mach numbers higher than the design value, while operating in self-powered regime. Plasma energy addition upstream of the inlet throat can increase the thrust by capturing more air (Virtual Cowl), or it can reduce the flow Mach number and thus eliminate the need for an isolator duct. In the latter two cases, the power that needs to be supplied to the plasma would be generated by an MHD generator downstream of the combustor, thus forming the 'reverse energy bypass' scheme. MHD power generation on board reentry vehicles is also discussed.

  14. Thermochemical Kinetics for Multireference Systems: Addition Reactions of Ozone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yan; Tishchenko, Oksana; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ozone to ethyne and ethene provide extreme examples of multireference singlet-state chemistry, and they are examined here to test the applicability of several approaches to thermochemical kinetics of systems with large static correlation. Four different multireference diagnostics are applied to measure the multireference characters of the reactants, products, and transition states; all diagnostics indicate significant multireference character in the reactant portion of the potential energy surfaces. We make a more complete estimation of the effect of quadruple excitations than was previously available, and we use this with CCSDT/CBS estimation of Wheeler et al. (Wheeler, S. E.; Ess, D. H.; Houk, K. N. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 1798.) to make new best estimates of the van der Waals association energy, the barrier height, and the reaction energy to form the cycloadduct for both reactions. Comparing with these best estimates, we present comprehensive mean unsigned errors for a variety of coupled cluster, multilevel, and density functional methods. Several computational aspects of multireference reactions are considered: (i) the applicability of multilevel theory, (ii) the convergence of coupled cluster theory for reaction barrier heights, (iii) the applicability of completely renormalized coupled cluster methods to multireference systems, (iv) the treatment by density functional theory, (v) the multireference perturbation theory for multireference reactions, and (vi) the relative accuracy of scaling-type multilevel methods as compared with additive ones. It is found that scaling-type multilevel methods do not perform better than the additive-type multilevel methods. Among the 48 tested density functionals, only M05 reproduces the best estimates within their uncertainty. Multireference perturbation theory based on the complete-active-space reference wave functions constructed using a small number of reaction-specific active orbitals gives accurate forward barrier heights; however, it significantly underestimates reaction energies.

  15. Internal and external rotation of the shoulder: Effects of plane, end-range determination, and scapular motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karduna, Andrew

    ). Passive humerothoracic motion was significantly greater than active humero- thoracic motion for internal

  16. 3.205 Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Samuel M.

    Laws of thermodynamics applied to materials and materials processes. Solution theory. Equilibrium diagrams. Overview of fluid transport processes. Kinetics of processes that occur in materials, including diffusion, phase ...

  17. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- The solubility and kinetics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The solubility and kinetics of minerals under CO2-EGS geothermal conditions: Comparison of experimental and modeling results Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ |...

  18. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, February 27, 2015 Figure 1 Figure 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of (A)...

  19. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Range of Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends Bruce G. Bunting and Scott Eaton, Oak Ridge National...

  20. Design and operating characteristics of a transient kinetic analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    catalysis reactor system employing in situ transmission Abstract: A novel apparatus for gas-phase heterogeneous catalysis kinetics is described. The apparatus enables fast...

  1. Coalescence of Drops Near A Hydrophilic Boundary Leads to Long Range Directed Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manoj K. Chaudhury; Aditi Chakrabarti; Tapasya Tibrewal

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A new mechanism for the passive removal of drop on a horizontal surface is described that does not require pre-fabrication of a surface energy gradient. The method relies upon the preparation of alternate hydrophilic/hydrophobic stripes on a surface. When one side of this surface is exposed to steam, with its other surface convectively cooled with cold water, steam condenses as a continuous film on the hydrophilic stripes but as droplets on the hydrophobic stripes. Coalescence leads to a random motion of the center of mass of the fused drops on the surface, which are readily removed as they reach near the boundary of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic zones thus resulting in a net diffusive flux of the coalesced drops from the hydrophobic to the hydrophilic stripes of the surface. Although an in-situ produced thermal gradient due to differential heat transfer coefficients of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes could provide additional driving force for such a motion, it is, however, not a necessary condition for motion to occur. This method of creating directed motion of drops does not require a pre-existing wettability gradient and may have useful applications in thermal management devices.

  2. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Sircar; A. J. Roberts

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of electrolytes as well as due to the defective properties of the mucin polymer network.

  3. JOURNAL ut PHYSIQUE Colloque C7, supplement au n 12, Tome 38, decembre 1977, page C7-51 A MICROSCOPIC THEORY FOR DOMAIN WALL MOTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the fact that the order parameter r\\ is not a conserved quantity. If the free energy is not at a minimum KINETICS J. W. CAHN Institute for Materials Research, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C. 20234 to mean curvature. Unlike previous models, the velocity is not proportional to domain wall free energy

  4. Motion of spinning test bodies in Kerr spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eva Hackmann; Claus Lämmerzahl; Yuri N. Obukhov; Dirk Puetzfeld; Isabell Schaffer

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the motion of spinning test bodies in General Relativity. By means of a multipolar approximation method for extended test bodies we derive the equations of motion, and classify the orbital motion of pole-dipole test bodies in the equatorial plane of the Kerr geometry. An exact expression for the periastron shift of a spinning test body is given. Implications of test body spin corrections are studied and compared with the results obtained by means of other approximation schemes.

  5. Tidal Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas [Univ of Washington; Aliseda, Alberto [Univ of Washington; Palodichuk, Michael [Univ of Washington; Polagye, Brian [Univ of Washington; Thomson, James [Univ of Washington; Chime, Arshiya [Univ of Washington; Malte, Philip [Univ of washington

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

  6. Real Time Estimation of Ship Motions Using Kalman Filtering Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafyllou, Michael S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The estimation of the heave, pitch, roll, sway, and yaw motions of a DD-963 destroyer is studied, using Kalman filtering

  7. Free motion in deformed (quantum) four-dimensional space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Leznov

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that trajectories of free motion of the particles in deformed ("quantum") four dimensional space-time are quadratic curves.

  8. Motion Capture of Character Interactions with a Rope.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Bryce Zachary

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??We present a solution to animating interactions between characters and thin, non-rigid bodies using a passive optical motion capture system. Prior work in human body… (more)

  9. Potomac Electric Power Company's Motion to Intervene and Comment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Intervene and Comment in Support of Emergency Petition and Complaint Potomac Electric Power Company's Motion to Intervene and Comment in Support of Emergency Petition and...

  10. Notes on the two-dimensional fractional Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrice Baudoin , David Nualart

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory Related Fields 118 121–291. [12] PITMAN, J. and YOR, M. (1986). Asymptotic laws of planar Brownian motion. Ann. Probab. 14 733–779. [13] PITMAN ...

  11. Read about the Brownian Motion. - Department of Mathematics ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motion of the suspended thermal molecules. On the other .... properties are exploited in animation to generate pictures of artificial plants and landscapes. Z. (

  12. Motional Broadening in Ensembles With Heavy-Tail Frequency Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoav Sagi; Rami Pugatch; Ido Almog; Nir Davidson; Michael Aizenman

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the spectrum of an ensemble of two-level systems can be broadened through `resetting' discrete fluctuations, in contrast to the well-known motional-narrowing effect. We establish that the condition for the onset of motional broadening is that the ensemble frequency distribution has heavy tails with a diverging first moment. We find that the asymptotic motional-broadened lineshape is a Lorentzian, and derive an expression for its width. We explain why motional broadening persists up to some fluctuation rate, even when there is a physical upper cutoff to the frequency distribution.

  13. Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

  14. ccsd-00105812,version1-12Oct2006 Unconventional motional narrowing in the optical spectrum of a semiconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    In the seminal work on motional narrowing by Bloem- bergen et al., relaxation effects in nuclear magnetic reso environment thus randomize the emission energy over a spectral range on a characteristic time scale c narrower when increasing the reservoir fluctuation. A textbook example is found in nuclear magnetic

  15. The MAST motional Stark effect diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, N. J.; De Bock, M. F. M.; Michael, C. A.; Walsh, M. J.; Carolan, P. G.; Hawkes, N. C.; Shibaev, S.; Wearing, G. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rachlew, E. [Department of Physics, KTH, EURATOM-VR Association, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); McCone, J. F. G. [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Association EURATOM-DCU, Cork (Ireland)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is now installed and operating routinely on the MAST spherical tokamak, with 35 radial channels, spatial resolution of {approx}2.5 cm, and time resolution of {approx}1 ms at angular noise levels of {approx}0.5 deg. Conventional (albeit very narrow) interference filters isolate {pi} or {sigma} polarized emission. Avalanche photodiode detectors with digital phase-sensitive detection measure the harmonics of a pair of photoelastic modulators operating at 20 and 23 kHz, and thus the polarization state. The {pi} component is observed to be significantly stronger than {sigma}, in reasonably good agreement with atomic physics calculations, and as a result, almost all channels are now operated on {pi}. Trials with a wide filter that admits the entire Stark pattern (relying on the net polarization of the emission) have demonstrated performance almost as good as the conventional channels. MSE-constrained equilibrium reconstructions can readily be produced between pulses.

  16. Handling congestion in crowd motion modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maury, B; Santambrogio, F; Venel, J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We address here the issue of congestion in the modeling of crowd motion, in the non-smooth framework: contacts between people are not anticipated and avoided, they actually occur, and they are explicitly taken into account in the model. We limit our approach to very basic principles in terms of behavior, to focus on the particular problems raised by the non-smooth character of the models. We consider that individuals tend to move according to a desired, or spontanous, velocity. We account for congestion by assuming that the evolution realizes at each time an instantaneous balance between individual tendencies and global constraints (overlapping is forbidden): the actual velocity is defined as the closest to the desired velocity among all admissible ones, in a least square sense. We develop those principles in the microscopic and macroscopic settings, and we present how the framework of Wasserstein distance between measures allows to recover the sweeping process nature of the problem on the macroscopic level, ...

  17. Entropic Motion in Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Manuel Garcia-Islas

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Entropic forces result from an increase of the entropy of a thermodynamical physical system. It has been proposed that gravity is such a phenomenon and many articles have appeared on the literature concerning this problem. Loop quantum gravity has also considered such possibility. We propose a new method in loop quantum gravity which reproduces an entropic force. By considering the interaction between a fixed gravity state space and a particle state in loop quantum gravity, we show that it leads to a mathematical description of a random walk of such particle. The random walk in special situations, can be seen as an entropic motion in such a way that the particle will move towards a location where entropy increases. This may prove that such theory can reproduce gravity as it is expected.

  18. Energy Budget of Cosmological First-order Phase Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose R. Espinosa; Thomas Konstandin; Jose M. No; Geraldine Servant

    2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the hydrodynamics of bubble growth in first-order phase transitions is very relevant for electroweak baryogenesis, as the baryon asymmetry depends sensitively on the bubble wall velocity, and also for predicting the size of the gravity wave signal resulting from bubble collisions, which depends on both the bubble wall velocity and the plasma fluid velocity. We perform such study in different bubble expansion regimes, namely deflagrations, detonations, hybrids (steady states) and runaway solutions (accelerating wall), without relying on a specific particle physics model. We compute the efficiency of the transfer of vacuum energy to the bubble wall and the plasma in all regimes. We clarify the condition determining the runaway regime and stress that in most models of strong first-order phase transitions this will modify expectations for the gravity wave signal. Indeed, in this case, most of the kinetic energy is concentrated in the wall and almost no turbulent fluid motions are expected since the surrounding fluid is kept mostly at rest.

  19. Seismic Safety Program: Ground motion and structural response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1964, John A. Blume & Associates Research Division (Blume) began a broad-range structural response program to assist the Nevada Operations Office of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in ensuring the continued safe conduct of underground nuclear detonation testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Blume`s long experience in earthquake engineering provided a general basis for the program, but much more specialized knowledge was required for the AEC`s purposes. Over the next 24 years Blume conducted a major research program to provide essential understanding of the detailed nature of the response of structures to dynamic loads such as those imposed by seismic wave propagation. The program`s results have been embodied in a prediction technology which has served to provide reliable advanced knowledge of the probable effects of seismic ground motion on all kinds of structures, for use in earthquake engineering and in building codes as well as for the continuing needs of the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). This report is primarily an accounting of the Blume work, beginning with the setting in 1964 and the perception of the program needs as envisioned by Dr. John A. Blume. Subsequent chapters describe the structural response program in detail and the structural prediction procedures which resulted; the intensive data acquisition program which, as is discussed at some length, relied heavily on the contributions of other consultant-contractors in the DOE/NV Seismic Safety Support Program; laboratory and field studies to provide data on building elements and structures subjected to dynamic loads from sources ranging from testing machines to earthquakes; structural response activities undertaken for testing at the NTS and for off-NTS underground nuclear detonations; and concluding with an account of corollary studies including effects of natural forces and of related studies on building response.

  20. The kinetic one-dimensional equation with frequency of collisions, affine depending on the module molecular velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Bugrimov; A. V. Latyshev; A. A. Yushkanov

    2014-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-dimensional kinetic equation with integral of collisions type BGK (Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook) and frequency of collisions affine depending on the module of molecular velocity is constructed. Laws of preservation of number of particles, momentum and energy at construction equation are used. Separation of variables leads to the characteristic equation. The system of the dispersion equations is entered. Its determinant is called as dispersion function. It is investigated continuous and discrete spectra of the characteristic equation. The set of zero of the dispersion equation makes the discrete spectrum of the characteristic equation. The eigen solutions of the kinetic equation corresponding to discrete spectrum are found. The solution of the characteristic equation in space of the generalized functions leads to eigen functions corresponding to the continuous spectrum. Results of the spent analysis in the form of the theorem about structure of the general solution of the entered kinetic equation are formulated.