Sample records for motion kinetic en

  1. Kinetic Alfv'en Eigenmodes in a Hot Tokamak Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaun, André

    'en waves, with a power absorption occurring through resistive dissipation. The kinetic model is appropriate­100 44 Stockholm, Sweden 2 CRPP­EPFL, CH­1015 Lausanne, Switzerland 3 JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon Resonant destabilization of Alfv'en waves by fusion produced ff\\Gammaparticles is an important issue

  2. Energy of tsunami waves generated by bottom motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy of tsunami waves generated by bottom motion By Denys Dutykh, Fr´ed´eric Dias CMLA, ENS investigation on the energy of waves generated by bottom motion is performed here. We start with the full for the linearized water wave equations. Exchanges between potential and kinetic energies are clearly revealed

  3. Understanding ammonia selective catalytic reduction kinetics over Cu-SSZ-13 from motion of the Cu ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Kollar, Marton; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios, at 6, 12 and 35, are synthesized with solution ion exchange. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Catalytic properties are examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions. By varying Si/Al ratios and Cu loadings, it is possible to synthesize catalysts with one dominant type of isolated Cu2+ ion species. Prior to full dehydration of the zeolite catalyst, hydrated Cu2+ ions are found to be very mobile as judged from EPR. NO oxidation is catalyzed by O-bridged Cu-dimer species that form at relatively high Cu loadings and in the presence of O2. For NH3 oxidation and standard SCR reactions, transient Cu-dimers even form at much lower Cu loadings; and these are proposed to be the active sites for reaction temperatures ? 350 C. These dimer species can be viewed as in equilibrium with monomeric Cu ion complexes. Between ~250 and 350 C, these moieties become less stable causing SCR reaction rates to decrease. At temperatures above 350 C and at low Cu loadings, Cu-dimers completely dissociate to regenerate isolated Cu2+ monomers that then locate at ion-exchange sites of the zeolite lattice. At low Cu loadings, these Cu species are the high-temperature active SCR catalytic centers. At high Cu loadings, on the other hand, both Cu-dimers and monomers are highly active in the high temperature kinetic regime, yet Cu-dimers are less selective in SCR. Brnsted acidity is also very important for SCR reactivity in the high-temperature regime. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  4. Phrases of the Kinetic: Dynamic Physicality as a Dimension of the Design Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Hiroshi

    construction and dynamics physics education with children; Kinetic Sketchup, a system for motion construction

  5. Motion capture och skrck; Motion capture and horror.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sn, Kristina Helene

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Det hr arbetet syftade till att underska om de skakningar och ryck som uppstr vid en dlig motion capture-inspelning, kan anvndas till frdel i (more)

  6. Phrases of the Kinetic: Dynamic Physicality as a Construct of Interaction Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Hiroshi

    , a system for motion construction and dynamics physics education with children; Kinetic Sketchup, a system Backpacks for motion modulation Evaluations Kinetic Sketch-up Design Tools for motion prototyping

  7. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  8. Motion-to-Energy (M2E™) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  9. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    INL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  10. Motion-to-Energy (M2E?) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  11. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mentesana; Charles P. (Leawood, KS)

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  12. Topobo : a 3-D constructive assembly system with kinetic memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffle, Hayes Solos, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce Topobo, a 3-D constructive assembly system em- bedded with kinetic memory, the ability to record and playback physical motion. Unique among modeling systems is Topobo's coincident physical input and output ...

  13. Depth, and Motion inVision CMSC 436/636

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Penny

    , perceived depth related #12;Head Motion Parallax Bruce and Green 90, p. 231. Kinetic Depth Effect Bruce displacement) #12;Structure from Motion Bruce and Green 90, pg. 328. #12;Image Segmentation Discontinuities Representation techniques parameters #12;Experimental Findings Control necessary for development Held

  14. An analysis of guard cell motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hsin-i

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ANALYSIS OF GUARD CELL MOTION A Thesis by BSIN-I WU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December, 1977 Ma]or Sub]ect: Industrial... Engineering AN ANALYSIS OF GUARD CELL MOTION A Thesis by HSIN-I WU Approved as to style and content by: L. Curry (I. En. ) Newton C. Ellis (I. En. ) c' eter J. H. Sharpe (B. E. ) Dar d J. Ha tfiel (Math) December 1977 I &'(2(i& R) ABSTRACT...

  15. Quantum potential energy as concealed motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Holland

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that the Schroedinger equation may be derived from a hydrodynamic model in which the Lagrangian position coordinates of a continuum of particles represent the quantum state. Using Routh\\s method of ignorable coordinates it is shown that the quantum potential energy of particle interaction that represents quantum effects in this model may be regarded as the kinetic energy of additional concealed freedoms. The method brings an alternative perspective to Planck\\s constant, which plays the role of a hidden variable, and to the canonical quantization procedure, since what is termed kinetic energy in quantum mechanics may be regarded literally as energy due to motion.

  16. Drift-/ Kinetic Alfven Eigenmodes in High Performance Tokamak Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaun, André

    Stockholm, Sweden 2) Plasma Science Fusion Centre, MIT, Cambridge MA 02139, USA 3) CRPP-EPFL, 1015 Lausanne to the kinetic Alfv´en wave. This stimulated the development of models such as continuum damping, complex-kinetic description for the bulk plasma. Such a model is required to calculate the power transfer between global fluid

  17. Motion Planning Jana Kosecka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosecka, Jana

    Slides thanks to http://cs.cmu.edu/~motionplanning, Jyh-Ming Lien Hard Motion Planning · Configuration Geometric Models S Sampling Based Motion Planner Discrete Search C-space planning Idea : Generate random

  18. Nonequilibrium quantum kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielewicz, P.

    1997-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains viewgraphs on non-equilibrium quantum kinetics of nuclear reactions at the intermediate and high energy ranges.

  19. Motion in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karim Noui

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We tackle the question of motion in Quantum Gravity: what does motion mean at the Planck scale? Although we are still far from a complete answer we consider here a toy model in which the problem can be formulated and resolved precisely. The setting of the toy model is three dimensional Euclidean gravity. Before studying the model in detail, we argue that Loop Quantum Gravity may provide a very useful approach when discussing the question of motion in Quantum Gravity.

  20. The Motion Capture Pipeline.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmboe, Dennis

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Motion Capture is an essential part of a world full of digital effects in movies and games. Understanding the pipelines between software is a (more)

  1. Bibliography 1. Motion Perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Penny

    and Patrick R. Green (1990), Visual Perception: Physiology, Psychology, and Ecology, 2nd edition, LawrenceBibliography 1. Motion Perception E. H. Adelson and J. R. Bergen. Spatiotemporal energy models for the perception of motion. Journal of the Optical Society of America, A, 2:284-299, February 1985. O. Braddick

  2. DOE Opposes Injunction Motion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 23, 2010, the Department of Energy opposed the State of Washingtons motion to enjoin the Department's efforts to wind down the Yucca Mountain Program. The Department's filing, made in the...

  3. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  4. Ion kinetic energy conservation and magnetic field strength constancy in multi-fluid solar wind Alfv\\'enic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteini, L; Pantellini, F; Velli, M; Schwartz, S J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate properties of the plasma fluid motion in the large amplitude low frequency fluctuations of highly Alfv\\'enic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles, which, owing to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfv\\'en speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform proton velocity into the frame of Alfv\\'enic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfv\\'enic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfv\\'enic turbulence, is at the origin of ...

  5. Kinetic theory viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the viscous evolution of Keplerian accretion discs can be understood in terms of simple kinetic theory. Although standard physics texts give a simple derivation of momentum transfer in a linear shear flow using kinetic theory, many authors, as detailed by Hayashi & Matsuda 2001, have had difficulties applying the same considerations to a circular shear flow. We show here how this may be done, and note that the essential ingredients are to take proper account of, first, isotropy locally in the frame of the fluid and, second, the geometry of the mean flow.

  6. Molecular Beam Kinetics | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes to AvoidKinetics Molecular Beam Kinetics

  7. Motion Planning ! Jana Kosecka!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosecka, Jana

    1! Motion Planning ! Jana Kosecka! Department of Computer Science! ·Discrete planning, graph search://cs.cmu.edu/~motionplanning, Jyh-Ming Lien! Discrete Planning! · Review of some discrete planning methods! · Given state space is discrete) ! · Use well developed search and graph traversal algorithms to find the path! · Path: set

  8. Motion Planning Jana Kosecka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosecka, Jana

    1 Motion Planning Jana Kosecka Department of Computer Science · Discrete planning, graph search://cs.cmu.edu/~motionplanning, Jyh-Ming Lien State space · Set of all possible states is represented as graph · Nodes states, links planning ­ generate a set of actions, if the solution exists it must be found in the finite time · Search

  9. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  10. Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling &...

  11. Operationalization of Relativistic Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Hartmann

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the Helmholtz program of basic measurements to relativistic motion. We define a spatiotemporal order by practical comparison: "longer than" if one object or process covers the other. To express its value also numerically (how many times more) we cover them by a locally regular grid of light clocks. We define basic measures from physical operations. Interrelation of measurement operations by different observers reveals a genetic derivation of formal Lorentz transformation. Operationally impracticable configurations for accelerating observers clarify the way out of apparent Twin paradox. From simple measurement-methodical principles - without mathematical presuppositions - we derive all equations of relativistic Kinematics (and next same for classical and relativistic Dynamics).

  12. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  13. Active Brownian Motion Models and Applications to Ratchets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Fiasconaro; Werner Ebeling; Ewa Gudowska-Nowak

    2008-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an overview over recent studies on the model of Active Brownian Motion (ABM) coupled to reservoirs providing free energy which may be converted into kinetic energy of motion. First, we present an introduction to a general concept of active Brownian particles which are capable to take up energy from the source and transform part of it in order to perform various activities. In the second part of our presentation we consider applications of ABM to ratchet systems with different forms of differentiable potentials. Both analytical and numerical evaluations are discussed for three cases of sinusoidal, staircase-like and Mateos ratchet potentials, also with the additional loads modeled by tilted potential structure. In addition, stochastic character of the kinetics is investigated by considering perturbation by Gaussian white noise which is shown to be responsible for driving the directionality of the asymptotic flux in the ratchet. This \\textit{stochastically driven directionality} effect is visualized as a strong nonmonotonic dependence of the statistics of the right versus left trajectories of motion leading to a net current of particles. Possible applications of the ratchet systems to molecular motors are also briefly discussed

  14. Motion capture based motion analysis and motion synthesis for human-like character animation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Zhidong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Motion capture technology is recognised as a standard tool in the computer animation pipeline. It provides detailed movement for animators; however, it also introduces problems (more)

  15. Motion Capture Technologies Jessica Hodgins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treuille, Adrien

    a few dof) #12;Production Pipeline #12;What is captured? · Dynamic motions? House of Moves #12;What is captured? · Scale? Motion Analysis #12;What is captured? · Non-rigid objects? House of Moves #12;What is captured? · Props often cause problems ­ Ball in pingpong ­ Fly fishing ­ Sword · Passive behaviors

  16. Tactual Motion Adaptation Phenomenon Junji Watanabe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    processing in the brain without imaging or neurophysiology. Especially, human visual perception of motion has ABSTRACT Tactual motion perception is one of the most important functions for realizing a delicate for investigating not only visual but also tactual motion processing. Keywords: Tactile motion perception, Motion

  17. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  18. Kinetic dielectric decrement revisited: phenomenology of finite ion concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcello Sega; Sofia Kantorovich; Axel Arnold

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With the help of a recently developed non-equilibrium approach, we investigate the ionic strength dependence of the Hubbard--Onsager dielectric decrement. We compute the depolarization of water molecules caused by the motion of ions in sodium chloride solutions from the dilute regime (0.035 M) up close to the saturation concentration (4.24 M), and find that the kinetic decrement displays a strong nonmonotonic behavior, in contrast to the prediction of available models. We introduce a phenomenological modification of the Hubbard--Onsager continuum theory, that takes into account the screening due to the ionic cloud at mean field level, and, is able to describe the kinetic decrement at high concentrations including the presence of a pronounced minimum.

  19. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    processes. deer09aceves.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Simulation of High...

  20. [Grain boundary and interface kinetics during ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, H.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed here is renewed support of a research program focused on interface motion and phase transformation during ion irradiation, with emphasis on elemental semiconductors. Broadly speaking, the aims of this program are to explore defect kinetics in amorphous and crystalline semiconductors, and to relate defect dynamics to interface motion and phase transformations. Over the last three years, we initiated a program under DOE support to explore crystallization and amorphization of elemental semiconductors under irradiation. This research has enabled new insights about the nature of defects in amorphous semiconductors and about microstructural evolution in the early stages of crystallization. In addition, we have demonstrated almost arbitrary control over the relative rates of crystal nucleation and crystal growth in silicon. As a result, the impinged grain microstructure of thin (100 nm) polycrystalline films crystallized under irradiation can be controlled with grain sizes ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers, which may have interesting technological implications.

  1. (Grain boundary and interface kinetics during ion irradiation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, H.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed here is renewed support of a research program focused on interface motion and phase transformation during ion irradiation, with emphasis on elemental semiconductors. Broadly speaking, the aims of this program are to explore defect kinetics in amorphous and crystalline semiconductors, and to relate defect dynamics to interface motion and phase transformations. Over the last three years, we initiated a program under DOE support to explore crystallization and amorphization of elemental semiconductors under irradiation. This research has enabled new insights about the nature of defects in amorphous semiconductors and about microstructural evolution in the early stages of crystallization. In addition, we have demonstrated almost arbitrary control over the relative rates of crystal nucleation and crystal growth in silicon. As a result, the impinged grain microstructure of thin (100 nm) polycrystalline films crystallized under irradiation can be controlled with grain sizes ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers, which may have interesting technological implications.

  2. 06241 Abstracts Collection Human Motion -Understanding, Modeling,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    06241 Abstracts Collection Human Motion - Understanding, Modeling, Capture and Animation. 13th Summary Human Motion - Understanding, Modeling, Capture and Animation. 13th Workshop Reinhard Klette 06241 Human Motion - Understanding, Modeling, Capture and Animation. 13th Workshop "Theoretical

  3. Motion Compensation Via Redundant-Wavelet Multihypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, James E.

    -based implementation. Index Terms-- multihypothesis motion compensation, redun- dant wavelet transform, phaseMotion Compensation Via Redundant-Wavelet Multihypothesis James E. Fowler, Senior Member, IEEE, Suxia Cui, Member, IEEE, and Yonghui Wang, Member, IEEE Abstract-- Multihypothesis motion compensation

  4. Reciprocal Relations Between Kinetic Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yablonsky, G S; Constales, D; Galvita, V; Marin, G B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study coupled irreversible processes. For linear or linearized kinetics with microreversibility, $\\dot{x}=Kx$, the kinetic operator $K$ is symmetric in the entropic inner product. This form of Onsager's reciprocal relations implies that the shift in time, $\\exp (Kt)$, is also a symmetric operator. This generates reciprocity relations between kinetic curves. For example, for the Master equation, if we start the process from the $i$th pure state and measure the probability $p_j(t)$ of the $j$th state ($j\

  5. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  6. The effect of heart motion on parameter bias in dynamic cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, S.G.; Gullberg, G.T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Huesman, R.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic cardiac SPECT can be used to estimate kinetic rate parameters which describe the wash-in and wash-out of tracer activity between the blood and the myocardial tissue. These kinetic parameters can in turn be correlated to myocardial perfusion. There are, however, many physical aspects associated with dynamic SPECT which can introduce errors into the estimates. This paper describes a study which investigates the effect of heart motion on kinetic parameter estimates. Dynamic SPECT simulations are performed using a beating version of the MCAT phantom. The results demonstrate that cardiac motion has a significant effect on the blood, tissue, and background content of regions of interest. This in turn affects estimates of wash-in, while it has very little effect on estimates of wash-out. The effect of cardiac motion on parameter estimates appears not to be as great as effects introduced by photon noise and geometric collimator response. It is also shown that cardiac motion results in little extravascular contamination of the left ventricle blood region of interest.

  7. Virtual Test Environment for Motion Capture Shoots.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redavid, Claudio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? This master thesis presents the design of an implementation of a working prototype for an augmented motion capture acting environment. Motion capture (MoCap), the (more)

  8. Microscopic chaos from Brownian motion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. P. Dettmann; E. G. D. Cohen; H. van Beijeren

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent experiment on Brownian motion has been interpreted to exhibit direct evidence for microscopic chaos. In this note we demonstrate that virtually identical results can be obtained numerically using a manifestly microscopically nonchaotic system.

  9. Motion at low Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Daniel See Wai, 1980-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this thesis centers on inertialess motion at low Reynolds numbers at the crossroad between biofluids and microfluids. Here we address questions regarding locomotion of micro-swimmers, transport of ...

  10. Computer simulation of submarine motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurflueh, Jeffery Alan

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject: Mechanical Engineering COMPUTER SIMULATION OF SUBMARINE MOTION A Thesis by JEFFERY ALAN ZURFLUEH Approved as to style and content by: Make McDermott, Jr. ( Chair of Committee ) Glen Williams ( Member ) Lo 4verett ( Member ) gu r Walter...COMPUTER SIMULATION OF SUBMARINE MOTION A Thesis by JEFFERY ALAN ZURFLUEH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major...

  11. Solar Radiation and Asteroidal Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Klacka

    2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of solar wind and solar electromagnetic radiation on motion of asteroids are discussed. The results complete the statements presented in Vokrouhlick\\'{y} and Milani (2000). As for the effect of electromagnetic radiation, the complete equation of motion is presented to the first order in $v/c$ -- the shape of asteroid (spherical body is explicitly presented) and surface distribution of albedo should be taken into account. Optical quantities must be calculated in proper frame of reference.

  12. Kinetic models of opinion formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Toscani

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and discuss certain kinetic models of (continuous) opinion formation involving both exchange of opinion between individual agents and diffusion of information. We show conditions which ensure that the kinetic model reaches non trivial stationary states in case of lack of diffusion in correspondence of some opinion point. Analytical results are then obtained by considering a suitable asymptotic limit of the model yielding a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of opinion among individuals.

  13. Nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Derrell W.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KTRIC AMPLIFICATION IN THE JACOBSEN HYDROLYTIC KINET RESOLUTION OF RACEMIC EPOXIDES 20 Applicability of Homocompetitive Reaction Kinetics to the Jacobsen HKR Effect of Catalyst EE and Choice of Epoxide on Amplification in the Jacobsen HKR.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Effect of Temperature on Amplification and Reaction Rate in the Jacobsen HKR . Effect of Low EE Catalyst Generation on Amplification in the Jacobsen HKR. . . . 21 21 25 26 27 30 31 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CHAPTER Page V AS...

  14. Pebble-bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This report presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to determine the contact forces and the lengths of motion in contact. This information combined with the proper wear coefficients can be used to determine the dust production from mechanical wear. These new capabilities enhance the understanding of PBRs, and the capabilities of the code will allow future improvements in understanding.

  15. Brownian Motion of Black Holes in Dense Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt; Peter Berczik; Frederik Laun

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the Brownian motion of a massive particle ("black hole") at the center of a galaxy using N-body simulations. Our galaxy models have power-law central density cusps like those observed at the centers of elliptical galaxies. The simulations show that the black hole achieves a steady-state kinetic energy that is substantially different than would be predicted based on the properties of the galaxy model in the absence of the black hole. The reason appears to be that the black hole responds to stars whose velocities have themselves been raised by the presence of the black hole. Over a wide range of density slopes and black hole masses, the black hole's mean kinetic energy is equal to what would be predicted under the assumption that it is in energy equipartition with stars lying within a distance ~r_h/2 from it, where r_h is the black hole's influence radius. The dependence of the Brownian velocity on black hole mass is approximately ~ 1/M^{1/(3-gamma)} with gamma the power-law index of the stellar density profile, rho~1/r^gamma. This is less steep than the 1/M dependence predicted in a model where the effect of the black hole on the stellar velocities is ignored. The influence of a stellar mass spectrum on the black hole's Brownian motion is also evaluated and found to be consistent with predictions from Chandrasekhar's theory. We use these results to derive a probability function for the mass of the Milky Way black hole based on a measurement of its proper motion velocity. Interesting constraints on M will require a velocity resolution exceeding 0.5 km/s.

  16. Motion Processing and From-from-Apparent-Motion in Infancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirshkowitz, Amy

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    /VPC) and discrimination paradigms. Infants in both paradigms extracted shape from apparent motion given luminance cues alone, and color and luminance cues co-varying; but failed to extract shape given color cues alone (Studies 1-2). Given only color cues, infants required...

  17. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  18. Visually simulating realistic fluid motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naithani, Priyanka

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's second law of motion and Conservation of Mass, which leads to the continuity equation. Newton's second law states that the total force F, acting on an element equals mass m times the element's acceleration a. In the case of fluids we do not consider...

  19. Smoothing of respiratory motion traces for motion-compensated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Floris; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, Luebeck SH 23538 (Germany)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The CyberKnife system has been used successfully for several years to radiosurgically treat tumors without the need for stereotactic fixation or sedation of the patient. It has been shown that tumor motion in the lung, liver, and pancreas can be tracked with acceptable accuracy and repeatability. However, highly precise targeting for tumors in the lower abdomen, especially for tumors which exhibit strong motion, remains problematic. Reasons for this are manifold, like the slow tracking system operating at 26.5 Hz, and using the signal from the tracking camera ''as is''. Since the motion recorded with the camera is used to compensate for system latency by prediction and the predicted signal is subsequently used to infer the tumor position from a correlation model based on x-ray imaging of gold fiducials around the tumor, camera noise directly influences the targeting accuracy. The goal of this work is to establish the suitability of a new smoothing method for respiratory motion traces used in motion-compensated radiotherapy. The authors endeavor to show that better prediction--With a lower rms error of the predicted signal--and/or smoother prediction is possible using this method. Methods: The authors evaluated six commercially available tracking systems (NDI Aurora, PolarisClassic, Polaris Vicra, MicronTracker2 H40, FP5000, and accuTrack compact). The authors first tracked markers both stationary and while in motion to establish the systems' noise characteristics. Then the authors applied a smoothing method based on the a trous wavelet decomposition to reduce the devices' noise level. Additionally, the smoothed signal of the moving target and a motion trace from actual human respiratory motion were subjected to prediction using the MULIN and the nLMS{sub 2} algorithms. Results: The authors established that the noise distribution for a static target is Gaussian and that when the probe is moved such as to mimic human respiration, it remains Gaussian with the exception of the FP5000 and the Aurora systems. The authors also showed that the proposed smoothing method can indeed be used to filter noise. The signal's jitter dropped by as much as 95% depending on the tracking system employed. Subsequently, the 3D prediction error (rms) for a prediction horizon of 150 ms on a synthetic signal dropped by up to 37% when using a normalized LMS prediction algorithm (nLMS{sub 2}) and hardly changed when using a MULIN algorithm. When smoothing a real signal obtained in our laboratory, the improvement of prediction was similar: Up to 30% for both the nLMS{sub 2} and the best MULIN algorithm. The authors also found a noticeable increase in smoothness of the predicted signal, the relative jitter dropped by up to 95% on the real signal, and on the simulated signal. Conclusions: In conclusion, the authors can say that preprocessing of marker data is very useful in motion-compensated radiotherapy since the quality of prediction increases. This will result in better performance of the correlation model. As a side effect, since the prediction of a preprocessed signal is also less noisy, the authors expect less robot vibration resulting in better targeting accuracy and less strain on the robot gears.

  20. Kinetic Modeling and Thermodynamic Closure Approximation of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 5, 2007 ... Kinetic Modeling and Thermodynamic Closure. Approximation of Liquid Crystal Polymers. Haijun Yu. Program in Applied and Computational...

  1. Practical Color-Based Motion Capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Robert

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion capture systems have been widely used for high quality content creation and virtual reality but are rarely used in consumer applications due to their price and setup cost. In this paper, we propose a motion capture ...

  2. Video looping of human cyclic motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hye Mee

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, a system called Video Looping is developed to analyze human cyclic motions. Video Looping allows users to extract human cyclic motion from a given video sequence. This system analyzes similarities from a large amount of live footage...

  3. 14CME Kinetic Energy and Mass Kinetic energy is the energy that a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14CME Kinetic Energy and Mass Kinetic energy is the energy that a body has by virtue of its mass the table by determining the value of the missing entries using the formula for Kinetic Energy. Problem 2: What is the minimum and maximum range for the observed kinetic energies for the 10 CMEs? The largest

  4. Experimental wave effect on vertical relative motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, Rajith

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the most probable peak value of the different modes of motion indicates that the linear theory tends to overpredict....

  5. Colloidal Micromotors: Controlled Directed Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baraban, Larysa; Makarov, Denys; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we demonstrate a synthetic micro-engine, based on long-range controlled movement of colloidal particles, which is induced by a local catalytic reaction. The directed motion at long timescales was achieved by placing specially designed magnetic capped colloids in a hydrogen peroxide solution at weak magnetic fields. The control of the motion of the particles was provided by changes of the concentration of the solution and by varying the strength of the applied magnetic field. Such synthetic objects can then be used not only to understand the fundamental driving processes but also be employed as small motors in biological environments, for example, for the transportation of molecules in a controllable way.

  6. Colloidal Micromotors: Controlled Directed Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larysa Baraban; Christian Kreidler; Denys Makarov; Paul Leiderer; Artur Erbe

    2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we demonstrate a synthetic micro-engine, based on long-range controlled movement of colloidal particles, which is induced by a local catalytic reaction. The directed motion at long timescales was achieved by placing specially designed magnetic capped colloids in a hydrogen peroxide solution at weak magnetic fields. The control of the motion of the particles was provided by changes of the concentration of the solution and by varying the strength of the applied magnetic field. Such synthetic objects can then be used not only to understand the fundamental driving processes but also be employed as small motors in biological environments, for example, for the transportation of molecules in a controllable way.

  7. Relativistic Motion with Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felicetti, S; Fuentes, I; Lamata, L; Romero, G; Solano, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the dynamical modulation of the qubit-field coupling strength in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture mimics the motion of the qubit at relativistic speeds. This allows us to propose a realistic experiment to detect microwave photons coming from simulated acceleration radiation. Moreover, by combining this technique with the dynamical Casimir physics, we enhance the toolbox for studying relativistic phenomena in quantum field theory with superconducting circuits.

  8. Learning Motion Style Synthesis from Perceptual Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bregler, Christoph

    that the learned model can apply a variety of motion styles to pre-recorded motion sequences and it can extrapolate models that are unable to fully capture the subtleties and complexities of human movement based on learned parametric models. The aim is to maintain the animated preci- sion of motion capture

  9. RHIC stochastic cooling motion control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassner, D.; DeSanto, L.; Olsen, R.H.; Fu, W.; Brennan, J.M.; Liaw, CJ; Bellavia, S.; Brodowski, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams are subject to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) that causes an emittance growth in all three-phase space planes. The only way to increase integrated luminosity is to counteract IBS with cooling during RHIC stores. A stochastic cooling system for this purpose has been developed, it includes moveable pick-ups and kickers in the collider that require precise motion control mechanics, drives and controllers. Since these moving parts can limit the beam path aperture, accuracy and reliability is important. Servo, stepper, and DC motors are used to provide actuation solutions for position control. The choice of motion stage, drive motor type, and controls are based on needs defined by the variety of mechanical specifications, the unique performance requirements, and the special needs required for remote operations in an accelerator environment. In this report we will describe the remote motion control related beam line hardware, position transducers, rack electronics, and software developed for the RHIC stochastic cooling pick-ups and kickers.

  10. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Abstract: Many...

  11. Challenges and Progress Toward a Commercial Kinetic Hydropower System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Challenges and Progress Toward a Commercial Kinetic Hydropower System for its kinetic hydropower devices, and has made precise measurements

  12. Hydrogen Atom in Relativistic Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Jarvinen

    2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lorentz contraction of bound states in field theory is often appealed to in qualitative descriptions of high energy particle collisions. Surprisingly, the contraction has not been demonstrated explicitly even in simple cases such as the hydrogen atom. It requires a calculation of wave functions evaluated at equal (ordinary) time for bound states in motion. Such wave functions are not obtained by kinematic boosts from the rest frame. Starting from the exact Bethe-Salpeter equation we derive the equal-time wave function of a fermion-antifermion bound state in QED, i.e., positronium or the hydrogen atom, in any frame to leading order in alpha. We show explicitly that the bound state energy transforms as the fourth component of a vector and that the wave function of the fermion-antifermion Fock state contracts as expected. Transverse photon exchange contributes at leading order to the binding energy of the bound state in motion. We study the general features of the corresponding fermion-antifermion-photon Fock states, and show that they do not transform by simply contracting. We verify that the wave function reduces to the light-front one in the infinite momentum frame.

  13. PHYS 626 --Fundamentals of Plasma Physics --Section 6.4-6.5 1. Using the ideal MHD equation of motion, an energy equation can be derived. It is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    of motion, an energy equation can be derived. It is simply the continuity equation of energy density, which is the sum of kinetic energy density mU2 /2, magnetic energy density B2 /2µ0, and the internal energy density p/( -1). The total energy obtained by integrating the energy density over the whole space

  14. Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

    2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

  15. Coupled simulation of kinetic pedestal growth and MHD ELM crash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, G. [New York University; Cummings, J. [California Institute of Technology, University of California, Davis; Chang, C. S. [New York University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Ku, S. [New York University; Podhorszki, Norbert [University of California, Davis; Pankin, A. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Samtaney, Ravi [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Snyder, P. [General Atomics, San Diego; Strauss, H. [New York University; Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); CPES Team, the [SciDAC Prototype FSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edge pedestal height and the accompanying ELM crash are critical elements of ITER physics yet to be understood and predicted through high performance computing. An entirely self-consistent first principles simulation is being pursued as a long term research goal, and the plan is planned for completion in time for ITER operation. However, a proof-of-principle work has already been established using a computational tool that employs the best first principles physics available at the present time. A kinetic edge equilibrium code XGC0, which can simulate the neoclassically dominant pedestal growth from neutral ionization (using a phenomenological residual turbulence diffusion motion superposed upon the neoclassical particle motion) is coupled to an extended MHD code M3D, which can perform the nonlinear ELM crash. The stability boundary of the pedestal is checked by an ideal MHD linear peeling-ballooning code, which has been validated against many experimental data sets for the large scale (type I) ELMs onset boundary. The coupling workflow and scientific results to be enabled by it are described.

  16. The Excitation Energy Dependence of the Total Kinetic Energy Release in 235U(n,f)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Yanez; L. Yao; J. King; W. Loveland; F. Tovesson; N. Fotiades

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The total kinetic energy release in the neutron induced fission of $^{235}$U was measured (using white spectrum neutrons from LANSCE) for neutron energies from E$_{n}$ = 3.2 to 50 MeV. In this energy range the average post-neutron total kinetic energy release drops from 167.4 $\\pm$ 0.7 to 162.1 $\\pm$ 0.8 MeV, exhibiting a local dip near the second chance fission threshold. The values and the slope of the TKE vs. E$_{n}$ agree with previous measurements but do disagree (in magnitude) with systematics. The variances of the TKE distributions are larger than expected and apart from structure near the second chance fission threshold, are invariant for the neutron energy range from 11 to 50 MeV. We also report the dependence of the total excitation energy in fission, TXE, on neutron energy.

  17. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    improved gasoline surrogate fuels for HCCI engines * Development of very efficient software to reduce the size of detailed chemical kinetic models for transportation fuels...

  18. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & coordinate DOE research efforts (CLEERS Coordination) * Develop detailed technical data required to simulate energy efficient emission controls (LNT & SCR Kinetics, Sulfur &...

  19. Kinetic bounding volume hierarchies for deformable objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Zachmann; Tu Clausthal

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present novel algorithms for updating bounding volume hierarchies of objects undergoing arbitrary deformations. Therefore, we introduce two new data structures, the kinetic AABB tree and the kinetic BoxTree. The event-based approach of the kinetic data structures framework enables us to show that our algorithms are optimal in the number of updates. Moreover, we show a lower bound for the total number of BV updates, which is independent of the number of frames. We used our kinetic bounding volume hierarchies for collision detection and performed a comparison with the classical bottomup update method. The results show that our algorithms perform up to ten times faster in practically relevant scenarios.

  20. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  1. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data - Pres. 1: Coordination of CLEERS Project; Pres. 2: ORNL Research on LNT Sulfation & Desulfation CLEERS...

  2. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  3. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  4. Implementation of motion capture support in smartphones.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinsson, Johannes

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis investigates the feasibility of developing cross-platform smart phone applications that utilize the Qualisys motion capture system. An Application Programming Interface that implements an (more)

  5. Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Kun

    Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow. For the non-equilibrium flow computations, i.e., the nozzle flow and hypersonic rarefied flow over flat plate-kinetic method; Hypersonic and rarefied flows 1. Introduction The development of aerospace technology has

  6. Testing the kinetic energy functional: Kinetic energy density as a density functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Kieron

    is to the exchange-correlation energy as a functional of the density. A large part of the total energy, the kinetic contexts. For finite systems these forms integrate to the same global ki- netic energy, but they differTesting the kinetic energy functional: Kinetic energy density as a density functional Eunji Sim

  7. Cross-fixation transfer of motion aftereffects with expansion motion Xin Meng a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    by expanding random-dots stimuli. We also used rightward translational motion for comparison. Subjects adapted, a test pattern without net motion elicits more response in the opposite direction than the adapted

  8. Violent Wave Motion due to Impact Violent Wave Motion due to Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Violent Wave Motion due to Impact Violent Wave Motion due to Impact Mark J. Cooker School of Mathematics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, England. m.cooker@uea.ac.uk Theory of Water Waves, Cambridge Motion due to Impact 2. Pressure-Impulse Theory 214 M.J. COOKER AND D.H. PEREGRINE Y; O: .-- I mpact zone

  9. NAAP Motions of the Sun 1/7 Motions of the Sun Student Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Name: NAAP ­ Motions of the Sun 1/7 Motions of the Sun ­ Student Guide Seasonal Motion Work through in these pages are used in the Paths of the Sun Simulator. Question 1: For each of the following statements questions. (A) On May 25th , the sun is in the constellation of ___________________. (B) What would

  10. Kinetic Theory of Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. van Zon; H. van Beijeren; J. R. Dorfman

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed that the dynamics of simple fluids can be considered to be chaotic, at least to the extent that they can be modeled as classical systems of particles interacting with short range, repulsive forces. Here we give a brief introduction to those parts of chaos theory that are relevant for understanding some features of non-equilibrium processes in fluids. We introduce the notions of Lyapunov exponents, Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and related quantities using some simple low-dimensional systems as "toy" models of the more complicated systems encountered in the study of fluids. We then show how familiar methods used in the kinetic theory of gases can be employed for explicit, analytical calculations of the largest Lyapunov exponent and KS entropy for dilute gases composed of hard spheres in d dimensions. We conclude with a brief discussion of interesting, open problems.

  11. ADVANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL REACTION KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    1262 ADVANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL REACTION KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS: LONG-TERM FATE thermodynamic and kinetic data is available with regard to the formation of these mixed metal precipitate phases to six months from the initial addition of aqueous nickel. Additionally, we have determined thermodynamic

  12. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  13. Free-Form Motion Processing Scott Kircher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garland, Michael

    Free-Form Motion Processing Scott Kircher University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Michael Descriptors: I.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism--Animation General Terms are typical of several common motion sources, including physical simulations of non-rigid objects (e.g., cloth

  14. Compressive Computation in Analog VLSI Motion Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutschmann, Rainer

    Compressive Computation in Analog VLSI Motion Sensors Rainer A. Deutschmann1 and Oliver G. Wenisch2 analog VLSI mo- tion sensors developed in the past. We show how their pixel-parallel architecture can is best suited to perform the algorithm even at high noise levels. 1 Analog VLSI Motion Sensors Inthe past

  15. The apsidal motion in close binary stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is usually accepted to consider an apsidal motion in binary stars as a direct confirmation that a substance inside stars is not uniformly distributed. It is shown in this paper that the apsidal motion in binary systems observation data is in a good agreement with an existence of uniform plasma cores inside stars if they consist of hydrogen-deuterium-helium mixture.

  16. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  17. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harben, Philip E. (Oakley, CA); Rodgers, Peter W. (Santa Barbara, CA); Ewert, Daniel W. (Patterson, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic switching device that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period.

  18. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

  19. Diagnosing residual motion via the x-ray self emission from indirectly driven inertial confinement implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, A., E-mail: pak5@llnl.gov; Field, J. E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Knauer, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In an indirectly driven implosion, non-radial translational motion of the compressed fusion capsule is a signature of residual kinetic energy not coupled into the compressional heating of the target. A reduction in compression reduces the peak pressure and nuclear performance of the implosion. Measuring and reducing the residual motion of the implosion is therefore necessary to improve performance and isolate other effects that degrade performance. Using the gated x-ray diagnostic, the x-ray Bremsstrahlung emission from the compressed capsule is spatially and temporally resolved at x-ray energies of >8.7 keV, allowing for measurements of the residual velocity. Here details of the x-ray velocity measurement and fitting routine will be discussed and measurements will be compared to the velocities inferred from the neutron time of flight detectors.

  20. Transverse collective motion in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogilvie, C.A.; Cebra, D.A.; Clayton, J.; Danielewicz, P.; Howden, S.; Karn, J.; Nadasen, A.; Vander Molen, A.; Westfall, G.D.; Wilson, W.K.; Winfield, J.S. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (US))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light charged fragments from the reactions {sup 40}Ar+{sup 51}V at 35 MeV/nucleon and {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C at 50 MeV/nucleon have been measured with a 4{pi} array. Transverse collective motion is observed for all fragment types and increases in strength for the heavier fragments. The transverse momentum is qualitatively similar for the different impact parameters selected by the midrapidity charge. The global transverse momentum analysis includes corrections for correlations due to momentum conservation. The results are compared to those at higher energies to investigate whether the same or a new reaction phenomenon produces the collective motion. We outline some implications for the extraction of thermodynamic information from the kinetic energy of emitted fragments.

  1. Actuar en asociacin Asociaciones en el mundo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    las contaminaciones por metales en los Andes, en Bolivia Taller sobre la variabilidad de El Nio y para la conservacin de la biodiversidad en Amazona boliviana, en Santa Cruz, Bolivia Taller

  2. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, John Kyle P [ORNL] [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL] [ORNL; Farquhar, Ethan [ORNL] [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

  3. Long-term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under Advective Conditions. Long-term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under Advective Conditions. Abstract: Long-term...

  4. Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium Deposition by in situ Electrochemical Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium...

  5. Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation. Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation. Abstract: Molecular simulation techniques...

  6. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments. Abstract: A...

  7. Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALHUSSEINI, ZAYNA ISHAQ

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model; 3-D; Monolith; Reactor; Optimization Introduction TheAngeles Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and KineticGlobal Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic

  8. Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation in the sediments under alkaline and saline conditions . Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and...

  9. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling 2010 DOE...

  10. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling 2009 DOE...

  11. Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes 2010 DOE...

  12. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Rangeof Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic...

  13. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  14. A Monte Carlo simulation for kinetic chemotaxis models: an application to the traveling population wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuda, Shugo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Monte Carlo simulation for the chemotactic bacteria is developed on the basis of the kinetic modeling, i.e., the Boltzmann transport equation, and applied to the one-dimensional traveling population wave in a micro channel.In this method, the Monte Carlo method, which calculates the run-and-tumble motions of bacteria, is coupled with a finite volume method to solve the macroscopic transport of the chemical cues in the field. The simulation method can successfully reproduce the traveling population wave of bacteria which was observed experimentally. The microscopic dynamics of bacteria, e.g., the velocity autocorrelation function and velocity distribution function of bacteria, are also investigated. It is found that the bacteria which form the traveling population wave create quasi-periodic motions as well as a migratory movement along with the traveling population wave. Simulations are also performed with changing the sensitivity and modulation parameters in the response function of bacteria. It is found th...

  15. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  16. Brownian Motion of Boomerang Colloidal Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayan Chakrabarty; Andrew Konya; Feng Wang; Jonathan V. Selinger; Kai Sun; Qi-Huo Wei

    2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the Brownian motion of boomerang colloidal particles confined between two glass plates. Our experimental observations show that the mean displacements are biased towards the center of hydrodynamic stress (CoH), and that the mean-square displacements exhibit a crossover from short time faster to long time slower diffusion with the short-time diffusion coefficients dependent on the points used for tracking. A model based on Langevin theory elucidates that these behaviors are ascribed to a superposition of two diffusive modes: the ellipsoidal motion of the CoH and the rotational motion of the tracking point with respect to the CoH.

  17. Ultra-wideband radar motion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A motion sensor is based on ultra-wideband (UWB) radar. UWB radar range is determined by a pulse-echo interval. For motion detection, the sensors operate by staring at a fixed range and then sensing any change in the averaged radar reflectivity at that range. A sampling gate is opened at a fixed delay after the emission of a transmit pulse. The resultant sampling gate output is averaged over repeated pulses. Changes in the averaged sampling gate output represent changes in the radar reflectivity at a particular range, and thus motion. 15 figs.

  18. Kinetic limits of dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Marklof

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the pioneering work of Maxwell and Boltzmann in the 1860s and 1870s, a major challenge in mathematical physics has been the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations from the fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. Macroscopic transport equations lie at the heart of many important physical theories, including fluid dynamics, condensed matter theory and nuclear physics. The rigorous derivation of macroscopic transport equations is thus not only a conceptual exercise that establishes their consistency with the fundamental laws of physics: the possibility of finding deviations and corrections to classical evolution equations makes this subject both intellectually exciting and relevant in practical applications. The plan of these lectures is to develop a renormalisation technique that will allow us to derive transport equations for the kinetic limits of two classes of simple dynamical systems, the Lorentz gas and kicked Hamiltonians (or linked twist maps). The technique uses the ergodic theory of flows on homogeneous spaces (homogeneous flows for short), and is based on joint work with Andreas Str\\"ombergsson.

  19. Notes 03. Kinematics of motion in cylindrical journal bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reynolds equation for cylindrical journal bearings. Kinematics of motion and film thickness. Distinction between fixed and rotating coordinates. The pure squeeze velocity vector. Examples of journal motion....

  20. advanced motion control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 MARCH 2012 | DOI: 10.1038NPHYS2269 Attosecond control of collective electron motion Materials Science Websites Summary: electron motion in plasmas Antonin Borot1 , Arnaud...

  1. A model of ATL ground motion for storage rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej; Walker, Nicholas J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MODEL OF ATL GROUND MOTION FOR STORAGE RINGS A. WolskiMODEL OF ATL GROUND MOTION FOR STORAGE RINGS* A. Wolski # ,

  2. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Abstract: Hydrogen...

  3. Kinetic description of mixtures of anisotropic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Florkowski; Oskar Madetko

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple system of coupled kinetic equations for quark and gluon anisotropic systems is solved numerically. The solutions are compared with the predictions of the anisotropic hydrodynamics describing a mixture of anisotropic fluids. We find that the solutions of the kinetic equations can be well reproduced by anisotropic hydrodynamics if the initial distribution are oblate for both quarks and gluons. On the other hand, the solutions of the kinetic equations have a different qualitative behavior from those obtained in anisotropic hydrodynamics if the initial configurations are oblate-prolate or prolate-prolate. This suggests that an extension of the anisotropic hydrodynamics scheme for the mixture of anisotropic fluids is needed, where higher moments of the kinetic equations are used and present simplifications are avoided.

  4. Test particle motion in modified gravity theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmood Roshan

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the equations of motion of an electrically neutral test particle for modified gravity theories in which the covariant divergence of the ordinary matter energy-momentum tensor dose not vanish (i.e. $\

  5. The Design of Shape from Motion Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caine, Michael E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a set of representations methodologies and tools for the purpose of visualizing, analyzing and designing functional shapes in terms of constraints on motion. The core of the research is an interactive ...

  6. Slow motion responses of compliant offshore structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Peimin

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method is developed to predict slow motion responses of slender compliant offshore structures in the unidirectional irregular waves and currents. The environmental loads are computed using the modified Morison equation based on slender...

  7. Generalized Sampling-Based Feedback Motion Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Sandip

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    states. In the deterministic robotics motion planning community, sampling based algorithms like probabilistic roadmaps (PRM) and rapidly exploring random trees (RRTs) have been successful in solving very high dimensional deterministic problem. However...

  8. Mechanistic studies using kinetic isotope effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulmeier, Brian E.

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    MECHANISTIC STUDIES USING KINETIC ISOTOPE EFFECTS A Thesis by BRIAN E. SCHULMFIER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requtrements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1999 Major Subject: Chemistry MECHANISTIC STUDIES USING KINETIC ISOTOPE EFFECTS A Thesis by BRIAN E. SCHULMEIER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

  9. Kinetic decoupling of WIMPs: analytic expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visinelli, Luca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.

  10. Simulating plant motion with levels of detail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flannery, Rebecca Lynn

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k. Academic Scholarships Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2003 Group: Engineering & Physics I SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships...

  11. Ground motion: An introduction for accelerator builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this seminar we will review some of the characteristics of the major classes of ground motion in order to determine whether their effects must be considered or place fundamental limits on the sitting and/or design of modern storage rings and linear colliders. The classes discussed range in frequency content from tidal deformation and tectonic motions through earthquakes and microseisms. Countermeasures currently available are briefly discussed.

  12. Range of joint motion in college males

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houy, David Richard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . These include the fact that there is little agreement as to the definition and limits of normal f1exibility. It was also found that the range of joint motion is highly specific and that measurement of one body joint cannot be used to predict the range... many of the problems outlined by Holland. There have been several techniques developed for measuring range of' joint motion. Adrian (1968), The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (1968), Ayoub (1972), Clarke (1975), Dempster (1955), Garrett...

  13. On the Kinematics of Undulator Girder Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, J; /SLAC; ,

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of rigid body kinematics is used to derive equations that govern the control and measurement of the position and orientation of undulator girders. The equations form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system. The equations are linear for small motion and easily inverted as desired. For reference, some relevant girder geometrical data is also given. Equations 6-8 relate the linear potentiometer readings to the motion of the girder. Equations 9-11 relate the cam shaft angles to the motion of the girder. Both sets are easily inverted to either obtain the girder motion from the angles or readings, or, to find the angles and readings that would give a desired motion. The motion of any point on the girder can be calculated by applying either sets of equations to the two cam-planes and extrapolating in the z coordinate using equation 19. The formulation of the equations is quite general and easily coded via matrix and vector methods. They form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system.

  14. Viability of Using Markerless Motion Capture; Lnsamheten av att anvnda Markerless Motion Capture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattsson, Viktor

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? This thesis presents a study on how to create a production pipeline using a markerless motion capture system for the creation of animations in (more)

  15. 22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 1 Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 1 Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Zonca, Liu Chen and Zhiyong Qiu #12;22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 2 Chen and Zhiyong Qiu #12;22nd IAEA-FEC Kinetic theory of Geodesic Acoustic Modes: ... 3 2 Linear

  16. Inlichtingenblad, matlab-en simulink handleiding en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Inlichtingenblad, matlab- en simulink handleiding en practicumopgaven IWS 1 #12;4 2 Opmerkingen bij de Matlab-handleiding De voor dit practicum relevante informatie staat in de paragrafen 3.4, 4.1 en 4.2, en in de paragraaf 4.3 tot SIMULINK MENUS en vanaf ANALYSIS COMMANDS van de Matlab-handleiding die

  17. Crustal motion in Indonesia from Global Positioning System measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaffrey, Robert

    Crustal motion in Indonesia from Global Positioning System measurements Y. Bock,1 L. Prawirodirdjo: crustal motion, Indonesia tectonics, GPS, current plate motions, Southeast Asia Citation: Bock, Y., L, Crustal motion in Indonesia from Global Positioning System measurements, J. Geophys. Res., 108(B8), 2367

  18. MHD versus kinetic effects in the solar coronal heating: a two stage mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Tsiklauri

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Particle-In-Cell simulations i.e. in the kinetic plasma description the discovery of a new mechanism of parallel electric field generation was recently reported. Here we show that the electric field generation parallel to the uniform unperturbed magnetic field can be obtained in a much simpler framework using the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) description. In ideal MHD the electric field parallel to the uniform unperturbed magnetic field appears due to fast magnetosonic waves which are generated by the interaction of weakly non-linear Alfv\\'en waves with the transverse density inhomogeneity. In the context of the coronal heating problem a new {\\it two stage mechanism} of plasma heating is presented by putting emphasis, first, on the generation of parallel electric fields within an {\\it ideal MHD} description directly, rather than focusing on the enhanced dissipation mechanisms of the Alfv\\'en waves and, second, dissipation of these parallel electric fields via {\\it kinetic} effects. It is shown that for a single Alfv\\'en wave harmonic with frequency $\

  19. 7-Gate Kinetic AMPA Model Kinetics to match EPSCs from calyx of Held

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Bruce

    7-Gate Kinetic AMPA Model · Kinetics to match EPSCs from calyx of Held · Multiple closed, open and EPSC amplitude Bruce Graham Department of Computing Science and Mathematics, University of Stirling, U, including the calyx of Held in the mammalian auditory system. Such depression may be mediated

  20. Can We Distinguish Biological Motions of Virtual Humans? Perceptual Study With Captured Motions of Weight Lifting.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Information Systems-- Animations ­ Artificial, augmented, and virtual realities Keywords: Human Motions of Weight Lifting. Ludovic Hoyet IRISA - INRIA Bunraku Team, Rennes Franck Multon Mouvement Sport Sant of Edinburgh Figure 1: Subject lifting a 6kg dumbbell: video of a real motion (up) and corresponding captured

  1. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  2. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardiner, Bennett P J; Dallaston, Michael C; Moroney, Timothy J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularisation on the interface is not provided by surface tension, but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalise high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularised solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this 'selection' of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analogue with surface tens...

  3. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the TKE to follow 1/t. With an adiabatic condition at the wall it predicts the logarithmic law with von Karman's constant as 1/\\sqrt{2 pi} = 0.399. Likewise rotating couples form dissipat...

  4. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roldn, . [ICFOInstitut de Cincies Fotniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); GISCGrupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Martnez, I. A.; Rica, R. A., E-mail: rul@ugr.es [ICFOInstitut de Cincies Fotniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Dinis, L. [GISCGrupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fsica Atmica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  5. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  6. Motion-Based Generators for Industrial Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterken, T; Puers, R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling down of electronic systems has generated a large interest in the research on miniature energy sources. In this paper a closer look is given to the use of vibration based scavengers in industrial environments, where waste energy is abundantly available as engine related vibrations or large amplitude motions. The modeling of mechanical generators resulted in the design and realization of two prototypes, based on electromagnetic and electrostatic conversion of energy. Although the prototypes are not yet optimized against size and efficiency, a power of 0.3 mW has been generated in a 5 Hz motion with a 0.5 meter amplitude.

  7. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  8. Model Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New Abelian vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by {epsilon} {approx}< 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.

  9. M. Flierl, A. Mavlankar, and B. Girod: Motion and Disparity Compensated Coding for Video Camera Arrays, PCS 2006, Beijing, China, April 2006. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flierl, Markus

    of a three-dimensional TV system which en- ables users to view a distant 3D world freely [1]. A critical for video coding with motion-compen- sated lifted wavelet transforms in [3] is extended This work has been

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - age-specific kinetic model Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Kinetic StabilizationNSTX Simple model... - Kinetic StabilizationNSTX Kinetic model: collisions decrease stability collision frequency (note... dissipation of mode...

  11. On the Topic of Motion Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertinato, Christopher

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An integral of motion is a function of the states of a dynamical system that is constant along the systems trajectories. Integrals are known for their utility as a means of reducing the dimension of a system, effectively leaving only one...

  12. Motion in Bimetric Type Theories of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahil, M E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of motion for different test particles, charged and spinning objects of constant spinning tensor in different versions of bimetric theory of gravity is obtained by deriving their corresponding path and path deviation equations, using a modified Bazanski in presence of Riemannian geometry. This method enables us to find path and path deviation equations of different objects orbiting very strong gravitational fields.

  13. Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions Ruina Ma, Damien Chablat, Fouad Bennis, and Liang Ma Abstract Human muscle fatigue is considered to be one of the main reasons for Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD). Recent models have been introduced to define muscle fatigue for static postures. However, the main

  14. N000149510521 Estimating Relative Vehicle Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markovitch, Shaul

    CAR­TR­881 CS­TR­3882 N00014­95­1­0521 March 1998 Estimating Relative Vehicle Motions in Traffic for Automation Research University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742­3275 2 Computer Science Department George of Technology Haifa, Israel 32000 Abstract Autonomous operation of a vehicle on a road calls for understanding

  15. Motion Control of Robot Manipulators with MATLAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siena, Università di

    Motion Control of Robot Manipulators with MATLAB · By Francesco Chinello, Stefano Scheggi, Fabio Morbidi, and Domenico Prattichizzo 1070-9932/11/$26.00ª2011 IEEE DECEMBER 2011 · IEEE ROBOTICS robot manipulators. The KUKA Control Toolbox (KCT) is a collection of MATLAB functions developed

  16. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  17. Motion Perception Model and Its Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliva, Aude

    of the blind, and brain-computer interface system etc. Furthermore, brain-like motion detection algorithms also a meaningful challenge to be solved. This thesis first introduces the psychophysical experiments on human applica- tions. Main contributions of this thesis are listed as follows. #12; First of all, we collect

  18. Strong-Motion Instrumentation Programs in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    western Taiwan, with high- rise buildings as a consequence of developing economy, is vulnerable-Motion Accelerograph Array in Taiwan, Phase 1 (SMART-1 Array) SMART-1 Array was set up in Lotung in 1980 and closed and University of California, Berkeley. The SMART-1 Array consisted of a central site and accelerographs in three

  19. Chemistry in Motion: Tiny Synthetic Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter H. Colberg; Shang Yik Reigh; Bryan Robertson; Raymond Kapral

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Account, we describe how synthetic motors that operate by self-diffusiophoresis make use of a self-generated concentration gradient to drive motor motion. A description of propulsion by self-diffusiophoresis is presented for Janus particle motors comprising catalytic and noncatalytic faces. The properties of the dynamics of chemically powered motors are illustrated by presenting the results of particle-based simulations of sphere-dimer motors constructed from linked catalytic and noncatalytic spheres. The geometries of both Janus and sphere-dimer motors with asymmetric catalytic activity support the formation of concentration gradients around the motors. Because directed motion can occur only when the system is not in equilibrium, the nature of the environment and the role it plays in motor dynamics are described. Rotational Brownian motion also acts to limit directed motion, and it has especially strong effects for very small motors. We address the following question: how small can motors be and still exhibit effects due to propulsion, even if only to enhance diffusion? Synthetic motors have the potential to transform the manner in which chemical dynamical processes are carried out for a wide range of applications.

  20. Precursors to Space Flight! Orbital Motion!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stengel, Robert F.

    " Industrial Revolution" #12;Industrial Revolution and Government Science" Long-Distance Communication" #12://www.princeton.edu/~stengel/FRS.html! ·! Prophets with Some Honor" ·! The Human Seed and Social Soil: Rocketry and Revolution" ·! Orbital Motion minitial mfinal The Human Seed and Social Soil: Rocketry and Revolution! #12;Early 20th Century Rocket

  1. Motional Spin Relaxation in Large Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Riccardo; Filippone, B W

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the precession of spin-polarized Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms in uniform and static magnetic and electric fields and calculate the spin relaxation effects from motional $v\\times E$ magnetic fields. Particle motion in an electric field creates a motional $v\\times E$ magnetic field, which when combined with collisions, produces variations of the total magnetic field and results in spin relaxation of neutron and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ samples. The spin relaxation times $T_{1}$ (longitudinal) and $T_{2}$ (transverse) of spin-polarized UCN and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms are important considerations in a new search for the neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS \\emph{nEDM} experiment. We use a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the relaxation of spins due to the motional $v\\times E$ field for UCN and for $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms at temperatures below $600 \\mathrm{mK}$. We find the relaxation times for the neutron due to the $v\\times E$ effect to be long compared to the neutron lifetime, ...

  2. Motional Spin Relaxation in Large Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Schmid; B. Plaster; B. W. Filippone

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the precession of spin-polarized Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) and $^{3}$He atoms in uniform and static magnetic and electric fields and calculate the spin relaxation effects from motional $v\\times E$ magnetic fields. Particle motion in an electric field creates a motional $v\\times E$ magnetic field, which when combined with collisions, produces variations of the total magnetic field and results in spin relaxation of neutron and $^{3}$He samples. The spin relaxation times $T_{1}$ (longitudinal) and $T_{2}$ (transverse) of spin-polarized UCN and $^{3}$He atoms are important considerations in a new search for the neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS \\emph{nEDM} experiment. We use a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the relaxation of spins due to the motional $v\\times E$ field for UCN and for $^{3}$He atoms at temperatures below $600,\\mathrm{mK}$. We find the relaxation times for the neutron due to the $v\\times E$ effect to be long compared to the neutron lifetime, while the $^{3}$He relaxation times may be important for the \\emph{nEDM} experiment.

  3. Ship Motion Prediction for Maritime Flight Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    prediction model, resulting from complicated wave-excitation dynamics caused by the local stochastic sea and stochastic sea state disturbances. An appropriate model aiming to feature the characteristics of the dynamic estimation model in the presence of uncertain stochastic processes (e.g. wind, sea wave), unknown ship motion

  4. Interpreting the Aggregation Kinetics of Amyloid Peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    Amyloid fibrils are insoluble mainly -sheet aggregates of proteins or peptides. The multi-step process) and amyloid-protected states, is used to investigate the kinetics of aggregation and the pathways of fibril state. The minimal-size aggregate able to form a fibril is generated by collisions of oligomers

  5. Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

    2007-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

  6. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    CHEM 6471 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings 9:35 10:55 am, Tuesday and Thursday of October 22-26 Textbooks Molecular Thermodynamics by D.A McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, University Science Books the laws of classical thermodynamics and some of their chemical applications. It also covers basic

  7. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of transcriptional pausing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    in the cotranscriptional RNA secondary structure upstream of the RNA exit channel. The calculations involve no adjustable of recovery of backtracked paused complexes. A crucial ingredient of our model is the incorporation of kinetic secondary structure, an aspect not included explicitly in previous attempts at modeling the transcrip- tion

  8. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS AARON R. DINNER New Chemistry Laboratory for Protein Folding: Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 120. Edited by Richard A. Friesner. Series Editors Experimental and theoretical studies have led to the emergence of a unified general mechanism for protein

  9. Direct kinetic correlation of carriers and ferromagnetism in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kinetic correlation of carriers and ferromagnetism in Co2+ : ZnO. Direct kinetic correlation of carriers and ferromagnetism in Co2+ : ZnO. Abstract: We report the use of controlled...

  10. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110). Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110). Abstract: The adsorption, desorption, and...

  11. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenation into styrene: kinetic modeling and reactor simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Won Jae

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    detailed kinetic model for coke formation and gasification, which was coupled to the kinetic model for the main reactions. The calculation of the dynamic equilibrium coke content provided a crucial guideline for the selection of the steam to ethylbenzene...

  12. Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Correlation and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Topic 4 Correlation and Regression Transformed Variables 1 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Outline Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Lineweaver-Burke double reciprocal plot 2 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production

  13. The Inverse Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Inverse Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Garnas ABSTRACT Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Garnas B.S. General

  14. Intuitive Generation of Realistic Motions for Articulated Human Characters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Jianyuan

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    create and control life-like human motions. This dissertation focuses on exploring theory, algorithms and applications that enable novice users to quickly and easily create and control natural-looking motions, including both full-body movement and hand...

  15. Robust hybrid control for autonomous vehicle motion planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazzoli, Emilio, 1970-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the problem of motion planning for agile autonomous vehicles. In realistic situations, the motion planning problem must be solved in real-time, in a dynamic and uncertain environment. The ...

  16. absolute proper motions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. Lenhardt; H. Schwan 2000-07-21 25 Lick Northern Proper Motion Program. III. Lick NPM2 Catalog Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: The Lick Northern Proper Motion (NPM) program, a...

  17. apparent proper motion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with a... Hirshkowitz, Amy 2014-08-05 46 Lick Northern Proper Motion Program. III. Lick NPM2 Catalog Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: The Lick Northern Proper Motion (NPM) program, a...

  18. Frequency analysis and sheared reconstruction for rendering motion blur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egan, Kevin

    Motion blur is crucial for high-quality rendering, but is also very expensive. Our first contribution is a frequency analysis of motion-blurred scenes, including moving objects, specular reflections, and shadows. We show ...

  19. Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenezy, Mohammed D.

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-parameter computational model is proposed for the study of the regional motion of the left ventricle (LV) wall using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) data. In this model, the LV wall motion is mathematically ...

  20. Perception and processing of self-motion cues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Michael Thomas

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The capacity of animals to navigate through familiar or novel environments depends crucially on the integration of a disparate set of self motion cues. The study begins with one of the most simple, planar visual motion, ...

  1. Detection of first and second order motion Alexander Grunewald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Heiko

    Neuroinformatik Vniversitat VIm 89069 VIm Germany hneumann@neuro.informatik.uni-ulm.de Abstract A model of motion

  2. Ground motion data for International Collider models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

  3. Compression of ground-motion data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.W.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground motion data has been recorded for many years at Nevada Test Site and is now stored on thousands of digital tapes. The recording format is very inefficient in terms of space on tape. This report outlines a method to compress the data onto a few hundred tapes while maintaining the accuracy of the recording and allowing restoration of any file to the original format for future use. For future digitizing a more efficient format is described and suggested.

  4. Inverted gravity, not inverted shape impairs biological motion perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troje, Nikolaus

    Inverted gravity, not inverted shape impairs biological motion perception Nikolaus Trojetroje. Scrambling should therefore impair perception even more than inversion. Upright and inverted scrambled motion). Is the cause of the inversion effect inverted gravity? If this is the case upright scrambled motion should

  5. A Code Motion Framework for Global Instruction Scheduling ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajiv

    of the program; and a transformation step in which the code motion is performed along with compensation code placement and application of code optimizations enabled by code motion. The framework is powerful elimination and partial dead code elimination optimizations with the code motion transformations

  6. Motion Prediction for Moving Objects: a Statistical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Motion Prediction for Moving Objects: a Statistical Approach Dizan Vasquez & Thierry Fraichard with those objects requires the ability to predict their future motion (e.g. for predator evasion, prey hunting, collision avoidance, etc.). Motion prediction is a research area with applications in many

  7. Controlled Lagrangian Methods and Tracking of Accelerated Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Jerrold

    Controlled Lagrangian Methods and Tracking of Accelerated Motions Dmitry V. Zenkov* Department of uniformly accelerated motions of mechanical systems with symmetry. The theory is illustrated with a simple- grangians to the problem of stabilization of accelerated motions of Lagrangian mechanical systems with symme

  8. Controlled Lagrangian Methods and Tracking of Accelerated Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zenkov, Dmitry

    Controlled Lagrangian Methods and Tracking of Accelerated Motions Dmitry V. Zenkov* Department of uniformly accelerated motions of mechanical systems with symmetry. The theory is illustrated with a simple- grangians to the problem of stabilization of accelerated motions of Lagrangian mechanical systems

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - approximate kinetic equations Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    equation. Reactor kinetics and Summary: equations, prompt jump approximation; subcritical reactor kinetics, circulating fuel reactor dynamics 5... solution to neutron...

  10. Self-organization at low Reynolds numbers in randomly forced isotropic fluid motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McComb, W D; Berera, A; Yoffe, S R; Jankauskas, B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe the formation at long times of a self-organized state in direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equation with random, isotropic forcing. In this state the kinetic energy is contained only in modes at the lowest resolved wavenumber, the skewness vanishes, and visualization of the flows shows a lack of small-scale structure. Accordingly we conclude that the state is not turbulent. Furthermore, we observe that this state is maximally helical. That is, the velocity field is an eigenfunction of the curl operator and is thus a Beltrami field. We put forward numerical evidence suggesting the presence of critical behavior, and outline arguments to support the existence of an upper Reynolds number bound for the occurrence of such self-organized states in forced isotropic fluid motion.

  11. Stability of global driftkinetic Alfv'en eigenmodes in A.JAUN 1 , J.VACLAVIK 2 , L.VILLARD 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaun, André

    wavefield, the mode converted kinetic Alfv'en, ion­acoustic and drift waves. The power transfers between.VILLARD 2 1 Alfv'en Laboratory, EURATOM­NFR Association, KTH, SE­100 44 Stockholm, Sweden 2 CRPP­EPFL, CH the wave and the particles show that the drift character of the wavefield in the core destabilizes DKAE

  12. Intelligent Motion Planning and Analysis with Probabilistic Roadmap Methods for the Study of Complex and High-Dimensional Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapia, Lydia

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    robots and proteins is highly dependent on their motions. In order to study motions in these two divergent domains, the same underlying algorithmic framework can be applied. This method is derived from probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs) originally...

  13. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Z. Baumert

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the TKE to follow 1/t. With an adiabatic condition at the wall it predicts the logarithmic law with von Karman's constant as 1/\\sqrt{2 pi} = 0.399. Likewise rotating couples form dissipative patches almost at rest ($\\rightarrow$ intermittency) wherein the spectrum evolves like an "Apollonian gear" as discussed first by Herrmann, 1990. On this basis the prefactor of the 3D-wavenumber spectrum is predicted as (1/3)(4 pi)^{2/3}=1.8; in the Lagrangian frequency spectrum it is simply 2. The results are situated well within the scatter range of observational, experimental and DNS results.

  14. ON HYDRODYNAMIC MOTIONS IN DEAD ZONES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oishi, Jeffrey S. [Department of Astronomy, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark, E-mail: jsoishi@astro.berkeley.ed, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.or [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate fluid motions near the midplane of vertically stratified accretion disks with highly resistive midplanes. In such disks, the magnetorotational instability drives turbulence in thin layers surrounding a resistive, stable dead zone. The turbulent layers in turn drive motions in the dead zone. We examine the properties of these motions using three-dimensional, stratified, local, shearing-box, non-ideal, magnetohydrodynamical simulations. Although the turbulence in the active zones provides a source of vorticity to the midplane, no evidence for coherent vortices is found in our simulations. It appears that this is because of strong vertical oscillations in the dead zone. By analyzing time series of azimuthally averaged flow quantities, we identify an axisymmetric wave mode particular to models with dead zones. This mode is reduced in amplitude, but not suppressed entirely, by changing the equation of state from isothermal to ideal. These waves are too low frequency to affect sedimentation of dust to the midplane, but may have significance for the gravitational stability of the resulting midplane dust layers.

  15. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sircar, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of el...

  16. Kinetics of atoms in a bichromatic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudnikov, O. N., E-mail: llf@laser.nsc.ru [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Baklanov, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Taichenachev, A. V. [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)] [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Tumaikin, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Yudin, V. I. [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)] [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of atoms in a bichromatic field is considered. Analytic solutions are obtained for the force, friction coefficient, and diffusion coefficient in the model of a two-level atom without limitations imposed on the intensity of light fields. This effect is observed in the domain of global minima and maxima of the optical potential (i.e., at points where the relative phase of two standing waves is Greek-Phi-Symbol = 0, {pi}/2.

  17. Philips Color Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilips Color Kinetics Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  18. Kinetic Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6Kentwood, Michigan:Killingworth, Connecticut:105.Kinetic

  19. Kinetic Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach, Florida:Kenyon MunicipalKinetic Energy LLC

  20. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  1. Kinetics and morphology of erbium silicide formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.; Wu, C.S.; Lau, S.S.

    1985-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth kinetics and surface morphology of erbium silicide formation from Er layers on Si(100) substrates are examined using both fast e-beam annealing and furnace annealing. Very smooth erbium silicide layers have been grown using a line-source e beam to heat and react the Er overlayers with the substrate. This contrasts to the severe pitting observed when Er layers are reacted with Si in conventional furnace annealing. The pitting phenomenon can be explained by a thin contaminant layer at the interface between Er and Si. Our results suggest the contamination barrier is not due to oxygen, as usually assumed, but may be related to the presence of carbon. Rapid e-beam heating to reaction temperatures of approx.1200 K permits dispersion of the barrier layer before substantial silicide growth can occur, allowing smooth silicide growth. Heating to shorter times to just disperse the interface barrier allows uniform layer growth by subsequent furnace annealing and has permitted measurement of the kinetics of erbium silicide formation on crystalline Si. The reaction obeys (time)/sup 1//sup ///sup 2/ kinetics but is shown to be not totally diffusion limited by the ability to sustain multiple interface growth from a single Si source. The growth rates are nearly an order of magnitude slower for the Er/Si(100) interface than for the Er/amorphous-Si, but with a similar activation energy near 1.75 eV in both cases.

  2. Isothermal kinetics of new Albany oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, S.D.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the development of technologies for the utilization of eastern U.S. oil shales, fluidized bed pyrolysis technology is emerging as one of the most promising in terms of oil yield, operating cost, and capital investment. Bench-scale testing of eastern shales has reached a level where scale-up represents the next logical step in the evolution of this technology. A major consideration in this development and an essential part of any fluidized bed reactor scale-up effort--isothermal kinetics-- has largely been ignored for eastern US shale with the exception of a recent study conducted by Richardson et al. with a Cleveland shale. The method of Richardson et al. was used previously by Wallman et al. with western shale and has been used most recently by Forgac, also with western shale. This method, adopted for the present study, entails injecting a charge of shale into a fluidized bed and monitoring the hydrocarbon products with a flame ionization detector (FID). Advantages of this procedure are that fluidized bed heat-up effects are simulated exactly and real-time kinetics are obtained due to the on-line FID. Other isothermal methods have suffered from heat-up and cool-down effects making it impossible to observe the kinetics at realistic operating temperatures. A major drawback of the FID approach, however, is that no differentiation between oil and gas is possible.

  3. Kinetic Energy Decay Rates of Supersonic and Super-Alfvenic Turbulence in Star-Forming Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Ralf S. Klessen; Andreas Burkert; Michael D. Smith

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present numerical studies of compressible, decaying turbulence, with and without magnetic fields, with initial rms Alfven and Mach numbers ranging up to five, and apply the results to the question of the support of star-forming interstellar clouds of molecular gas. We find that, in 1D, magnetized turbulence actually decays faster than unmagnetized turbulence. In all the regimes that we have studied 3D turbulence-super-Alfvenic, supersonic, sub-Alfvenic, and subsonic-the kinetic energy decays as (t-t0)^(-x), with 0.85 < x < 1.2. We compared results from two entirely different algorithms in the unmagnetized case, and have performed extensive resolution studies in all cases, reaching resolutions of 256^3 zones or 350,000 particles. We conclude that the observed long lifetimes and supersonic motions in molecular clouds must be due to external driving, as undriven turbulence decays far too fast to explain the observations.

  4. MCAMC: An Advanced Algorithm for Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations: from Magnetization Switching to Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Novotny; Shannon M. Wheeler

    2002-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Monte Carlo with Absorbing Markov Chains (MCAMC) method for extremely long kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The MCAMC algorithm does not modify the system dynamics. It is extremely useful for models with discrete state spaces when low-temperature simulations are desired. To illustrate the strengths and limitations of this algorithm we introduce a simple model involving random walkers on an energy landscape. This simple model has some of the characteristics of protein folding and could also be experimentally realizable in domain motion in nanoscale magnets. We find that even the simplest MCAMC algorithm can speed up calculations by many orders of magnitude. More complicated MCAMC simulations can gain further increases in speed by orders of magnitude.

  5. Concept of the effective potential in describing the motion of ions in a quadrupole mass filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudakov, M. Yu., E-mail: m.soudakov@gmail.com; Apatskaya, M. V. [Ryazan State Radio Engineering University (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a generalization of the effective potential theory for the motion of particles in a rapidly oscillating electric field for the stability parameters lying near the boundary of the diagram where the standard effective potential theory is inapplicable. We derive the dynamic equations describing the variation of the envelope of ion oscillations for the motion of ions near the stability vertex of the first zone of the quadrupole mass filter. We reduce them to the form of the Hamilton equations for oscillations of a material particle in the field of potential forces. We obtain expressions for the effective potential well. It is shown that in spite of the high kinetic energy of oscillations, the depth of the effective potential well for ions in the quadrupole is less than 1 eV in the case of filtration with a mass resolution exceeding 200 units. The acceptance of the mass filter is calculated as a function of the stability parameters and the resolving power.

  6. Quantization of singular systems and incomplete motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. P. Landsman

    1998-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for a mathematically rigorous quantization procedure of singular spaces and incomplete motions is pointed out in connection with quantum cosmology. We put our previous suggestion for such a procedure, based on the theory of induced representations of C*-algebras, in the light of L. Schwartz' theory of Hilbert subspaces. This turns out to account for the freedom in the induction procedure, at the same time providing a basis for generalized eigenfunction expansions pertinent to the needs of quantum cosmology. Reinforcing our previous proposal for the wave-function of the Universe, we are now able to add a concrete prescription for its calculation.

  7. Casimir friction: Relative motion more generally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan S. Hye; Iver Brevik

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper extends our recent study on Casimir friction forces for dielectric plates moving parallel to each other [J. S. H{\\o}ye and I. Brevik, Eur. Phys. J. D {\\bf 68}, 61 (2014)], to the case where the plates are no longer restricted to rectilinear motion. Part of the mathematical formalism thereby becomes more cumbersome, but reduces in the end to the form that we could expect to be the natural one in advance. As an example, we calculate the Casimir torque on a planar disc rotating with constant angular velocity around its vertical symmetry axis next to another plate.

  8. Soret Motion of a Charged Spherical Colloid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyyed Nader Rasuli; Ramin Golestanian

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermophoretic motion of a charged spherical colloidal particle and its accompanying cloud of counterions and co-ions in a temperature gradient is studied theoretically. Using the Debye-Huckel approximation, the Soret drift velocity of a weakly charged colloid is calculated analytically. For highly charged colloids, the nonlinear system of electrokinetic equations is solved numerically, and the effects of high surface potential, dielectrophoresis, and convection are examined. Our results are in good agreement with some of the recent experiments on highly charged colloids without using adjustable parameters.

  9. The equation of motion of an electron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 and The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Sessler, A.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the current status of understanding of the equation of motion of an electron. Classically, a consistent, linearized theory exists for an electron of finite extent, as long as the size of the electron is larger than the classical electron radius. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics seems to offer a fine theory even in the point particle limit. Although there is as yet no convincing calculation, it is probable that a quantum electrodynamical result will be at least as well-behaved as is the nonrelativistic quantum mechanical results. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. The equation of motion of an electron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.-J.

    1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the current status of understanding of the equation of motion of an electron. Classically, a consistent linearized theory exists for an electron of finite extent, as long as the size of the electron is larger than the classical electron radius. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics seems to offer a fine theory even in the point particle limit. Although there is as yet no convincing calculation, it is probable that a quantum electrodynamical result will be at least as well-behaved as is the nonrelativistic quantum mechanical results.

  11. Help:Motion Chart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:NetHealth DivisionHelioMotion Chart Jump to:

  12. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  13. Benchmarks for the point kinetics equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapol, B. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (United States); Picca, P. [Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona (United States); Previti, A.; Mostacci, D. [Laboratorio di Montecuccolino Alma Mater Studiorum, Universita di Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new numerical algorithm is presented for the solution to the point kinetics equations (PKEs), whose accurate solution has been sought for over 60 years. The method couples the simplest of finite difference methods, a backward Euler, with Richardsons extrapolation, also called an acceleration. From this coupling, a series of benchmarks have emerged. These include cases from the literature as well as several new ones. The novelty of this presentation lies in the breadth of reactivity insertions considered, covering both prescribed and feedback reactivities, and the extreme 8- to 9- digit accuracy achievable. The benchmarks presented are to provide guidance to those who wish to develop further numerical improvements. (authors)

  14. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocation of Shewanella Oneidensis OuterDirect Kinetic

  15. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel prices topDirect Kinetic

  16. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel prices topDirect KineticDirect

  17. Kinetic Bounding Volume Hierarchies for Collision Detection of Deformable Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Zachmann; Rene Weller

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present novel algorithms for updating bounding volume hierarchies of objects undergoing arbitrary deformations. Therefore, we introduce two new data structures, the kinetic AABB tree and the kinetic BoxTree. The event-based approach of the kinetic data structures framework enables us to show that our algorithms are optimal in the number of updates. Moreover, we show a lower bound for the total number of BV updates, which is independent of the number of frames. Furthermore, we present a kinetic data structures which uses the kinetic AABB tree for collision detection and show that this structure can be easily extended for continuous collision detection of deformable objects. We performed a comparison of our kinetic approaches with the classical bottom-up update method. The results show that our algorithms perform up to ten times faster in practically relevant scenarios.

  18. Simulations of magnetic nanoparticle Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel B Reeves; John B Weaver

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful in many medical applications because they interact with biology on a cellular level thus allowing microenvironmental investigation. An enhanced understanding of the dynamics of magnetic particles may lead to advances in imaging directly in magnetic particle imaging (MPI) or through enhanced MRI contrast and is essential for nanoparticle sensing as in magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion (MSB). Moreover, therapeutic techniques like hyperthermia require information about particle dynamics for effective, safe, and reliable use in the clinic. To that end, we have developed and validated a stochastic dynamical model of rotating Brownian nanoparticles from a Langevin equation approach. With no field, the relaxation time toward equilibrium matches Einstein's model of Brownian motion. In a static field, the equilibrium magnetization agrees with the Langevin function. For high frequency or low amplitude driving fields, behavior characteristic of the linearized Debye approximation is reproduced. In a higher field regime where magnetic saturation occurs, the magnetization and its harmonics compare well with the effective field model. On another level, the model has been benchmarked against experimental results, successfully demonstrating that harmonics of the magnetization carry enough information to infer environmental parameters like viscosity and temperature.

  19. Internal and external rotation of the shoulder: Effects of plane, end-range determination, and scapular motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karduna, Andrew

    ). Passive humerothoracic motion was significantly greater than active humero- thoracic motion for internal

  20. 3.205 Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Samuel M.

    Laws of thermodynamics applied to materials and materials processes. Solution theory. Equilibrium diagrams. Overview of fluid transport processes. Kinetics of processes that occur in materials, including diffusion, phase ...

  1. average kinetic energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy by kinetic averaging Pierre-Emmanuel Jabin Ecole Normale Sup-Landau energy for two dimensional divergence free fields ap- pearing in the gradient theory of...

  2. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- The solubility and kinetics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The solubility and kinetics of minerals under CO2-EGS geothermal conditions: Comparison of experimental and modeling results Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ |...

  3. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, February 27, 2015 Figure 1 Figure 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of (A)...

  4. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Range of Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends Bruce G. Bunting and Scott Eaton, Oak Ridge National...

  5. Design and operating characteristics of a transient kinetic analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    catalysis reactor system employing in situ transmission Abstract: A novel apparatus for gas-phase heterogeneous catalysis kinetics is described. The apparatus enables fast...

  6. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Sircar; A. J. Roberts

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of electrolytes as well as due to the defective properties of the mucin polymer network.

  7. Motion of spinning test bodies in Kerr spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eva Hackmann; Claus Lmmerzahl; Yuri N. Obukhov; Dirk Puetzfeld; Isabell Schaffer

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the motion of spinning test bodies in General Relativity. By means of a multipolar approximation method for extended test bodies we derive the equations of motion, and classify the orbital motion of pole-dipole test bodies in the equatorial plane of the Kerr geometry. An exact expression for the periastron shift of a spinning test body is given. Implications of test body spin corrections are studied and compared with the results obtained by means of other approximation schemes.

  8. Real Time Estimation of Ship Motions Using Kalman Filtering Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafyllou, Michael S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The estimation of the heave, pitch, roll, sway, and yaw motions of a DD-963 destroyer is studied, using Kalman filtering

  9. Free motion in deformed (quantum) four-dimensional space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Leznov

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that trajectories of free motion of the particles in deformed ("quantum") four dimensional space-time are quadratic curves.

  10. Motion Capture of Character Interactions with a Rope.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Bryce Zachary

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??We present a solution to animating interactions between characters and thin, non-rigid bodies using a passive optical motion capture system. Prior work in human body (more)

  11. Potomac Electric Power Company's Motion to Intervene and Comment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Intervene and Comment in Support of Emergency Petition and Complaint Potomac Electric Power Company's Motion to Intervene and Comment in Support of Emergency Petition and...

  12. Notes on the two-dimensional fractional Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrice Baudoin , David Nualart

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory Related Fields 118 121291. [12] PITMAN, J. and YOR, M. (1986). Asymptotic laws of planar Brownian motion. Ann. Probab. 14 733779. [13] PITMAN...

  13. Read about the Brownian Motion. - Department of Mathematics ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motion of the suspended thermal molecules. On the other .... properties are exploited in animation to generate pictures of artificial plants and landscapes. Z. (

  14. Motional Broadening in Ensembles With Heavy-Tail Frequency Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoav Sagi; Rami Pugatch; Ido Almog; Nir Davidson; Michael Aizenman

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the spectrum of an ensemble of two-level systems can be broadened through `resetting' discrete fluctuations, in contrast to the well-known motional-narrowing effect. We establish that the condition for the onset of motional broadening is that the ensemble frequency distribution has heavy tails with a diverging first moment. We find that the asymptotic motional-broadened lineshape is a Lorentzian, and derive an expression for its width. We explain why motional broadening persists up to some fluctuation rate, even when there is a physical upper cutoff to the frequency distribution.

  15. Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

  16. The MAST motional Stark effect diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, N. J.; De Bock, M. F. M.; Michael, C. A.; Walsh, M. J.; Carolan, P. G.; Hawkes, N. C.; Shibaev, S.; Wearing, G. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rachlew, E. [Department of Physics, KTH, EURATOM-VR Association, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); McCone, J. F. G. [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Association EURATOM-DCU, Cork (Ireland)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is now installed and operating routinely on the MAST spherical tokamak, with 35 radial channels, spatial resolution of {approx}2.5 cm, and time resolution of {approx}1 ms at angular noise levels of {approx}0.5 deg. Conventional (albeit very narrow) interference filters isolate {pi} or {sigma} polarized emission. Avalanche photodiode detectors with digital phase-sensitive detection measure the harmonics of a pair of photoelastic modulators operating at 20 and 23 kHz, and thus the polarization state. The {pi} component is observed to be significantly stronger than {sigma}, in reasonably good agreement with atomic physics calculations, and as a result, almost all channels are now operated on {pi}. Trials with a wide filter that admits the entire Stark pattern (relying on the net polarization of the emission) have demonstrated performance almost as good as the conventional channels. MSE-constrained equilibrium reconstructions can readily be produced between pulses.

  17. Solid state engine with alternating motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golestaneh, A.A.

    1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat energy is converted to mechanical motion utilizing apparatus including a cylinder, a piston having openings therein reciprocable in the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for warm water at one end of the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for cool water at the other end of the cylinder, gates movable with the piston and slidably engaging the cylinder wall to alternately open and close the warm and cool water ports, a spring bearing against the warm water side of the piston and a double helix of a thermal shape memory material attached to the cool end of the cylinder and to the piston. The piston is caused to reciprocate by alternately admitting cool water and warm water to the cylinder.

  18. Handling congestion in crowd motion modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maury, B; Santambrogio, F; Venel, J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We address here the issue of congestion in the modeling of crowd motion, in the non-smooth framework: contacts between people are not anticipated and avoided, they actually occur, and they are explicitly taken into account in the model. We limit our approach to very basic principles in terms of behavior, to focus on the particular problems raised by the non-smooth character of the models. We consider that individuals tend to move according to a desired, or spontanous, velocity. We account for congestion by assuming that the evolution realizes at each time an instantaneous balance between individual tendencies and global constraints (overlapping is forbidden): the actual velocity is defined as the closest to the desired velocity among all admissible ones, in a least square sense. We develop those principles in the microscopic and macroscopic settings, and we present how the framework of Wasserstein distance between measures allows to recover the sweeping process nature of the problem on the macroscopic level, ...

  19. Entropic Motion in Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Manuel Garcia-Islas

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Entropic forces result from an increase of the entropy of a thermodynamical physical system. It has been proposed that gravity is such a phenomenon and many articles have appeared on the literature concerning this problem. Loop quantum gravity has also considered such possibility. We propose a new method in loop quantum gravity which reproduces an entropic force. By considering the interaction between a fixed gravity state space and a particle state in loop quantum gravity, we show that it leads to a mathematical description of a random walk of such particle. The random walk in special situations, can be seen as an entropic motion in such a way that the particle will move towards a location where entropy increases. This may prove that such theory can reproduce gravity as it is expected.

  20. Solid state engine with alternating motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golestaneh, Ahmad A. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat energy is converted to mechanical motion utilizing apparatus including a cylinder, a piston having openings therein reciprocable in the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for warm water at one end of the cylinder, inlet and outlet ports for cool water at the other end of the cylinder, gates movable with the piston and slidably engaging the cylinder wall to alternately open and close the warm and cool water ports, a spring bearing against the warm water side of the piston and a double helix of a thermal shape memory material attached to the cool end of the cylinder and to the piston. The piston is caused to reciprocate by alternately admitting cool water and warm water to the cylinder.

  1. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  2. A Chemical Kinetic Model of Transcriptional Elongation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yujiro Richard Yamada; Charles S. Peskin

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical kinetic model of the elongation dynamics of RNA polymerase along a DNA sequence is introduced. The proposed model governs the discrete movement of the RNA polymerase along a DNA template, with no consideration given to elastic effects. The model's novel concept is a ``look-ahead'' feature, in which nucleotides bind reversibly to the DNA prior to being incorporated covalently into the nascent RNA chain. Results are presented for specific DNA sequences that have been used in single-molecule experiments of the random walk of RNA polymerase along DNA. By replicating the data analysis algorithm from the experimental procedure, the model produces velocity histograms, enabling direct comparison with these published results.

  3. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  4. MEANKINETIC ENERGY,EDDY ENERGY,AND KINETIC ENERGYEXCHANGEBETWEENFLUCTUATIONSAND MEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    MEANKINETIC ENERGY,EDDY ENERGY,AND KINETIC ENERGYEXCHANGEBETWEENFLUCTUATIONSAND MEAN FLOWWITHIN by cornputing three quantities suggested by the theory of turbulence: the nean kinetic energy, the eddy energy, and the energy exchange between the nean and fluctuating portions of the flow field (ca11ed dE/dt). Contours

  5. Kinetics and Modeling of Reductive Dechlorination at High PCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    Kinetics and Modeling of Reductive Dechlorination at High PCE and TCE Concentrations Seungho Yu for anaerobic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) were developed. The models were compared with results from batch kinetic tests conducted over a wide range of PCE and TCE

  6. Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets Valery I. Shematovich Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences Modeling Atmospheric Escape Workshop - Spring 2012 University are populated by the atoms and molecules with both thermal and suprathermal kinetic energies (Johnson et al

  7. Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1 David Eppstein 2 Leonidas J. Guibas 3 Monika R. Henzinger 4 Abstract We consider the parametric minimum spanning tree problem- pute the sequence of minimum spanning trees generated as varies. We also consider the kinetic minimum

  8. Rotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zagar, Nedjeljka

    energy, divergent energy, ALADIN, limited-area modelling 1. Introduction Horizontal divergenceRotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN By V. BLAZ ICA1 *, N. Z AGAR1 received 7 June 2012; in final form 7 March 2013) ABSTRACT Kinetic energy spectra from the mesoscale

  9. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel Olivier Herbineta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate Olivier Herbineta , William of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from

  10. An action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At first, we state some results in arXiv: 0707.2639, and then, using a positive kinetic energy coordinate condition given by arXiv: 0707.2639, we present an action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity. Based on this action, the corresponding theory of canonical quantization is discussed.

  11. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis and devolatilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimentally based, conceptual model of the devolatilization of a HV bituminous coal is outlined in this report. This model contends that the relative dominance of a process type-chemical kinetic, heat transport, mass transport -- varies with the extent of reaction for a given set of heating conditions and coal type and with experimental conditions for a given coal type and extent of reaction. The rate of devolatilization mass loss process is dominated initially by heat transfer processes, then coupled mass transfer and chemical kinetics, and finally by chemical processes alone. However, the chemical composition of the initial tars are determined primarily by the chemical characteristics of the parent coal. Chemically controlled gas phase reactions of the initial tars and coupled mass transfer and chemically controlled reactions of heavy tars determine the bulk of the light gas yields. For a HV bituminous coal this conceptual model serves to quantify the Two-Component Hypothesis'' of volatiles evolution. The model postulates that the overall rates of coal devolatilization should vary with coal type insofar as the characteristics of the parent coal determine the potential tar yield and the chemical characteristics of the initial tars. Experimental evidence indicates chemical characteristics and yields of primary'' tars vary significantly with coal type. Consequently, the conceptual model would indicate a shift from transport to chemical dominance of rate processes with variation in coal type. Using the conceptual model, United Technologies Research Center has been able to correlate initial mass loss with a heat transfer index for a wide range of conditions for high tar yielding coals. 33 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. A Kinetic Theory Approach to Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a kinetic theory approach to quantum gravity -- by which we mean a theory of the microscopic structure of spacetime, not a theory obtained by quantizing general relativity. A figurative conception of this program is like building a ladder with two knotted poles: quantum matter field on the right and spacetime on the left. Each rung connecting the corresponding knots represent a distinct level of structure. The lowest rung is hydrodynamics and general relativity; the next rung is semiclassical gravity, with the expectation value of quantum fields acting as source in the semiclassical Einstein equation. We recall how ideas from the statistical mechanics of interacting quantum fields helped us identify the existence of noise in the matter field and its effect on metric fluctuations, leading to the establishment of the third rung: stochastic gravity, described by the Einstein-Langevin equation. Our pathway from stochastic to quantum gravity is via the correlation hierarchy of noise and induced metric fluctuations. Three essential tasks beckon: 1) Deduce the correlations of metric fluctuations from correlation noise in the matter field; 2) Reconstituting quantum coherence -- this is the reverse of decoherence -- from these correlation functions 3) Use the Boltzmann-Langevin equations to identify distinct collective variables depicting recognizable metastable structures in the kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes of quantum matter fields and how they demand of their corresponding spacetime counterparts. This will give us a hierarchy of generalized stochastic equations -- call them the Boltzmann-Einstein hierarchy of quantum gravity -- for each level of spacetime structure, from the macroscopic (general relativity) through the mesoscopic (stochastic gravity) to the microscopic (quantum gravity).

  13. Negative kinetic energy term of general relativity and its removing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We first present a new Lagrangian of general relativity, which can be divided into kinetic energy term and potential energy term. Taking advantage of vierbein formalism, we reduce the kinetic energy term to a sum of five positive terms and one negative term. Some gauge conditions removing the negative kinetic energy term are discussed. Finally, we present a Lagrangian that only include positive kinetic energy terms. To remove the negative kinetic energy term leads to a new field equation of general relativity in which there are at least five equations of constraint and at most five dynamical equations, this characteristic is different from the normal Einstein field equation in which there are four equations of constraint and six dynamical equations.

  14. Heart motion measurement with three dimensional sonomicrometry and acceleration sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavusoglu, Cenk

    Heart motion measurement with three dimensional sonomicrometry and acceleration sensing Tetsuya Horiuchi, E. Erdem Tuna, Ken Masamune, M. Cenk C¸ avus¸oglu Abstract--In robotic assisted beating heart surgery, the goal is to develop a robotic system that can actively cancel heart motion by closely

  15. Analysis of Redundant-Wavelet Multihypothesis for Motion Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, James E.

    Analysis of Redundant-Wavelet Multihypothesis for Motion Compensation James E. Fowler Department, Mississippi Abstract An analysis is presented that examines multihypothesis motion-compensated video coding using a redundant wavelet transform to produce multiple predictions that are diverse in transform phase

  16. Description of ground motion data processing codes: Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, M.L.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data processing codes developed to process ground motion at the Nevada Test Site for the Weapons Test Seismic Investigations Project are used today as part of the program to process ground motion records for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project. The work contained in this report documents and lists codes and verifies the ``PSRV`` code. 39 figs.

  17. Risk based motion planning and navigation in uncertain dynamic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Risk based motion planning and navigation in uncertain dynamic environment Chiara Fulgenzi, Anne of the dynamic environments. Moving obstacles are supposed to move along typical motion patterns represented the performance for a robotic wheelchair in a simulated environment among multiple dynamic obstacles. Index Terms

  18. Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burtscher, Martin

    Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions Igor Szczyrba School motions in traumatic scenarios that are as- sociated with severe brain injuries. Our results are based on the linear Kelvin-Voigt brain injury model, which treats the brain matter as a viscoelastic solid, and on our

  19. Robot Hand-Eye Calibration using Structure-from-Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Robot Hand-Eye Calibration using Structure-from-Motion Nicolas Andre Radu Horaud Bernard Espiau procedure for hand- eye calibration. Indeed, no more calibration jig is needed and small calibration motions. This spatial relationship is a rigid transformation, a rotation and a translation, known as the hand-eye

  20. Roadmap-based Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Roadmap-based Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments Jur P. van den Berg Mark H. Overmars.cs.uu.nl #12;Roadmap-based Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments Jur P. van den Berg Mark H. Overmars April obstacles. We propose a practical algorithm based on a roadmap that is created for the static part

  1. Atlas: A Novel Kinematic Architecture for Six DOF Motion Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, John

    Atlas: A Novel Kinematic Architecture for Six DOF Motion Platforms M.J.D. HAYES, R.G. LANGLOIS. This paper presents an overview of the Atlas platform: a novel six DOF motion platform architecture of the mechanism. The decoupling is accomplished by fixing a three DOF spherical orienting device, called the Atlas

  2. People Tracking with Human Motion Predictions from Social Forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arras, Kai O.

    People Tracking with Human Motion Predictions from Social Forces Matthias Luber Johannes A. Stork Gian Diego Tipaldi Kai O. Arras Abstract-- For many tasks in populated environ- ments, robots need to keep track of current and future motion states of people. Most approaches to people tracking make weak

  3. The Biodiversity of Catalytic Super-Brownian Motion Klaus Fleischmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klenke, Achim

    The Biodiversity of Catalytic Super-Brownian Motion Klaus Fleischmann Weierstra?-Institut f that the reactant has an infinite local biodiversity or genetic abundance. This contrasts the finite local biodiversity of the equilibrium of classical super-Brownian motion. Another question we address

  4. Planning Motions for Robotic Systems Subject to Differential Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    Planning Motions for Robotic Systems Subject to Differential Constraints Alessandro De Luca of planning point-to-point motion for general robotic systems subject to non-integrable differential feedback linearization, are illustrated with the aid of four case studies: the plate-ball manipulation

  5. Universal constants and equations of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spirit of Prandtl [1926], for turbulence at high Reynolds number we present an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, with dipoles made of Thorpe's [1977] quasi-solid vortex tubes as frictionless, incompressible but deformable quasi-particles. Their movements are governed by Helmholtz' elementary vortex rules applied locally. A contact interaction or 'collision' leads either to random scatter of a trajectory or to the formation of two likewise rotating, fundamentally unstable whirls forming a dissipative patch slowly rotating around its center of mass which is almost at rest. This approach predicts von Karman's constant as 1/sqrt(2 pi) = 0.399 and the spatio-temporal dynamics of energy-containing time and length scales controlling turbulent mixing Baumert [2009]. A link to turbulence spectra was missing so far. In the present paper it is shown that the above image of random vortex-dipole movements is compatible with Kolmogorov's turbulence spectra if dissipative patches, beginning as two likewise ro...

  6. 3D Periodic Human Motion Reconstruction from 2D Motion Sequences Zonghua Zhang and Nikolaus F. Troje

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troje, Nikolaus

    1 3D Periodic Human Motion Reconstruction from 2D Motion Sequences Zonghua Zhang and Nikolaus F@psyc.queensu.ca Abstract In this report, we present and evaluate a method of reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) periodic set of 3D data, we construct a linear, morphable representation. Using this representation a low

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated search kinetics Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dependence of the elongation kinetics. Marked acceleration... to the slowing of protein folding kinetics by other denaturants (28) and the acceleration of folding by TFE (26......

  8. Inlichtingenblad, matlab-en simulink handleiding en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Inlichtingenblad, matlab- en simulink handleiding en practicumopgaven IWS 1 #12;6 3 Matlab 3.1 Fundamentals Matlab. The name Matlab stands for matrix laboratory. Main principle. Matlab works and commands in Matlab are intended to be natural in a matrix sense, not unlike how they might be indicated

  9. Inlichtingenblad, matlab en simulink handleiding en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Inlichtingenblad, matlab­ en simulink handleiding en practicumopgaven IWS 1 #12; 6 3 Matlab 3.1 Fundamentals Matlab. The name Matlab stands for matrix laboratory. Main principle. Matlab works and commands in Matlab are intended to be natural in a matrix sense, not unlike how they might be indicated

  10. M. Flierl: Motion-Compensated Orthogonal Transforms for Multiview Video Coding, EURASIP EUSIPCO, Poznan, Poland, Sep. 2007. 1 MOTION-COMPENSATED ORTHOGONAL TRANSFORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flierl, Markus

    of motion information. This is in contrast to the well known motion-compensated lifted wavelets where in time and view direction are cascaded. Motion-compensated lifted wavelets suffer from their motion. Well known examples are free viewpoint video [1] and free viewpoint television (FTV) [2]. For all

  11. M. Flierl: Adaptive Spatial Wavelets for Motion-Compensated Orthogonal Video Transforms, IEEE ICIP, Cairo, Egypt, Nov. 2009. 1 ADAPTIVE SPATIAL WAVELETS FOR MOTION-COMPENSATED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flierl, Markus

    , Cairo, Egypt, Nov. 2009. 1 ADAPTIVE SPATIAL WAVELETS FOR MOTION-COMPENSATED ORTHOGONAL VIDEO TRANSFORMS

  12. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

  13. Universal constants and equations of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Z. Baumert

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spirit of Prandtl's conjecture of 1926, for turbulence at high Reynolds number we present an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, with dipoles made of quasi-rigid and 'dressed' vortex tubes as frictionless, incompressible but deformable quasi-particles. Their movements are governed by Helmholtz' elementary vortex rules applied locally. A contact interaction or 'collision' leads either to random scatter of a trajectory or to the formation of two likewise rotating, fundamentally unstable whirls forming a dissipative patch slowly rotating around its center of mass which is almost at rest. This approach predicts von Karman's constant as 1/sqrt(2 pi) = 0.399 and the spatio-temporal dynamics of energy-containing time and length scales controlling turbulent mixing [Baumert 2009]. A link to turbulence spectra was missing so far. In the present paper it is shown that the above image of random vortex-dipole movements is compatible with Kolmogorov's turbulence spectra if dissipative patches, beginning as two likewise rotating eddies, evolve locally into a space-filling bearing in the sense of Herrmann [1990], i.e. into an "Apollonian gear". Its parts and pieces are incompressible and flexibly deformable vortex tubes which are frictionless, excepting the dissipative scale of size zero. For steady and locally homogeneous conditions our approach predicts the dimensionless pre-factor in the 3D Eulerian wavenumber spectrum as [(4 pi)^2/3]/3 = 1.8, and in the Lagrangian frequency spectrum as 2. Our derivations rest on geometry, methods from many-particle physics, and on elementary conservation laws.

  14. Kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kossaya, A.M.; Belyakov, B.P.; Kuchma, Z.V.; Sandrozd, M.K.; Vasil'eva, V.G.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the kinetics of interaction of gaseous hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide at temperatures 300-700 degrees. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory adsorption apparatus modified and adapted for work with corrosive hydrogen fluoride. Calcium oxide samples in granulated form and deposited on gamma-alumina were used in the experiments. Kinetic curves representing variations of the degree of conversion of the solid samples with time are shown. The influence of retardation dure to diffusion was observed in the experiments. The influence of diffusion control on the reaction rate was also observed in a study of the reaction kinetics on supported layers of calcium oxide.

  15. Evidence of critical balance in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation of kinetic plasma turbulence is performed to assess the applicability of critical balance to kinetic, dissipation scale turbulence. The analysis is performed in the frequency domain to obviate complications inherent in performing a local analysis of turbulence. A theoretical model of dissipation scale critical balance is constructed and compared to simulation results, and excellent agreement is found. This result constitutes the first evidence of critical balance in a kinetic turbulence simulation and provides evidence of an anisotropic turbulence cascade extending into the dissipation range. We also perform an Eulerian frequency analysis of the simulation data and compare it to the results of a previous study of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations.

  16. Kinetics of methanation on nickel catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, S.V.; Harriott, P.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive steady-state and transient measurements of the disproportionation of carbon monoxide, the hydrogenation of deposited carbon, and methanation of carbon monoxide were performed over 2 and 10% nickel on silica support. The results indicated that the methanation of carbon monoxide involves competitively adsorbed species; that the reaction is nearly zero order in carbon monoxide at 0.1-0.5 atm CO and 1 atm H/sub 2/, but negative at higher CO partial pressures and that it becomes less negative with increasing temperature or increasing hydrogen pressure; and that the reaction order with respect to hydrogen changes from 0.5 to 1.0 with increasing CO pressure and decreasing H/sub 2/ pressure. A reaction mechanism is proposed which consists of the molecular adsorption of CO, the dissociative adsorption of H/sub 2/, dissociation of the surface CO species, and reaction of two adsorbed hydrogen atoms with the oxygen; and a multistep hydrogenation and desorption process for the adsorbed carbon. The dissociation and reaction of adsorbed CO is probably the rate-limiting step. The kinetic behavior is best represented with the assumption of a heterogeneous catalyst surface, containing three types of sites of widely varying activity.

  17. Simulating galactic outflows with kinetic supernova feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Dalla Vecchia; Joop Schaye

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback from star formation is thought to play a key role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, but its implementation in cosmological simulations is currently hampered by a lack of numerical resolution. We present and test a sub-grid recipe to model feedback from massive stars in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The energy is distributed in kinetic form among the gas particles surrounding recently formed stars. The impact of the feedback is studied using a suite of high-resolution simulations of isolated disc galaxies embedded in dark halos with total mass 10^{10} and 10^{12} Msol/h. We focus in particular on the effect of pressure forces on wind particles within the disc, which we turn off temporarily in some of our runs to mimic a recipe that has been widely used in the literature. We find that this popular recipe gives dramatically different results because (ram) pressure forces on expanding superbubbles determine both the structure of the disc and the development of large-scale outflows. Pressure forces exerted by expanding superbubbles puff up the disc, giving the dwarf galaxy an irregular morphology and creating a galactic fountain in the massive galaxy. Hydrodynamic drag within the disc results in a strong increase of the effective mass loading of the wind for the dwarf galaxy, but quenches much of the outflow in the case of the high-mass galaxy.

  18. 1 Introduction The perception of motion transparency can arise from physically transparent objects,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaina, Lucia M.

    motion transparency processing implements an ecological smoothness constraint Perception, 2006, volume 351 Introduction The perception of motion transparency can arise from physically transparent objects between two perpendicularly moving gratings favors the perception of transparent over coherent motion

  19. Test-Particle Motion in the Nonsymmetric Gravitational Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Legare; J. W. Moffat

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a derivation of the equation of motion for a test-particle in the framework of the nonsymmetric gravitational theory. Three possible couplings of the test-particle to the non-symmetric gravitational field are explored. The equation of motion is found to be similar in form to the standard geodesic equation of general relativity, but with an extra antisymmetric force term present. The equation of motion is studied for the case of a static, spherically symmetric source, where the extra force term is found to take the form of a Yukawa force.

  20. Symmetries of geodesic motion in Gdel-type spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Camci

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study Noether gauge symmetries of geodesic motion for geodesic Lagrangian of four classes of metrics of G\\"{o}del-type spacetimes for which we calculated the Noether gauge symmetries for all classes I-IV, and find the first integrals of corresponding classes to derive a complete characterization of the geodesic motion. Using the obtained expressions for $\\dot{t}, \\dot{r}, \\dot{\\phi}$ and $\\dot{z}$ of each classes I-IV which depends essentially on two independent parameters $m$ and $w$, we explicitly integrated the geodesic equations of motion for the corresponding G\\"{o}del-type spacetimes.

  1. Quasar Proper Motions and Low-Frequency Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl R. Gwinn; T. Marshall Eubanks; Ted Pyne; Mark Birkinshaw; Demetrios N. Matsakis

    1996-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observational upper limits on the mass-energy of the cosmological gravitational-wave background, from limits on proper motions of quasars. Gravitational waves with periods longer than the time span of observations produce a simple pattern of apparent proper motions over the sky, composed primarily of second-order transverse vector spherical harmonics. A fit of such harmonics to measured motions yields a 95%-confidence limit on the mass-energy of gravitational waves with frequencies <2e-9 Hz, of <0.11/h*h times the closure density of the universe.

  2. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfanner, Florian [Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Maier, Joscha [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Kachelrie, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the measurements of the test persons, there is a very good correlation (?= 0.917) between the respiratory motion phases received by the radar system and the external motion monitor. Our concept of using an array of transmitting antennas turned out to be widely insensitive to the positioning of the test persons. A time shift between the respiratory motion curves recorded with the radar system and the motion curves from the external respiratory monitor was observed which indicates a slight difference between internal organ motion and motion detected by the external respiratory monitor. The simulations were in good accordance with the measurements.Conclusions: A continuous wave radar operating in the near field of the antennas can be used to determine the respiratory motion of humans accurately. In contrast to trigger systems used today, the radar system is able to measure motion inside the body. If such a monitor was routinely available in clinical CT, it would be possible optimizing the scan start with respect to the respiratory state of the patient. Breathing commands would potentially widely be avoided, and as far as uncooperative patients or children are concerned, less sedation might be necessary. Further applications of the radar system could be in radiation therapy or interventional imaging for instance.

  3. BE.420J Biomolecular Kinetics and Cellular Dynamics, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittrup, K. Dane

    This subject deals primarily with kinetic and equilibrium mathematical models of biomolecular interactions, as well as the application of these quantitative analyses to biological problems across a wide range of levels of ...

  4. Phase IV Simulant Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified the adsorption kinetics of actinides and strontium onto monosodium titanate (MST) as a technical risk in several of the processing alternatives selected for additional evaluation in Phase III of their effort.

  5. Nonphotochemical hole burning and dispersive kinetics in amorphous solids.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenney, Michael Joseph

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Results of an extensive study, covering burn intensities in the nW to {dollar}?{dollar}W/cm{dollar}2{dollar} range, of dispersive hole growth kinetics are reported for Oxazine 720 in (more)

  6. A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data Presents experimental study of a Cu-zeolite SCR in both reactor and engine test cell,...

  7. atom kinetic energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .self-consistent Thomas Fermi TF atom discussed w Kais, Sabre 3 Towards an exact orbital-free single-particle kinetic energy density for the inhomogeneous electron liquid in the...

  8. Kinetic energy error in the NIMROD spheromak simulations Carl Sovinec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sovinec, Carl

    Kinetic energy error in the NIMROD spheromak simulations Carl Sovinec 10/25/00 Dmitri Ryutov at the ends (as in the spheromak simulations), it may lead to compression in a boundary layer.] The maximum

  9. Mechanistic kinetic modeling of the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Hans

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two separate mechanistic kinetic models have been developed for the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks. The first model is targeted for the hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil. The second one addresses specifically the hydrocracking of long...

  10. RIS-M-2216 CHEMICAL KINETICS IN THE GAS PHASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KINETICS, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, GASES, HYDROGEN SULFIDES, PULSED IRRADIATION, RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOLYSIS is subjected to high energy radiation (e.g. a- particles, Y-radiation or fast electrons), the primary products

  11. Topobo : a gestural design tool with kinetic memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkes, Amanda Jane

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling of kinetic systems, both in physical materials and virtual simulations, provides a methodology to better understand and explore the forces and dynamics of our physical environment. The need to experiment, ...

  12. Fully kinetic modeling of a divergent cusped-field thruster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gildea, Stephen Robert

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully kinetic, particle-in-cell plasma simulation tool has been incrementally developed by members of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Space Propulsion Laboratory. Adapting this model to simulate the performance ...

  13. Kinetic studies of isoprene reactions with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Inseon

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic studies of the isoprene oxidation reactions initiated by the hydroxyl radical OH and the chlorine atom Cl have been investigated using a fast-flow reactor in conjunction with chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and using laser...

  14. astrophysical systems kinetic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Thermonuclear Kinetics in Astrophysics CERN Preprints Summary: Over the billions of years since...

  15. Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houshmandyar, Saeid [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

  16. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    es093daniel2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical...

  17. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx Traps for Design and Optimization Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx...

  18. Kinetic modeling and automated optimization in microreactor systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jason Stuart

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimization, kinetic investigation, or scale-up of a reaction often requires significant time and materials. Silicon microreactor systems have been shown advantageous for studying chemical reactions due to their small ...

  19. Nonlinear Adaptive Control for Bioreactors with Unknown Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Olivier

    , unknown kinetics, wastewater treatment. 1 Introduction Biological processes have become widely used on a real life wastewater treatment plant. Key words: Nonlinear adaptive control, continuous bioprocesses a pollutant (wastewater treatment...). There- fore, bioreactors require advanced regulation procedures

  20. Theory of hair bundle motion: new insights from the simplest model of hair bundle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Seung Keun

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Single Hair bundle motion and a simpleas a model of a single hair bundle motion . . . . . . . . .of mechan- otransduction in hair cells. Annu Rev Neurosci,

  1. Some topics on the fractional Brownian motion and stochastic partial differential equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jian

    2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we investigate some problems in fractional Brownian motion and stochastic partial differential partial differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motion and Hilbert space valued Wiener ...

  2. A unified theory on electro-kinetic extraction of contaminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datla, Subbaraju

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of contaminants from fine-grained soils. Here, the experimental and the theoretical studies conducted to date are reviewed briefly 2. 3. 1. Experimental Studies The technique of electro-kinetic extraction of salts from alkaline soils was investigated by Puri...A VNIFIED THEORY ON ELECTRO-KINETIC EXTRACTION OF CONTAMINANTS A Thesis by SUBBARAJU DATLA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  3. Kinetics of Mercury(II) Adsorption and Desorption on Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Mercury(II) Adsorption and Desorption on Soil Y U J U N Y I N , H E R B E R T E . A L L of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 D O N A L D L . S P A R K S Department of Plant and Soil Sciences kinetics of Hg(II) on four soils at pH 6 were investigated to discern the mechanisms controlling

  4. Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiv, B. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii St., 79011 Lviv (Ukraine)] [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii St., 79011 Lviv (Ukraine); Tokarchuk, M. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii St., 79011 Lviv (Ukraine) [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii St., 79011 Lviv (Ukraine); National University Lviv Polytechnic, 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

  5. HCCI in a CFR engine: experiments and detailed kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Smith, R; Torres, J; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Single cylinder engine experiments and chemical kinetic modeling have been performed to study the effect of variations in fuel, equivalence ratio, and intake charge temperature on the start of combustion and the heat release rate. Neat propane and a fuel blend of 15% dimethyl-ether in methane have been studied. The results demonstrate the role of these parameters on the start of combustion, efficiency, imep, and emissions. Single zone kinetic modeling results show the trends consistent with the experimental results.

  6. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to report the development of the flexible object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulation code KSOME (kinetic simulation of microstructure evolution) which can be used to simulate microstructure evolution of complex systems under irradiation. In this report we briefly describe the capabilities of KSOME and present preliminary results for short term annealing of single cascades in tungsten at various primary-knock-on atom (PKA) energies and temperatures.

  7. Theory of semicollisional kinetic Alfven modes in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectra of the semicollisional kinetic Alfven modes in a sheared slab geometry are investigated, including the effects of finite ion Larmor radius and diamagnetic drift frequencies. The eigenfrequencies of the damped modes are derived analytically via asymptotic analyses. In particular, as one reduces the resistivity, we find that, due to finite ion Larmor radius effects, the damped mode frequencies asymptotically approach finite real values corresponding to the end points of the kinetic Alfven continuum.

  8. Wave-induced motion of ramp-interconnected craft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oonk, Stephen Holt

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Wave-Induced Motion of Ramp-5 2.1 Mathematical Description of the Wave49 4.2 Case 1: Waves are Parallel to Ship-Ramp-Ship Axis (

  9. Motion of Robert G. Burnley, Director the Commonwealth of Virginia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Columbia Public Service Commission Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department...

  10. Impacts of a popular motion picture on destination images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyounggon

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of popular motion pictures upon the formation of destination perceptions has received some attention in the tourism literature. Previous empirical studies have examined the effects of movies on visitation to places they depict...

  11. Wave motions in unbounded poroelastic solids infused with compressible fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave motions in unbounded poroelastic solids infused with compressible fluids S. Quiligotti, G at proposing a two-scale constitutive theory of a poroelastic solid infused with an inviscid compressible fluid

  12. Geodesic and Path Motion in the Nonsymmetric Gravitational Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Legare; J. W. Moffat

    1995-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of test-particle motion in the Nonsymmetric Gravitational Theory (NGT) assuming the four-velocity of the particle is parallel-transported along the trajectory. The predicted motion is studied on a static, spherically symmetric background field, with particular attention paid to radial and circular motions. Interestingly, it is found that the proper time taken to travel between any two non-zero radial positions is finite. It is also found that circular orbits can be supported at lower radii than in General Relativity for certain forms of motion. We present three interactions which could be used as alternate methods for coupling a test-particle to the antisymmetric components of the NGT field. One of these takes the form of a Yukawa force in the weak-field limit of a static, spherically symmetric field, which could lead to interesting phenomenology.

  13. Sound-induced micromechanical motions in an isolated cochlea preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Scott Lawrence

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanical processes at work within the organ of Corti can be greatly elucidated by measuring both radial motions and traveling-wave behavior of structures within this organ in response to sound stimuli. To enable such ...

  14. Animating Non-Rigid Bodies Using Motion Capture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Jie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Simulating the motion of a non-rigid body under external forces is a difficult problem because of the complexity and flexibility of the non-rigid geometry and (more)

  15. Second Skin : motion capture with actuated feedback for motor learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miaw, Dennis (Dennis R.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second Skin aims to combine three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking with tactile feedback for the purpose of improving users' motor-learning ability. Such a system would track a user's body and limb movements as he or she ...

  16. ahumada motion detector: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We show data from a new type of detector that can be used to determine the neutron flux, the energy distribution, and the direction of motion neutron for both fast and thermal...

  17. John Papanikolas: Visualizing Charge Carrier Motion in Nanowires...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Papanikolas: Visualizing Charge Carrier Motion in Nanowires Using Femtosecond Pump-Probe Microscopy Apr 17, 2014 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM John Papanikolas Professor of Chemistry &...

  18. Potomac Electric Power Company's Motion for Leave to Answer and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Leave to Answer and Answer to Comments and Protests Potomac Electric Power Company's Motion for Leave to Answer and Answer to Comments and Protests Docket No. EO-05-01:...

  19. Wave-induced motion of ramp-interconnected craft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oonk, Stephen Holt

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Figure 4.3 (the system experiences yaw as one rigid bodyamount of yaw experienced by the total system (but notthe impact the yaw motions have on the system, Graph 4.26 is

  20. Optimal shape and motion of undulatory swimming organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokic, Grgur

    Undulatory swimming animals exhibit diverse ranges of body shapes and motion patterns and are often considered as having superior locomotory performance. The extent to which morphological traits of swimming animals have ...

  1. The Motional Stark Effect diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuh, Howard Yung-Hao

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ten channel Motional Stark Effect diagnostic has been installed on Alcator C-Mod to measure the plasma internal magnetic pitch angle profile. The C-Mod MSE measures the local electric field direction by measuring the ...

  2. Bulgarian Verbs of Motion: Slavic Verbs in a Balkan Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Traci Speed

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    motion events in Serbo-Croatian. In Victoria Hasko & ReneeRussian and Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BCS). The theoreticalRussian and Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BCS). Theoretical

  3. Filtering Number States of the Vibrational Motion of an Ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moya-Cessa, H

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme to generate number states (and specific superpositions of them) of the vibrational motion of a trapped ion. In particular, we show that robust to noise qubits can be generated with arbitrary amplitudes.

  4. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular diffusion. The magnitude of the reaction rate is important, since it is found that scaling effects (and thus rate discrepancies) are negligible at the single pore and fracture scale for plagioclase and iron hydroxide because of the slow rate at which they dissolve. In the case of calcite, where dissolution rates are rapid, scaling effects can develop at high flow rates from 0.1 cm/s to 1000 cm/s and for fracture lengths less than 1 cm. At more normal flow rates, however, mixing via molecular diffusion is effective in homogenizing the concentration field, thus eliminating any discrepancies between the Poiseuille Flow and the Well-Mixed Reactor model. This suggests that a scale dependence to mineral dissolution rates is unlikely at the single pore or fracture scale under normal geological/hydrologic conditions, implying that the discrepancy between laboratory and field rates must be attributed to other factors.

  5. Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

  6. POLARIZATION AND COMPRESSIBILITY OF OBLIQUE KINETIC ALFVEN WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunana, P.; Goldstein, M. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Laveder, D. [Laboratoire J. L. Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [Laboratoire J. L. Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Zank, G. P. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)] [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that a complete description of the solar wind requires a kinetic description and that, particularly at sub-proton scales, kinetic effects cannot be ignored. It is nevertheless usually assumed that at scales significantly larger than the proton gyroscale r{sub L} , magnetohydrodynamics or its extensions, such as Hall-MHD and two-fluid models with isotropic pressures, provide a satisfactory description of the solar wind. Here we calculate the polarization and magnetic compressibility of oblique kinetic Alfven waves and show that, compared with linear kinetic theory, the isotropic two-fluid description is very compressible, with the largest discrepancy occurring at scales larger than the proton gyroscale. In contrast, introducing anisotropic pressure fluctuations with the usual double-adiabatic (or CGL) equations of state yields compressibility values which are unrealistically low. We also show that both of these classes of fluid models incorrectly describe the electric field polarization. To incorporate linear kinetic effects, we use two versions of the Landau fluid model that include linear Landau damping and finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections. We show that Landau damping is crucial for correct modeling of magnetic compressibility, and that the anisotropy of pressure fluctuations should not be introduced without taking into account the Landau damping through appropriate heat flux equations. We also show that FLR corrections to all the retained fluid moments appear to be necessary to yield the correct polarization. We conclude that kinetic effects cannot be ignored even for kr{sub L} << 1.

  7. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? A?(140) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(140) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(140) fibril formation. ? At high A?(140) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (140) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(140) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleationpolymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(140) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  8. Small mass asymptotic for the motion with vanishing friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Freidlin; Wenqing Hu; Alexander Wentzell

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the small mass asymptotic (Smoluchowski-Kramers approximation) for the Langevin equation with a variable friction coefficient. The friction coefficient is assumed to be vanishing within certain region. We introduce a regularization for this problem and study the limiting motion for the 1-dimensional case and a multidimensional model problem. The limiting motion is a Markov process on a projected space. We specify the generator and boundary condition of this limiting Markov process and prove the convergence.

  9. Roles of Dry Friction in Fluctuating Motion of Adiabatic Piston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohiko G. Sano; Hisao Hayakawa

    2014-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of an adiabatic piston under dry friction is investigated to clarify the roles of dry friction in non-equilibrium steady states. We clarify that dry friction can reverse the direction of the piston motion and causes a discontinuity or a cusp-like singularity for velocity distribution functions of the piston. We also show that the heat fluctuation relation is modified under dry friction.

  10. Motion planning algorithms for a group of mobile agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lal, Mayank

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    sampling, like the probabilis- tic roadmap (PRM) planners [46, 47] have gained popularity due to their eciency 5 and simplicity. Centralized methods using PRM have been developed for solving the motion planning problem for multiple agents [48, 49...]. The no- tion of coordination diagram was used in [57] and later analyzed for manipulators in [60, 61]. On similar lines roadmap coordination [62, 63] was used to plan the motion of multiple robots. The problem with decoupled approaches is that despite...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash kinetics mechanism Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Some of these ash particles may contribute to surface sealing if rainfall kinetic energy is sufficient... ......

  12. Polymerization and Bundling Kinetics of FtsZ Filaments Ganhui Lan,* Alex Dajkovic,y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Sean

    Polymerization and Bundling Kinetics of FtsZ Filaments Ganhui Lan,* Alex Dajkovic,y Denis Wirtz a kinetic model that describes the polymerization and bundling mechanism of FtsZ filaments. The model polymerization kinetics data of another researcher, and explains the cooperativity observed in FtsZ kinetics

  13. Phase-field Model for Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics and Thermodynamic and Kinetic Models of Irradiated Fe-Cr Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructure evolution kinetics in irradiated materials has strongly spatial correlation. For example, void and second phases prefer to nucleate and grow at pre-existing defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and cracks. Inhomogeneous microstructure evolution results in inhomogeneity of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. Therefore, the simulation capability for predicting three dimensional (3-D) microstructure evolution kinetics and its subsequent impact on material properties and performance is crucial for scientific design of advanced nuclear materials and optimal operation conditions in order to reduce uncertainty in operational and safety margins. Very recently the meso-scale phase-field (PF) method has been used to predict gas bubble evolution, void swelling, void lattice formation and void migration in irradiated materials,. Although most results of phase-field simulations are qualitative due to the lake of accurate thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects, possible missing of important kinetic properties and processes, and the capability of current codes and computers for large time and length scale modeling, the simulations demonstrate that PF method is a promising simulation tool for predicting 3-D heterogeneous microstructure and property evolution, and providing microstructure evolution kinetics for higher scale level simulations of microstructure and property evolution such as mean field methods. This report consists of two parts. In part I, we will present a new phase-field model for predicting interstitial loop growth kinetics in irradiated materials. The effect of defect (vacancy/interstitial) generation, diffusion and recombination, sink strength, long-range elastic interaction, inhomogeneous and anisotropic mobility on microstructure evolution kinetics is taken into account in the model. The model is used to study the effect of elastic interaction on interstitial loop growth kinetics, the interstitial flux, and sink strength of interstitial loop for interstitials. In part II, we present a generic phase field model and discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in phase-field models including the reaction kinetics of radiation defects and local free energy of irradiated materials. In particular, a two-sublattice thermodynamic model is suggested to describe the local free energy of alloys with irradiated defects. Fe-Cr alloy is taken as an example to explain the required thermodynamic and kinetic properties for quantitative phase-field modeling. Finally the great challenges in phase-field modeling will be discussed.

  14. A unified analysis of crustal motion in Southern California, 19702004: The SCEC crustal motion map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Z.-K.

    To determine crustal motions in and around southern California, we have processed and combined trilateration data collected from 1970 to 1992, VLBI data from 1979 to 1992, and GPS data from 1986 to 2004: a long temporal ...

  15. Utilization of Recently Enhanced Simulation Tools and Empirical Ground Motion Databases to Improve Ground Motion Prediction Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khodavirdi, Khatereh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. Irikura, H.K. Thio, P.G. Somerville, Y. Fukushima, and Y.Fukushima. Attenuation relations of strong ground motion incatastrophic damage at the Fukushima nuclear power plant,

  16. The Impact of Alternative Fuels on Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The research targets the development of detailed kinetic models to quantitatively characterize the impact of alternative fuels on the performance of Navy turbines and diesel engines. Such impacts include kinetic properties such as cetane number, flame speed, and emissions as well as physical properties such as the impact of boiling point distributions on fuel vaporization and mixing. The primary focus will be Fischer-Tropsch liquids made from natural gas, coal or biomass. The models will include both the effects of operation with these alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional petroleum-based fuels. The team will develop the requisite kinetic rules for specific reaction types and incorporate these into detailed kinetic mechanisms to predict the combustion performance of neat alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional fuels. Reduced kinetic models will be then developed to allow solution of the coupled kinetics/transport problems. This is a collaboration between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CSM/LLNL team plans to build on the substantial progress made in recent years in developing accurate detailed chemical mechanisms for the oxidation and pyrolysis of conventional fuels. Particular emphasis will be placed upon reactions of the isoalkanes and the daughter radicals, especially tertiary radicals, formed by abstraction from the isoalkanes. The various components of the program are described. We have been developing the kinetic models for two iso-dodecane molecules, using the same kinetic modeling formalisms that were developed for the gasoline and diesel primary reference fuels. These mechanisms, and the thermochemical and transport coefficient submodels for them, are very close to completion at the time of this report, and we expect them to be available for kinetic simulations early in the coming year. They will provide a basis for prediction and selection of desirable F-T molecules for use in jet engine simulations, where we should be able to predict the ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics of proposed fuel components. These mechanisms include the reactions and chemical species needed to describe high temperature phenomena such as shock tube ignition and flammability behavior, and they will also include low temperature kinetics to describe other ignition phenomena such as compression ignition and knocking. During the past years, our hydrocarbon kinetics modeling group at LLNL has focused a great deal on fuels typical of gasoline and diesel fuel. About 10 years ago, we developed kinetic models for the fuel octane primary reference fuels, n-heptane [1] and iso-octane [2], which have 7 and 8 carbon atoms and are therefore representative of typical gasoline fuels. N-heptane represents the low limit of knock resistance with an octane number of 0, while iso-octane is very knock resistant with an octane number of 100. High knock resistance in iso-octane was attributed largely to the large fraction of primary C-H bonds in the molecule, including 15 of the 18 C-H bonds, and the high bond energy of these primary bonds plays a large role in this knock resistance. In contrast, in the much more ignitable n-heptane, 10 of its 16 C-H bonds are much less strongly bound secondary C-H bonds, leading to its very low octane number. All of these factors, as well as a similarly complex kinetic description of the equally important role of the transition state rings that transfer H atoms within the reacting fuel molecules, were quantified and collected into large kinetic reaction mechanisms that are used by many researchers in the fuel chemistry world.

  17. En defensa de Elsinor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martí nez, Gloria Marí a

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    no "cercena," sino asume e incorpora las necesidades de renovacin, de bsqueda y experimentacin. Varias generaciones de teatristas cubanos han alentado y aplicado su talento artstico a la realizacin de procesos creadores y de puestas en escena con... proceso unido a sus intereses vitales mismos: profesionales, artstico-creativos, sociales, ideo-estticos . . . ; en sus contradicciones de estilos, de mtodos, de poticas teatrales, pero con principios comunes en torno al teatrista que reclama formar...

  18. PREDICTING MERGER-INDUCED GAS MOTIONS IN ?CDM GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.; Avestruz, Camille; Rudd, Douglas H. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Nelson, Kaylea, E-mail: daisuke.nagai@yale.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the hierarchical structure formation model, clusters of galaxies form through a sequence of mergers and continuous mass accretion, which generate significant random gas motions especially in their outskirts where material is actively accreting. Non-thermal pressure provided by the internal gas motions affects the thermodynamic structure of the X-ray emitting intracluster plasma and introduces biases in the physical interpretation of X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect observations. However, we know very little about the nature of gas motions in galaxy clusters. The ASTRO-H X-ray mission, scheduled to launch in 2015, will have a calorimeter capable of measuring gas motions in galaxy clusters at the level of ?< 100 km s{sup 1}. In this work, we predict the level of merger-induced gas motions expected in the ?CDM model using hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. We show that the gas velocity dispersion is larger in more massive clusters, but exhibits a large scatter. We show that systems with large gas motions are morphologically disturbed, while early forming, relaxed groups show a smaller level of gas motions. By analyzing mock ASTRO-H observations of simulated clusters, we show that such observations can accurately measure the gas velocity dispersion out to the outskirts of nearby relaxed galaxy clusters. ASTRO-H analysis of merging clusters, on the other hand, requires multi-component spectral fitting and enables unique studies of substructures in galaxy clusters by measuring both the peculiar velocities and the velocity dispersion of gas within individual sub-clusters.

  19. MULTI-VALUED MOTION FIELDS ESTIMATION FOR TRANSPARENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera, Mariano

    is with the Computer Science Department, Centro de Investigacion en Matematicas A.C., Apdo. Postal 402, Guanajuato, Gto Department, Centro de Investigacion en Matematicas A.C., Apdo. Postal 402, Guanajuato, Gto., 36000, Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 The diffusion coefficients wi. The diffusion process is performed in the spatio

  20. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another.

  1. Kinetics of in situ combustion. SUPRI TR 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamora, D.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidation kinetic experiments with various crude oil types show two reaction peaks at about 250{degree}C (482{degree}F) and 400{degree}C (725{degree}F). These experiments lead to the conclusion that the fuel during high temperature oxidation is an oxygenated hydrocarbon. A new oxidation reaction model has been developed which includes two partially-overlapping reactions: namely, low-temperature oxidation followed by high-temperature oxidation. For the fuel oxidation reaction, the new model includes the effects of sand grain size and the atomic hydrogen-carbon (H/C) and oxygen-carbon (O/C) ratios of the fuel. Results based on the new model are in good agreement with the experimental data. Methods have been developed to calculate the atomic H/C and O/C ratios. These methods consider the oxygen in the oxygenated fuel, and enable a direct comparison of the atomic H/C ratios obtained from kinetic and combustion tube experiments. The finding that the fuel in kinetic tube experiments is an oxygenated hydrocarbon indicates that oxidation reactions are different in kinetic and combustion tube experiments. A new experimental technique or method of analysis will be required to obtain kinetic parameters for oxidation reactions encountered in combustion tube experiments and field operations.

  2. Gravitationally Induced Particle Production: Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; I. P. Baranov

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic kinetic description for the irreversible thermodynamic process of gravitationally induced particle production is proposed in the context of an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) geometry. We show that the covariant thermodynamic treatment referred to as "adiabatic" particle production provoked by the cosmic time-varying gravitational field has a consistent kinetic counterpart. The variation of the distribution function is associated to a non-collisional kinetic term of quantum-gravitational origin which is proportional to the ratio $\\Gamma/H$, where $\\Gamma$ is the gravitational particle production rate and H is the Hubble parameter. For $\\Gamma gravitation. The resulting non-equilibrium distribution function has the same functional form of equilibrium with the evolution laws corrected by the particle production process. The macroscopic temperature evolution law is also kinetically derived for massive and massless particles. The present approach points to the possibility of an exact (semi-classical) quantum-gravitational kinetic treatment by incorporating back-reaction effects in the cosmic background.

  3. Lick Northern Proper Motion Program. III. Lick NPM2 Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, R B; Jones, B F; Monet, D G; Hanson, Robert B.; Klemola, Arnold R.; Jones, Burton F.; Monet, David G.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lick Northern Proper Motion (NPM) program, a two-epoch (1947-1988) photographic survey of the northern two-thirds of the sky (Dec. > -23 deg), has measured absolute proper motions, on an inertial system defined by distant galaxies, for 380,000 stars from 8 14) anonymous stars for astrometry and galactic studies, 92,000 bright (B NPM2 proper motions are on the ICRS system, via Tycho-2 stars, to an accuracy of 0.5 mas/yr in each field. RMS proper motion precision is 6 mas/yr. Positional errors average 80 mas at the mean plate epoch 1968, and 200 mas at the NPM2 catalog epoch 2000. NPM2 photographic photometry errors average 0.18 mag in B, and 0.20 mag in B-V. The NPM2 Catalog and the updated (to J2000) NPM1 Catalog are available at the CDS Strasbourg data center and on the NPM WWW site (http://www.ucolick.org/~npm). The NPM2 Catalog completes the Lick Northern Proper Motion program after a half-century of w...

  4. Brownian Motion of Arbitrarily Shaped Particles in Two-Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayan Chakrabarty; Andrew Konya; Feng Wang; Jonathan V. Selinger; Kai Sun; Qi-Huo Wei

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we implement microfabricated boomerang particles with unequal arm lengths as a model for non-symmetry particles and study their Brownian motion in a quasi-two dimensional geometry by using high precision single particle motion tracking. We show that due to the coupling between translation and rotation, the mean squared displacements of a single asymmetric boomerang particle exhibit a non-linear crossover from short time faster to long time slower diffusion, and the mean displacements for fixed initial orientation are non-zero and saturate out at long time. The measured anisotropic diffusion coefficients versus the tracking point position indicate that there exists one unique point, i.e. the center of hydrodynamic stress (CoH), at which all coupled diffusion coefficients vanish. This implies that in contrast to motion in 3D where the CoH only exists for high symmetry particles, the CoH always exists for Brownian motion in 2D. We develop an analytical model based on Langevin theory to explain the experimental results and show that among the 6 anisotropic diffusion coefficients only 5 are independent because the translation-translation coupling originates from the translation-rotation coupling. Finally we classify the behavior of 2D Brownian motion of arbitrarily shaped particles into four groups based on the particle shape symmetry group.

  5. Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by Reaction Kinetics and EPR Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Karp, Eric M.; Luo, Jin-Yong; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with various Cu loadings were prepared via solution ion exchange. The hydrated samples were studied with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Cu2+ ion coordination numbers were obtained by analyzing the hyperfine structures while Cu-Cu distances were estimated from line broadening of the EPR features. By coupling EPR and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) results, two Cu2+ ion locations were suggested. Standard and fast NH3-SCR, as well as non-selective NH3 oxidation reactions were carried out over these catalysts at high space velocities. For the SCR reaction, intra-particle diffusion limitation was found throughout the reaction temperatures investigated. Although clear structure-activity relationships cannot be derived, the reaction results allow for reactant diffusivities and Cu2+ ion locations to be estimated. The slower NH3 oxidation reaction, on the other hand, is kinetically limited at low temperatures, and, therefore, allows for a correlation between Cu2+ ion location and reaction kinetics to be made. Furthermore, the dynamic Cu2+ ion motion as a function of temperature could also be derived from the NH3 oxidation kinetics.

  6. Kinetic Alfvn wave turbulence and formation of localized structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Modi, K. V. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India) [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001 (India)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents non-linear interaction of magnetosonic wave with kinetic Alfvn wave for intermediate ?-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i}???1). A set of dimensionless equations have been developed for analysis by considering ponderomotive force due to pump kinetic Alfvn wave in the dynamics of magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis has been done to study modulational instability or linear growth rate. Further, numerical simulation has been carried out to study the nonlinear stage of instability and resulting power spectrum applicable to solar wind around 1 AU. Due to the nonlinearity, background density of magnetosonic wave gets modified which results in localization of kinetic Alfvn wave. From the obtained results, we observed that spectral index follows k{sup ?3.0}, consistent with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind around 1 AU. The result shows the steepening of power spectrum which may be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind.

  7. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Sarathy, S M

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive engine simulation models are needed to make rapid progress towards DOE's goals of increasing combustion engine efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. These engine simulation models require chemical kinetic submodels to allow the prediction of the effect of fuel composition on engine performance and emissions. Chemical kinetic models for conventional and next-generation transportation fuels need to be developed so that engine simulation tools can predict fuel effects. The objectives are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  8. Kinetics of high-conversion hydrocracking of bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagaishi, H.; Gray, M.R. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Chan, E.W.; Sanford, E.C. [Syncrude Canada, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Residues are complex mixtures of thousands of components. This mixture will change during hydrocracking, so that high conversion may result in a residue material with different characteristics from the starting material. Our objective is to determine the kinetics of residue conversion and yields of distillates at high conversions, and to relate these observations to the underlying chemical reactions. Athabasca bitumen was reacted in a 1-L CSTR in a multipass operation. Product from the first pass was collected, then run through the reactor again and so on, giving kinetic data under conditions that simulated a multi-reactor or packed-bed operation. Experiments were run both with hydrocracking catalyst and without added catalyst. Products were analyzed by distillation, elemental analysis, NMR, and GPC. These data will be used to derive a kinetic model for hydrocracking of bitumen residue covering a wide range of conversion (from 30% to 95%+), based on the underlying chemistry.

  9. Vibrated polar disks: spontaneous motion, binary collisions, and collective dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Deseigne; Sbastien Lonard; Olivier Dauchot; Hugues Chat

    2012-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spontaneous motion, binary collisions, and collective dynamics of "polar disks", i.e. purpose-built particles which, when vibrated between two horizontal plates, move coherently along a direction strongly correlated to their intrinsic polarity. The motion of our particles, although nominally three-dimensional and complicated, is well accounted for by a two-dimensional persistent random walk. Their binary collisions are spatiotemporally extended events during which multiple actual collisions happen, yielding a weak average effective alignment. We show that this well-controlled, "dry active matter" system can display collective motion with orientationally-ordered regions of the order of the system size. We provide evidence of strong number density in the most ordered regimes observed. These results are discussed in the light of the limitations of our system, notably those due to the inevitable presence of walls.

  10. Regular Black Hole Metric with Three Constants of Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannsen, Tim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely characterized by their masses and spins and are described by the Kerr metric. Several parametric spacetimes which deviate from the Kerr metric have been proposed in order to test this theorem with observations of black holes in both the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra. Such metrics often contain naked singularities or closed timelike curves in the vicinity of the compact objects that can limit the applicability of the metrics to compact objects that do not spin rapidly, and generally admit only two constants of motion. The existence of a third constant, however, can facilitate the calculation of observables, because the equations of motion can be written in first-order form. In this paper, I design a Kerr-like black hole metric which is regular everywhere outside of the event horizon, possesses three independent constants of motion, and depends nonlinearly on four free functions that parameterize potential deviations from ...

  11. Friction and the oscillatory motion of granular flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lydie Staron

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution reports on numerical simulations of 2D granular flows on erodible beds. The broad aim is to investigate whether simple flows of model granular matter exhibits spontaneous oscillatory motion in generic flow conditions, and in this case, whether the frictional properties of the contacts between grains may affect the existence or the characteristics of this oscillatory motion. The analysis of different series of simulations show that the flow develops an oscillatory motion with a well-defined frequency which increases like the inverse of the velocity's square root. We show that the oscillation is essentially a surface phenomena. The amplitude of the oscillation is higher for lower volume fractions, and can thus be related to the flow velocity and grains friction properties. The study of the influence of the periodic geometry of the simulation cell shows no significant effect. These results are discussed in relation to sonic sands.

  12. Stirling engine power control and motion conversion mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, David T. (Birmingham, MI)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A motion conversion device for converting between the reciprocating motion of the pistons in a Stirling engine and the rotating motion of its output shaft, and for changing the stroke and phase of the pistons, includes a lever pivoted at one end and having a cam follower at the other end. The piston rod engages the lever intermediate its ends and the cam follower engages a cam keyed to the output shaft. The lever pivot can be moved to change the length of the moment arm defined between the cam follower and the piston rod the change the piston stroke and force exerted on the cam, and the levers can be moved in opposite directions to change the phase between pistons.

  13. Proper Motion Objects in the Hubble Deep Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kilic; Ted von Hippel; R. A. Mendez; D. E. Winget

    2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the deepest and finest resolution images of the Universe acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope and a similar image taken 7 years later for the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, we have derived proper motions for the point sources in the Hubble Deep Field--North. Two faint blue objects,HDF2234 and HDF3072, are found to display significant proper motion, 10.0 $\\pm$ 2.5 and 15.5 $\\pm$ 3.8 mas yr$^{-1}$. Photometric distances and tangential velocities for these stars are consistent with disk white dwarfs located at $\\sim$ 500 pc. The faint blue objects analyzed by Ibata et al. (1999) and Mendez & Minniti (2000) do not show any significant proper motion; they are not halo white dwarfs and they do not contribute to the Galactic dark matter. These objects are likely to be distant AGN.

  14. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wang, Z. R.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive SpectrumKinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  15. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  16. Spectroscopy and kinetics of combustion gases at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program involves two complementary activities: (1) development and application of cw ring dye laser absorption methods for sensitive detection of radical species and measurement of fundamental spectroscopic parameters at high temperatures; and (2) shock tube studies of reaction kinetics relevant to combustion. Species currently under investigation in the spectroscopic portion of the research include NO and CH{sub 3}; this has necessitated the continued operated at wavelengths in the range 210-230 nm. Shock tube studies of reaction kinetics currently are focussed on reactions involving CH{sub 3} radicals.

  17. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  18. A kinetic scheme for pressurized flows in non uniform pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourdarias, Christian; Gerbi, Stphane

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to present a kinetic numerical scheme for the computations of transient pressurised flows in closed water pipes with variable sections. Firstly, we detail the derivation of the mathematical model in curvilinear coordinates under some hypothesis and we performe a formal asymptotic analysis. Then the obtained system is written as a conservative hyperbolic partial differential system of equations, and we recall how to obtain the corresponding kinetic formulation based on an upwinding of the source term due to the "pseudo topography" performed in a close manner described by Perthame and al.

  19. Chemical and kinetic equilibrations via radiative parton transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Zhang; Warner A. Wortman

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A hot and dense partonic system can be produced in the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. How it equilibrates is important for the extraction of Quark-Gluon Plasma properties. We study the chemical and kinetic equilibrations of the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a radiative transport model. Thermal and Color-Glass-Condensate motivated initial conditions are used. We observe that screened parton interactions always lead to partial pressure isotropization. Different initial pressure anisotropies result in the same asymptotic evolution. Comparison of evolutions with and without radiative processes shows that chemical equilibration interacts with kinetic equilibration and radiative processes can contribute significantly to pressure isotropization.

  20. The greatest convex minorant of Brownian motion, meander, and bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitman, Jim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article contains both a point process and a sequential description of the greatest convex minorant of Brownian motion on a finite interval. We use these descriptions to provide new analysis of various features of the convex minorant such as the set of times where the Brownian motion meets its minorant. The equivalence of the these descriptions is non-trivial, which leads to many interesting identities between quantities derived from our analysis. The sequential description can be viewed as a Markov chain for which we derive some fundamental properties.

  1. Motional broadening in ensembles with heavy-tail frequency distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagi, Yoav; Pugatch, Rami; Almog, Ido; Davidson, Nir; Aizenman, Michael [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Departments of Physics and Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the spectrum of an ensemble of two-level systems can be broadened through ''resetting'' discrete fluctuations, in contrast to the well-known motional-narrowing effect. The broadening occurs if the ensemble frequency distribution has heavy tails with a diverging first moment. The asymptotic motional broadened line shape is then a Lorentzian. In case there is a physical upper cutoff in the frequency distribution, the broadening effect may still be observed, though only up to a certain fluctuation rate.

  2. Proper Motion of Pulsar B1800-21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. Brisken; M. Carrillo-Barragan; S. Kurtz; J. P. Finley

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report high angular resolution, multi-epoch radio observations of the young pulsar PSR B1800-21. Using two pairs of data sets, each pair spanning approximately a ten year period, we calculate the proper motion of the pulsar. We obtain a proper motion of mu_alpha=11.6 +- 1.8 mas/yr, mu_delta=14.8 +- 2.3 mas/yr, which clearly indicates a birth position at the extreme edge of the W30 supernova remnant. Although this does not definitively rule out an association of W30 and PSR B1800-21, it does not support an association.

  3. Motion as perturbation. II. Development of the method for dosimetric analysis of motion effects with fixed-gantry IMRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States)] [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Opp, Daniel; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.feygelman@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In this work, the feasibility of implementing a motion-perturbation approach to accurately estimate volumetric dose in the presence of organ motionpreviously demonstrated for VMAT-is studied for static gantry IMRT. The method's accuracy is improved for the voxels that have very low planned dose but acquire appreciable dose due to motion. The study describes the modified algorithm and its experimental validation and provides an example of a clinical application. Methods: A contoured region-of-interest is propagated according to the predefined motion kernel throughout time-resolved 4D phantom dose grids. This timed series of 3D dose grids is produced by the measurement-guided dose reconstruction algorithm, based on an irradiation of a staticARCCHECK (AC) helical dosimeter array (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL). Each moving voxel collects dose over the dynamic simulation. The difference in dose-to-moving voxel vs dose-to-static voxel in-phantom forms the basis of a motion perturbation correction that is applied to the corresponding voxel in the patient dataset. A new method to synchronize the accelerator and dosimeter clocks, applicable to fixed-gantry IMRT, was developed. Refinements to the algorithm account for the excursion of low dose voxels into high dose regions, causing appreciable dose increase due to motion (LDVE correction). For experimental validation, four plans using TG-119 structure sets and objectives were produced using segmented IMRT direct machine parameters optimization in Pinnacle treatment planning system (v. 9.6, Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI). All beams were delivered with the gantry angle of 0. Each beam was delivered three times: (1) to the static AC centered on the room lasers; (2) to a static phantom containing a MAPCHECK2 (MC2) planar diode array dosimeter (Sun Nuclear); and (3) to the moving MC2 phantom. The motion trajectory was an ellipse in the IEC XY plane, with 3 and 1.5 cm axes. The period was 5 s, with the resulting average motion speed of 1.45 cm/s. The motion-perturbed high resolution (2 mm voxel) volumetric dose grids on the MC2 phantom were generated for each beam. From each grid, a coronal dose plane at the detector level was extracted and compared to the corresponding moving MC2 measurement, using gamma analysis with both global (G) and local (L) dose-error normalization. Results: Using the TG-119 criteria of (3%G/3 mm), per beam average gamma analysis passing rates exceeded 95% in all cases. No individual beam had a passing rate below 91%. LDVE correction eliminated systematic disagreement patterns at the beams aperture edges. In a representative example, application of LDVE correction improved (2%L/2 mm) gamma analysis passing rate for an IMRT beam from 74% to 98%. Conclusions: The effect of motion on the moving region-of-interest IMRT dose can be estimated with a standard, static phantom QA measurement, provided the motion characteristics are independently known from 4D CT or otherwise. The motion-perturbed absolute dose estimates were validated by the direct planar diode array measurements, and were found to reliably agree with them in a homogeneous phantom.

  4. Correlation between internal fiducial tumor motion and external marker motion for liver tumors imaged with 4D-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: abeddar@mdanderson.org; Kainz, Kristofer [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina Marie [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsunashima, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pan Tinsu [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Prado, Karl [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We investigated the correlation between the motions of an external marker and internal fiducials implanted in the liver for 8 patients undergoing respiratory-based computed tomography (four-dimensional CT [4D-CT]) procedures. Methods and Materials: The internal fiducials were gold seeds, 3 mm in length and 1.2 mm in diameter. Four patients each had one implanted fiducial, and the other four had three implanted fiducials. The external marker was a plastic box, which is part of the Real-Time Position Management System (RPM) used to track the patient's respiration. Each patient received a standard helical CT scan followed by a time-correlated CT-image acquisition (4D-CT). The 4D-CT images were reconstructed in 10 separate phases covering the entire respiratory cycle. Results: The internal fiducial motion is predominant in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 7.5-17.5 mm. The correlation between external respiration and internal fiducial motion is best during expiration. For 2 patients with their three fiducials separated by a maximum of 3.2 cm, the motions of the fiducials were well correlated, whereas for 2 patients with more widely spaced fiducials, there was less correlation. Conclusions: In general, there is a good correlation between internal fiducial motion imaged by 4D-CT and external marker motion. We have demonstrated that gating may be best performed at the end of the respiratory cycle. Special attention should be paid to gating for patients whose fiducials do not move in synchrony, because targeting on the correct respiratory amplitude alone would not guarantee that the entire tumor volume is within the treatment field.

  5. Ground motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes II:Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aagaard, B T; Graves, R W; Rodgers, A; Brocher, T M; Simpson, R W; Dreger, D; Petersson, N A; Larsen, S C; Ma, S; Jachens, R C

    2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate long-period (T > 1.0-2.0 s) and broadband (T > 0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenarios earthquakes (Mw 6.7-7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area with about 50% of the urban area experiencing MMI VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland and 2007 Mw 4.5 Alum Rock earthquakes show that the USGS Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute at least some of this difference to the relatively narrow width of the Hayward fault ruptures. The simulations suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by including a dependence on the rupture speed and increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period. The simulations also indicate that the NGA relations may under-predict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins.

  6. Verbs and Adverbs: Multidimensional Motion Interpolation Using Radial Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodenheimer, Bobby

    behavior. 1 Introduction Creating believable animated human figures is a difficult task, even with the most environment. Research into controllable human figure animation can be divided into three major groupings. Dynamically simulated figure animation uses controllers together with a simulated human to generate motion

  7. The Duffing Oscillator And Linearization Techniques For Its Motion Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashdan, Mouath

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    constant is known, solving the system is no longer needed to analyze the characteristics of the system. Motion constants are time independent integrals that are hard to find for nonlinear dynamic systems. We chose the Duffing Oscillator as a higher order...

  8. Blade Motion and Nutrient Flux to the Kelp, Eisenia arborea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    Blade Motion and Nutrient Flux to the Kelp, Eisenia arborea MARK DENNY* AND LORETTA ROBERSON- plore the effect of oscillatory pitching on the flux to a flat plate and to two morphologies of the kelp-averaged flux to both kelp mor- phologies, but not to the plate. In fast flow (equivalent to 20 cm s 1 in water

  9. Biomimetic ratcheting motion of a soft, slender, sessile gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhury, Manoj K.

    Biomimetic ratcheting motion of a soft, slender, sessile gel L. Mahadevan* , S. Daniel , and M. K, just as in a mechanical ratchet. Worms use a combination of unidirectional waves and the inequalityheal cycle in response to periodic unidirectional pulses producing a material ratchet (1, 4); snakes use

  10. Motion detector suitable for detecting earthquakes and the like

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, D.E.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A motion detector device is described suitable for detecting vibrational tremors such as earthquakes comprising: an inertial mass, spring means comprising a spring barb oriented principally for motion along a horizontal axis and a coil spring oriented principally for motion along a vertical axis, means for resiliently supporting the inertial mass on the spring means for resilient motion along both the horizontal and vertical axes comprising means for anchoring the spring barb at one end thereof and means for connecting the coil spring between the other end of the spring barb and the inertial mass, the mass and spring means forming a resonant mechanical vibration circuit at a predetermined vibrational frequency corresponding to that of the vibrational tremor to be detected, spaced apart oppositely positioned electrical switching contact means connected to the spring means and the inertial mass respectively, the contact means being brought into switching contact with each other when the vibrational circuit is excited at the predetermined vibrational frequency, and alarm means connected to the switching means for providing an alarm signal when the contact means are brought into switching contact.

  11. Unconventional motional narrowing in the optical spectrum of a semiconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    observed for nuclear magnetic resonance. I n the seminal work on motional narrowing1 , relaxation effects. The fluctuation of the quantum-dot environment thus randomizes the emission energy over a range of spectral. A textbook example is found in nuclear magnetic resonance, where the fluctuating local magnetic fields

  12. Branching Brownian motion with an inhomogeneous breeding potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Simon Colin

    Branching Brownian motion with an inhomogeneous breeding potential J. W. Harris and S. C. Harris 1TW, U.K. email: john.harris@bristol.ac.uk. Supported by the Heilbronn Institute for Mathe- matical.K. email: s.c.harris@bath.ac.uk 1 #12;|y|p for p > 2, the population would almost surely explode

  13. Finance President's Council Section Page 6 Motion: 199610.30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    Finance President's Council Section Page 6 Motion: 199610.30 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH by the Finance Department. 1. Cheque Requisition Procedure Complete the Cheque Requisition form in full as indicated (form available from the Finance department). This includes the name of the payee, address, amount

  14. Finance President's Council Section Page 31 Motion: 199204.09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    Finance President's Council Section Page 31 Motion: 199204.09 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BRITISH guarantee that a card will be issued. d) Approved application forms must be forwarded to the Finance.1.4 Reimbursement should take approximately 10 working days from the Finance Department's receipt of the Travel

  15. From robotic arms to mobile manipulation: on coordinated motion schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    From robotic arms to mobile manipulation: on coordinated motion schemes V. Padois , J.-Y. Fourquet. It is compared with the classical kinematic modelling of robotic arms. In particular, it is shown that many tools of organization are due to the inherently bounded workspace of classic robotic arms or auto- matic machines

  16. FREE ENERGIES OF STAGING A SCENARIO AND PERPETUAL MOTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamon, Peter

    CHAPTER 1 FREE ENERGIES OF STAGING A SCENARIO AND PERPETUAL MOTION MACHINES OF THE THIRD KIND Peter to a notion of staging free energy: the free energy invested in choreographing all the actors of a biochemical \\offprintinfo{(Title, Edition)}{(Author)} at the beginning of your document. 1 #12;2 FREE ENERGIES OF STAGING

  17. Motion planning under uncertainty: application to an unmanned helicopter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Joshua Daniel

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology is presented in this work for intelligent motion planning in an uncertain environment using a non-local sensor, like a radar sensor, that allows the sensing of the environment non-locally. This methodology is applied to an unmanned...

  18. Hierarchical task and motion planning Tomas Lozano-Perez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    ? #12;Real robot meets real world: large spaces Configuration space · joint,000 linearly interpolated joint motions #12;Real robot meets real world: uncertainty symbolic action descriptions Put(Block, Target): exists: Source pre: On(Block, Source), Clear(Block

  19. Ankle Strength and Stiffness Predict Range of Motion During

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Ankle Strength and Stiffness Predict Range of Motion During Walking in Older Adults Erica D Persons, 2001) · Studies focusing on lower extremity vulnerability show weakness in the ankle dorsiflexors and lack of flexibility of ankle plantarflexors increase risk of falling. (Hylton, 2003) · Ankle stiffness

  20. Ambient fluid motions influence swimming and feeding by the ctenophore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    current erosion and fluid mechanical signal noise within turbulent flows affect the mechanics of predatorAmbient fluid motions influence swimming and feeding by the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi KELLY R) fluid interactions during feeding by the lobate ctenophore, Mnemiopsis leidyi, a highly successful

  1. Utilizing Mobility to Minimize the Total Communication and Motion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostofi, Yasamin

    Utilizing Mobility to Minimize the Total Communication and Motion Energy Consumption of a Robotic costs. However, simplified path loss models are utilized to model the communication channels. In Yan Operation Yuan Yan and Yasamin Mostofi Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University

  2. Roadmap-based Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Berg, Jur

    Roadmap-based Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments Jur P. van den Berg Mark H. Overmars propose a practical algorithm based on a roadmap that is created for the static part of the scene. On this roadmap an approximate time-optimal trajectory from a start to a goal configuration is computed

  3. www.iop.org/journals/physed Teaching motion with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planin?iè, Gorazd

    and also demonstrated the utility of GPS and ICT. In this article we report on the various hands;Teaching motion with the Global Positioning System Figure 1. The freeware GPS Utility [5] enables users sentence or line inside the NMEA message, which might read: $GPGGA,190239.62,4603.9040,N, 01434.7951,E,1

  4. ATLAS: A NOVEL KINEMATIC ARCHITECTURE FOR SIX DOF MOTION PLATFORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, John

    ATLAS: A NOVEL KINEMATIC ARCHITECTURE FOR SIX DOF MOTION PLATFORMS M.J.D. HAYES Mechanical simulation required in many applications. This paper presents an overview of the Atlas platform: a novel six orienting device, called the Atlas sphere, on a gantry with three linear axes. The key to the design

  5. Virtual Remote Center of Motion Control for Needle Placement Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    mechanical design but also the need for calibration and registration of the robot to the medical imager priorVirtual Remote Center of Motion Control for Needle Placement Robots Emad M. Boctor, Robert J@jhu.edu, GaborF@jhu.edu http://cisstweb.cs.jhu.edu Abstract. Surgical robots, including those with remote center

  6. Sensorless Robot Collision Detection and Hybrid Force/Motion Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    a lightweight robot design [6], possibly with distributed compliant characteristics in the driving system andSensorless Robot Collision Detection and Hybrid Force/Motion Control Alessandro De Luca Raffaella-time detection of collisions between a robot manipulator and obstacles of unknown geometry and location

  7. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging with Motion Estimation and Liliana Borcea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papanicolaou, George C.

    Callaghan George Papanicolaou Abstract We introduce from first principles a synthetic aperture radar (SAR calibrated small apertures, (b) preliminary motion estimation from the data using the Wigner transform-band persistent surveillance SAR is a specific application that is covered by our analysis. Detailed numerical

  8. From the adiabatic piston to macroscopic motion induced by fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    From the adiabatic piston to macroscopic motion induced by fluctuations J. Piasecki Institute. In the case of two infinite volume one­ dimensional ideal fluids separated by a piston whose mass is equal of the Boltzmann equation. It is shown that at equal pressures on both sides of the piston, the temperature

  9. Large deviations for rough paths of fractional Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millet, Annie

    limit theorem. Stochastic modeling deals basically with rough path controls. Indeed, the ground-breaking It^o's theory on stochastic differential equations is based on Brownian motion, which has almost surely nowhere differentiable sam- ple paths but only -H¨older continuous ones, with ]0, 1 2 [. Note

  10. Optical Flow Estimation versus Motion Estimation Draft: Anita Sellent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    . In the proposed challenge we aim to estimate the physical motion of objects. In industrial applications in the Camera System In industrial applications, sufficient illumination cannot always be provided. This can in the path of a robot or the trajectories of objects [7,12,13,17]. Video cameras provide information

  11. Adaptive robust motion control of linear motors for precision manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    for widespread use in high-speed/high-accuracy positioning systems [13]. In general, the linear motor hasAdaptive robust motion control of linear motors for precision manufacturing Bin Yao *, Li Xu School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA Received 6 October 1999; accepted 11

  12. Motion Without Correspondence from Tomographic Projections by Bayesian Inversion Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Sami

    Computing 3D reconstructions from X-ray projections is al- ready possible in some medical applications by Bayesian formalism as we want to handle either sparsely collected or limited-angle data, which are beyondMotion Without Correspondence from Tomographic Projections by Bayesian Inversion Theory S. S

  13. Vehicle Trajectory Prediction based on Motion Model and Maneuver Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Vehicle Trajectory Prediction based on Motion Model and Maneuver Recognition Adam Houenou, Philippe is a crucial task for an autonomous vehicle, in order to avoid collisions on its planned trajectory. It is also necessary for many Advanced Driver Assistance Systems, where the ego- vehicle's trajectory has

  14. Invitation to Participate in a Strong Ground Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    ground motion prediction exercise focussed on the Treasure Island National Geotechnical Experimentation for rock at Treasure Island, with major emphasis on quantifying their associated aleatory and epistemic various aspects of soil response at Treasure Island will be examined. Predictors will be asked to furnish

  15. -STABILITY AND VORTEX MOTION IN TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirn, Daniel

    -STABILITY AND VORTEX MOTION IN TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTORS MATTHIAS KURZKE AND DANIEL SPIRN Abstract. 1. Introduction 1.1. Physical background. The evolution of a superconducting material is usu- ally of the magnetic field and the electric field potential for a superconducting sample R2 . The parameter

  16. CRITICAL FEATURES IN HUMAN MOTION SIMULATION FOR ERGONOMIC ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraway, Julian

    CRITICAL FEATURES IN HUMAN MOTION SIMULATION FOR ERGONOMIC ANALYSIS Matthew P. Reed, Don B. Chaffin of choice for assessments of the physical ergonomics of products and workplaces. Software representations important for ergonomic analysis. This paper identifies and justifies a set of these critical features

  17. Team-Driven Multi-Model Motion Tracking with Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veloso, Manuela M.

    . Communication im- proves the performance of a multi-agent system. The focus of this paper is to present our, such as a soccer robot grabbing a ball and passing it to a teammate, the motion model of the target relies seriously. However, communication improves the performance of such a multi-agent system [5]. When

  18. Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning Emilio Frazzoli 1 Munther A. Dahleh 2 on a hybrid automaton, the states of which represent feasible trajectory primitives for the vehicle Eric Feron 3 Abstract The operation of an autonomous vehicle in an unknown, dynamic environment

  19. Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feron, Eric

    Robust Hybrid Control for Autonomous Vehicle Motion Planning Emilio Frazzoli Munther A. Dahleh y Eric Feron z Abstract The operation of an autonomous vehicle in an unknown, dynamic environment is a very complex problem, especially when the vehicle is required to use its full maneuvering capabilities

  20. Energy Conserving Equations of Motion for Gear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, James R.

    : 10.1115/1.1891815 1 Introduction The undesirable noise and vibration caused by gears in a large critically on the high frequency response. A primary source of gear noise and vibration is the varying meshEnergy Conserving Equations of Motion for Gear Systems Sejoong Oh Senior Engineer General Motors

  1. DYNAMICS & CONTROL OF UNDERWATER GLIDERS I: STEADY MOTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    underwater vehicle which uses gravity for propulsion. Underwater gliders are winged underwater vehicles whichDYNAMICS & CONTROL OF UNDERWATER GLIDERS I: STEADY MOTIONS N. Mahmoudian, J. Geisbert, & C. Woolsey Blacksburg, VA 24060 www.unmanned.vt.edu June 6, 2009 Technical Report No. VaCAS-2007-01 Copyright c 2007 #12

  2. A Multi-Vehicle Testbed for Underwater Motion Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Collective Unmanned Underwater Labora- tory (SCUUL) testbed is a multi-vehicle testbed that is used. SCUUL is a multi-vehicle testbed consisting of six propellor-driven unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVsA Multi-Vehicle Testbed for Underwater Motion Coordination Nitin Sydney Department of Aerospace

  3. Stochastic Conformational Roadmaps for Computing Ensemble Properties of Molecular Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    for analyzing the motion pathways of molecules during vital biological processes, such as protein folding, or fold, into unique 3-D struc- tures called native folds. Protein folding plays a central role importance, the protein folding process remains a mystery. While it is traditionally studied through tedious

  4. Supercooled water and the kinetic glass transition F. Sciortino,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciortino, Francesco

    -dynamics study of the self-dynamics of water molecules in deeply supercooled liquid states. We find the superheated, stretched, and supercooled states of liquid water 4­6 ; ii the existence of a meta- stable, lowSupercooled water and the kinetic glass transition F. Sciortino,1 P. Gallo,2 P. Tartaglia,1 and S

  5. Research Article Kinetic Study of Epoxy Resin Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    Research Article Kinetic Study of Epoxy Resin Decomposition in Near-Critical Water A diglycidyl ether type epoxy resin from bisphenol A, E-51, was cured by methyl- hexahydrophthalic anhydride (Me, hydrogenolysis, and alcoholysis [1316] have been reported to decompose epoxy resin into its original mono- mers

  6. SUPPORTING INFORMATION Dissecting the Kinetic Process of Amyloid Fiber Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    eight Type-I amyloid proteins (the yeast prion Sup35 NW region, Csg Btrunc, Ure2 protein, 2SUPPORTING INFORMATION Dissecting the Kinetic Process of Amyloid Fiber Formation through Asymptotic 2 1 , where A represents proteins with specific conformations before fibrillation, B is proteins

  7. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  8. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  9. Linear Kinetic Heat Transfer: Moment Equations, Boundary Conditions, and Knudsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struchtrup, Henning

    ] and phonons [6], and the radiative transfer equation [7]. The solution of any kinetic equation is usually][25], radiative transfer [7][26], and phonon transport in crystals [6]. Despite the long history, and success method, and the methods employed in [18][19][20], are based solely on the transport equations in the bulk, and

  10. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene covered Pt(111) are investigated. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra for both methanol and ethanol have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent with zero-order desorption kinetics from all layers. In contrast, for water the first and second layers are not resolved. At low water coverages (< 1 ML) the initial desorption leading edges are aligned but then fall out of alignment at higher temperatures. For thicker water layers (10 to 100 ML), the desorption leading edges are in alignment throughout the desorption of the film. The coverage dependence of the desorption behavoir suggests that at low water coverages the non-alignment of the desorption leading edges is due to water dewetting from the graphene substrate. Kinetic simulations reveal that the experimental results are consistent with zero-order desorption. The simulations also show that fractional order desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra.

  11. Kinetic theory of geodesic acoustic and related modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinetic theory of geodesic acoustic and related modes A.I. Smolyakov Department of Physics · Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) are relatively high frequency eigen-modes supported by plasma compressibility history of GAM and related modes ·1968 : Geodesic acoustic modes: Winsor, Johnson, Dawson ·2000-05: Surge

  12. ORBITAL-FREE KINETIC-ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan Alexander

    Chapter 5 ORBITAL-FREE KINETIC-ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY Yan Alexander Wang and Emily A Theory (DFT), there was the Thomas-Fermi (TF) model, which uses the electron density ¢¡ r£ (a function-dependent DFT Density-Functional Theory DI density-independent DM1 first-order reduced density matrix EDF energy

  13. AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groth, Clinton P. T.

    AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #2 1. Using the formalism of the text book is as follows. Assume that the particle number density is a slowly varying function of the z coordinate #27; ? is a constant. 3. Show that if the potential function, U(r), varies as 1=r 4

  14. AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groth, Clinton P. T.

    AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #2 1. Using the formalism of the text book the particle number density and temperature are both slowly varying functions of the z coordinate of the previous problem is as follows. Assume that the particle number density is a slowly varying function

  15. Plasmadynamics and ionization kinetics of thermionic energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawless, J.L. Jr.; Lam, S.H.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce the plasma arc-drop, thermionic energy conversion is studied with both analytical and numerical tools. Simplifications are made in both the plasmadynamic and ionization-recombination theories. These are applied to a scheme proposed presently using laser irradiation to enhance the ionization kinetics of the thermionic plasma and thereby reduce the arc-drop. It is also predicted that it is possible to generate the required laser light from a thermionic-type cesium plasma. The analysis takes advantage of theoretical simplifications derived for the ionization-recombination kinetics. It is shown that large laser ionization enhancements can occur and that collisional cesium recombination lasing is expected. To complement the kinetic theory, a numerical method is developed to solve the thermionic plasma dynamics. To combine the analysis of ionization-recombination kinetics with the plasma dynamics of thermionic conversion, a finite difference computer program is constructed. It is capable of solving for both unsteady and steady thermionic converter behavior including possible laser ionization enhancement or atomic recombination lasing. A proposal to improve thermionic converter performance using laser radiation is considered. In this proposed scheme, laser radiation impinging on a thermionic plasma enhances the ionization process thereby raising the plasma density and reducing the plasma arc-drop. A source for such radiation may possibly be a cesium recombination laser operating in a different thermionic converter. The possibility of this being an energy efficient process is discussed. (WHK)

  16. Kinetic Properties of Alfven Modes in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauber, Ph.; Guenter, S.; Bruedgam, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Koenies, A. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Pinches, S. D. [UKAEA Fusion Association Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX143DB (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to predict the stability of fast-particle-driven Alfven eigenmodes in burning fusion plasmas requires a detailed understanding of the dissipative mechanisms that damp these modes. In order to address this question, the linear gyro-kinetic, electromagnetic code LIGKA is employed to investigate their behaviour in realistic tokamak geometry. The eigenvalue formulation of LIGKA allows to calculate self-consistently the coupling of large-scaled MHD modes to the gyroradius scale-length kinetic Alfven waves. Therefore, the properties of the kineticly modified TAE mode in or near the gap (KTAE, radiative damping or 'tunnelling') and its coupling to the continuum close to the edge can be analysed numerically. In addition, an antenna-like version of LIGKA allows for a frequency scan, analogous to an external antenna.The model and the implementation of LIGKA were recently extended in order to capture the coupling of the shear Alfven waves to the sound waves. This coupling becomes important for the investigation of kinetic effects on the low-frequency phase of cascade modes, where e.g. geodesic acoustic effects play a significant role.

  17. Polymerization dynamics of double-stranded biopolymers: Chemical kinetic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polymerization dynamics of double-stranded biopolymers: Chemical kinetic approach Evgeny B 19 November 2004; accepted 20 December 2004; published online 10 March 2005 The polymerization by the processes that take place during their polymerization. However, our understanding of the coupling between

  18. Determination of the Kinetic Parameters of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determination of the Kinetic Parameters of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerizations Young-Je Kwark a novel catalyst system for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a parameter estimation method parameters of polymerization. From our model system considering small molecular atom transfer addition

  19. Improve Claus simulation by integrating kinetic limitations into equilibrium calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, T.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since all existing Claus simulators are based on equilibrium calculations, it is not surprising that the simulation results, including the overall sulfur yield, air to acid gas ratio, and stream compositions are somewhat different from the plant data. One method for improving the simulation is to consider the kinetic limitations in the Claus reactions. This has been accomplished in this work by integrating kinetic considerations into equilibrium calculations. Kinetic limitations have been introduced in both the Claus reaction furnace and the catalytic converters. An interactive computer program SULPLT Version 3 was written to implement the proposed modifications. The computer program was used to simulate the Claus furnace, catalytic converters, and the effect of air to acid gas ratio on sulfur recovery to check against literature data. Three Claus plants for which data exist have also been simulated. The results show that the proposed model predicts sulfur recovery, sulfur emission, optimal air to acid gas ratio, and various stream compositions more accurately than the equilibrium model. The proposed model appears to be valid, reliable, and applicable over a wide range of operating conditions (acid gas feeds ranging from 13% to 95% H/sub 2/S with different levels of impurities). The methodology developed in this study should be applicable to any reaction systems where kinetic limitations are important but where equilibrium still prevails.

  20. Optimization of a Microfluidic Mixer for Studying Protein Folding Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    Optimization of a Microfluidic Mixer for Studying Protein Folding Kinetics David E. Hertzog with numerical simulations to minimize the mixing time of a microfluidic mixer developed for protein folding reported continuous flow mixer for protein folding. Fast events in protein folding often occur

  1. Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalet, Xavier

    Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding David E. Hertzog,, Xavier a microfluidic mixer for studying protein folding and other reactions with a mixing time of 8 µs and sample) measurements of single-stranded DNA. We also demon- strate the feasibility of measuring fast protein folding

  2. Statistical Analysis of Protein Folding Kinetics Aaron R. Dinner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    Statistical Analysis of Protein Folding Kinetics Aaron R. Dinner , Sung-Sau So ¡ , and Martin and theoretical studies over several years have led to the emergence of a unified general mechanism for protein folding that serves as a framework for the design and interpretation of research in this area [1

  3. Kinetics of the clay roofing tile convection drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S. (Univ. of Osijek (Croatia). Faculty of Food Technology); Skansi, D. (Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology); Sokele, M. (Croatian Post and Telecommunications, Zagreb (Croatia). Telecommunications Center)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetics of the convection drying process of flat tile has been investigated experimentally in an industrial tunnel dryer. Several velocities of wet tile movement through the dryer were tested to obtain maximum allowable drying rate curve. As there are various models to describe the kinetics of convection drying, finding a model that would fairly well approximate the kinetics of the whole drying process was part of the research. Especially the polynomial and exponential models were tested. It was found that exponential model of the type: B(t) = (a[minus]B[sub e])[center dot]EXP([minus]bt[sup 2])+B[sub e], ([minus]dB(t)/dt) = 2bt(B(t)[minus]B[sub e]) significantly correlates the kinetics of the whole tile drying process. Applying the maximum allowable drying rate curve obtained for flat tile in the first period of drying, a grapho-analytic model for the optimal conducting of the process has been developed.

  4. Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Chinmay Soman1 the streptavidin-biotin interaction [9] 0078 Nano Res (2009) 2: 78 84 DOI 10.1007/s12274-009-9005-z Research Article #12;79Nano Res (2009) 2: 78 84 are incubated with specific antigens in a physiological buffer

  5. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, Olivier; Pitz, William J.; Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran and co-workers for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet-stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels. (author)

  6. Kinetics of Silicothermic Reduction of Calcined Dolomite in Flowing Argon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    of Experimental Rig De oxi dat ion Fu rn ac e TC TC Copper Turning Reduction Furnace Argon Gas Condenser Gas wash. Disadvantages: high impurity, high condenser area #12;© Swinburne University of Technology Aim of the project the fundamental physical chemistry Thermodynamic modelling Kinetic analysis High temperature experiments

  7. Hydrogen pickup measurements in zirconium alloys: Relation to oxidation kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Hydrogen pickup measurements in zirconium alloys: Relation to oxidation kinetics Adrien Couet a to reduce hydrogen pickup during operation, and the associated cladding degradation. The present study focuses on precisely and accurately measuring hydrogen pickup fraction for a set of alloys to specifically

  8. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the fourth year of a research project conducted under the University Coal Research Program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (water, carbon dioxide, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the fourth year of the project, an analysis of experimental data collected during the second year of this project was performed. Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing product distributions from 27 mass balances. During the reporting period two kinetic models were employed: a comprehensive kinetic model of Dr. Li and co-workers (Yang et al., 2003) and a hydrocarbon selectivity model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) The kinetic model of Yang et al. (2003) has 24 parameters (20 parameters for hydrocarbon formation, and 4 parameters for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction). Kinetic parameters for the WGS reaction and FTS synthesis were estimated first separately, and then simultaneously. The estimation of these kinetic parameters employed the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method and the trust-region reflective Newton large-scale (LS) method. A genetic algorithm (GA) was incorporated into estimation of parameters for FTS reaction to provide initial estimates of model parameters. All reaction rate constants and activation energies were found to be positive, but at the 95% confidence level the intervals were large. Agreement between predicted and experimental reaction rates has been fair to good. Light hydrocarbons are predicted fairly accurately, whereas the model underpredicts values of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. Van der Laan and Beenackers hydrocarbon selectivity model provides a very good fit of the experimental data for hydrocarbons up to about C{sub 20}. However, the experimental data shows higher paraffin formation rates in C{sub 12}-C{sub 25} region which is likely due to hydrocracking or other secondary reactions. The model accurately captures the observed experimental trends of decreasing olefin to paraffin ratio and increasing {alpha} (chain growth length) with increase in chain length.

  9. Lick Northern Proper Motion Program. III. Lick NPM2 Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert B. Hanson; Arnold R. Klemola; Burton F. Jones; David G. Monet

    2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lick Northern Proper Motion (NPM) program, a two-epoch (1947-1988) photographic survey of the northern two-thirds of the sky (Dec. > -23 deg), has measured absolute proper motions, on an inertial system defined by distant galaxies, for 380,000 stars from 8 NPM1 Catalog contains 148,940 stars in 899 fields outside the Milky Way's zone of avoidance. The 2003 NPM2 Catalog contains 232,062 stars in the remaining 347 NPM fields near the plane of the Milky Way. This paper describes the NPM2 star selection, plate measurements, astrometric and photometric data reductions, and catalog compilation. The NPM2 Catalog contains 120,000 faint (B > 14) anonymous stars for astrometry and galactic studies, 92,000 bright (B NPM2 proper motions are on the ICRS system, via Tycho-2 stars, to an accuracy of 0.5 mas/yr in each field. RMS proper motion precision is 6 mas/yr. Positional errors average 80 mas at the mean plate epoch 1968, and 200 mas at the NPM2 catalog epoch 2000. NPM2 photographic photometry errors average 0.18 mag in B, and 0.20 mag in B-V. The NPM2 Catalog and the updated (to J2000) NPM1 Catalog are available at the CDS Strasbourg data center and on the NPM WWW site (http://www.ucolick.org/~npm). The NPM2 Catalog completes the Lick Northern Proper Motion program after a half-century of work by three generations of Lick Observatory astronomers. The NPM Catalogs will serve as a database for research in galactic structure, stellar kinematics, and astrometry.

  10. Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O Nanoscale Films of Amorphous Solid Water. Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O Nanoscale...

  11. A comparison of the point kinetics equations with the QUANDRY analytic nodal diffusion method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velasquez, Arthur

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The point kinetics equations were incorporated into QUANDRY, a nuclear reactor analysis computer program which uses the analytic nodal method to solve the neutron diffusion equation. Both the point kinetics equations, solved using the IMSL MATH...

  12. Theory of Chemical Kinetics and Charge Transfer based on Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    Advances in the fields of catalysis and electrochemical energy conversion often involve nanoparticles, which can have kinetics surprisingly different from the bulk material. Classical theories of chemical kinetics assume ...

  13. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeII/III electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral sheet. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeIIIII electron transfer in the octahedral...

  14. Progress in an oxygen-carrier reaction kinetics experiment for rotary-bed chemical looping combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jester-Weinstein, Jack (Jack L.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design process for an experimental platform measuring reaction kinetics in a chemical looping combustion (CLC) process is documented and justified. To enable an experiment designed to characterize the reaction kinetics ...

  15. Thesis for the Degree of Licentiate of Engineering A Compartmental Model for Kinetics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patriksson, Michael

    Thesis for the Degree of Licentiate of Engineering A Compartmental Model for Kinetics The thesis This licentiate thesis is the mathematical result in an ongoing project in kinetics of lipopro

  16. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Keywords: Methyl decanoate; Methyl decenoate; Surrogate; Oxidation; Biodiesel fuels; Kinetic modeling; Engine; Low

  17. Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral/Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral in the Earth's Critical Zone is the kinetics. The timescales for geochemical processes range from milliseconds geochemical processes including surface complexation, mineral transformations, and oxidation

  18. Application of Genetic Algorithms and Thermogravimetry to Determine the Kinetics of Polyurethane Foam in Smoldering Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rein, Guillermo; Lautenberger, Chris; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Torero, Jose L; Urban, David

    In this work, the kinetic parameters governing the thermal and oxidative degradation of flexible polyurethane foam are determined using thermogravimetric data and a genetic algorithm. These kinetic parameters are needed ...

  19. Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks for Kinetic Separation of Propane and David H. Olson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks for Kinetic Separation of Propane and Propene Kunhao Li, David H the first examples of MMOFs that are capable of kinetic separation of propane and propene (propylene), which

  20. COMUNICACIN EN SISTEMAS DISTRIBUIDOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale Villarreal, Yudith C.

    COMUNICACI?N EN SISTEMAS DISTRIBUIDOS Tema # VI Sistemas de operación II Abril-Julio 2012 Yudith Protocolos de Transporte Construcción de Bloques para la Comunicación Modelo Cliente-Servidor (Operaciones

  1. Adsorption kinetics taking account of the interaction of nearest and next-nearest neighbors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tovbin, Yu.K.; Surovtsev, S.Yu.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was carried out on the effect of the interaction between nearest and next-nearest neighbors on adsorption and desorption kinetics. The interaction effect on the adsorption kinetics is much stronger than on the desorption kinetics. The suitability of an adsorption model taking account of the two nearest neighbors for describing the experimental data was examined. The effect of taking account of the ordering of adatoms on desorption kinetics was shown for the case of 2 x 2 super-structure.

  2. Teatro en Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutié rrez, Alfonso

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    194 LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE REVIEW v ;f Grupo Teatro Taller de Colombia. Festival al Aire Puro. Foto: Alfonso Gutirrez. SPRING 1998 195 Teatro en Colombia Alfonso Gutirrez I Encuentro Internacional de Teatro Callejero Fue una celebracin... con bombos y platillos los 25 aos de labores del Teatro Taller de Colombia. Jorge Vargas y Mario Matallana en 1972 montaron Gnesis (La creacin del mundo) y empezaron a trabajar por Centro Amrica. Despus de muchos aos de luchas lograron...

  3. Experto Universitario en Enfermera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Experto Universitario en Enfermería en Reproducción Asistida VI Edición Vicerrectorado de Alumnos Fertilidad Campus de Excelencia Internacional #12;PROGRAMA BLOQUE I ­ Anatomía y Fisiología de la varón: espermato- génesis 4. Fecundación e implantación embrionaria BLOQUE II ­ Pruebas diagnósticas 5

  4. On Measuring the Terms of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budget from an AUV LOUIS GOODMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Louis

    of production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Heat flux is obtained by correlating the vertical velocityOn Measuring the Terms of the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budget from an AUV LOUIS GOODMAN School of the steady-state, homogeneous turbulent kinetic energy budgets are obtained from mea- surements of turbulence

  5. Determination of kinetic parameters in laminar flow reactors. I. Theoretical aspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the numerical evaluation of kinetic data, obtained from controlled experiments in a flow reactorDetermination of kinetic parameters in laminar flow reactors. I. Theoretical aspects T. Carraro1- mization of chemical flow reactors. The goal is the reliable determination of unknown kinetic parameters

  6. Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Accepted Manuscript Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene Pyrolysis: Part 1. Comparison this article as: Gascoin N, Navarro-Rodriguez A, Gillard P, Mangeot A, Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene.polymdegradstab.2012.05.008 #12;M ANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Kinetic Modelling of High Density PolyEthylene

  7. Zonal flow and field generation by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Zonal flow and field generation by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves P. N magnetic fields by finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves is presented. The analysis by electrostatic drift waves to finite beta drift waves and kinetic drift-Alfve´n waves. The drift wave driven

  8. COPPER-UPTAKE KINETICS OF COASTAL AND OCEANIC DIATOMS1 , Amber L. Annett3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COPPER-UPTAKE KINETICS OF COASTAL AND OCEANIC DIATOMS1 Jian Guo2 , Amber L. Annett3 , Rebecca L We investigated copper (Cu) acquisition mecha- nisms and uptake kinetics of the marine diatoms organic Cu complexes. Key index words: copper; Cu; diatom; Fe; iron; kinetics; Thalassiosira; transport

  9. CHAPTER 5. PLASMA DESCRIPTIONS I: KINETIC, TWO-FLUID 1 Plasma Descriptions I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    CHAPTER 5. PLASMA DESCRIPTIONS I: KINETIC, TWO-FLUID 1 Chapter 5 Plasma Descriptions I: Kinetic, Two-Fluid Descriptions of plasmas are obtained from extensions of the kinetic theory of gases of charged particles in the plasma, and because the electric and magnetic fields in the plasma must

  10. Using Stochastic Roadmap Simulation to Predict Experimental Quantities in Protein Folding Kinetics: Folding Rates and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Using Stochastic Roadmap Simulation to Predict Experimental Quantities in Protein Folding Kinetics for studying protein folding kinetics. It uses the recently intro- duced Stochastic Roadmap Simulation (SRS validate the SRS method and indicate its potential as a general tool for studying protein folding kinetics

  11. Harvesting Kinetic Energy with Switched-Inductor DCDC Converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    the highest output power density, except when supplied from indoor lighting under which conditions power energy in motion may not compete with solar power but, in contrast to indoor lighting and thermal sources, moderate and consistent output power across a vast range of applications is typical [3][4]. Although

  12. Personalization of Cardiac Motion and Contractility from Images using Variational Data Assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Personalization of Cardiac Motion and Contractility from Images using Variational Data Patient Data Biophysical Personalization Fig. 1. Electromechanical Models Personalization from Images motion data. In this article, we demonstrate a novel personalization

  13. Acquiring 3D Full-body Motion from Noisy and Ambiguous Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lou, Hui

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural human motion is highly demanded and widely used in a variety of applications such as video games and virtual realities. However, acquisition of full-body motion remains challenging because the system must be capable of accurately capturing a...

  14. Simulation of human motion data using short-horizon model-predictive control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Marco Jorge Tome da

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many data-driven animation techniques are capable of producing high quality motions of human characters. Few techniques, however, are capable of generating motions that are consistent with physically simulated environments. ...

  15. Un exemple de conversion d'une table de production en volume en tables de production en biomasse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Un exemple de conversion d'une table de production en volume en tables de production en biomasse secteur ligérien, proposée par PARD? en 1962, est convertie en quatre tables de production en biomasse correspondant chacune à une partie de l'arbre ou à l'arbre entier, biomasse foliaire exclue. La conversion est

  16. Musculoskeletal simulation model generation from MRI datasets and motion capture data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Musculoskeletal simulation model generation from MRI datasets and motion capture data Jérôme Schmid

  17. motions, langage et prises de dcision : un rseau cognitif Bernard Cadet,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    et Tabasco, 1992 ; Wierzbicka, 1992, 1995 ; Bamberg ; 1996) conçoivent les émotions comme relevant

  18. Tropical cyclone motion and recurvature in TCM-90. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, M.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rawinsonde and satellite data collected during the Tropical Cyclone Motion (TCM90) experiment, which was conducted during the summer of 1990 in the Western North pacific, is used to examine tropical cyclone steering motion and recurvature. TCM-90 composite results are compared with those found in a composite study using twenty-one years (1957-77) of Western North Pacific rawinsonde data during the same August-September period and also for all months during this same 21-year period. Both data sets indicate that the composite deep-layer-mean (850-300 mb) winds 5-7 deg from the cyclone center provide an important component of the steering flow for tropical cyclones. However, despite the rawinsonde data enhancements of the TCM-90 experiment, data limitations prevented an accurate observation of steering flow conditions at individual time periods or for the average of only 5-10 time periods when composited together.

  19. Connecting apparatus for limited rotary or rectilinear motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardin, Jr., Roy T. (Greensburg, PA)

    1981-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for providing connection between two members movable in a horizontal plane with respect to each other in a rotary or linear fashion. The apparatus includes a set of horizontal shelves affixed to each of the two members, vertically aligned across a selected gap. A number of cables or hoses, for electrical, hydraulic or pneumatic connection are arranged on the aligned shelves in a U-shaped loop, connected through their extremities to the two members, so that through a sliding motion portions of the cable are transferred from one shelf to the other, across the gap, upon relative motion of the members. The apparatus is particularly adaptable to the rotating plugs of the reactor vessel head of a nuclear reactor.

  20. Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, R J; Leibfried, D; Wesenberg, J H; Bollinger, J J; Amini, J M; Blakestad, R B; Britton, J; Home, J P; Itano, W M; Jost, J D; Knill, E; Langer, C; Ozeri, R; Shiga, N; Wineland, D J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi-ion quantum logic gate fidelities. Two simplified techniques were developed for this purpose: one relies on Raman sideband detection implemented with a single laser source, while the second is even simpler and is based on time-resolved fluorescence detection during Doppler recooling. We applied these methods to determine heating rates in a microfrabricated surface-electrode trap made of gold on fused quartz, which traps ions 40 microns above its surface. Heating rates obtained from the two techniques were found to be in reasonable agreement. In addition, the trap gives rise to a heating rate of 300 plus or minus 30 per second for a motional frequency of 5.25 MHz, substantially below the trend observed in other traps.

  1. Characterization of Slow Orbit Motion in the SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunilkumar, Nikita; /Southern California U.; Gassner, Georg; /SLAC; Safranek, James; /SLAC; Yan, Yiton; /SLAC

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    SPEAR3 is a third-generation synchrotron light source storage ring. The beam stability requirements are {approx}10% of the beam size, which is about 1 micron in the vertical plane. Hydrostatic level system (HLS) measurements show that the height of the SPEAR3 tunnel floor varies by tens of microns daily. We present analysis of the HLS data, including accounting for common-mode tidal motion. We discuss the results of experiments done to determine the primary driving source of ground motion. We painted the accelerator tunnel walls white; we temporarily installed Mylar over the asphalt in the center of the accelerator; and we put Mylar over a section of the tunnel walls.

  2. Spatial motion of the Magellanic Clouds. Tidal models ruled out?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruzicka, Adam; Palous, Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Kallivayalil et al. derived new values of the proper motion for the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). The spatial velocities of both Clouds are unexpectedly higher than their previous values resulting from agreement between the available theoretical models of the Magellanic System and the observations of neutral hydrogen (HI) associated with the LMC and the SMC. Such proper motion estimates are likely to be at odds with the scenarios for creation of the large-scale structures in the Magellanic System suggested so far. We investigated this hypothesis for the pure tidal models, as they were the first ones devised to explain the evolution of the Magellanic System, and the tidal stripping is intrinsically involved in every model assuming the gravitational interaction. The parameter space for the Milky Way (MW)-LMC-SMC interaction was analyzed by a robust search algorithm (genetic algorithm) combined with a fast restricted N-body model of the interaction. Our method extended ...

  3. A Pore Scale Evaluation of the Kinetics of Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation Reactions (EMSI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, Carl I.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chief goals for CEKA are to (1) collect and synthesize molecular-level kinetic data into a coherent framework that can be used to predict time evolution of environmental processes over a range of temporal and spatial scales; (2) train a cohort of talented and diverse students to work on kinetic problems at multiple scales; (3) develop and promote the use of new experimental techniques in environmental kinetics; (4) develop and promote the use of new modeling tools to conceptualize reaction kinetics in environmental systems; and (5) communicate our understanding of issues related to environmental kinetics and issues of scale to the broader scientific community and to the public.

  4. The early American motion picture industry: promoting American cultural hegemony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wier, Theresa Joanne

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : CULTURAL IMPERIALISM? Introduction Film as imperialism? Technology Cultural Imperialism Economic Trends Conclusion 67 67 69 72 74 79 81 Vl THE ADVENT OF SOUND 85 Introduction Europe Conclusion 85 95 99 VII CONCLUDING COMMENTS 100... classical imperialism to a new category of international exportation founded on the products of the second industrial revolution: steel, the internal combusion [sic] engine and electricity ? including motion pictures" (1980, 81). However, American...

  5. Robust, multidimensional mesh motion based on Monge-Kantorovich equidistribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delzanno, G L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finn, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesh-motion (r-refinement) grid adaptivity schemes are attractive due to their potential to minimize the numerical error for a prescribed number of degrees of freedom. However, a key roadblock to a widespread deployment of the technique has been the formulation of robust, reliable mesh motion governing principles, which (1) guarantee a solution in multiple dimensions (2D and 3D), (2) avoid grid tangling (or folding of the mesh, whereby edges of a grid cell cross somewhere in the domain), and (3) can be solved effectively and efficiently. In this study, we formulate such a mesh-motion governing principle, based on volume equidistribution via Monge-Kantorovich optimization (MK). In earlier publications [1, 2], the advantages of this approach in regards to these points have been demonstrated for the time-independent case. In this study, demonstrate that Monge-Kantorovich equidistribution can in fact be used effectively in a time stepping context, and delivers an elegant solution to the otherwise pervasive problem of grid tangling in mesh motion approaches, without resorting to ad-hoc time-dependent terms (as in moving-mesh PDEs, or MMPDEs [3, 4]). We explore two distinct r-refinement implementations of MK: direct, where the current mesh relates to an initial, unchanging mesh, and sequential, where the current mesh is related to the previous one in time. We demonstrate that the direct approach is superior in regards to mesh distortion and robustness. The properties of the approach are illustrated with a paradigmatic hyperbolic PDE, the advection of a passive scalar. Imposed velocity flow fields or varying vorticity levels and flow shears are considered.

  6. Robust, multidimensional mesh motion based on Monge-Kantorovich equidistribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chacon De La Rosa, Luis [ORNL; Delzanno, Gian Luca [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Finn, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesh-motion (r-refinement) grid adaptivity schemes are attractive due to their potential to minimize the numerical error for a prescribed number of degrees of freedom. However, a key roadblock to a widespread deployment of this class of techniques has been the formulation of robust, reliable mesh-motion governing principles, which (1) guarantee a solution in multiple dimensions (2D and 3D), (2) avoid grid tangling (or folding of the mesh, whereby edges of a grid cell cross somewhere in the domain), and (3) can be solved effectively and efficiently. In this study, we formulate such a mesh-motion governing principle, based on volume equidistribution via Monge-Kantorovich optimization (MK). In earlier publications [1] and [2], the advantages of this approach with regard to these points have been demonstrated for the time-independent case. In this study, we demonstrate that Monge-Kantorovich equidistribution can in fact be used effectively in a time-stepping context, and delivers an elegant solution to the otherwise pervasive problem of grid tangling in mesh-motion approaches, without resorting to ad hoc time-dependent terms (as in moving-mesh PDEs, or MMPDEs [3] and [4]). We explore two distinct r-refinement implementations of MK: the direct method, where the current mesh relates to an initial, unchanging mesh, and the sequential method, where the current mesh is related to the previous one in time. We demonstrate that the direct approach is superior with regard to mesh distortion and robustness. The properties of the approach are illustrated with a hyperbolic PDE, the advection of a passive scalar, in 2D and 3D. Velocity flow fields with and without flow shear are considered. Three-dimensional grid, time-step, and nonlinear tolerance convergence studies are presented which demonstrate the optimality of the approach.

  7. PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS USING NUPEC RECORDED FREE FIELD MOTIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

    2002-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS PERFORMED BY BNL, USING THE FREE FIELD EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS RECORDED AT THE NUPEC TEST SITE. THE BNL ANALYSIS WAS INTENDED TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOIL PROPERTIES FOR THE TEST SITE TO BE USED FOR SSI ANALYSES. THE FREE FIELD DATA WERE PROVIDED BY NUPEC. THE METHODOLOGY EMPLOYED IN THE BNL PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF SITE IDENTIFICATION INCLUDES THE MONTE CARLO PR...

  8. Friction (Chapter 5, section 8) & Circular Motion (Chapter 6,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Week 5 Friction (Chapter 5, section 8) & Circular Motion (Chapter 6, sections 1-2) Lecture Quiz 1 travels in time t is: A. x B. 1.5x C. 3x D. 4.5x E. 9x Forces of Friction When an object to the interactions between the object and its environment This resistance is called the force of friction Forces

  9. Motion estimation using the differential epipolar equation Dep. Inteligencia Artificial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumela, Luis

    Science University of Oxford 19 Parks Rd, Oxford (UK) lourdes@robots.ox.ac.uk P. Bustos Dep. Inform of Oxford 19 Parks Rd, Oxford (UK) ian@robots.ox.ac.uk Abstract We consider the motion estimation problem of the projection equation (t)m(t) = P(t)X = [Q(t) | T(t)] X, viz: ( + t + O(t2 ))(m + mt + O(t2 )) = ([Q | T] + [ Q

  10. Extensions of Basic Motion Planning Steven M. LaValle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaValle, Steven M.

    -Varying Problems This section brings time into the motion planning formulation. Although the robot has been allowed be defined as X = C ? T, in which C is the usual C- space of the robot, as defined in Chapter 4. A state x-algebraic, time-varying obstacle region O(t) W for every t T. It is assumed that the obstacle region is a finite

  11. Nonequilibrium sensing and its analogy to kinetic proofreading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartich, David; Seifert, Udo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a paradigmatic model of chemotaxis, we analyze the effect how a nonzero affinity driving receptors out of equilibrium affects sensitivity. This affinity arises whenever changes in receptor activity involve ATP hydrolysis. The sensitivity integrated over a ligand concentration range is shown to be enhanced by the affinity, providing a measure of how much energy consumption improves sensing. With this integrated sensitivity we can establish an intriguing analogy between sensing with nonequilibrium receptors and kinetic proofreading: the increase in integrated sensitivity is equivalent to the decrease of the error in kinetic proofreading. The influence of the occupancy of the receptor on the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reaction rates is shown to be crucial for the relation between integrated sensitivity and affinity. This influence can even lead to a regime where a nonzero affinity decreases the integrated sensitivity, which corresponds to anti-proofreading.

  12. Species separation and kinetic effects in collisional plasma shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellei, C., E-mail: bellei1@llnl.gov; Wilks, S. C.; Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Rinderknecht, H.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of collisional shock waves propagating in uniform plasmas are studied with ion-kinetic calculations, in both slab and spherical geometry and for the case of one and two ion species. Despite the presence of an electric field at the shock frontand in contrast to the case where an interface is initially present [C. Bellei et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 044702 (2013)]essentially no ion reflection at the shock front is observed due to collisions, with a probability of reflection ?10{sup ?4} for the cases presented. A kinetic two-ion-species spherical convergent shock is studied in detail and compared against an average-species calculation, confirming effects of species separation and differential heating of the ion species at the shock front. The effect of different ion temperatures on the DT and D{sup 3}He fusion reactivity is discussed in the fluid limit and is estimated to be moderately important.

  13. COMSOL-based Nuclear Reactor Kinetics Studies at the HFIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computational ability to accurately predict the dynamic behavior of a nuclear reactor core in response to reactivity-induced perturbations is an important subject in reactor physics. Space-time and point kinetics methodologies were developed for the purpose of studying the transient-induced behavior of the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) compact core. The space-time simulations employed the three-energy-group neutron diffusion equations, and transients initiated by control cylinder and hydraulic tube rabbit ejections were studied. The work presented here is the first step towards creating a comprehensive multiphysics methodology for studying the dynamic behavior of the HFIR core during reactivity perturbations. The results of these studies show that point kinetics is adequate for small perturbations in which the power distribution is assumed to be time-independent, but space-time methods must be utilized to determine localized effects.

  14. Gasification characteristics and kinetics for an eastern oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification tests of Indiana New Albany oil shale fines have been conducted. Thermobalance test results indicate that over 95% of the organic carbon in the shale can be gasified at 1700{degree}F and 135 psig with 30 minutes residence time under a synthesis gas atmosphere and at 1800{degree}F and 15 psig with 30 minutes residence time under a hydrogen/steam atmosphere. A simple kinetic expression for hydrogen/steam gasification weight loss has been developed. Weight loss has been described as the sum of the weight loss from two independent, simultaneous reaction paths: a rapid (<2 minutes) first order reaction and a slower gasification reaction that can be expressed in terms of the steam/carbon reaction. Work is in progress to study the gasification of other Eastern shales and improve the kinetic description of weight loss.

  15. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  16. Kinetics of gasification of black liquor char by steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; van Heiningen, A.R.P. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, McGill Univ., Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Montreal, Quebec (CA))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the steam gasification kinetics of kraft black liquor char that were studied in a thermogravimetric analysis reactor. The effect of steam and hydrogen concentration on gasification rate can be described by Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetics. An activation energy of 210 kJ/mol was obtained. Methane formation was negligible, and H{sub 2}S was the major gaseous sulfur-containing product obtained over the temperature range studied, 873-973 K. The CO{sub 2} concentration was higher than calculated for the water-shift reaction at equilibrium. A gasification mechanism is proposed whereby CO{sub 2} is one of the primary gasification products.

  17. Visualizing kinetic pathways of homogeneous nucleation in colloidal crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Tan; Ning Xu; Lei Xu

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    When a system undergoes a transition from a liquid to a solid phase, it passes through multiple intermediate structures before reaching the final state. However, our knowledge on the exact pathways of this process is limited, mainly due to the difficulty of realizing direct observations. Here, we experimentally study the evolution of symmetry and density for various colloidal systems during liquid-to-solid phase transitions, and visualize kinetic pathways with single-particle resolution. We observe the formation of relatively-ordered precursor structures with different symmetries, which then convert into metastable solids. During this conversion, two major cross-symmetry pathways always occur, regardless of the final state and the interaction potential. In addition, we find a broad decoupling of density variation and symmetry development, and discover that nucleation rarely starts from the densest regions. These findings hold for all our samples, suggesting the possibility of finding a unified picture for the complex crystallization kinetics in colloidal systems.

  18. Dissipative kinetic Alfvn solitary waves resulting from viscosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, C.-R.; Kang, S.-B.; Min, K.-W. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, M.-H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, J.; Park, Y.-D. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear small-amplitude kinetic Alfvn solitary waves (KASWs) are investigated with their anomalous kinetic viscosity effect on electrons. It is found that the structure of a hump-type KASW solution develops into a shock-type (or double layer) KASW solution for large amplitude KASWs when viscosity exists. For small amplitude KASWs, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with an approximate pseudopotential was solved, and it is found that the hump-type KASWs develop into oscillating shock-type (kink-type) KASWs. It is also found that the oscillating scale of this structure is related to the propagation velocity and plasma beta, while the damping scale is inversely proportional to the viscosity.

  19. Origin of Reversed Vortex Ratchet Motion W. Gillijns, A. V. Silhanek, and V. V. Moshchalkov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    Origin of Reversed Vortex Ratchet Motion W. Gillijns, A. V. Silhanek, and V. V. Moshchalkov INPAC. This rectified motion of particles, known as a rocked ratchet, is basically the result of the broken spatial that the particles (flux lines) cannot be regarded as independent entities leads to a far richer ratchet motion

  20. Exploring Motion Signatures for Vision-Based Tracking, Recognition and Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wen

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    to explore motion signatures for object recognition. We begin with study of the periodic wingbeat motion of flying birds. To analyze the wing motion of a flying bird, we establish kinematics models for bird wings, and obtain wingbeat periodicity in image...

  1. DASC -Electronics In Motion17CFP_K American Institute of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    ) 328-3256 FAX p.kostek@ieee.org and Automotive Electronics #12;17th DASC - Electronics In Motion17CFP17th DASC - Electronics In Motion17CFP_K American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers Space Air Electronics in Motion Ground IEEE/AIAA Digital Avionics Systems

  2. A Database Architecture For Real-Time Motion Retrieval Charly Awad, Nicolas Courty and Sylvie Gibet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    A Database Architecture For Real-Time Motion Retrieval Charly Awad, Nicolas Courty and Sylvie Gibet, leading to an ex- ponential growth of the size of motion databases. Conse- quently indexing, querying, and retrieving motion capture data have become important considerations in the usability of such databases. Our

  3. Deployment Mechanism Design with Behavioral Modeling Based on Pro/Engineer Motion Skeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kind of motion mechanisms, is often used to stretch out solar panels or antennas in spacecraftDeployment Mechanism Design with Behavioral Modeling Based on Pro/Engineer Motion Skeleton Chao.com.cn Keywords: Deployment mechanism, Motion skeleton, Behavioral modeling, Feasibility analysis Abstract

  4. Role of friction-induced torque in stick-slip motion J. Scheibert1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Role of friction-induced torque in stick-slip motion J. Scheibert1, and D.K. Dysthe1 1 PGP describing the kinematics of the transition from static friction to stick-slip motion of a linear elastic the precursors to frictional sliding and the periodic stick- slip motion are controlled by the amount of friction

  5. ATLAS MOTION PLATFORM MECANUM WHEEL JACOBIAN IN THE VELOCITY AND STATIC FORCE DOMAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, John

    ATLAS MOTION PLATFORM MECANUM WHEEL JACOBIAN IN THE VELOCITY AND STATIC FORCE DOMAINS Jonathan J applications. Atlas is a six degree of freedom vehicle op- erating training simulator motion platform where and static force Jacobians; normal forces. JACOBIAN DES ROUES MECANUM DU PLATFORME DE MOTION ATLAS DANS LES

  6. Adaptive Motion and Force Control of Robots Performing a Complete Task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagilla, Prabhakar R.

    . Typically, in many industrial applications such as robotic surface nishing, the robot moves in free motionAdaptive Motion and Force Control of Robots Performing a Complete Task Prabhakar R. Pagilla Biao Yu Abstract. In this work, we consider adaptive motion and force control of a robot perform- ing a complete

  7. A Biomedical Patient Data Driven Approach for the Prediction of Tumor Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yuqing Melanie

    1 A Biomedical Patient Data Driven Approach for the Prediction of Tumor Motion Jonanthan of the patient biomedical data and the tumor motion data for accurate tumor motion characterization and prediction. Method and Materials: For the analysis of biomedical data, we worked through the main steps

  8. Scaling cosmologies, geodesic motion and pseudo-susy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wissam Chemissany; Andr ploegh; Thomas Van Riet

    2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    One-parameter solutions in supergravity carried by scalars and a metric trace out curves on the scalar manifold. In ungauged supergravity these curves describe a geodesic motion. It is known that a geodesic motion sometimes occurs in the presence of a scalar potential and for time-dependent solutions this can happen for scaling cosmologies. This note contains a further study of such solutions in the context of pseudo-supersymmetry for multi-field systems whose first-order equations we derive using a Bogomol'nyi-like method. In particular we show that scaling solutions that are pseudo-BPS must describe geodesic curves. Furthermore, we clarify how to solve the geodesic equations of motion when the scalar manifold is a maximally non-compact coset such as occurs in maximal supergravity. This relies upon a parametrization of the coset in the Borel gauge. We then illustrate this with the cosmological solutions of higher-dimensional gravity compactified on a $n$-torus.

  9. PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS USING NUPEC RECORDED FREE FIELD MOTIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

    2002-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS PERFORMED BY BNL, USING THE FREE FIELD EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS RECORDED AT THE NUPEC TEST SITE. THE BNL ANALYSIS WAS INTENDED TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOIL PROPERTIES FOR THE TEST SITE TO BE USED FOR SSI ANALYSES. THE FREE FIELD DATA WERE PROVIDED BY NUPEC. THE METHODOLOGY EMPLOYED IN THE BNL PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF SITE IDENTIFICATION INCLUDES THE MONTE CARLO PROCESS IN CONJUNCTION WITH EQUIVALENT LINEARCONVOLUTION ANALYSES FOR GENERATING A LARGE NUMBER OF SITE PROFILES FOR USE IN CONVOLUTION STUDIES FROM WHICH MEAN ESTIMATES OF RESPONSE CAN BE GENERATED. THE RANDOM VARIABLE SELECTED TO CHARACTERIZE THE SITE PROFILE IS THE SHEAR WAVE VELOCITY IN EACH SOIL LAYER OF THE SITE PROFILE. A LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION WAS ASSUMED WITH THE STANDARD DEVIATION DETERMINED FROM AVAILABLE SITE DATA AND APPLICABLE REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS. THE CONVOLUTION ANALYSES WERE PERFORMED USING AN APPROPRIATE SOILDEGRADATION MODEL AN D THE OUTCROP INPUT MOTIONS GENERATED FROM THE RECORDED IN ROCK MOTIONS. THE BNL ANALYSIS PRODUCED RESULTS IN TERMS OF THE MEAN, MEDIAN AND VARIOUS FRACTILES OF FREE FIELD SOIL PROPERTIES AT THE TEST SITE, AND THE CORRESPONDING SURFACE RESPONSE SPECTRA, WHICH ARE PRESENTED IN THIS PAPER.

  10. Validation and Comparison of One-Dimensional Graound Motion Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Darragh; W. Silva; N. Gregor

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Both point- and finite-source stochastic one-dimensional ground motion models, coupled to vertically propagating equivalent-linear shear-wave site response models are validated using an extensive set of strong motion data as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. The validation and comparison exercises are presented entirely in terms of 5% damped pseudo absolute response spectra. The study consists of a quantitative analyses involving modeling nineteen well-recorded earthquakes, M 5.6 to 7.4 at over 600 sites. The sites range in distance from about 1 to about 200 km in the western US (460 km for central-eastern US). In general, this validation demonstrates that the stochastic point- and finite-source models produce accurate predictions of strong ground motions over the range of 0 to 100 km and for magnitudes M 5.0 to 7.4. The stochastic finite-source model appears to be broadband, producing near zero bias from about 0.3 Hz (low frequency limit of the analyses) to the high frequency limit of the data (100 and 25 Hz for response and Fourier amplitude spectra, respectively).

  11. Nonlinear simplified model to study localization of kinetic Alfvn wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P., E-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ac.in; Gaur, Nidhi, E-mail: nidhiphysics@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have presented the numerical simulation of the coupled equations governing the dynamics of kinetic Alfvn wave (KAW) and ion acoustic wave in the intermediate ? plasma, where ? is the ratio of thermal pressure to the background magnetic pressure. We have also developed a simplified model for this nonlinear interaction using the results obtained from the simulation to understand the physics of nonlinear evolution of KAW. Localization of magnetic field intensity of KAW has been studied by means of the simplified model.

  12. Consistent neutron kinetics data generation for nodal transient calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdeniz, B. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mueller, E.; Panayotov, D. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, SE - 721 63 Vaesteraas (Sweden); Ivanov, K. N. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current three-dimensional transient codes for thermal reactors are mostly based on two-group diffusion-theory nodal models. In the two-group approach no explicit distinction is made between prompt fission neutrons and delayed neutrons. Consequently, effective delayed neutron fractions have traditionally been used in an attempt to compensate for this shortcoming. A fundamentally better approach would be to solve the nodal kinetics equations in a sufficient number of energy groups to explicitly capture neutron emission spectrum effects. However, this would require the availability of a multi-group nodal transient code as well as a lattice code to generate the appropriate multi-group nodal data for the simulator. One such simulator is the PARCS nodal transient code, which is widely used and recognized as representative of the current state-of-the-art. Unfortunately, a proper nodal data preparation path between PARCS and a lattice code is not available. Even though several industrial lattice codes could be considered as candidates, most of them are tailored to producing two-group nodal data and would require modifications to produce multi-group prompt and delayed neutron emission spectra. In this paper, the particular modifications required to match the TransLAT lattice code and the PARCS nodal transient code for BWR transient applications are reported. Some modifications to PARCS were also required to make two-group and multi-group applications fully consistent. Numerical results are presented both to verify the proper functioning of these modifications and to illuminate the impact of various nodal kinetics data approximations in a selected transient calculation. In particular, the significance of blending rodded and un-rodded kinetics data in partially rodded nodes is demonstrated. It is also confirmed that the use of delayed neutron importance factors in two-group calculations notably reduces the differences between two-group and multi-group kinetics calculations. (authors)

  13. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Combustion of Automotive Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Silke, E J

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of fuels, including olefins and cycloalkanes used in diesel, spark-ignition and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate mixtures of hydrocarbon components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on production of emissions from practical automotive engines.

  14. Plasmadynamics and ionization kinetics of thermionic energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawless, J.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce the plasma arc-drop, thermionic energy conversion is studied with both analytical and numerical tools. Simplifications are made in both the plasmadynamic and ionization-recombination theories. These are applied to a scheme proposed presently using laser irradiation to enhance the ionization kinetics of the thermionic plasma and thereby reduce the arc-drop. It is also predicted that it is possible to generate the required laser light from a thermionic-type Cesium plasma. The analysis takes advantage of theoretical simplifications derived for the ionization-recombination kinetics. It is shown that large laser ionization enhancements can occur and that collisional Cesium recombination lasing is expected. To complement the kinetic theory, a numerical method is developed to solve the thermionic plasma dynamics. The effects of the complete system of electron-atom inelastic collisions on the ionization-recombination problem are shown to reduce to a system nearly as simple as the well-known one-quantum approximation. To combine the above analysis of ionization-recombination kinetics with the plasma dynamics of thermionic conversion, a finite difference computer program is constructed. Using the above developments, a proposal to improve thermionic converter performance using laser radiation is considered. In this proposed scheme, laser radiation impinging on a thermionic plasma enhances the ionization process thereby raising the plasma density and reducing the plasma arc-drop. A source for such radiation may possibly be a Cesium recombination laser operating in a different thermionic converter. The possibility of this being an energy efficient process is discussed.

  15. Adiabatic trapping in coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, H. A.; Ali, Z. [Department of Physics, G.C. University, 54000 Lahore (Pakistan); Masood, W. [COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, we have discussed the effects of adiabatic trapping of electrons on obliquely propagating Alfven waves in a low {beta} plasma. Using the two potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, we have investigated the existence of arbitrary amplitude coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic solitary waves in both the sub and super Alfvenic cases. The results obtained have been analyzed and presented graphically and can be applied to regions of space where the low {beta} assumption holds true.

  16. Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

  17. Master equation approach to protein folding and kinetic traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Cieplak; Malte Henkel; Jan Karbowski; Jayanth R. Banavar

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The master equation for 12-monomer lattice heteropolymers is solved numerically and the time evolution of the occupancy of the native state is determined. At low temperatures, the median folding time follows the Arrhenius law and is governed by the longest relaxation time. For good folders, significant kinetic traps appear in the folding funnel whereas for bad folders, the traps also occur in non-native energy valleys.

  18. Potential digestibilities and digestion kinetics of forage cell wall components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tauskey, William Henry

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LITERATURE REVIEW. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES. Chemical Analysis Colorimetric Determinations Statistical Evaluation. 10 13 15 IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 16 V Characteristics of Forage Kinetics of Cell Wall Digestion SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS... and both of these variables appear to be the result of several dynamic processes. The amount of structural carbohydrates, the main constituents of the fibrous cell wall, ruminants can digest appears to be limited by the potential digestibility...

  19. Nonphotochemical hole burning and dispersive kinetics in amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, M.J.

    1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Results covering burn intensities in the nW to {mu}W/cm{sup 2} range, of dispersive hole growth kinetics are reported for Oxazine 720 in glycerol glasses and polyvinyl alcohol polymer films and their deuterated analogues. A theoretical model which employs a distribution function for the hole burning rate constant based upon a Gaussian distribution for the tunnel parameter is shown to accurately describe the kinetic data. This model incorporates the linear electron-phonon coupling. A method for calculating the nonphotochemical quantum yield is presented which utilizes the Gaussian distribution of tunnel parameters. The quantum yield calculation can be extended to determine a quantum yield as a function of hole depth. The effect of spontaneous hole filling is shown to be insignificant over the burn intensity range studied. Average relaxation rates for hole burning are {approximately}8 orders of magnitude greater than for hole filling. The dispersive kinetics of hole burning are observed to be independent over the temperature range of these experiments, 1.6 to 7.0 K. 6 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Kinetics of Cd Release from Some Contaminated Calcareous Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sajadi Tabar, S.; Jalali, M., E-mail: jalali@basu.ac.ir [Bu-Ali Sina University, Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of soils with heavy metals may pose long-term risk to groundwater quality leading to health implications. Bioavailability of heavy metals, like cadmium (Cd) is strongly affected by sorption and desorption processes. The release of heavy metals from contaminated soils is a major contamination risks to natural waters. The release of Cd from contaminated soils is strongly influenced by its mobility and bioavailability. In this study, the kinetics of Cd desorption from ten samples of contaminated calcareous soils, with widely varying physicochemical properties, were studied using 0.01 M EDTA extraction. The median percentage of Cd released was about 27.7% of the total extractable Cd in the soils. The release of Cd was characterized by an initial fast release rate (of labile fractions) followed by a slower release rate (of less labile fractions) and a model of two first-order reactions adequately describes the observed release of Cd from the studied soil samples. There was positive correlation between the amount of Cd released at first phase of release and Cd in exchangeable fraction, indicating that this fraction of Cd is the main fraction controlling the Cd in the kinetic experiments. There was strongly negative correlation between the amount of Cd released at first and second phases of release and residual fraction, suggesting that this fraction did not contribute in Cd release in the kinetic experiments. The results can be used to provide information for evaluation of Cd potential toxicity and ecological risk from contaminated calcareous soils.