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1

marchand-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ninth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, San Antonio, Texas, March 22-26, 1999 1 A Two-Year Cloud Climatology for the Southern Great Plains Site R. T. Marchand, T. P. Ackerman,...

2

moran-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Signal Processing Techniques Used in the Signal Processing Techniques Used in the ARM 8-mm Cloud Radars K. P. Moran, R. Lataitis, M. J. Post, B. E. Martner, and D. Welsh National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Strauch Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences Boulder, Colorado K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radars (MMCRs) are a new generation of research tools designed to provide high temporal and spacial resolution measurements of the clouds above the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites. The last of the four field sites for the MMCRs, located on Manus Island, Papau New Guinea, will be operating in

3

moran-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 A Review of the First Year of Operations of ARM's 8-mm Cloud Profiling Radar at the SGP CART Site K. P. Moran, B. E. Martner, and M. J. Post NOAA-Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program designed the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites to provide researchers with a set of measurements of the state of the atmosphere for monitoring the radiative aspects of climate (Stokes and Schwartz 1994). Recently, a millimeter- wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) was developed for ARM to provide continuous unattended measurements of the clouds over CART sites. Nearly two decades of atmos-

4

City of Moran, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moran, Kansas (Utility Company) Moran, Kansas (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Moran Place Kansas Utility Id 12909 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electric Rates Commercial Commercial All Electric Rates Industrial Industrial All Electric Rates Residential Residential Standard Rate Commercial Commercial Standard Rate Industrial Industrial Standard Rate Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1170/kWh Commercial: $0.0915/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

5

Comments from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia Supporting the Comments from the City of Alexandria on PEPCO's Intention to Commence Planned Transmission Outages Comments from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia Supporting the Comments from the City of Alexandria on PEPCO's Intention to Commence Planned Transmission Outages Docket No. EO-05-01: I wish to add my voice to the comments submitted on behalf of the City of Alexandria by its legal counsel John B. Britton of Schnader Harrison Segal and Lewis LLP and City Attorney, Ignacio B. Pessoa, and offer my additional comments on the Tuesday, December 20th order governing future operations of the Mirant Potomac River Generating Station (Docket No. EO-05-0 1). I would especially like to emphasize that all

6

Anonymity and CSP for Voting Systems Murat Moran, James Heather, Steve Schneider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anonymity and CSP for Voting Systems Murat Moran, James Heather, Steve Schneider Department Processes (CSP). In addition, we formalise conventional voting system with CSP and analyse whether our and the weak anonymity is more suitable specification for the voting processes. Keywords: anonymity, CSP

Doran, Simon J.

7

OpenHaRT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The OpenHaRT evaluation is modeled after the evaluation of the DARPA Multilingual Automatic Document Classification Analysis and Translation ...

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first horizontal well ever in the Marchand sandstone has been drilled. Although major difficulties arose with certain aspects of the drilling operation, a horizontal section of approximately 1300 was drilled. The section was left open hole as planned. The shales just above and between the Marchand sands appear to be very water-sensitive, requiring careful drilling practices. These shales were encountered in the middle part of the curve (45{sup o}-60{sup o}), which can be the most difficult part of a directional well to clean. Difficulties with these shales and cleaning this section led to a parted drill string, requiring a sidetrack. There were no major geologic ''surprises'', such as formation tops coming in much shallower or deeper than expected, or unexpected faults. Thin kaolinite beds were encountered in the horizontal section of the well. Previous descriptions of the mineralogy of this formation did not mention any kaolinite. The lateral extent of these beds is unknown. Completion of the well is under way. One additional injection profile was gathered during the quarter. Results are consistent with other recently profiles that show gas within the C Sand is overriding the oil and failing to sweep the deeper parts of the reservoir. International Reservoir Technologies, Inc. has completed the construction of the pilot area reservoir simulation model and the updating of historical production and injection data. They have begun fine-tuning the history match to better match production data and recently acquired pressure and profile data.

Joe Sinner

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

9

OpenHaRT 2013 Information Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OpenHaRT Pipeline (version 1.1.2, last uploaded May 24, 2013) - a software tool that evaluates OpenHaRT evaluation submissions. ...

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

10

rt Prst r r rtr ts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P P P P P P P P P P PP r é t r rt Prést r r étés s rtrs érts stés ts érqs tr st rss stq tr t q été é érr t s trs s st râ à r t rtr q tt tès srsr s ts à rrr rst r rs trr s s éq t r r rté s ss ü sq t s trs ét été ér trèt

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Mapping RT-LOTOS specifications into time petri nets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RT-LOTOS is a timed process algebra which enables compact and abstract specification of real-time systems. This paper proposes and illustrates a structural translation of RT-LOTOS terms into behaviorally equivalent (timed bisimilar) finite Time Petri ...

Tarek Sadani; Marc Boyer; Pierre de Saqui-Sannes; Jean-Pierre Courtiat

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Predicting Gene Structures from Multiple RT-PCR Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Gene Structures from Multiple RT-PCR Tests (Extended Abstract) Jakub Kov´ac1 , Tom RT-PCR experiments in gene finding. We present hardness results and practical algorithms for several variants of the problem. We also apply our methods to a real RT-PCR data set in the Drosophila genome. We

Vinar, Tomas

13

HEQUEST FOR Rt43RDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- - HEQUEST FOR Rt43RDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY (See ~nstructions on reverse) / GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS SERVICE, WASHINGTON, D C 20408 1 . F R O M (Agency orestablishment) U.S. Department of Energy 2 . MAJOR SUBDIVISION Oak Ridge Operations Office 3. M I N O R SUBDIVISION I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposal of the agency's records; that the records proposed for disposal in this Request of 4 page(s) are not now needed for the business of this agency or will not be needed after the retention periods specified; and that written concurrence from the General Accounting Office, if required under the provisions of Title 8 of the GAO Manual for Guidance of Federal Agencies, is

14

Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc Kraft Rt Kraft Electronics Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Kraft Rt (Kraft Electronics Inc) Place Budapest, Hungary Zip H-112 Sector Solar Product Equipment manufacturer for the clean energy industry, currently focused on thin-film solar cell production equipment. Coordinates 47.506225°, 19.06482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.506225,"lon":19.06482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

stt rt t Prstt st sttr r str r s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stt rt t Prstt st sttr r str r s rtr tétqs ë rsté rrr tr strt r t stt rt t r st sttr tr stt Pr t tt sttr str r s r r s s t rs t rtr t rsts sr tq rts s rs rs rtr stt r st rsss r t s s t sr ts t t rtr rs s rtr t str ts t t t t ssts rs rss tr t tr r st sttr

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

16

Comparison of Relative RT-PCR and Northern Blot Analyses to Measure Expression of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commentary Comparison of Relative RT-PCR and Northern Blot Analyses to Measure Expression of -1­polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is much more sensitive. Ob- taining quantitative RT-PCR results, however, can be challenging. Relative RT-PCR uses standard PCR techniques but permits the comparison of transcript quantities

Hsiang, Tom

17

Quantifying a bystander response following microbeam irradiation using single-cell RT-PCR analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying a bystander response following microbeam irradiation using single-cell RT-PCR analyses in a population. Semi- quantitative RT-PCR of individual hit cells demonstrated increases in the levels of CDKN1A

18

Moran_OthHyd_VE.ppt  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 Hydrodynamic test problems...

19

reaction (RT-PCR) to detect Kashmir bee virus (KBV). This technique requires time-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reaction (RT-PCR) to detect Kashmir bee virus (KBV). This technique requires time- consuming virus purification and RNA extraction steps. Hung and Shimanuki [9] developed a direct RT-PCR method of KBV detection with the sequences of many virus polyproteins. Kasmir bee virus / direct RT-PCR / pairwise comparison / phylogenetic

Recanati, Catherine

20

Original article RT-PCR detection of lentiviruses in milk or mammary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article RT-PCR detection of lentiviruses in milk or mammary secretions of sheep or goats ― In this study we evaluated a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique on seven goats infected with cloned caprine arthritis- encephalitis virus (CAEV) showed that RT-PCR on milk

Recanati, Catherine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Original article A RT-PCR assay for the rapid recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article A RT-PCR assay for the rapid recognition of border disease virus* Sltefan VILC l) Abstract ­ A reverse transcription ­ polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed it was shown to be BDV-specific. A closed, one-tube nested RT-PCR method employ- ing general pestivirus outer

Recanati, Catherine

22

NEAC-RT ComLtr 11.1.12  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering Physics 1500 Engineering Drive Madison WI 53706 Engineering Physics 1500 Engineering Drive Madison WI 53706 Phone: (608) 263-1646 Fax: (608) 263-7451 www.engr.wisc.edu/ep/ Nuclear Engineering Engineering Physics Engineering Mechanics Astronautics October 3 0, 2 012 To: Dr. R ichard M eserve, N EAC C hair From: NEAC N uclear R eactor T echnology S ubcommittee Re: Initial R eview o f A dvanced R eactor T echnology O ffice On S eptember 2 4 th , 2 012 o ur S ubcommittee m et w ith t he D oE N uclear R eactors Technologies Office (NE---7) s taff. T hey p rovided o ur s ubcommittee a n o verview o f t he Advanced R eactor T echnologies O ffice ( ART --- N E---74; a genda a ttached). Key e lements o f t he A RT R &D

23

Comparison of Three-Dimensional (3D) Conformal Proton Radiotherapy (RT), 3D Conformal Photon RT, and Intensity-Modulated RT for Retroperitoneal and Intra-Abdominal Sarcomas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3DCPT), intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), and 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) to predict the optimal RT technique for retroperitoneal sarcomas. Methods and Materials: 3DCRT, IMRT, and 3DCPT plans were created for treating eight patients with retroperitoneal or intra-abdominal sarcomas. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the gross tumor plus a 2-cm margin, limited by bone and intact fascial planes. For photon plans, the planning target volume (PTV) included a uniform expansion of 5 mm. For the proton plans, the PTV was nonuniform and beam-specific. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy/Cobalt gray equivalent CGE. Plans were normalized so that >95% of the CTV received 100% of the dose. Results: The CTV was covered adequately by all techniques. The median conformity index was 0.69 for 3DCPT, 0.75 for IMRT, and 0.51 for 3DCRT. The median inhomogeneity coefficient was 0.062 for 3DCPT, 0.066 for IMRT, and 0.073 for 3DCRT. The bowel median volume receiving 15 Gy (V15) was 16.4% for 3DCPT, 52.2% for IMRT, and 66.1% for 3DCRT. The bowel median V45 was 6.3% for 3DCPT, 4.7% for IMRT, and 15.6% for 3DCRT. The median ipsilateral mean kidney dose was 22.5 CGE for 3DCPT, 34.1 Gy for IMRT, and 37.8 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral mean kidney dose was 0 CGE for 3DCPT, 6.4 Gy for IMRT, and 11 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral kidney V5 was 0% for 3DCPT, 49.9% for IMRT, and 99.7% for 3DCRT. Regardless of technique, the median mean liver dose was <30 Gy, and the median cord V50 was 0%. The median integral dose was 126 J for 3DCPT, 400 J for IMRT, and 432 J for 3DCRT. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCPT result in plans that are more conformal and homogenous than 3DCRT. Based on Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in Clinic benchmarks, the dosimetric advantage of proton therapy may be less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity.

Swanson, Erika L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)] [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Paryani, Nitesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Slopsema, Roelf [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)] [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Speaker Diarization for Conference Room: The UPC RT07s Evaluation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors present the UPC speaker diarization system for the NIST Rich Transcription Evaluation (RT07s) [1] conducted on the conference environment. The presented system is based on the ICSI RT06s system, which employs agglomerative clustering ...

Jordi Luque; Xavier Anguera; Andrey Temko; Javier Hernando

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Characteristics of AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure RT-SCR model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical properties of a resonant-tunneling-semiconductor-controlled rectifier (RT-SCR) model have been presented. The current, temperature, gain, doping concentration, and layer size versus voltage relationships have been numerically obtained. The ... Keywords: RT-SCR, Semiconductor devices, Thyristors

B. D. Barkana

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A semantics for UML-RT active classes via mapping into circus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lack of a formal semantics for UML-RT makes it inadequate for rigourous system development, especially if the preservation of behaviour is a major concern when applying well-known model transformations, like refactorings and refinements. In this ... Keywords: UML-RT, circus, method integration, model transformations

Rodrigo Ramos; Augusto Sampaio; Alexandre Mota

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

SU?FF?T?388: Secondary Radiation Doses From CyberKnife SRS/RT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Because of extensive use of conventional x?rays in CyberKnife SRS/RT for treatment tracking and large number of monitor units (MU) in beam delivery

C Yu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

V-190: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue 0: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue V-190: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue July 2, 2013 - 12:38am Addthis PROBLEM: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue PLATFORM: ASUS RT-N66U Router firmware versions 3.0.0.4.270 and 3.0.0.4.354. ABSTRACT: A security issue in ASUS RT-N66U Router has been reported REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA53931 neohapsis IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The security issue is caused due to the device not properly restricting access when processing certain HTTPS requests and can be exploited to gain access to otherwise restricted functionality and e.g. disclose the contents of arbitrary files and directories. Successful exploitation requires the AiCloud web service to be enabled.

29

Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents Using RT3D  

SciTech Connect

RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a reactive transport code that can be applied to model solute fate and transport for many different purposes. This document specifically addresses application of RT3D for modeling related to evaluation and implementation of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA). Selection of MNA as a remedy requires an evaluation process to demonstrate that MNA will meet the remediation goals. The U.S. EPA, through the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Directive 9200.4?17P, provides the regulatory context for the evaluation and implementation of MNA. In a complementary fashion, the context for using fate and transport modeling as part of MNA evaluation is described in the EPA?s technical protocol for chlorinated solvent MNA, the Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA, and in this document. The intent of this document is to describe (1) the context for applying RT3D for chlorinated solvent MNA and (2) the attenuation processes represented in RT3D, (3) dechlorination reactions that may occur, and (4) the general approach for using RT3D reaction modules (including a summary of the RT3D reaction modules that are available) to model fate and transport of chlorinated solvents as part of MNA or for combinations of MNA and selected types of active remediation.

Johnson, Christian D.; Truex, Michael J.; Clement, T P.

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

30

RT in situ PCR detection of MART-1 and TRP-2 mRNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of melanoma and nevi.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primer Sequences and Sizes of RT-PCR Products Target MART-1and keratinocytic tumors MART-1 RT in situ PCR IHC TRP-2RT in situ PCR IHC Primary melanoma in situ invasive

Itakura, Eijun; Huang, Rong-Rong; Wen, Duan-Ren; Paul, Eberhard; Wnsch, Peter H; Cochran, Alistair J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

FORODT: Fortran debug routine for the PDP-11 (RT-11). [For run-time debugging  

SciTech Connect

FORODT provides run-time debug features to PDP-11 Fortran programs running with the RT-11 operating system. Digital Equipment Corporation's ODT program has been extended to include Fortran breakpoints, decimal integer and floating point data input, and output options. 3 figures.

Tanner, D.N.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

ISSN0249-0803ISRNINRIA/RT--0395--FR+ENG Distributed and High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

apport technique ISSN0249-0803ISRNINRIA/RT--0395--FR+ENG Distributed and High Performance Computing Performance Computing ?quipe-Projet Myriads Rapport technique n° 0395 -- Octobre 2010 -- 15 pages Abstract-Dina Tîra , Pierre Riteau , Jérôme Gallard , Christine Morin , Yvon Jégou Theme : Distributed and High

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

RtS>-l-2437 Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RtS«>-l»-2437 3*- if, -. Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of Xe and Kr in Fission Gas 4* #12;RIS?-M-2437 UTILIZATION OF THE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF Xe AND Kr IN FISSION GAS RELEASE Computerized Man- Machine Communication, Hotel Alexandra, Loen, May 23rd-28th, 1983 ISBN 87-550-1018-0 ISSN

34

Development of Real Time RT-PCR Assays for Neuraminidase Subtyping of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Real Time RT-PCR Assays for Neuraminidase Subtyping of Avian Influenza Virus Yanyan (PCR) has become the method of choice for virus subtype identification, largely replacing traditional]. However, designing subtype specific PCR primer pairs is a very challenging task [4]: on one hand, selected

Mandoiu, Ion

35

Emulating a crowded intracellular environment in vitro dramatically improves RT-PCR performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polymerase chain reaction's (PCR) phenomenal success in advancing fields as diverse as Medicine, Agriculture, Conservation, or Paleontology is based on the ability of using isolated prokaryotic thermostable DNA polymerases in vitro to copy DNA irrespective of origin. This process occurs intracellularly and has evolved to function efficiently under crowded conditions, namely in an environment packed with macromolecules. However, current in vitro practice ignores this important biophysical parameter of life. In order to more closely emulate conditions of intracellular biochemistry in vitro we added inert macromolecules into reverse transcription (RT) and PCR. We show dramatic improvements in all parameters of RT-PCR including 8- to 10-fold greater sensitivity, enhanced polymerase processivity, higher specific amplicon yield, greater primer annealing and specificity, and enhanced DNA polymerase thermal stability. The faster and more efficient reaction kinetics was a consequence of the cumulative molecular and thermodynamic effects of the excluded volume effect created by macromolecular crowding.

Lareu, Ricky R. [Tissue Modulation Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Division Office Block E3A 04-15, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); NUS Tissue Engineering Program and Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Harve, Karthik S. [Tissue Modulation Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Division Office Block E3A 04-15, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Raghunath, Michael [Tissue Modulation Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Division Office Block E3A 04-15, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (Singapore)], E-mail: bierm@nus.edu.sg

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

36

The angular integral of the radon transform (aniRT) as a feature vector in categorization of visual objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently introduced angular integral of the Radon transform (aniRT) seems to be a good candidate as a feature vector used in categorization of visual objects in a rotation invariant fashion. We investigate application of aniRT in situations when ... Keywords: categorization of visual objects, chinese characters, incremental learning, radon transform, self-organizing maps

Andrew P. Papli?ski

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Definition and implementation of a semantic mapping for UML-RT using a timed pi-calculus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on ongoing work to define a formal semantics for UML-RT suitable for execution and analysis. The paper advocates the use of kiltera as an executable, yet formal, specification language for the high-level description and analysis of complex ... Keywords: ?-calculus, UML-RT, model driven development, process algebra

Juergen Dingel; Eyrak Paen; Ernesto Posse; Rezoanoor (Ruben) Rahman; Karolina Zurowska

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

DATE: REPLY TO ATINOF SUBJECT: DEPA RT MEN T OF E NERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPLY TO ATINOF SUBJECT: DEPA RT MEN T OF E NERGY Memorandum January 17, 2013 John McKenzie, NA-30 FY 2013 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY ro Gregory H. Woods, General Counsel Attached please find the 2013 Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summary for Naval Reactors ( NR). This is in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1 B, Section 4.d. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program is

39

Department of Energy Reply to Congressman James P. Moran | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Department of Energy Emergency...

40

Frog fence along Vermont Rt. 2 in sandbar wildlife management area collaboration between Vermont Agency of Transportation and Vermont Agency of Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROG FENCE ALONG VERMONT RT. 2MANAGEMENT AREA COLLABORATION BETWEEN VERMONT AGENCY OFTRANSPORTATION AND VERMONT AGENCY OF NATURAL RESOURCES

Hoffman, Nelson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

STEMS-RT 1.0: Short-Term Electricity Market Simulator (Real Time), Demonstration Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Short-Term Electricity Market Simulator (Real Time) Demonstration Version 1.0 (STEMS-RT 1.0) allows the user to simulate simple examples of electricity markets. Description: The STEMS-RT 1.0 software is based on EPRI's pioneering development and application of agent-based simulation for the study of decision-making associated with electricity markets. In fact, the Nobel Prize in Economics was recently awarded to earlier pioneers of such investigations using people and otherwise known as experimental ...

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

42

DOE/SC-ARM-12-023 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-023 2-023 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2012 New Climate Measurement Sites h ?QOPQK?* ? * - " ?q " *"- ?l *?G qlH?b " * ?q ?e " "* ? ? - " ?*"-? "?- *"- ? "* Y? ? "? ql?l- " ?e " "* ? - ? ? * ? - *? *?n " *- K? K? ? ? "? ? "* ?- ?f "- ?h ? " ?* ? - M?? ? "? "* ? ? ?*-? ?- *"- ? ?* ? ?- ?QOPRK? ?* ?"" ? -" ? ql ? " *" ? "* ?- ? *? " * ?- *"- ? " "*" ? - ?* ?"- M??o - - ?" * * *"- ? - ?* ?*"-? "* ?" Y

43

WEB-BASED TRAINING SYSTEM FOR TEACHING BASICS OF RT-LEVEL DIGITAL DESIGN, TEST, AND DESIGN FOR TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineers to design larger, more complex, integrated circuits. Until recently, most electronic systems and test means teaching a lot of complex connections. Those connected topics have to be explained at first and test of digital devices is presented. The system is designed mainly to illustrate RT-level (Register

Jutman, Artur

44

Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus and look-alike disease viruses  

SciTech Connect

A high-throughput multiplexed assay was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRT-PCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

Hindson, B J; Reid, S M; Baker, B R; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; King, D P

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth and look-alike disease viruses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-throughput multiplexed assay (Multiplex Version 1.0) was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRTPCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

Hindson, B J; Baker, B R; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; Reid, S M; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; King, D P

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

46

Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves hematologic toxicity in particular. Although the long-term efficacy of current treatment options remains disappointing, the improved therapeutic index of IMRT may aid in generalizing its use and allowing the addition of novel approaches such as intraperitoneal immunotherapy.

Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The R-W Metric Has No Constant Curvature When Scalar Factor R(t) Changes With Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The real physics meaning of constant k in the Robertson-Walker metric is discussed when scalar factor R(t) is relative to time. Based on the curvature formula of the Riemannian geometry strictly, the spatial curvature of the R-W metric is calculated. The result indicates that the spatial curvature of the R-W metric is not a constant when R(t) changes with time and the constant in the R-W metric k does not represent spatial curvature factor. It can only be considered as an adjustable parameter relative to the Hubble constant. The result is completely different from the current understanding which is based on specious estimation actually, in stead of strict calculation. In light of this result, many conclusions in the current cosmology, such as the values of the Hubble constant, dark material and dark energy densities, should be re-estimated. In this way, we may get rid of the current puzzle situation of cosmology thoroughly.

Mei Xiaochun

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

48

IH'.O), u.s. DEP.-'.RT1IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IH'.O), IH'.O), u.s. DEP.-'.RT1IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\JINATION RECIPIENT:City of Orlando PROJECT TITLE : City of Orlando - SOW (S) Page 1 of2 STATE: FL Funding Opportunity Announcement Numbu DE·FOA-QOOOO13 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOOOO779 NEPA Control Number ell> Number o Based on my review of the infonnation concerning the proposed adiou, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoriud under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B5.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentra tions of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

49

DOE/SC-ARM-10-032 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-032 10-032 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2010 Recovery Act HigHligHts September 2009 * One hundred percent of allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 released to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. October 2009 * Preliminary design reviews successfully completed for new solar spectrometer and Data Management Facility (DMF) upgrades. December 2009 * Preliminary design reviews successfully completed for 18 new radars and upgrades to existing radars. January 2010 * Design reviews completed for DMF, radars, and shipborne radar wind profiler. * Installation and integration of new equipment in process for the ARM Data Archive and aircraft infrastructure, data systems, and

50

Austin(2)-RT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stratus Sensing in the CloudSat Antecedent Stratus Sensing in the CloudSat Antecedent Validation Experiment (CAVEX99) R. T. Austin, G. L. Stephens, R. F. McCoy, Jr., R. B. McCoy, and S. D. Miller Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado S. M. Sekelsky Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts Introduction The CloudSat Antecedent Validation Experiment (CAVEX99) was one component of the Monterey Coastal Stratus Experiment (MCSE), a multi-experiment study of maritime stratus conducted off the Pacific coast near Monterey, California, in June and July 1999. MCSE was proposed and organized by Professor Bruce Albrecht of the University of Miami and Professor Qing Wang of the Naval Postgraduate School; it was supported by the Office of Naval Research. CAVEX was proposed as an

51

Comments from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on the Tuesday, December 20th order governing future operations of the Mirant Potomac River Generating Station (Docket No. EO-05-0 1). I would especially like to emphasize that all...

52

Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses (which are of two bovine types) bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). A timeline for this development is presented in Table 1. The development of the Version 1.0 panel for FMDV rule-out and the most current efforts aimed to designed species specific panels has spanned over 2 1/2 years with multiple collaborative partnerships. This document provides a summary of the development, testing and performance data at OIE Stage 1 Feasibility into Stage 2 Assay Development and Standardization1 (see Table 2), gathered as of June 30th, 2007 for the porcine and bovine MUX assay panels. We present an overview of the identification and selection of candidate genetic signatures, the assay development process, and preliminary performance data for each of the individual signatures as characterized in the multiplexed format for the porcine and bovine panels. The Stage 1 Feasibility data of the multiplexed panels is presented in this report also includes relevant data acquired from the Version 1.0 panel as supporting information where appropriate. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must precede efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available. As a summary report, this document does not provide the details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, nor does it provide spec

Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cko.rtef' -, CtIOr4rt...tt. G~P:s (ITfS'rHO) u.t A,8,C,D~Jisf."c{ por..f,s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,)t. (..-) ~\\1\\Ct. (hfo{'" rt.. -....1. O.Ms Wt ,et1'"" (b-s),+ (t"1.--i:\\t... rr..'t ·...( s",,"(r,··d= fit. Stl~ Cko.rtef' -, CtIOr4rt...tt. G~P:s ~~~1 (ITfS'rHO) u.t A,8,C,D~Jisf."c{ por..f,s 011\\" ';f\\f. I i ~"o\\ ""'"",t...&. "",... r. I. ,_ . ...J... Urdc. ""~~"t lUi""~A .J- ..:v.(~ ·· c...e.t e't.."'

Li, Kin-Yin

54

Tissue- and cell-specific expression of metallothionein genes in cadmium- and copper-exposed mussels analyzed by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR  

SciTech Connect

Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal-inducible proteins that can be used as biomarkers of metal exposure. In mussels two families of MT isoforms (MT10 and MT20) have been characterized. In this study, mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) were exposed to 200 ppb Cd and 40 ppb Cu for 2 and 9 days to characterize the tissue and isoform specificity of metal-induced MT expression. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization demonstrated that both MT isoforms were mainly transcribed in digestive tubule epithelial cells, especially in basophilic cells. Weaker MT expression was detected in non-ciliated duct cells, stomach and gill epithelial cells, haemocytes, adipogranular cells, spermatic follicles and oocytes. RT-PCR resulted in cloning of a novel M. galloprovincialis isoform homologous to recently cloned Mytilus edulis intron-less MT10B isoform. In gills, Cd only affected MT10 gene expression after 2 days of exposure while increases in MT protein levels occurred at day 9. In the digestive gland, a marked increase of both isoforms, but especially of MT20, was accompanied by increased levels of MT proteins and basophilic cell volume density (Vv{sub BAS}) after 2 and 9 days and of intralysosomal metal accumulation in digestive cells after 9 days. Conversely, although metal was accumulated in digestive cells lysosomes and the Vv{sub BAS} increased in Cu-exposed mussels, Cu exposure did not produce an increase of MT gene expression or MT protein levels. These data suggest that MTs are expressed in a tissue-, cell- and isoform-specific way in response to different metals.

Zorita, I. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Bilbao, E. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Schad, A. [Institute of Pathology, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55101, Mainz (Germany); Cancio, I. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Soto, M. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain); Cajaraville, M.P. [Lab. Cell Biology and Histology, Dept. Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country, PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)]. E-mail: mirenp.cajaraville@ehu.es

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Lifting 2-integer knapsack inequalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 1, 2003 ... We mention the works of Gu, Nemhauser & Savels- ... superadditivity, the papers of Marchand & Wolsey (1999) and Marchand & Wolsey (2001)...

56

Analysis of genes regulated by the peroxide response regulator PerR in Borrelia burgdorferi using real-time RT-PCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is a spirochetal bacterium that is transmitted to mammals via the bite of an Ixodes tick. The environments that the bacterium is exposed to when it resides in the tick and mammal are quite disparate and include differences in temperature, pH, and oxygen concentration. Although it has been shown that the aforementioned factors alter gene expression, few regulatory proteins have been identified in the B. burgdorferi genome. bb0647 encodes a peroxide response regulator (PerR) which regulates gene expression in response to oxidative stress in other organisms. Several borrelial genes with homology to known oxidative stress genes, and the pathogenesis-associated gene dbpA, contain putative PerR binding domains. To determine if PerR regulates the expression of oxidative stress genes in B. burgdorferi, we inactivated perR from a non-infectious B. burgdorferi strain (designated Lab), creating strain JS167. JS167 is hyper-resistant to reactive oxygen species and has increased superoxide dismutase activity compared to the Lab parental strain. JS167 makes four-fold more DbpA protein than Lab. We analyzed the expression of two oxidative stress genes, napA and sodA, and dbpA using real-time RT-PCR in JS167 and the infectious isolate MSK5 compared to Lab. We found napA and dbpA were induced 1.13-fold and 2.89-fold in JS167 compared to Lab, and sodA was induced 1.78-fold more in Lab than in JS167. The napA and sodA results indicate that the hyper-resistance of JS167 to reactive oxygen species is not due to the up-regulation of these two genes. MSK5 contains all known borrelial plasmids, and we therefore expect that gene expression be more tightly regulated in this strain compared to Lab. dbpA and sodA were expressed 3.48-fold and 1.25-fold more in Lab than in MSK5 and napA was expressed 1.38-fold more in MSK5. The low level of expression of dbpA in MSK5 does not correspond to DbpA protein levels in this isolate. Further studies addressing the effect of different oxygen concentrations and/or the presence of different oxidative stressors are needed to determine how these genes are regulated in response to oxidative stress.

Swingle, Kristen Lynn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

1997 BNL Site Environmental Report E -1 Bari, R.A., Gordon, D., Moran, D., and Volkow, N.,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection and Measurements, 1987a, Recommendations on Limits for Exposure to Ionizing Radiation, NCRP Report No. 91. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 1987b, Exposure of the Population Report, Brookhaven National Laboratory (June 1988). U.S. Department of Energy, 1988a, Internal Dose

Homes, Christopher C.

58

Science Fiction Atmospheres R.T. Pierrehumbert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that Ballard actually had a quite reasonable premise in The Drowned World. A long-lived solar storm increases Ballard's plot line, but let's give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he had in mind that the Solar- tance of this work. Be that as it may, the Sun can do the job Ballard needs it to do. In fact, the main

Boyce, C. Kevin

59

Mapeando CSP em UML-RT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A integrao de mtodos formais com notaes semi-formais visuais uma tendncia em engenharia de software. Mtodos formais apresentam uma semntica precisa e permitem verificao (more)

Manoel Messias da Silva Menezes Junior

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT  

SciTech Connect

The cooperative agreement for this project was finalized and signed during April 2000. The official project start date was April 11, 2000. Initial reporting requirements, including the completion of a Project Management Plan, Milestone Plan and Log, and a Hazardous Substance Plan, were completed and submitted to the DOE in early May 2000. Work on the project tasks was initiated in May 2000. During the course of this budget period, efforts will focus on enhancing reservoir characterization work that had been in progress prior to the start of this grant project, incorporation of this information into an existing 3-D full-field compositional model, and utilization of a ''window area'' of the model (representing a selected pilot area) to evaluate the impacts of horizontal laterals on recovery in the miscible nitrogen flood. The ''window area'' model will also be used to design the most effective configuration and placement of the lateral sections. The following is a summary of progress made between April 11, 2000 and June 30, 2000.

Teresa Muhic

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress on the East Binger Unit (EBU) project has slowed as difficulties have been encountered with obtaining satisfactory production from well EBU 37G-3H, the new horizontal well. Remedial operations have been conducted and stimulation operations were about to get under way at the end of the reporting period. International Reservoir Technologies, Inc. has made additional progress on the pilot area simulation model, reaching a point with the history match that we are awaiting more definitive production data from the horizontal well. Planning future development of the EBU hinges on evaluating the results of well EBU 37G-3H. Performance of this well must be understood in order to evaluate development scenarios involving horizontal wells and compare them with development scenarios involving vertical wells.

Joe Sinner

2001-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

62

Improved Miscible Nitrogen Flood Performance Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Laterals in a Class I Reservoir - East Binger (Marchand) Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE-sponsored project at the East Binger Unit is an investigation into the benefits of reservoir characterization and horizontal wells in this particular setting of geologic and recovery method. The geologic setting is a tight (average porosity of 7% and average permeability of less than 1 millidarcy) Pennsylvanian-age sandstone at about 10,000 feet, and the recovery method is a miscible nitrogen flood. The projected oil recovery of the East Binger Unit, prior to the initiation of this project, was about 25%. Gravity segregation of nitrogen and crude oil was believed to be the principal cause of the poor sweep efficiency, and it was envisioned that with horizontal producing wells in the lower portion of the reservoir and horizontal injection wells near the top, the process could be converted from a lateral displacement process to a vertical displacement/gravity assisted process. Through the characterization and field development work completed in Budget Periods 1 and 2, Binger Operations, LLC (BOL) has developed a different interpretation of the sweep problem as well as a different approach to improving recovery. The sweep problem is now believed to be one of an areal nature, due to a combination of natural and hydraulic fracturing. Vertical wells have provided a much better economic return than have the horizontal wells. The natural and hydraulic fracturing manifests itself as a direction of higher permeability, and the flood is being converted to a line drive flood aligned with this orientation. Consistent with this concept, horizontal wells have been drilled along the line of the fracture orientation, such that hydraulic fracturing leads to 'longitudinal' fractures, in line with the wellbore. As such, the hydraulically fractured horizontal wells are not significantly different than hydraulically fractured vertical wells - save for the potential for a much longer fracture face. This Topical Report contains data from new wells, plus new and updated production, pressure, and gas analysis data that was not included in the Topical Report provided at the end of Budget Period 1. The analysis and interpretation of these data are provided in the many technical reports submitted throughout this project.

Joe Sinner

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed advanced rapid diagnostics that may be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the potential to improve our nation's ability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect animal populations of high economic importance in the United States. Under 2005 DHS funding we have developed multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based PCR assays that combine foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1 or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitus IBR), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus BPSV, Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). Under 2006 funding we have developed a Multiplexed PCR [MUX] porcine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for VESV and SVD foreign animal diseases in addition to one other domestic vesicular animal disease vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and one domestic animal disease of swine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). We have also developed a MUX bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine foreign animal diseases malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses which are of two bovine types bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). This document provides details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used. A condensed summary of the development, testing and performance of the multiplexed assay panel was presented in a 126 page separate document, entitled 'Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out'. This supplemental document provides additional details of large amount of data collected for signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used for all steps in the assay development and utilization processes. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, VSV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must preceed efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available.

Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Satellite and ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, Y, SA Klein, C Liu, B Tian, RT Marchand, JM Haynes, RB McCoy, Y Zhang, and TP Ackerman. 2008. "On the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level cloud, and upper troposphere water vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D16105, doi:10.1029/2008JD009905. Figure 1: Diurnal anomalies for tropical (left) ocean and (right) land: (top) the precipitation index (PI), high-level cloud (CLD) and upper

65

Deletions within COL11A1 in Type 2 stickler syndrome detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peak ratios romosomes (far left) may differ depending upon the gender of the DNA e deleted region, are not included in either kit. AB E DC P382 del 39 P382 del 49 P381 del 41-42 P382 del 6-43P381 del 8-42 del Exons 6-43 P381 del 15-25 P382 del 16... , Moran RT, Warman M, Ala-Kokko L: Stickler syndrome. In GeneReviews [internet]. Edited by Pagon RA, Bird TC, Dolan CR, Stephens K. Seattle, WA: University of Washington; 2000. updated 2010. 10. Schouten JP, McElgunn CJ, Waaijer R, Zwijnenburg D, Diepvens...

Vijzelaar, Raymon; Waller, Sarah; Errami, Abdellatif; Donaldson, Alan; Lourenco, Teresa; Rodrigues, Marcia; McConnell, Vivienne; Fincham, Gregory; Snead, Martin; Richards, Allan

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

AnnuAl RepoRt of ReseARch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and conversion, bio-energy systems, hydrogen energy, nuclear energy, and solar energy, especially photo-system conversion of light energy to clean fuels such as hydrogen. To promote this new initiative, the University and transportation for fuel cells; public and social discussions of nuclear power; and conversion of light to do work

Yener, Aylin

67

RobeRt GutteRsohn The South End  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using techniques such as manual wet Pre-cured Laminate FRP Installation FRP for Manual Lay-Up Near/4 Bridge Y 298, Pulaski Co., MO System: Manual Wet-Layup Built: 1956 g g q lay-up systems, pre-cured plate P-962, Dallas Co., MO System: Manual Wet-Layup, SRP Built: 1946 Reference Delamination Defect

VandeVord, Pamela

68

20072008 Complete RepoRt Table of Contents LEHIGH UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Orr, Jr. '52 '79P '82P ++ Jennifer A. Ostrow '03 Nishad Pai '93 Michelle A. Paitich '05 Marc L. Paley

Gilchrist, James F.

69

16 December, 2007 The Rt. Hon. John Denham MP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Andrea Fischer Sarah Gordon Thomas Neukirch Mark Rayner Eric Torrence James A McLaughlin Ruth Nicol Greenham Tom Whyntie James Aldous Anastasia Freshville Luke Barnes University of St Andrews Quantum

Crowther, Paul

70

AnnuAl RepoRt july 2007june 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Earlene Kenderdine Michael D. Kiser Tommy Klepper Robert and Julie Klopfenstein Craig Knutson Richard

Oklahoma, University of

71

NIST OpenHaRT'13 Evaluation: Overview and Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Evaluation Workshop Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington DC ... Manage the evaluations Provide evaluation utilities and infrastructure for ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

72

600 HCN RT zaxis Probe Default Parameters Tuning for Ubiquitin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with pwD90 of 250 usec) o H2dpwr3D = xxxx o H2dmf3D = xxxx · Amplifier compressions o compH = 1.00 o

Oliver, Douglas L.

73

500 HCN RT zaxis Probe Default Parameters Tuning for Ubiquitin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(assumes garp1 or waltz with pwD90 of 250 usec) o H2dpwr3D = 43 dB o H2dmf3D = 4000 o H2dseq3D = 'garp1

Oliver, Douglas L.

74

Utvrdering av Windows RT fr portning av Mario Framework; Evaluation of Windows RT for porting Mario Framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Ericsson har utvecklat ett ramverk fr multimediakommunikation som heter Mario. Mario kan anvndas fr att stta upp video- och ljud-samtal ver IP och finns (more)

Isaksson, Marcus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Multilingual Practices of Senegalese Immigrants in Paris and Rome: A Comparative Study of Language Use and Identity Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coppel, A. (1975). La norme Linguistique. In Marchand etal. , Manuel de linguistique applique lenseignement deFranais et la norme linguistique: une passion singulire.

Smith, Maya Angela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Poster Abstract of Eighteenth ARM STM: Sort by Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z., Marchand, R., and Ackerman, T. A Comparison of Water Uptake by Aerosols Using Two Thermodynamic Models ABSTRACT, POSTER Xu, L. and Penner, J. ACRF Data Acquisition and...

77

Microsoft PowerPoint - Flach CBP overview PA CoP Tech Exchange...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K. Snyder, J. Bullard, NIST E. Samson, J. Marchand, SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (CA) DOE Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange 25-26 May 2011 *Hans...

78

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrieval of Cloud Ice Water Content and Effective Radius Using ARM Cloud Radar Reflectivity and Doppler Velocity R. Marchand, J. Comstock, and S. McFarlane Pacific Northwest...

79

hinkelman-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Radiative Processes and Cloud Prediction in the Eta Forecast Model L. M. Hinkelman, T. P. Ackerman, and R. T. Marchand Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State...

80

542.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 1, 2002 ... Denver, Colorado,. September 8-12, 1996. 1015-1026. [6] Ceria, S., Cordier, C., Marchand, H., Wolsey, L. A. (1998): Cutting planes for.

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81

A High-Dimensional Subband Speech Representation and SVM Framework for Robust Speech Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, A.; López-Solera, M. I. J. Org. Chem. 1997, 62, 976-981. b) Marchand, A. P.; Alihodzic, S.; ShuMa, R

Sollich, Peter

82

pdf: preliminary program without abstracts - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2004 ... Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lincoln Lab. Lexington, MA ..... tory, Washington, DC 20375 USA; Peter Moran, Michigan. Technological...

83

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 22, 2005 ... Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. Peter Moran. Michigan Technological ... Lincoln Labs. Lloyd Whitman. Naval Research Laboratory. David Wilt.

84

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE ABOUT THE CONFERENCE LOCATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 4, 2009... The Pennsylvania State University. Peter Moran, Michigan Technological University ... Lincoln Laboratory. William Wong, Palo Alto Research...

85

Advance Mailer - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 26, 2002 ... Lincoln Laboratory. Massachusetts Institute of ..... Peter Moran. Michigan Technological ... Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Lab.

86

About the 2002 Electronic Materials Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Peter Moran, Michigan Technological University; Phil Neudeck, NASA Glenn ... ATMI; Christine Wang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Lab;...

87

EMC 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peter Moran, Michigan Technological Univ. Yasushi Nanishi ... Christine Wang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lincoln Labs. Lloyd Whitman, Naval...

88

CIRAAnnuAl RepoRt 2005-2006AnnuAl RepoRt 2005-2006 CIRA ANNUAL REPORT FY 05/06  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and for four other events along the Aleutian chain and the Kamchatka peninsula. Refer to http://www- ad the eruptions of Mt. Augustine and for four other events along the Aleutian chain and the Kamchatka peninsula

89

EuropeanEuropean ControlControl ConferenceConference,, KosKos RT 2007RT 2007 Randomized Algorithms for Systems and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was invented by Metropolis, UlamUlam, von, von Neumann, Fermi,Neumann, Fermi, ...... (Manhattan project)(Manhattan project) Las Vegas first appeared in computer science in the lateLas Vegas first appeared in computer

Tempo, Roberto

90

Complete genome sequence of Syntrophobotulus glycolicus type strain (FlGlyRT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Syntrophobotulus glycolicus Friedrich et al. 1996 is currently the only member of the genus Syntrophobotulus within the family Peptococcaceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the genome-sequenced fraction of tree of life. When grown in pure culture with glyoxylate as carbon source the organism utilizes glyoxylate through fermentative oxidation, whereas, when grown in syntrophic co-culture with homoacetogenic or methanogenic bacteria, it is able to oxidize glycolate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. No other organic or inorganic carbon source is utilized by S. glycolicus. The subdivision of the family Peptococcaceae into genera does not reflect the natural relationships, particularly re- garding the genera most closely related to Syntrophobotulus. Both Desulfotomaculum and Pelotomaculum are paraphyletic assemblages, and the taxonomic classification is in signifi- cant conflict with the 16S rRNA data. S. glycolicus is already the ninth member of the family Peptococcaceae with a completely sequenced and publicly available genome. The 3,406,739 bp long genome with its 3,370 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mwirichia, Romano [Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

AnnuAl RepoRt 2 0 0 7-2 0 0 8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lunch--as we discussed drinking and vampires and travel and all of those things that make conversations amount of energy to the Hall Center Conference Hall for a breakfast event sponsored by the Friends in publishing, noting that published books and artistic works require "enormous energy, perseverance

Peterson, Blake R.

92

Preliminary ILAW Formulation Algorithm Description, 24590 LAW RPT-RT-04-0003, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), has contracted with Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to design, construct, and commission the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site (DOE 2000). This plant is designed to operate for 40 years and treat roughly 50 million gallons of mixed hazardous high-level waste (HLW) stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The process involves separating the hight-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions through filtration, leaching, Cs ion exchange, and precipitation. Each fraction will be separately vitrified into borosilicate waste glass. This report documents the initial algorithm for use by Hanford WTP in batching LAW and glass-forming chemicals (GFCs) in the LAW melter feed preparation vessel (MFPV). Algorithm inputs include the chemical analyses of the pretreated LAW in the concentrate receipt vessel (CRV), the volume of the MFPV heel, and the compositions of individual GFCs. In addition to these inputs, uncertainties in the LAW composition and processing parameters are included in the algorithm.

Kruger, Albert A.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

93

MESA+ AnnuAl REpoRt 2009 General Preface...............................................................................................................................................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Superlattices; Absorption Processes in Semiconductors; Light Emitters in Silicon; Photodetectors, Photodiodes applications are found in infrared systems, satellite communications and medical equipment Paper, M.J. Deen and P. Pascal, "A Review of Low Frequency Noise Behavior of Polysilicon Emitter Bipolar

Twente, Universiteit

94

The Royal InsTITuTe of Technology ManageMenT RepoRT 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Titus and Wayne Bequette, RPI p38.Control and Operation of VSC-based Multiterminal HVDC Systems, Rohail

Haviland, David

95

2012 EmploymEnt REpoRt RICE MBA Full TIME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production Engineer McKinsey & Company Joseph Abdou Associate Justin Dahl Associate Mercer Rachel Mc

96

The Dean's RepoRT | 20092010 haRvaRD MeDical school  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in key areas for UW TechTransfer. UW researchers, faculty and staff reported 335 innovations, which TechTransfer programs like the Technology Gap Innovation Fund and LaunchPad continue to demonstrate and dedication of an exceptional team assembled at UW TechTransfer. This past year we have added staff in key

Lahav, Galit

97

Crystallographic Initiation of Nickel-Base Superalloy IN100 at RT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

reported to be different for different crack-tip stress intensity factor ranges, K ... stress intensity factor range K or high temperature promote ..... The capital letters.

98

Sm@rtCaf Expert 6.0 FIPS 140-2 Non- proprietary Security ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Bytes 1 and 2: self tests during ATR Bytes 3 and 4: self tests after ATR before first command Bytes 5 and 6: self tests after ATS before first command ...

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

99

Employing Cluster Analysis to Detect Significant Cloud 3D RT Effect Indicators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional cloud field morphology contributes to scene-averaged cloud reflectivity, but climate models do not currently incorporate methods of identifying situations where this contribution is substantial. This work represents an effort to ...

Michael J. Foster; Dana E. Veron

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

2008-2009 AnnuAl RepoRt Preface Pages -i  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Thesis Title: Development of microchannel device for long term neuron culture Bachelors Ambala

Xuan, Dong

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101

Microsoft PowerPoint - Kosson CBP Overview for PA CoP 4-15-2010...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Marchand, SIMCO, Inc. (CA) C. Langton, G. Flach, R. Seitz, S. Marra, H. Burns, SRNL DOE Project Manager: Steven Ross DOE Project Manager: Steven Ross 13 April 2010 1 *Hans van...

102

Tax and Fee Payments by Motor-Vehicle Users for the Use of Highways, Fuels, and Vehicles: Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhancement Through Increased Motor-Fuel Tax Enforcement,1976). L. R. Moran, Motor Vehicles, Model Year 1991,Commercial and Industrialb Motor vehiclesc (AVMV USA,Yr )

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Solar observations with a millimeter-wavelength Array - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

see Chapter 13 of Thompson, Moran, and Swenson, 1986). One of these ...... Hoyng, P., Marsh, K. A., Zirin, H., and Dennis, B. R.: 1983, Astrophys. J. 268, 865.

104

Lab researchers win eight R&D 100 Awards and Editors' Award  

issue of R&D Magazine. At an afternoon poster session, the award-winning teams displayed exhibits of their work, including Bryan Moran, a senior

105

EMC Call for Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 3, 2005 ... E: rdawson@chtm.unm.edu. Christine Wang. MIT Lincoln Laboratories .... E: kuech@engr.wisc.edu. Peter Moran. Michigan Technological...

106

21 learn network advance preliminary schedule of events ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2006 ... Session Chairs: Peter D. Moran, Michigan Technological ..... Michael Lorenz2; Marius Grundmann2; 1University of Nebraska-Lincoln;.

107

Call For Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 3, 2004 ... E-mail: kuech@engr.wisc.edu. Peter Moran. Michigan Technological ... MIT Lincoln Laboratories. Phone: (781) 981-4466 Fax: (781) 981-0122.

108

2000 Electronic Materials Conference - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dept. of Electrical Engineering. University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 ... Lincoln Laboratory. John M. Parsey ... Motorola. Peter D. Moran. University of...

109

03MTG-016 2003 EMC Adv. Mailer1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2003 ... Lincoln Laboratory. Sungho Jin ...... Engrg., Madison, WI 53706 USA; Peter Moran, ..... Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory, 244 Wood St.,.

110

2001 Electronic Materials Conference - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2001 ... NebraskaLincoln, Dept. of EE, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511. USA ...... Edmondson1; Takahiro Isshiki1; Moran Haddad1; Peter C. Colter1; David.

111

Call For Papers - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 4, 2002 ... Peter Moran. Michigan Technological University. Phone: (906) .... MIT Lincoln Laboratory. Phone: (781) 981-4466 Fax: (781) 981-0122.

112

About the 2004 Electronic Materials Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lincoln Laboratory ... Charles Lutz, Kopin Corp; T.P. Ma, Yale University; Michael Manfra, Bell Labs, Lucent Technology; Peter Moran, Michigan Technological...

113

EMC 2009 Call for Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 31, 2009 ... April Brown, Duke University, abrown@ee.duke.edu. David Janes .... Ionic Conductors for Transport and Energy Applications. Peter Moran...

114

Presentations from the 2009 Workshop on Future Large CO2 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Session 4.0. Richard Zhang, GE Oil and Gas; Kenneth Kullinger, ABB; Steve Moran, Converteam. Session 5.0. Ron Wolk, WITS. Session 6.0. ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

Getting to the Core of Sustainability (EStar Award - Change Agents...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Getting to the Core of Sustainability (EStar Award - Change Agents) SUSTAINABILITY ASSISTANCE NETWORK (SAN) 1 Mike Moran & Jennifer Su-Coker March 15, 2012 Outline 2 2 PNNL...

116

Forthcoming Upgrades to the ARM MMCRs: Improved Radar Processor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Radar Processor and Dual-Polarization K. P. Moran, B. E. Martner, and K. A. Clark National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory...

117

Five-Laboratory Conference on Computational Mathematics - 2005...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

National Laboratory Compton Cook Gentile Lomov Moran Owen Procassini Schilling Sandia National Laboratories Bochev 1, Bochev 2 Brunner 1, Brunner 2 Crawford Lorence 1, Lorence...

118

Spatial Dispersion of Peering Clusters in the European Internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the geographical position within the area of interest. This conclusion is also supported by the standardized Morans I statistic of spatial autocorrelation7 of 0.157 (see Table 1 above). There is thus strong evidence in support of the claim that the distribution...

D'Ignazio, Alessio; Giovannetti, Emanuele

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

FI_,L RE__.RT CGHPLEX _IIT_IVIrY ME.ASt,q_E.MEh_  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:--_T_.R WAVELENGTHS BY _ _'_" Harold L. Bassett and Robert C. Shackelford _ m s _._ En_Ineerlng Exper__ment Station

Rathbun, Julie A.

120

UNAIDS RepoRt oN the globAl AIDS epIDemIc | 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australia Azerbaijan Bangladesh Belarus Belize Brazil Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Colombia Costa Indonesia Nicaragua Nigeria Pakistan 25­49% Azerbaijan Benin Bolivia Brazil Chile Democratic Republic Hungary Philippines Lebanon Republic of Korea Lithuania Tunisia Serbia Algeria Slovenia Azerbaijan Armenia

Lycan, Deborah E.

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121

R E S E AR C H R E P O RT 200 8 VANDERBILT U NIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). 1974 ­ 78 Hertz Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship. 1973 American Chemical Society Undergraduate Award on Materials Chemistry, Albuquerque. IEEE Ultrasonics '93 Symposium, Baltimore. Invited Speaker, 6th ICBIC, San Invited Speaker, Frontiers of Science Workshop on Catalysis, Exxon Corporate Research Lab Plenary Lecturer

122

Program on Technology Innovation: Economic Analysis of California Climate Initiatives: An Integrated Approach, Volume 2: Full Repo rt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The State of California has set ambitious climate policy goals to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 80 by 2050. This three volume study, the first of its kind, used a comprehensive model of the State's economy and the U.S. electricity market and power grid to measure the potential gains or losses to the state's economic welfare under a range of implementation options. Volume 1 is a summary for policymakers and contains a high-level discussion of the current California policy milieu and the major f...

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

123

WSU foUndation/2006-2007 2006-2007 annUaL REPoRt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Loïc, Manu, Marie-Jo, Chantale, Mi chèle, Anastasia, Patrick, Pierre, Anne, Ilizabethe, Eléa, Boris

Collins, Gary S.

124

58 UTS ANNUAL REPORT 2008 sUppoRtING oUR objEctIvEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvingenvironmentalsustainabilityin ourcampusoperations.Itisoverseenby asteeringcommitteeandsevenworking groups:waste,transport,energy into the atmosphere. The proposal from students Antony Henry and Kavit Pandya was to put this wasted energy through Energy-efficientlightinginmorethan> 60percentoftheUniversity Savingtheequivalentof45Olympic

University of Technology, Sydney

125

Identification of low penetrance alleles for lung cancer: The GEnetic Lung CAncer Predisposition Study (GELCAPS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in European and African populations. Nat Genet 2006, 38(6):652-658. 26. Haiman CA, Patterson N, Freedman ML, Myers SR, Pike MC, Walisze- wska A, Neubauer J, Tandon A, Schirmer C, McDonald GJ, Greenway SC, Stram DO, Le Marchand L, Kolonel LN, Frasco M, Wong D...

Eisen, Tim; Matakidou, Athena; Consortium, Gelcaps; Houlston, Richard

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Teaming Profile FEMoran and Pepsi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scope In 2010, F.E. Moran implemented a retro-commissioning project at a 225,000 square foot PepsiCo facility. A number of high impact recommendations were identified and...

127

Nano-Sensors and Magnetic Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2010 ... Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing Properties of Cosb2O6 Prepared by a Colloidal Method: Hector Guillen-Bonilla1; Carlos Michel2; Juan Moran2;...

128

1999 EMC: Publication of Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 1999 ... E-mail seaforml@ml.wpafb.af.mil, Peter Moran University of Wisconsin Department of ... Lincoln, NE 68588-0511. Telephone (402) 472-0294

129

2007 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactions", Neuron 56, 992 (2007) Y. Arai, P. B. Moran, B. D. Honeyman and J. A. Davis, "In Situ Spectroscopic Evidence for Neptunium(V)-Carbonate Inner-Sphere and...

130

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA-ECO LC-09 Daily Precipitation for Altamira and Santarem, Para, Brazil: 1961-1998 Data set prepared by Eduardo S. Brondizio and Emilio F. Moran. This data set reports daily...

131

Two LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LC-09 Landsat TM and ETM+ Data, Sites in Rondonia and Para, Brazil: 1985-2004. Data set prepared by E.S. Brondizio and E.F. Moran. This data set includes 15 zipped archives of...

132

--No Title--  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to 11:00 am Additional Protocol Bruce Moran (NRC) 11:00 to 11:15 am Upcoming NMMSS Training Ron Bonifay (NMMSS) 11:15 to 11:30 am Training Wrap Up Peter Dessaules (DOE) Brian...

133

Interplanetary Scintillation Observations of Stream Interaction Regions in the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ph.D. Thesis, University of California, San Diego. Harrison,Thesis, University of California, San Diego. Kojima, M. ,Thesis, University of California, San Diego. Moran, P.J. :

Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R. A.; Breen, A. R.; ONeill, I. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

WPP, No. 98: Fieldwork Studies of Targeted Languages VI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nkeel siki sika midadee hidaa Original Consonant rtirtim rti rti rti rt i rt i rt i rt i rt i rt i rt i W [n] h h h

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Antiviral Drug Design: Computational Analyses of the Effects of the L100I Mutation for HIV-RT on the Binding of NNRTIs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in understanding the atomic details of protein-ligand interactions and accurately choosing near-native ligand

Rizzo, Robert C.

136

Circuit Breaker Maintenance; Volume 1: Low-Voltage Circuit Breakers; Part 2: GE AK Models: Volume 1: Low-Voltage Circuit Breakers Pa rt 2: GE AK Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive guide will help utilities improve their maintenance of GE model AK circuit breakers. It consolidates industry guidelines, applicable standards, original equipment manufacturer recommendations, and hands-on experience relative to these circuit breakers. Ultimately, improved maintenance will increase reliability and reduce costs associated with corrective maintenance and equipment downtime.

1992-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

RT in situ PCR detection of MART-1 and TRP-2 mRNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of melanoma and nevi.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. Prognostic significance of occult metastases detected byPCR evidence of possible occult metastases (39-42). However,potential to identify occult metastatic melanoma cells in

Itakura, Eijun; Huang, Rong-Rong; Wen, Duan-Ren; Paul, Eberhard; Wnsch, Peter H; Cochran, Alistair J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Mechanistic Evaluation of the Pros and Cons of Digital RT-LAMP for HIV1 Viral Load Quantification on a Microfluidic Device and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We learned the following three lessons from this work: (i) digital amplification technologies with HIV, many of whom live in developing countries and under resource-limited conditions.1 As antire- troviral treatment becomes more widely available, viral resistance to first-line antiretroviral drugs

Ismagilov, Rustem F.

139

FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Linking to the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) RT3D and MT3DMS Models  

SciTech Connect

Linkages to the Groundwater Modeling System have been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to enable the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to more realistically assess the risk to the public of radioactive contaminants at NRC-licensed sites. Common software tools presently in use are limited in that they cannot assess contaminant migration through complex natural environments. The purpose of this initiative is to provide NRC with a licensing safety-analysis tool with sufficient power, flexibility, and utility that it can serve as the primary software platform for analyzing the hazards associated with licensing actions at those complex sites at which the traditional tools are inappropriate. As a tool designed to realistically approximate prospective doses to the public, this initiative addresses NRCs safety-performance goal by confirming that licensing actions do not result in undue risk to the public.

Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.; Pelton, Mitch A.

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

Don't break the pipeline: Ensuring a workforce for the burning plasma era G.M. Olynyk, Z.S. Hartwig, and R.T. Mumgaard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Don't break the pipeline: Ensuring a workforce for the burning plasma era G.M. Olynyk, Z.S. Hartwig, creating and sustaining a workforce requires a robust "pipeline" of people--from undergraduates to Ph.D stu uninterrupted and the decades of accumulated expertise are not lost due to a discontinuity in the pipeline. An e

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Engineering --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

N O P Q R S N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Maqueda, Ricardo J. "Ricky" (Ricardo J. "Ricky" Maqueda) - Magnetic Fusion Energy Experiments, P-24 Plasma Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory Marchand, Richard (Richard Marchand) - Department of Physics, University of Alberta Marjoribanks, Robin S. (Robin S. Marjoribanks) - Department of Physics, University of Toronto Martín-Solís, José Ramón (José Ramón Martín-Solís) - Grupo de Fusión, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Mauel, Michael E. (Michael E. Mauel) - Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University Mazzucato, Ernesto (Ernesto Mazzucato) - Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Milchberg, Howard (Howard Milchberg) - Institute for Physical Science and Technology & Department of Physics, University of Maryland at

142

PowerPoint Presentation  

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Surface and TOA Cloud Forcings Computed Using Several Cirrus Cloud Property Retrievals Surface and TOA Cloud Forcings Computed Using Several Cirrus Cloud Property Retrievals Chris Schwartz 1 , Jay Mace 1 , Roger Marchand 2 , Sally M c Farlane 2 , Matt Shupe 3 , Sergey Matrosov 3 , Min Deng 1 , Yuying Zhang 1 1. University of Utah, 2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3. University of Colorado Satellite-derived fluxes provided by Pat Minnis and Surface Radiation Analysis provided by Chuck Long Source Description Name Used in Plots G. Mace VZ, extinction constrained by Raman lidar Mace Bimodal Mace et al, 2006 Combination of retrieval algorithms, parameterizations, and empirical equations Ciret4 Yuying Zhang Retrieval based on reflectivity and radiance Zhang ZR Roger Marchand Retrievals base on reflectivity and Doppler velocity, parameterized for several different ice

143

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Plasma Physics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

N O P Q R S N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ma, Lena (Lena Ma) - Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Manley, Steven L. (Steven L. Manley) - Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach Marchand, Eric A. (Eric A. Marchand) - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno Marden, James (James Marden) - Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University Markusson, Nils (Nils Markusson) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Martin, Scot T.(Scot T.Martin).- School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University Matin, A.C. (A.C. Matin) - Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University Mayne, Paul W. (Paul W. Mayne) - School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

144

Evaluating the MMF Using CloudSat  

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CloudSat, ARM, and the Multi CloudSat, ARM, and the Multi CloudSat, ARM, and the Multi - - scale scale Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Tropical Western Pacific Tropical Western Pacific Tom Ackerman Tom Ackerman University of Washington University of Washington Collaborators on the ARM Project Collaborators on the ARM Project Roger Marchand, U. Washington Roger Marchand, U. Washington Steve Klein, LLNL Steve Klein, LLNL Sally McFarlane, PNNL Sally McFarlane, PNNL Robert Pincus, U. Colorado (NY office) Robert Pincus, U. Colorado (NY office) Kuan Kuan - - Man Man Xu Xu , NASA Langley , NASA Langley Anning Anning Chen, Hampton University Chen, Hampton University Pete Henderson, U. Colorado Pete Henderson, U. Colorado Yunyan Zhang, LLNL Yunyan Zhang, LLNL

145

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM2008_norfolk.ppt  

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Properties from CloudSat and ARM Observations at Manus Island Zheng Zheng Liu, Roger Liu, Roger Marchand Marchand , and Thomas Ackerman , and Thomas Ackerman University of Washington Sally McFarlane Sally McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 Motivation * Radiative heating is important * Cloud vertical differential heating affects local convective dynamics * Horizontal differential heating helps to maintain large scale tropical dynamics * Challenge and solution * Radiative heating calculation requires information about vertical structures of cloud properties * CloudSat mission: a cloud radar in space provide opportunity to observe vertical structure of cloud in global coverage. * Together with ARM surface measurements, it enable us to compare the heating rates retrievals from different perspectives.

146

Exploring the retinal connectome James R. Anderson,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Ophthalmology, Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; 2The Boulder and Imaging Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; 4Sorenson Media, Salt Lake City, UT; 5Department Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Purpose: A connectome

Utah, University of

147

The Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Multiple Sclerosis (MSCIMS) Trial protocol and baseline cohort characteristics: an open-label pre-test : post-test study with blinded outcome assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Moran S, Margolin DH, Norris K, Tandon PK: Alemtuzumab vs. interferon beta-1a in early multiple sclerosis. N Engl J Med 2008, 359:1786-801. 4. Rivera FJ, Couillard-Despres S, Pedre X, Ploetz S, Caioni M, Lois C, Bogdahn U, Aigner L: Mesenchymal stem...

Connick, Peter; Kolappan, Madhan; Patani, Rickie; Scott, Michael A; Crawley, Charles; He, Xiao-ling; Richardson, Karen; Barber, Kelly; Webber, Daniel J; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Tozer, Daniel J; Samson, Rebecca S; Thomas, David L; Du, Ming-Qing; Luan, Shi L; Michell, Andrew W; Altmann, Daniel R; Thompson, Alan J; Miller, David H; Compston, Alastair; Chandran, Siddharthan

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

Re: RE: disappointment BlIl.Lehr 0 Rainey, David I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

History: Re: RE: disappointment t BlIl.Lehr 0 Rainey, David I Cc: Kathryn Moran, mcnutt, Jane. Bill Original Message - - - -- From: "Rainey, David I" Da te: Sunday, May 23, 2010 9 :30 pm Subject: RE > > -- -- -original Message-- -- - > From : Bill.Lehr@noaa.gov ( > Sent: Sunday, May 23, 2010 8:56 PM > To: Rainey, Da

149

egi.utah.edu | EGI ... the science to find energy EGIDirector@egi.utah.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-McMoran Oil & Gas GDF Suez Greenshale Energy Hess Hunt Oil Inpex Corporation Japex JOGMEC KNOC Kosmos Energy Professor Addax Petroleum Afren Africa Oil Anadarko Apache AWE Bashneft Beach Energy BG Group BHP Billiton BP Cairn India Casa Exploration Chevron Cobalt International ConocoPhillips Delonex Energy Devon DNO

150

APPENDIX A: Forms and Instructions Form Form R93D-44 Form R93D-03  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

APPENDIX A: Forms and Instructions APPENDIX A: Forms and Instructions Form Form R93D-44 Form R93D-03 Form R93D-59 Instructions Form RT94-02 Form RT94-04 Form RT94-0! Form RT94-03 Form RT94-05 Form RT94-06 Instructions Form RT94-09 Instructions Form RT94-10 Form RT94-07 Form RT94-08 Form RT94-17 Form RT94-19 Form RT94-24 Form RT94-15 Form RT94-13 Form RT94-22 Form RT94-26 Form RT94-18 Form RT94-20 FormRT94-16 Form RT94-14 Form RT94-21 Form RT94-25 FormRT94-ll Form RT94-12 Form RT94-23 Form RT94-27 Section N (Vehicles) of 1993 RECS Questionnaire ............. Cover Letter for VIN Follow-up ........................... Vehicle Information Card (yellow, front only) ................. 1993 RECS Mail Questionnaire, Pages 4-5 (vehicle pages only) .... Instructions for Assembling RTECS Mid-Year Mailings ..........

151

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dual Polarization Observations on an MMCR: Dual Polarization Observations on an MMCR: Implementation and First Results K. P. Moran, T. Ayers, B. E. Martner, and M. J. Post National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) is a super-sensitive device capable of measuring extremely weak signals backscattered from small ice crystals and water droplets. Its sensitivity allows the radar to observe thin high cirrus clouds containing small ice particles as well as low-altitude stratus clouds composed of tiny water droplets (Moran et al. 1998). Unfortunately, other particulates suspended in the atmosphere, such as insects, ash,

152

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 20990 of 28,905 results. 81 - 20990 of 28,905 results. Download EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-212-coral-power-llc Download EA-97-B Portland General Electric Company http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-97-b-portland-general-electric-company Download Department of Energy Reply to Congressman James P. Moran http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/department-energy-reply-congressman-james-p-moran Download EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-167-pge-energy-trading-power-lp-0 Download EIS-0285-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-05-supplement-analysis Download Procedures for Departing Employees http://energy.gov/cio/downloads/procedures-departing-employees

153

JGI - Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee Meeting  

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Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee Meeting Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee Meeting Members Cameron Currie, University of Wisconsin Ed DeLong, MIT Jed Fuhrman, University of Southern California George Garrity, MSU Steve Hallam, University of British Columbia Bob Landick, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Folker Meyer, Argonne National Laboratory Nancy Moran, Yale University Mary Ann Moran, University of Georgia Karen Nelson, JCVI Rich Roberts, NEB Doug Rusch, J. Craig Venter Institute Ramunas Stepanauskas, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences Niels van der Lelie, RTI Phil Hugenholtz, University of Queensland Home > About Us > JGI Management > Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee Meeting UC logo DOE logo Contact Us Credits Disclaimer Access KeysAccessibility/Section 508 ©1997-2013 The Regents of the University of California Page Last Updated

154

The Secretary of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1,2006 1,2006 The Honorable James P. Moran U.S. House of Representatives Washington, DC 205 15 Dear Congressman Moran: Thank you for your December 27,2005, letter concerning my December 20,2005, emergency order in the matter of the Mirant Potomac River Generating Station (DOE Docket No. EO-05-01). In your letter, you requested "that all documents and related material, particularly any operational plan covering compliance with the Clean Air Act, should be available for public review and scrutiny." All publicly releasable documents and filings submitted to and relied upon by me in issuing the emergency order, including the compliance plan and the comments thereon, have been posted on the docket's website at www.electricity.doe.gov. We will continue to make all publicly releasable material filed

155

Sustainability or Sustainable Development: An Anthropological Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, drinking water and electricity and some offices also established. During the process of development Kuma!s lost about 70 percent of their land, traditional pottery occupation, forest and clay resources and traditional practices. The new migrants were... . An unpublished M. Phil.. thesis submitted to Social Anthropology Department, University of Bergen, Norway: Moran, E., 1979 Human Adaptability: An Introduction to Ecological Anthropology. Colorado: Westview press. Milton, K., 1997 "Ecologies: anthropology, culture...

Kattel, Shambhu Prasad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thermo-Fluids, Energy Systems and Environment This group conducts research in the following areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stirling Cycle Cryocoolers and Engines", U.S. Patent No. 5,457,956, October 17. [8] Moran, M.E., Stelter, S Analysis Methods for Stirling Engines", Journal of Energy in Southern Africa, 19(3), pp. 4-19. [15 and Evaluation of a MEMS-Based Stirling Microcooler Dongzhi Guo1 , Jinsheng Gao2 , Alan J. H. McGaughey1 , Gary K

Calgary, University of

157

Where is the instructional leader? : how the district office creates the ties that keep principals connected to the classroom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new response to intervention (RtI) implementation. For oneto do a really good job with RtI [response to intervention4. How did you move your RtI process forward this year? Did

Paul, Susan Merry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evaluating the Predictive Validity of DIBELS Literacy Measures with Third Grade Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intervention (RtI) .. 5 Curriculum BasedResponse to Intervention (RtI) is a three-tiered preventionResearch conducted on RtI with EL learners has resulted in

Kim, Jennifer Sun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Public-key encryption secure in the presence of randomness failures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deterministic encryption. Define RtD[AE r , AE d ] = ( P, K,the hedged security of the RtD construction is inheritedtheorem. Theorem 3.4.1 [RtD is hedge secure] Let AE r = (P

Yilek, Scott Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Poster Abstract of Seventeenth ARM STM: Sort by Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Science Team Meeting 7 Science Team Meeting 2007 Proceedings Proceedings Sorted by Title Proceedings Sorted by Author Proceedings Sorted by Category Cover image Poster Abstract of the Seventeenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting ARM-CONF-2007, March 2007 Monterey, California View poster abstract by Author or Category or Title. 10 Years of External Data ABSTRACT, POSTER Ma, L., Wagener, R., Gregory, L., Liang, M., Tilp, A., and Cialella, A. A Comparison of Broad-band Fluxes at the Main and Auxiliary AMF Sites During the RADAGAST Campaign. ABSTRACT, POSTER Settle, J. A Comparison of Cloud Radar Profiles of Cloud Occurrence with MMF Simulated Radar Profiles as a Function of the Large-Scale Atmospheric State ABSTRACT, POSTER Marchand, R., Beagley, N., and Ackerman, T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Tanks Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Partnership Project Number 08.1.3.1.7, DOE-EM 21 K. Brown (Presenter), Senior Research Scientist, CRESP/Vanderbilt U. D. Esh, M. Furman, J. Phillip, US NRC D. Kosson, S. Mahadevan, A. Garrabrants, CRESP/Vanderbilt U. H. van der Sloot, J.C.L. Meeussen, R. Comans, P. Seignette, ECN (NL) E. Garboczi, K. Snyder, J. Bullard, NIST (US) E. Samson, J. Marchand, SIMCO, Inc. (Canada) C. Langton, G. Flach, R. Seitz, G. Taylor, S. Marra, SRNL DOE Project Manager: Al Baione U.S. DOE Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange 19-21 May 2009 2 Partnership Members Department of Energy - Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) * Principal supporting agency * Primary end-user Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) * Oversight & Research Divisions * Primary end-user

162

An Evaluation of MWR Retrievals of Liquid Water Path  

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Evaluation of MWR Retrievals Evaluation of MWR Retrievals of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor R. T. Marchand and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction This paper offers some observations on the quality of Microwave Radiometer (MWR) retrievals of precipitable water vapor (PWV) and liquid water path (LWP). The paper shows case study comparisons between the standard "statistical" approach and those obtained using an iterative solution of the microwave radiative transfer equations. These examples show how improvements in the retrieval of LWP can be obtained by using an iterative approach, but that possible improvements are limited by the accuracy of the forward model absorption coefficients and errors in the brightness temperature measurements. Each of these effects limits the

163

ARM Poster 2007.ai  

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40 60 80 100120 Number Density (L -1 ) 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Altitude (km) Further Development of Multi-Instrument Multi-Parameter Cloud Retrievals Richard Austin, Norm Wood, and Graeme Stephens Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado *BUGSRAD computations also use BBHRP data sets and radiosonde profiles 1. The Problem Acknowledgements The work described here was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Dept. of Energy, Grant DE-FG02-05ER63961. We also thank Qilong Min and the BBHRP VAP team for providing data used in our analyses. References *Austin, R. T., and G. L. Stephens, 2001: J. Geophys. Res., 106, 28233-28242. *Benedetti, A., G. L. Stephens, and J. M. Haynes, 2003: J. Geophys. Res., 108, 4335, doi:10.1029/2002JD002693. *Min, Q.-L., M. Duan, and R. Marchand, 2003: J. Geophys. Res., 108,

164

Microsoft Word - Poellot-MR.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of Cloud Liquid Water Over the SGP Site Measurements of Cloud Liquid Water Over the SGP Site M. R. Poellot University of North Dakota Grand Forks, North Dakota R. T. Marchand Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington C. Twohy Oregon State University Corvallis, Oregon Introduction The University of North Dakota Citation aircraft made in situ measurements of liquid water clouds on six flights in stratus clouds during the Spring 2000 Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Four in situ instruments were used to measure cloud liquid water content (LWC): a particle measuring system (PMS) King liquid water sensor, a Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI), a PMS Forward Spectral Scattering Probe (FSSP) and a one-dimensional (1D) optical

165

Slide 1  

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Cloud Properties and Heating Cloud Properties and Heating Rates in Tropical Cloud Systems Jennifer Comstock and Sally McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Alain Protat Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research Motivation Cloud properties retrievals Cloud process understanding Cloud Radiative forcing and heating rates Model evaluation on many scales (LES, CRM, SCM...) Quantified uncertainties are needed... 2 Retrieval Algorithm Evaluation within CPWG Past intercomparisons CLOWD - Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (Turner et al. 2007) Ice Clouds - (Comstock et al. 2007) One retrieval does not fit all Present algorithm evaluation BBHRP Ice Cloud Retrievals at SGP - Microbase (Dunn, Jensen, Mace, Marchand) Arctic mixed phase clouds - BBHRP (Shupe, Turner) CLOWD - BBHRP Pt. Reyes AMF deployment

166

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Broken Clouds: Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Broken Clouds: Validation Tests E. Kassianov, T. P. Ackerman, R. T. Marchand, and M. Ovtchinnikov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction An approach for the stochastic description of the solar radiation transfer through broken fields with the arbitrary horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity have been introduced (Kassianov 2000). Different combinations of the random and maximum cloud overlap can be treated by the suggested approach. We derived the approximated equations for both the mean direct and diffuse solar radiance on the basis of the stochastic transfer equation and a new statistically inhomogeneous Makovian model of broken clouds. In this paper we estimate the accuracy and robustness of the approximated equations by using

167

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

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Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms of CTH-OD are now being produced by the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. There are notable differences in the histograms being produced by these three projects. In this poster we analyze some of the differences and discuss how the

168

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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5 5 The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar P. Kollias, M. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Widener, R. Marchand, T. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December 2005 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

169

DOE/SC-ARM-10-021 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment  

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1 1 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan J Mace Principal Investigator S Matrosov B Orr M Shupe R Coulter P Lawson A Sedlacek G Hallar L Avallone I McCubbin C Long R Marchand September 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

170

Microsoft Word - kassianov_3_-ei.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brightness Fields in Statistically Inhomogeneous Clouds Brightness Fields in Statistically Inhomogeneous Clouds E. I. Kassianov, T. P. Ackerman, R. T. Marchand, and M. Ovtchinnikov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The angular structure of reflected and transmitted radiation provides important information needed for remote sensing of a cloudy atmosphere. The model angular distributions of radiation can be obtained by direct numeric simulation of three-dimensional (3D) clouds and radiation (numerical averaging), and the equations for the mean radiance (analytical averaging). The advantage of numerical averaging is that the needed statistical parameters of a radiation field may be obtained for any cloud model with accuracy as high as necessary. This makes it possible to use this direct method to estimate the accuracy

171

1  

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Multi-Angle Remote Sensing of Cumulus Geometry Multi-Angle Remote Sensing of Cumulus Geometry E. I. Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington and Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia T. P. Ackerman and R. T. Marchand Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Satellite remote sensing is the major source for statistics of cloud properties; however, accurate and robust methods for extracting both optical and geometrical characteristics of broken clouds have yet to be fully developed. Currently, most broken cloud retrieval schemes rely on spectral (e.g., microwave, visible, or infrared [IR]) observations from near-vertically pointing remote sensors (Rossow 1989; Minnis et al. 1992). Although the multi-spectral techniques can provide accurate retrievals of cloud

172

Cumulus Geometry from Satellite and Surface Data at the ARM TWP Site  

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Cumulus Geometry from Satellite and Surface Data Cumulus Geometry from Satellite and Surface Data at the ARM TWP Site E. I. Kassianov, T. P. Ackerman, and R. T. Marchand Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The multi-angle imaging spectrometer (MISR), a sensor on board the earth observing system (EOS) Terra satellite platform, observes reflected radiation in nine directions with high resolution (~0.275 km). The overall mission of the MISR is to provide continuous, global multi-angle measurements of the reflected radiation from the earth's atmosphere and surface, and thereby create a valuable resource for studying their physical properties (Diner et al. 1999). For single-layer marine cumulus clouds, we have demonstrated that satellite-derived basic statistics (mean, variance) of vertical cloud size match closely

173

ackerman-98.pdf  

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One-Year Cloud Climatology for the One-Year Cloud Climatology for the Southern Great Plains Site T. P. Ackerman, R. T. Marchand, and E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction The addition of the millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) to the suite of instruments at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site has provided the necessary observations to produce a cloud climatology. Data from the MMCR are currently being combined with data from the Belfort laser ceilometer (BLC) and micropulse lidar (MPL) to determine cloud occurrence and location using algorithms developed by our research group. These basic cloud statistics should prove useful for comparing with both single-column model (SCM) and general circulation model (GCM) predictions of cloud

174

Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the ARM SGP Central Facility  

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Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the ARM SGP Central Facility J. J. Michalsky and Q.-L. Min Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York J. C. Barnard and R. T. Marchand Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P. Pilewskie National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California Introduction During ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment II (ARESE II) the Twin Otter aircraft made low-altitude (100-300-m) passes over the Central Facility (CF) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) site as part of the flight pattern design for the experiment. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Solar Spectral Flux

175

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: A Bootstrap Technique  

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A Bootstrap Technique for Testing the Relationship between Local-Scale A Bootstrap Technique for Testing the Relationship between Local-Scale Radar Observations of Cloud Occurrence and Large-Scale Atmospheric Fields Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Beagley, Nathaniel Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Limitations in the ability of Global Climate Models (GCMs) to predict clouds create significant uncertainties in predicting and understanding climate. Comparison studies have demonstrated that clouds are among the largest source of uncertainty in global climate model simulations [Cess et al., 1990; Potter and Cess, 2003]. Comparisons of model output and observational data generally require averaging (or aggregating) the observations in an attempt to put them on the same large spatial scale as

176

Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse amplitude changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Asymptotic methods provide an efficient means by which to infer reservoir flow properties, such as permeability, from time-lapse seismic data. A trajectory-based methodology, much like ray-based methods for medical and seismic imaging, is the basis for an iterative inversion of time-lapse amplitude changes. In this approach a single reservoir simulation is required for each iteration of the algorithm. A comparison between purely numerical and the trajectory-based sensitivities demonstrates their accuracy. An application to a set of synthetic amplitude changes indicates that they can recover large-scale reservoir permeability variations from time-lapse data. In an application of actual time-lapse amplitude changes from the Bay Marchand field in the Gulf of Mexico we are able to reduce the misfit by 81% in twelve iterations. The time-lapse observations indicate lower permeabilities are required in the central portion of the reservoir.

Vasco, D.W.; Datta-Gupta, Akhil; Behrens, Ron; Condon, Pat; Rickett, Jame s

2003-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

barker-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overlapping Cloud: What Radars Give Overlapping Cloud: What Radars Give and What Models Require H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environment Service Ontario, Canada E. E. Clothiaux, T. P. Ackerman, and R. T. Marchand The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Z. Li Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Q. Fu Dalhousie University Halifx, Nova Scotia, Canada Introduction Large-scale models (LSMs) of earth's atmosphere parameterize clouds and radiative transfer for domains measuring thousands of square kilometers. For domains this large, assumptions regarding vertical structure of non-overcast clouds are crucial for radiation budgets. Uni-directional cloud- profiling radars (CPRs) can yield information about the vertical structure of clouds but regardless of whether they are at the surface or on a satellite, they sample clouds very differently than how they are

178

Microsoft PowerPoint - Zheng_roj_edits_v3.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Properties from Properties from A Comparison of Heating Rates and Related Cloud Properties from CloudSat and ARM Observations at Manus Island CloudSat and ARM Observations at Manus Island Zheng Liu, Roger Marchand, Thomas Ackerman University of Washington Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean Introduction Introduction Radiative heating is an important processes linking cloud, water vapor and tropical dynamics in both local and large-scale circulation. Here we analyze retrieved cloud properties and radiative heating rates from both ARM and CloudSat. These retrievals differ due to both the different measurement perspectives and retrieval schemes used. Ze Ze comparison: comparison: Categorized heating rates and cloud water content Categorized heating rates and cloud water content

179

An Examination of the Predictive Validity of Early Literacy Measures for Korean English Language Learners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learners: support for an RTI model. The California Schoolto Intervention (RtI).. Standards forResponse to Intervention (RtI) Given the benefits of early

Nam, Jeanie Eunjoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Shortcomings of the Cartagena Protocol: Resolving the Liability Loophole at an International Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

soybeans, and Monsanto RT-200 Canola seeds). 34. Bratspies,and Monsanto RT-200 Canola seeds). 36. Duall, supra note 4,

Kohm, Katherine E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NCNR 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the flux gradients found along the axis of the irradiation rabbits in three NBSR irradiation channels depicted by INAA of zinc (RT-4) and nickel (RT-1 ...

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

NIST Part 2.pmd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the flux gradients found along the axis of the irradiation rabbits in three NBSR irradiation channels depicted by INAA of zinc (RT-4) and nickel (RT-1 ...

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

Gas Adsorption and Permeance with Metal Organic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 4. ? Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) ? Zeolitic Imidazolate ... 1 2 2,1 P P = ? nRT A nRT PV = ? = ? 7 coupled equations, 9 unknowns ...

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

184

Pharmaceutical Powder Diffraction: Structure Solution from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Crystalline solids containing 2 or more building blocks (solids at rt) in stoichiometric amounts ... blocks (solids at rt) in stoichiometric amounts N O H2N ...

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

DFG-Schwerpunktprogramm 1324 Extraktion quantifizierbarer Information aus komplexen Systemen"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strt trt r ss t t trt st qrs rt t s s r t sst st r s r t trtt tt tss tsr ts r tt r t rt tsr tr rt sts s rt stt t r r t t rst r t st rt rs t s t r r r tr r t tt ts sst tr t r s tt t r tr t rtrt ts t s t ss t t ts r ts sst t t rs s tt r r ss tsr rt rt tsr tr

186

Khesbn no. 85-86 - September 1976 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ltN trD ilts ? Sttyr ? rt{ rtD bDtlll/Sf lyl]y) ttH FJy''Et.t :l :rry:-! .r:iDi> g rtD lgpyp .r:i- r43i! ; ':j'i 'l? SDy: DtJPDy 11$ l-l$tiy: 'rtD brj lyjt\\t I_.rtD . ',ty*D,

Admin, LAYCC

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION DEVICES: EFFECTIVENESS IN IMPROVING SAFEGUARDS AT GAS-CENTRIFUGE URANIUM-ENRICHMENT PLANTS.  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs) have engendered a growing interest among international safeguards experts. Potentially, RFIDs could reduce inspection work, viz. the number of inspections, number of samples, and duration of the visits, and thus improve the efficiency and effectiveness of international safeguards. This study systematically examined the applications of RFIDs for IAEA safeguards at large gas-centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). These analyses are expected to help identify the requirements and desirable properties for RFIDs, to provide insights into which vulnerabilities matter most, and help formulate the required assurance tests. This work, specifically assesses the application of RFIDs for the ''Option 4'' safeguards approach, proposed by Bruce Moran, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for large gas-centrifuge uranium-enrichment plants. The features of ''Option 4'' safeguards include placing RFIDs on all feed, product and tails (F/P/T) cylinders, along with WID readers in all FP/T stations and accountability scales. Other features of Moran's ''Option 4'' are Mailbox declarations, monitoring of load-cell-based weighing systems at the F/P/T stations and accountability scales, and continuous enrichment monitors. Relevant diversion paths were explored to evaluate how RFIDs improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards. Additionally, the analysis addresses the use of RFIDs in conjunction with video monitoring and neutron detectors in a perimeter-monitoring approach to show that RFIDs can help to detect unidentified cylinders.

JOE,J.

2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

SU?FF?T?465: Relating Changes in Pulmonary Functin Tests (PFTs) to Changes in Radiation?Induced Regional Lung Perfusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To further assess if RT?induced changes in pulmonary function tests (PFTs) can be prospectively predicted based on the sum of predicted RT?induced changes in regional lung perfusion. Method and Materials: Between 1991 and 2005

J Mao; S Zhou; R Folz; T Wong; L Marks

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Changing Places: How Communities Will Improve the Health of Boys of Color  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to Intervention (RtI) framework, available onlinea Response to Intervention (RtI) frame- work (see Cunha etsupport Ap s du In try rti ce Transitional jobs Community-

Edley, Christopher; Ruiz de Velasco, Jorge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Response to Intervention Within Restrictive Settings: A Multi-Tiered Behavioral Intervention System for Addressing Behavior Problems Within the Top Tier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caption F igure 1. Recycled RtI model. Tier III: IntensifiedL. , & McGraw, K. (2009). RTI in the classroom: Guidelinessuch as Response to Intervention (RtI) and Positive Behavior

Thornton, Sage

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

School-Based Screening: A Population-Based Approach to Inform and Monitor Childrens Mental Health Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a response to intervention (RTI) model on identi?cation ofresponse to intervention (RtI) movement of identifying andwithin a school as a part of a RtI program to determine risk

Dowdy, Erin; Ritchey, Kristin; Kamphaus, R. W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Early Response-to-Intervention Measures and Criteria as Predictors of Reading Disability in 3rd Grade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

among traditional and RTI-based definitions of readingResponse-to- Intervention ( RtI) framework for identifyingderived from a longitudinal RtI project executed in low-

Beach, Kristen Dawn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference between the real-time price and the actual real-2008) used historic real-time prices and simulated long-runin the real-time (RT) market at the RT price. Variable

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand (RT- Demand), Real-Time Price (RT-Price) and Day-to reduce load in real-time when a specific price point iscloser to real-time when energy market prices rose above a

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Armored RNA as virus surrogate in a real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assay proficiency panel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

second ring test to evaluate RT-PCR detection methods. Vet.real-time, reverse transcription-PCR assays for detection ofHigh-throughput real-time RT-PCR assay to detect the exotic

Hietala, S K; Crossley, B M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development of a quantitative PCR method to differentiate between viable and nonviable bacteria in environmental water samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a quantitative PCR method to differentiateof polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative polymer-such as reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR or RT-qPCR), these

Gedalanga, Phillip B.; Olson, Betty H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Aktualisierte Liste der Geckos von Neuguinea Gekkota, 5: 33-64.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bezeichnungen: West-Neuguinea, Westirian, Irian Jaya) gehört seit 1963 zu Indonesien. Akronyme nach LEVITON et

198

Christopher Hartshorn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... HIV RT molecules. (Regional ACS conference 2010). Kumud R ... Mesoporous Silica Films. (Regional ACS conference 2002). HY Fan ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Table of Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... are based on the reference Leachman, JW, Jacobsen, RT, Lemmon, EW, and Penoncello, SG Fundamental Equations of ... Handbook 44 2013 ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

200

Katalog separt -Z. ernohorsk &.. S-8 -.-0 5 -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), or penalized by subtrac- tion of previous winnings: RRm = (1 - ER) - qER RT + Dtotal (11) This leads

Svoboda, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Quantitative Response Measurement of Cell Substrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative Response Measurement of Cell Substrate Interactions via RT-PCR. Matthew L. Becker, 1 LeeAnn O. Bailey ...

202

NIST Sigma-Xi Post Doc Posters for 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Microanalysis 35. (B) Matthew L. Becker Quantitative Response Measurement of Cell Substrate Interactions via RT-PCR 36. (M ...

203

The Quantification of Inflammatory Cellular Responses Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Quantification of Inflammatory Cellular Responses Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). LeeAnn ...

204

Khesbn no. 99 - Spring 1982 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r.t .D yljlln ']y:ls J,rtD i2ti,lll .Drl'1t l! i11lit T'Ntill ..lgltyl . 'l'x Jrt ttj)rtD''tN ! iuhrurrlf E! nl'Tll/JrR )lt )lrlt ilrfg "ly:rtD ,UU'l ..1'N )'1 ,E'.tyD [r'i2

Admin, LAYCC

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Khesbn No. 127 - Spring 1996 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R rtt )] o'np D'rt"! ,'yp"'rtD; 1R'Dpti"t D'l I'N ? tltDgrx igl lrr ? l]rp ? 1N rgi-rtD l,tp fpt' pt",l,t p* ur6b7 . ?ltlyr t'N 'po:f'? t;3i )RtD" .olgDtj? t1'N tt 1tx rtu6ryu')

Admin, LAYCC

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Khesbn no. 64-65 - Fall 1971 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JtN"lE,lD J'tD . //Er'tt;.i' rtD)tlz !" 7 t r0]l, Dur']ynNt'l'Iy' l''1N llN Etlu ? ul. 'rtD)tx lJytl llNl'l']yl Dyx rJgr1pn1: 0y trlu lt-rtEtsi7 ':rtD .ErrlxllI'tNl yu''by-r llb)

Admin, LAYCC

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Rt Peak",41246,41247,41247,31.5,31.5,31.5,-1.5,1600,2,3 Indiana Rt Peak",41246,41247,41247,31.5,31.5,31.5,-1.5,1600,2,3 "Indiana Rt Peak",41247,41248,41248,34,33.5,33.75,2.25,1600,2,3 "Indiana Rt Peak",41248,41249,41249,37.25,37,37.13,3.38,8000,10,9 "Indiana Rt Peak",41249,41250,41250,34.25,33.25,33.67,-3.46,2400,3,6 "Indiana Rt Peak",41250,41253,41253,38.25,37,37.5,3.83,12800,16,13 "Indiana Rt Peak",41253,41254,41254,37.75,37.5,37.63,0.13,1600,2,4 "Indiana Rt Peak",41254,41255,41255,34,34,34,-3.63,2400,3,4 "Indiana Rt Peak",41255,41256,41256,32.25,32,32.19,-1.81,3200,4,6 "Indiana Rt Peak",41256,41257,41257,31,31,31,-1.19,1600,2,3 "Indiana Rt Peak",41257,41260,41260,33,32,32.5,1.5,1600,2,4 "Indiana Rt Peak",41260,41261,41261,33.9,33.5,33.66,1.16,3200,4,7

208

A CSP View on UMLRT structure diagrams Clemens Fischer, ErnstRudiger Olderog and Heike Wehrheim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A CSP View on UML­RT structure diagrams Clemens Fischer, Ernst­R¨udiger Olderog and Heike Wehrheim UML­RT structure diagrams together with the formal method CSP­OZ combining CSP and Object­Z. While CSP­OZ is used for specifying the system components themselves (by CSP­OZ classes), UML­RT diagrams provide

Olderog, Ernst-Rüdiger

209

Process Selection: Immersion Coating versus Spray Coating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...(d) 82 180 6 7 Neutralizing rinse NaNO 2 , 1.1 g/L (9.2 ? 10 -3 lb/gal) RT RT 1 8 Lubricant Soap, 10 wt% 66 150 6 RT, room temperature. (a) When lime is present in water, sequestering

210

Supplementary Note Contributions of low molecule number and chromosomal positioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of active rtTA. The concentration i denotes the relative doxycycline concentration, so that i=1 if all rtTA molecules are in the active form. i=0 (doxycycline is absent) if all rtTA molecules are inactive. The rate b denotes the basal expression rate at the tetO7 promoter. The rate s involves fast reactions (doxycycline

van Oudenaarden, Alexander

211

Controlling the dynamics of classical and quantum information in spin systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he text of hpter ssD in prtD is reprint of the mterihe text of hpter ssD in prtD is reprint of the mterilhe text of hpter sD in prtD is reprint of the mteril

Dalal, Parin B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

How Do You Adapt Your Energy Use During the Winter-to-Spring Transition? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Adapt Your Energy Use During the Winter-to-Spring Adapt Your Energy Use During the Winter-to-Spring Transition? How Do You Adapt Your Energy Use During the Winter-to-Spring Transition? March 3, 2011 - 8:47am Addthis This week, we wrapped up February and bid a hearty hello to March-and the coming spring! It's still early, though, and spring hasn't fully sprung yet. While you may be having a warm day here and there, cold and snowy days are still cropping up in many parts of the country. This up-and-down weather can be difficult to adapt to, especially when you're trying to maximize your energy savings. So we'd like to hear your tricks. How do you adapt your energy use during the winter-to-spring transition? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please e-mail

213

How Do You Adapt Your Energy Use During the Winter-to-Spring Transition? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Do You Adapt Your Energy Use During the Winter-to-Spring How Do You Adapt Your Energy Use During the Winter-to-Spring Transition? How Do You Adapt Your Energy Use During the Winter-to-Spring Transition? March 3, 2011 - 8:47am Addthis This week, we wrapped up February and bid a hearty hello to March-and the coming spring! It's still early, though, and spring hasn't fully sprung yet. While you may be having a warm day here and there, cold and snowy days are still cropping up in many parts of the country. This up-and-down weather can be difficult to adapt to, especially when you're trying to maximize your energy savings. So we'd like to hear your tricks. How do you adapt your energy use during the winter-to-spring transition? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please e-mail

214

Training Topic Group Conference Call Meeting Minutes December 16, 1998  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Minutes December 16, 1998 Meeting Minutes December 16, 1998 Participants Included: Aubrey Godwin Tammy Ottmer Tom Hughes Jim Price Deena LaRue Tom Smith Bill Lent Wilbur Smith Dan McGee Gordon Veerman STATUS OF CHICAGO COMMENTS RESOLUTION MEETING On December 9-10, 1998, Jim Price, John Moran, Tom Clawson, Gordon Veerman, and Bill Ruting met in Chicago to review comments that were received on the draft training modules. Four major items appeared during this review: Material doesn't flow well. Material is not sequenced to fit the training levels normally associated with HAZMAT emergency response training. There is a significant amount of information that is not necessary for first responders to know. The training material needs to be reinforced with

215

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Cloud Radar Upgrades: Wave Cloud Radar Upgrades: Review, Status, and Plans K.B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington K.P. Moran National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration- Earth System Research Laboratory-Physical Sciences Division Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program currently operates five millimeter-wave cloud radars (MMCRs) at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale's Barrow site, and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale's Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. Currently, three different signal processors are deployed, and we are in process of upgrading the remaining two radars to provide higher reliability and efficiency along with

216

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALSTOM'S DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED CFB BASED TECHNOLOGIES ALSTOM'S DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED CFB BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR CO 2 MITIGATION David G. Turek (david.g.turek@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2128) Gregory N. Liljedahl (greg.n.liljedahl@power.alstom.com; 860-285-4833) Nsakala ya Nsakala (nsakala.y.nsakala@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2018) Herbert E. Andrus (herbert.e.andrus@power.alstom.com; 860-285-4770) John H. Chiu (john.h.chiu@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2735) ALSTOM Power Inc. Power Plant Laboratories 2000 Day Hill Road Windsor, CT, USA 06095 Jean-Xavier Morin (jean-xavier.morin@power.alstom.com; +33 1 34 65 45 98) ALSTOM Power Boilers 19/21, Avenue Morane-Saulnier - BP 74 Vélizy Cedex, France Paper Presented at the 4th Annual Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 2 - 5, 2005 Alexandria, Virginia, USA

217

Climate Vision: Presidential Statements  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The President on Energy Efficiency and Job Creation The President on Energy Efficiency and Job Creation Home Depot Alexandria, Virginia December 15, 2009 (Read the White House Press page.) THE PRESIDENT: Hello, everybody. Hello! Hello! (Applause.) Thank you guys. Thank you. Everybody, please have a seat. We've got a couple of special guests here today. First of all, the outstanding senator from the great Commonwealth of Virginia, Senator Mark Warner is here. Where's Mark? Right there. (Applause.) We've got a couple of champions for job creation here in Northern Virginia -- Gerry Connolly and Jim Moran. (Applause.) Can I just ask, how come they got the Home Depot thing and you guys don't have it? (Laughter.) What, the senators are too cool to put it on? What's going on here? (Laughter.) Working to jumpstart our retrofit efforts around the country, Senator Jeff

218

Five LBA Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use-Land Change Data Sets Released Use-Land Change Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of three data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-09 Land Cover Transitions Maps for Study Sites in Para, Brazil: 1970-2001 . Data set prepared by E.S. Brondizio and E.F. Moran. This data set includes classified land cover transition maps at 30-m resolution derived from Landsat TM, MSS, ETM+ imagery and aerial photos of Altamira, Santarem, and Ponta de Pedras, in the state of Para, Brazil. The Landsat images were classified into several types of land use and subjected to change detection analysis to create transition matrices of land cover change. LBA-ECO LC-22 Post-deforestation Land Use, Mato Grosso, Brazil:

219

Eduardo S. Brondizio,¹ Anthony Cak,² Marcellus M. Caldas,³ Carlos Mena,⁴  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 a 143 7 a 143 Pequenos Produtores e o Desmatamento na Amazônia Eduardo S. Brondizio,¹ Anthony Cak,² Marcellus M. Caldas,³ Carlos Mena,⁴ , ⁵ Richard Bilsborrow,⁶ Celia Futemma,⁷ Thomas Ludewigs,⁸ Emilio F. Moran,¹ e Mateus Batistella⁹ Este capítulo discute a relação entre o uso da terra por pequenos agricultores e o desmatamento, com uma atenção especial aos últimos 30 anos da colonização amazônica no Brasil e Equador. Nossa análise chama a atenção para aspectos comuns que unem diferentes grupos sociais, como os pequenos produtores (ex. identidade social, acesso à terra e recursos, tecnologia, mercado e crédito), assim como para a variabilidade entre pequenos produtores em termos de tempo de permanência na

220

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEWS RELEASE For Immediate Release: Contacts: Jill Moran, BLM (202) 452-5068 Wednesday, November 26, 2008 Bethany Shively, DOE (202) 586-4940 Joe Walsh, USFS (202) 205-1134 http://corridoreis.anl.gov Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement On Energy Corridor Designation in the West Four Federal agencies today released a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Final PEIS) proposing to designate more than 6,000 miles of energy transport corridors on Federal lands in 11 Western States. The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Departments of Energy, Agriculture, and Defense (the Agencies) prepared the Final PEIS as part of their work to implement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

UCRL-CONF-212699 Hydrodynamic  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

CONF-212699 CONF-212699 Hydrodynamic test problems B. Moran June 6, 2005 Five Lab Conference Vienna, Austria June 20, 2005 through June 24, 2005 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United

222

MMCR Upgrades: Present Status and Future Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MMCR Upgrades: Present Status and Future Plans MMCR Upgrades: Present Status and Future Plans K. B. Widener and A. S. Koontz Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington K. P. Moran and K. A. Clark National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado C. Chander STC xxxxxxxxx M. A. Miller and K. L. Johnson Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Abstract In September 2003, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) was upgraded to a new digital signal processor that significantly increases the temporal resolution and the processing capability of the MMCR. The Barrow MMCR upgrade will be completed in early 2004. We will discuss the hardware and software C40 upgrade to the MMCRs at SGP and Barrow and the plans

223

Impact of preoperative radiation for rectal cancer on subsequent lymph node evaluation: A population-based analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) on the accuracy of lymph node staging (LNS). Preoperative RT is a well-established component of rectal cancer treatment but its impact on LNS is unknown. Methods and materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry, representing 14% of the U.S. population, was used to assess the impact of preoperative RT on LNS. Our study population consisted of adults with rectal cancer between 1998 and 2000 who underwent radical resection. Results: In our 3-year study period, 5647 patients met the selection criteria and 1034 (19.5%) underwent preoperative RT. The preoperative RT group was younger (average age, 61 years) than those who did not undergo preoperative RT (average age, 69 years) and more likely to be male (22% of men vs. 16% of women). On average, fewer nodes were examined in patients who underwent preoperative RT (7 nodes) vs. those who did not (10 nodes); this difference was statistically significant, controlling for potential confounders (p {<=} 0.0001). In 16% of the preoperative RT patients (vs. 7.5% without), no nodes were identified (p {<=} 0.0001). If one used a minimum of 12 nodes as the standard, only 20% of patients who underwent preoperative RT underwent adequate LNS. Conclusion: Lymph node staging in patients who undergo preoperative RT must be interpreted with caution. Studies are needed to evaluate the clinical relevance of node number and pathologic staging after preoperative RT for rectal cancer.

Baxter, Nancy N. [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)]. E-mail: baxte025@umn.edu; Morris, Arden M. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rothenberger, David A. [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Tepper, Joel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

One-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue, Cognitive Functions, and Quality of Life After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Methods and Materials: Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. Results: At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom.

Noal, Sabine [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Levy, Christelle [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Hardouin, Agnes [Department of Medical Biology, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Rieux, Chantal [Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Heutte, Natacha [Universite de Caen Basse Normandie GRECAN, Caen (France); Segura, Carine [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Collet, Fabienne [Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Henry-Amar, Michel [Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Joly, Florence, E-mail: f.joly@baclesse.fr [Medical Oncology Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Clinical Research Department, Centre Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); CHU, Cote de Nacre, Caen (France)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Foley, Kathleen A. [Strategic Consulting, Thomson Reuters Healthcare, Cambridge, MA (United States); Keith, Scott W. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D. [Department of Urology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hoffman-Censits, Jean [Department of Medical Oncology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pizzi, Laura T. [School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gomella, Leonard G. [Department of Urology, Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Predictive Factors for Radiation Pneumonitis in Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Receiving Combined-Modality Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study sought to quantify the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients receiving mediastinal radiation therapy (RT) and to identify predictive factors for RP. Methods and Materials: We identified 75 patients with newly diagnosed HL treated with mediastinal RT and 17 patients with relapsed/refractory HL treated with mediastinal RT before or after transplant. Lung dose-volumetric parameters including mean lung dose and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy were calculated. Factors associated with RP were explored by use of the Fisher exact test. Results: RP developed in 7 patients (10%) who received mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1 in 6 cases). A mean lung dose of 13.5 Gy or greater (p = 0.04) and percentage of lungs receiving 20 Gy of 33.5% or greater (p = 0.009) significantly predicted for RP. RP developed in 6 patients (35%) with relapsed/refractory HL treated with peri-transplant mediastinal RT (Grade 3 in 4 cases). Pre-transplant mediastinal RT, compared with post-transplant mediastinal RT, significantly predicted for Grade 3 RP (57% vs. 0%, p = 0.015). Conclusions: We identified threshold lung metrics predicting for RP in HL patients receiving mediastinal RT as part of initial therapy, with the majority of cases being of mild severity. The risk of RP is significantly higher with peri-transplant mediastinal RT, especially among those who receive pre-transplant RT.

Fox, Amy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); 21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Dosoretz, Arie P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Fisher, David C.; LaCasce, Ann S.; Freedman, Arnold S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Ng, Andrea K., E-mail: ang@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

Dunn, Emily F., E-mail: dunn@humonc.wisc.ed [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Moody, John S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Quantitative Assessment of Range Fluctuations in Charged Particle Lung Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Water equivalent path length (WEL) variations due to respiration can change the range of a charged particle beam and result in beam overshoot to critical organs or beam undershoot to tumor. We have studied range fluctuations by analyzing four-dimensional computed tomography data and quantitatively assessing potential beam overshoot. Methods and Materials: The maximal intensity volume is calculated by combining the gross tumor volume contours at each respiratory phase in the four-dimensional computed tomography study. The first target volume calculates the maximal intensity volume for the entire respiratory cycle (internal target volume [ITV]-radiotherapy [RT]), and the second target volume is the maximal intensity volume corresponding to gated RT (gated-RT, {approx}30% phase window around exhalation). A compensator at each respiratory phase is calculated. Two 'composite' compensators for ITV-RT and gated-RT are then designed by selecting the minimal compensator depth at the respective respiratory phase. These compensators are then applied to the four-dimensional computed tomography data to estimate beam penetration. Analysis metrics include range fluctuation and overshoot volume, both as a function of gantry angle. We compared WEL fluctuations observed in treating the ITV-RT versus gated-RT in 11 lung patients. Results: The WEL fluctuations were <21.8 mm-WEL and 9.5 mm-WEL for ITV-RT and gated-RT, respectively for all patients. Gated-RT reduced the beam overshoot volume by approximately a factor of four compared with ITV-RT. Such range fluctuations can affect the efficacy of treatment and result in an excessive dose to a distal critical organ. Conclusion: Time varying range fluctuation analysis provides information useful for determining appropriate patient-specific treatment parameters in charged particle RT. This analysis can also be useful for optimizing planning and delivery.

Mori, Shinichiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: shinshin@nirs.go.jp; Wolfgang, John; Lu, H.-M.; Schneider, Robert; Choi, Noah C.; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Prolonged Time Interval Between Trauma and Prophylactic Radiation Therapy Significantly Increases the Risk of Heterotopic Ossification  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To ascertain whether the time from injury to prophylactic radiation therapy (RT) influences the rate of heterotopic ossification (HO) after operative treatment of displaced acetabular fractures. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution, retrospective analysis of patients referred for RT for the prevention of HO. Between January 2000 and January 2009, 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures were treated surgically followed by RT for HO prevention. We analyzed the effect of time from injury on prevention of HO by RT. In all patients, 700 cGy was prescribed in a single fraction and delivered within 72 hours postsurgery. The patients were stratified into five groups according to time interval (in days) from the date of their accident to the date of RT: Groups A {<=}3, B {<=}7, C {<=}14, D {<=}21, and E >21days. Results: Of the 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures treated with RT, (18%) 106 patients developed HO within the irradiated field. The risk of HO after RT increased from 10% for RT delivered {<=}3 days to 92% for treatment delivered >21 days after the initial injury. Wilcoxon test showed a significant correlation between the risk of HO and the length of time from injury to RT (p < 0.0001). Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis showed no significant association between all other factors and the risk of HO (race, gender, cause and type of fracture, surgical approach, or the use of indomethacin). Conclusions: Our data suggest that there is higher incidence and risk of HO if prophylactic RT is significantly delayed after a displaced acetabular fracture. Thus, RT should be administered as early as clinically possible after the trauma. Patients undergoing RT >3 weeks from their displaced acetabular fracture should be informed of the higher risk (>90%) of developing HO despite prophylaxis.

Mourad, Waleed F., E-mail: Waleed246@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (Israel); Packianathan, Satyaseelan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Shourbaji, Rania A. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS (United States); Zhang Zhen; Graves, Mathew [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Khan, Majid A. [Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Baird, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Russell, George [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation #12;Basic Thermodynamics Helmoholtz free energy A = U ­ TS + i Ni dA = wrev (reversible, const N V T) eq (22.9) McQuarrie & Simon Gibbs free energy G = U;Implication of Free Energy A B Keq = [A]/[B] Keq = exp (-G0 /RT) G0 = -RT ln Keq G = G0 + RT ln Q G > 0

Nielsen, Steven O.

231

Khesbn no. 87-88 - April 1977 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Admin, LAYCC

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Khesbn no. 52-53 - October - December 1968 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tyl FJS; lt$ii . ? yttU? tp 'rtD llfti ? yty:513t5 ttD 'JtNry-ry)ru N ,''tyt:b N ,.I:rtD . 'l,tlJ .pb llg lJlrTtl T6 IJl ,Dlg'l'r' l:&r y:)yr,D;t:RtD-ryl yi7''rbr? ypl, Eyllyl$ti

Admin, LAYCC

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Khesbn no. 50 - January-March 1968 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Admin, LAYCC

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Khesbn no. 98 - Autumn 1981 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Admin, LAYCC

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Khesbn no. 26-27 - October 1961 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Admin, LAYCC

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Khesbn no. 71-72 - April 1973 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Admin, LAYCC

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Khesbn no. 9 - January 1957 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Admin, LAYCC

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Khesbn no. 83-84 - April 1976 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Admin, LAYCC

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Khesbn no. 104 - Autumn 1984 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Admin, LAYCC

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Khesbn no. 107 - Spring 1987 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

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Admin, LAYCC

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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241

Khesbn no. 54 - January-March 1969 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IlNl jlll u"1lylD'']N J:Sn rtD bt;'1 .I1'r:}i-]! 1N -TNnt'N ltN )ruo Ery ltr'tr rtD ,rr)ND rJ)tJ E$iz Elr 1:1 1y".by:x: izl-$rlt Jtx ,i7'"rtD. 'tl 'lrt J)N|J t lrrJ -''yllj ,

Admin, LAYCC

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Khesbn no. 44 - April 1966 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EttP:y? ::Li:lSD 1tt1'3 "'rtD ,ll! )tsi-lsD ''l"t ?! 2y? D!jtN P''ri) ,D'''ly:"'tt yl''rtD Dt'11{ , lt: ll-:" l] Ly ,Elli'T lrtg oyt! tt llyl"rtD Eyt''N ii2'li2t''! '1N plbf

Admin, LAYCC

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

q q  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphics 4569/2007 (2007)" DOI : 10.1007/978-3-540-73214-3_21 #12;PRE-PRINT r rt s r s r sst t t r tt ss t t r strt t st rr t r ss t t t t ts st t r ttr t r tt ss t r rrt s t rt t t r rt t t ts r

Recanati, Catherine

244

A host of vital, current, and developing technologies, including ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mark.Saeys@rug.ac.be. c ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company. 1545 Rt. ... Annandale, NJ, 08801. jeffrey.m.grenda@exxonmobil.com. ...

245

NIST Thermophysical Properties of  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... After the installation process has been completed successfully, you ... factor (defined as Z=PV/RT), density (D ... It is used to install SUPERTRAPP on non ...

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Mechanical Dross Processing: The Approach to Zero Waste from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RT Metal/Reclaimer manufactured by DIDION has now allowed small volume dross generators the ability to use this type of technology. This paper will

247

Literacy Progress Monitoring: Efficiency Versus Stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011). A systematic view of RTI research: Introduction toPyramid response to intervention: RTI, professional learningis Response to Intervention (RtI), or a Multitiered Systems

Garcia, Melissa Jeanne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

CLE14/CLE20 peptides may interact with CLAVATA2/CORYNE receptor-like kinases to irreversibly inhibit cell division in the root meristem of Arabidopsis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a detailed analysis of the mitotic activities in the RAM ofactivity in the RAM. Using RTPCR analysis, several CLE (

Meng, Ling; Feldman, Lewis J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Appendix C Statistical Considerations - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

d R C R Radj SO Oth EP IN ... Rt = the reported revenue from natural gas transported by local distribution companies for marketers within the State in ...

250

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Visual TTH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(RT 91, 2000, 2004 and 2005). Report under Word in RTF partly personalised. Easy email transmission. Easy to store in an electronic file record. Computer Platform PC, Windows...

251

Changes in Global Function and Regional Ventilation and Perfusion on SPECT During the Course of Radiotherapy in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study aimed to (1) examine changes in dyspnea, global pulmonary function test (PFT) results, and functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scans during the course of radiation (RT), and (2) factors associated with the changes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifty-six stage I to III NSCLC patients treated with definitive RT with or without chemotherapy were enrolled prospectively. Dyspnea was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 prior to and weekly during RT. V/Q SPECT-computed tomography (CT) and PFTs were performed prior to and during RT at approximately 45 Gy. Functions of V and Q activities were assessed using a semiquantitative scoring of SPECT images. Results: Breathing improved significantly at the third week (mean dyspnea grade, 0.8 vs. 0.6; paired t-test p = 0.011) and worsened during the later course of RT (p > 0.05). Global PFT results did not change significantly, while regional lung function on V/Q SPECT improved significantly after {approx}45 Gy. The V defect score (DS) was 4.9 pre-RT versus 4.3 during RT (p = 0.01); Q DS was 4.3 pre-RT versus 4.0 during RT (p < 0.01). Improvements in V and Q functions were seen primarily in the ipsilateral lung (V DS, 1.9 pre-RT versus 1.4 during RT, p < 0.01; Q DS, 1.7 pre-RT versus 1.5 during RT, p < 0.01). Baseline primary tumor volume was significantly correlated with pre-RT V/Q DS (p < 0.01). Patients with central lung tumors had greater interval changes in V and Q than those with more peripheral tumors (p <0.05 for both V and Q DS). Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion improved during RT at 45 Gy. This suggests that adaptive planning based on V/Q SPECT during RT may allow sparing of functionally recoverable lung tissue.

Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Shaexamndong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Frey, Kirk A.; Gross, Milton D. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Arenberg, Doug [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ramnath, Nithya; Hassan, Khaled [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Veterans' Affairs Health Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

DD1, Enhanced Spin Injection and Spin Lifetimes in Graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gate tunable spin transport and spin precession in non-local single layer graphene (SLG) spin valves at room temperature (RT) were was demonstrated in 2007.

253

Cars and the City: An Investigation of Transportation and Residential Location Choices in New York City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weighted) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Car Ownership inof Private Car Riding Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 4.11 Number of Cars Per Household from the RT-HIS Sample

Salon, Deborah

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Cryptographic Module Validation Program FIPS 140-1 and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 Kingston DataTraveler DT4000 Series USB Flash Drive ... Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, and Windows RT Enhanced DSS and Diffie- Hellman ...

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

255

Optimal Real-time Dispatch for Integrated Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Fundamentals PJM Historical RT hourly pricing. NOx NP NRC NREL OLS P&DC PJM PUCT PURPA PV RETScreen RReDCfollowing sources. Baltimore PJM Interconnection clearing

Firestone, Ryan Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Operator Combined cycle gas turbine Continuousinclude natural gas combined cycle (CCGTs) and combustiona balance in RT. The combined-cycle vintage (CCGT) modeled

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

CHAPTER 4 (Addendum re Corrosion Kinetics) Corrosion Kinetics, WTE Emissions and the Effects of HCl and SO2 to Corrosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ( )( ) ( )soxoxcon P RT D MZK = (65b) where: Mox = the molar mass of the oxide ox = density of the oxide 4

Columbia University

258

Rare Earth and Magnetic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetoresistance Effect Using Co Based Full Heusler Electrodes: Nobuki ... Here we report giant TMR observation at room temperature (RT) for the MTJ using...

259

Magnetoresistance Effect Using Co Based Full Heusler Electrodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After our first observation of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) using a Co2(Fe ... Here we report giant TMR observation at room temperature (RT) for the MTJ...

260

Characteristics of Polymer Films Deposited via Microwave Plasma ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thin films were deposited on both Al and glass substrates at RT by MPECVD using benzene as precursor. Surface and physical properties of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Coatings for Wear and Corrosion III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin films were deposited on both Al and glass substrates at RT by MPECVD using benzene as precursor. Surface and physical properties of deposited films...

262

Journal of Research Volume 22  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... point pressure of plastic clay, p. 329 Stull, RT; Johnson, PV http://dx ... Solubility of colored glazes in organic acids, p. 441 Geller, RF; Creamer, AS http ...

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

NIST r ecommended practice guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gas Absorption Surface Area Analysis (E) [BET Absorption] ... where, ? is the angular velocity of the centrifuge, r0 and rt are the radial positions of the ...

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

NIST Sigma-Xi Post Doc Posters for 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (B) LeeAnn O. Bailey The Quantification of Inflammatory Cellular Responses Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) 48. ...

265

Development of quantitative real time PCR to assess human brain microvascular endothelial cell susceptibility to HIV -1 infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Quantitative Real Time PCR to Assess Human Brainof the PCR assays.. 18and optimization of qRT-PCR assays specific for different

Chao, Ying Sheng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Improving Transit Performance With Advanced Public Transportation System Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

News VA RT, Sacramento CA RTA, New Orleans LA RTD, DenverCO RTD-Pace, Chicago Il RTS, Rochester NY SamTrans, San

Hansen, Mark; Qureshi, Mohammad; Rydzewski, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Khesbn. no 56-57 - October - December 1968 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t'H Ey'T , l 'r y n nE .rtD Ey? tN ,rT [r:s'']tJs: rNlns ? ]glstE :'T l.tN"l :)N 'rtD lrl$'r "ty)tBlJ 0$1I tyl'rNtJy tr'ttlyD u)tJ . 'l! t ''rtD l'lyrilslD bST JIN DSDD$l>

Admin, LAYCC

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

APPLICATIONS OF DELAYED NEUTRON ACTIVATION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... flux from the RT2 facility at the NBSR reactor. ... threat of illicit and clandestine nuclear activities has ... a significant concern for Homeland Security in the ...

269

Microsoft PowerPoint - AMSC SolarTie.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solutions * Worldwide leader in connecting renewable energy sources to the power grid * D-VAR and D-VAR RT technology utilized at more than 70 wind plants...

270

The Use of Radiation Therapy Appears to Improve Outcome in Patients With Malignant Primary Tracheal Tumors: A SEER-Based Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To conduct a matched pair analysis assessing the impact of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with resectable and unresectable primary malignant tracheal tumors using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. Patients and Methods: The SEER registry was used to identify every patient (or 'case') who received RT between 1988 and 2007 for primary malignant tracheal tumors, and to search for corresponding 'controls' (not treated with RT), with the same prognostic and treatment factors (surgery on the trachea, disease extension, histology, and gender). Overall survival (OS) was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier methods. Results of OS and cumulative incidence of death from tracheal cancer in the cases and controls, and in various subsets, were compared using log-rank and Gray's tests. Results: Two hundred fifty-eight patients who received RT were identified, and 78 of these had appropriate matched controls identified, forming the basis of this analysis. In the 78 (+RT) cases, the median follow-up was 60 months (range, 10-192) in the survivors vs. 55 months (range, 2-187) in the controls (no-RT group). Patients in RT group had significantly better OS, and a lower cumulative incidence of death from tracheal cancer than no-RT patients (p < 0.05). Treatment with radiation was associated with improved survival in patients with squamous cell histology [p < 0.0001], regional disease extension [p = 0.030], or those that did not undergo resection [p = 0.038]. There were four deaths in RT group and three in no-RT group attributed to cardiac and respiratory causes. Conclusion: Our data suggest a survival benefit for the use of RT broadly for all patients with tracheal cancer. Nevertheless, the retrospective nature of this observational study limits its interpretation.

Xie Liyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Fan Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Sheets, Nathan C.; Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Jiang, Guo-Liang, E-mail: jianggl@shca.org.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Marks, Lawrence B., E-mail: marks@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Neoadjuvant Radiation Is Associated With Improved Survival in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: An Analysis of Data From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation has been investigated in several trials as a strategy for downstaging locally advanced disease to resectability. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of neoadjuvant radiation therapy (RT) vs. other treatments on long-term survival for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer in a large population-based sample group. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry database (1994-2003) was queried for cases of surgically resected pancreatic cancer. Retrospective analysis was performed. The endpoint of the study was overall survival. Results: Using Kaplan-Meier analysis we found that the median overall survival of patients receiving neoadjuvant RT was 23 months vs. 12 months with no RT and 17 months with adjuvant RT. Using Cox regression and controlling for independent covariates (age, sex, stage, grade, and year of diagnosis), we found that neoadjuvant RT results in significantly higher rates of survival than other treatments (hazard ratio [HR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.79; p = 0.001). Specifically comparing adjuvant with neoadjuvant RT, we found a significantly lower HR for death in patients receiving neoadjuvant RT rather than adjuvant RT (HR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.90; p = 0.03). Conclusions: This analysis of SEER data showed a survival benefit for the use of neoadjuvant RT over surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant RT in treating pancreatic cancer. Therapeutic strategies that use neoadjuvant RT should be further explored for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

Stessin, Alexander M. [Tri-Institutional M.D.-Ph.D. Program, New York, NY (United States); Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY (United States); Meyer, Joshua E. [New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Sherr, David L. [New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: dls9003@med.cornell.edu

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Testing for spatial correlation and semiparametric spatial modeling of binary outcomes with application to aberrant crypt foci in colon carcinogenesis experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an experiment to understand colon carcinogenesis, all animals were exposed to a carcinogen while half the animals were also exposed to radiation. Spatially, we measured the existence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), namely morphologically changed colonic crypts that are known to be precursors of colon cancer development. The biological question of interest is whether the locations of these ACFs are spatially correlated: if so, this indicates that damage to the colon due to carcinogens and radiation is localized. Statistically, the data take the form of binary outcomes (corresponding to the existence of an ACF) on a regular grid. We develop score??type methods based upon the Matern and conditionally autoregression (CAR) correlation models to test for the spatial correlation in such data, while allowing for nonstationarity. Because of a technical peculiarity of the score??type test, we also develop robust versions of the method. The methods are compared to a generalization of Moran??s test for continuous outcomes, and are shown via simulation to have the potential for increased power. When applied to our data, the methods indicate the existence of spatial correlation, and hence indicate localization of damage. Assuming that there are correlations in the locations of the ACF, the questions are how great are these correlations, and whether the correlation structures di?er when an animal is exposed to radiation. To understand the extent of the correlation, we cast the problem as a spatial binary regression, where binary responses arise from an underlying Gaussian latent process. We model these marginal probabilities of ACF semiparametrically, using ?xed-knot penalized regression splines and single-index models. We ?t the models using pairwise pseudolikelihood methods. Assuming that the underlying latent process is strongly mixing, known to be the case for many Gaussian processes, we prove asymptotic normality of the methods. The penalized regression splines have penalty parameters that must converge to zero asymptotically: we derive rates for these parameters that do and do not lead to an asymptotic bias, and we derive the optimal rate of convergence for them. Finally, we apply the methods to the data from our experiment.

Apanasovich, Tatiyana Vladimirovna

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Real-time magnetic resonance imagingguided radiofrequency atrial ablation and visualization of lesion formation at 3 Tesla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of lesion formation at 3 Tesla Gaston R. Vergara, MD,* Sathya Vijayakumar, MS,* Eugene G. Kholmovski, Ph. In this study, we report a novel 3-Tesla RT -RI based porcine RF ablation model and visuali- zation of lesion-Tesla RT MRI-based catheter ablation and lesion visualization system. METHODS RF energy was delivered

Utah, University of

275

Journal of Process Control 22 (2012) 809822 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a classical valve equation [24] wout = Coutu m(pr,t - ps) The density of the mixture m is assumed constant,in - Coutu l(x2 - ps) (7) with a = RT MVeb , b = lRT M , c = g sin ? A , ml = lVr - ml,still (8) pr,t = x2

276

An enhanced dynamic voltage scaling scheme for energy-efficient embedded real-time control systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real-Time Dynamic Voltage Scaling (RT-DVS) has been one of the most important techniques for energy savings in battery-powered embedded systems. However, pure RT-DVS approaches rarely take into account the actual performance requirements of the target ...

Feng Xia; Youxian Sun

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Bharatiya Darshanme Nirvana Ka Svarup - Ek Adhyayan (A Study on Nirvana)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.&CfiP!CfiIl! - mlT 4 (2) 't1RtI" ~ CflTl:f if ~ I 3Td": ~ ~ ~ WIT ~ I r@ fcl~o.&tr\\ll ~ I (2) ~ ~ RtI" m-m ~ I ~ ~ ~ l1 r ?lifl., ~ ~ I ~ CflTl:f cF IDU dl1R1J! wf...

Yogi, P. G.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE FLAMES: RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRETCHING VERSUS TURBULENT WRINKLING  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we provide support for the Rayleigh-Taylor-(RT)-based subgrid model used in full-star simulations of deflagrations in Type Ia supernovae explosions. We use the results of a parameter study of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an RT unstable model flame to distinguish between the two main types of subgrid models (RT or turbulence dominated) in the flamelet regime. First, we give scalings for the turbulent flame speed, the Reynolds number, the viscous scale, and the size of the burning region as the non-dimensional gravity (G) is varied. The flame speed is well predicted by an RT-based flame speed model. Next, the above scalings are used to calculate the Karlovitz number (Ka) and to discuss appropriate combustion regimes. No transition to thin reaction zones is seen at Ka = 1, although such a transition is expected by turbulence-dominated subgrid models. Finally, we confirm a basic physical premise of the RT subgrid model, namely, that the flame is fractal, and thus self-similar. By modeling the turbulent flame speed, we demonstrate that it is affected more by large-scale RT stretching than by small-scale turbulent wrinkling. In this way, the RT instability controls the flame directly from the large scales. Overall, these results support the RT subgrid model.

Hicks, E. P. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Rosner, R., E-mail: eph2001@columbia.edu [Computation Institute, University of Chicago, 5735 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Platinum Group Thiophenoxyimine Complexes: Syntheses, Crystallographic and Computational Studies of Structural Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prepared, see ref. 10b. Ir(cod) 2 Cl used as iridium source4 MS R.T. , 2 d S M N [M(cod)Cl] 2 THF, RT S N Ar Zn Ar2 undergo reaction with [M(cod)Cl] 2 to form L 1 M(cod) (M =

Krinsky, Jamin L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Ray tracing visualization toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ray Tracing Visualization Toolkit (rtVTK) is a collection of programming and visualization tools supporting visual analysis of ray-based rendering algorithms. rtVTK leverages layered visualization within the spatial domain of computation, enabling ... Keywords: ray tracing, ray-based rendering, visualization

Christiaan Gribble; Jeremy Fisher; Daniel Eby; Ed Quigley; Gideon Ludwig

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Detecting and characterizing HIV-1 intraclade dual infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method: Single Genome Sequencing (SGS) 3.2.4 Cost and TimePlasma 2.2.3 Single Genome Sequencing of C2-V3 and RT fromPlasma 2.3.2 Single Genome Sequencing of C2-V3 and RT from

Pacold, Mary Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

*This research was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy Advanced Research Materials Program, DOE/FE AA1510100, and Work Breakdown Structure Element IMTL-3 (B). Oak Ridge National Laboratory is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diameters available in commercial inorganic membranes are about 4 nm. ORNL has been engaged Transport All dp Variable dp -1 P exp[(Ha! - Es)/RT] Capillary Condensation f(P) Variable Nanopore Diffusion 3 dm > dp Highest m-1/2 dp T-1/2 exp[!-Ed/RT] STATUS OF APPROVAL OF MEMBRANES FOR COMMERCIALIZATION

283

Timing of Radiotherapy and Outcome in Patients Receiving Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the association between the interval from breast-conserving surgery (BCS) to radiotherapy (RT) and the clinical outcome among patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients and Methods: Patient information was obtained from three International Breast Cancer Study Group trials. The analysis was restricted to 964 patients treated with BCS and adjuvant endocrine therapy. The patients were divided into two groups according to the median number of days between BCS and RT and into four groups according to the quartile of time between BCS and RT. The endpoints were the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Proportional hazards regression analysis was used to perform comparisons after adjustment for baseline factors. Results: The median interval between BCS and RT was 77 days. RT timing was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, no significant effect of a RT delay {=}113 days. Conclusion: A RT delay of {<=}20 weeks was significantly associated with baseline factors such as age, menopausal status, and estrogen-receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, the timing of RT was not significantly associated with the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

Karlsson, Per, E-mail: per.karlsson@oncology.gu.s [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Cole, Bernard F. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, Burlington, VT (United States); International Breast Cancer Study Group Statistical Center, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Colleoni, Marco [Department of Medicine, Research Unit in Medical Senology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Roncadin, Mario [Department of Radiotherapy, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (Italy); Chua, Boon H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Murray, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Groote Shuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa); Price, Karen N. [International Breast Cancer Study Group Statistical Center, Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Boston, MA (United States); Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica [International Breast Cancer Study Group Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Goldhirsch, Aron [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Gruber, Guenther [Institut fuer Radiotherapie, Klinik Hirslanden, Zuerich (Switzerland)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Real-time static voltage scaling on multiprocessors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a real-time static voltage scaling (RT-SVS) technique called T-L plane transforming, which is an extension of LLREF, an optimal real-time scheduling algorithm for multiprocessor systems. We present two RT-SVS algorithms for different types ... Keywords: energy consumption, multiprocessor systems, real-time scheduling, real-time voltage scaling

Kenji Funaoka; Shinpei Kato; Nobuyuki Yamasaki

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

SU?GG?T?509: Development of a Database and Software Tools for Outcome Analysis of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose:Dose?volume response data for breast cancerradiotherapy (RT) are generally lacking. The purpose of this work is to develop a database and software tools to facilitate the analyses of short? and long?term radiationdose?volume responses of breast cancer RT. Method and Materials: As a part of the project aiming to develop the Research Analysis Platform and IGRTDatabases (RAPID)

P Prior; G Chen; X Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Khesbn no. 47 - June 1967 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r ,lJllls ID r''lhlN Ey'r l'lN 'rtD l''tll llylr i'I lylN'IlDy)ri2y) ,JUJllS- "tyt! )"rtD lJ'"l x ls] ly})I]ly'l'TNf

Admin, LAYCC

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Adoption of Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer From 2000 to 2006: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Patterns-of-Care Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The German rectal study determined that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) as a component of combined-modality therapy decreased local tumor recurrence, increased sphincter preservation, and decreased treatment toxicity compared with postoperative RT for rectal cancer. We evaluated the use of preoperative RT after the presentation of the landmark German rectal study results and examined the impact of tumor and sociodemographic factors on receiving preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: In total, 20,982 patients who underwent surgical resection for T3-T4 and/or node-positive rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2000 through 2006 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results tumor registries. We analyzed trends in preoperative RT use before and after publication of the findings from the German rectal study. We also performed multivariate logistic regression to identify factors associated with receiving preoperative RT. Results: Among those treated with RT, the proportion of patients treated with preoperative RT increased from 33.3% in 2000 to 63.8% in 2006. After adjustment for age; gender; race/ethnicity; marital status; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry; county-level education; T stage; N stage; tumor size; and tumor grade, there was a significant association between later year of diagnosis and an increase in preoperative RT use (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26/y increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.29). When we compared the years before and after publication of the German rectal study (2000-2003 vs. 2004-2006), patients were more likely to receive preoperative RT than postoperative RT in 2004-2006 (adjusted odds ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-2.59). On multivariate analysis, patients who were older, who were female, and who resided in counties with lower educational levels had significantly decreased odds of receiving preoperative RT. Conclusions: After the publication of the landmark German rectal study, there was widespread, rapid adoption of preoperative RT for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, preoperative RT may be underused in certain sociodemographic groups.

Mak, Raymond H. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, Ellen P. [Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Das, Prajnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffman, Karen E., E-mail: khoffman1@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Preoperative Versus Postoperative Radiotherapy in Soft-Tissue Sarcoma: Multi-Institutional Analysis of 821 Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the impact of radiotherapy (RT) sequencing with surgery on overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), local failure, and distant failure in soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was conducted using the National Oncology Database, a proprietary database of aggregated tumor registries owned by IMPAC Medical Systems (Sunnyvale, CA). Patients with STS of all major anatomic sites who received definitive surgery and either preoperative (preop) or postoperative (postop) RT were included. Patients were also required to have known stage and grade. Prognostic factors for survival were identified using multivariate techniques. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and compared for statistical significance (p < 0.05) using the log-rank test. Results: A total of 821 patients met inclusion criteria. The median follow-up time was 63 months. Age, stage, histology, gender, tumor size, and RT sequence were independent predictors for OS (p < 0.05). Preop RT was associated with significantly improved OS and CSS compared with postop RT (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.91, p < 0.01, and HR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.46-0.88, p < 0.01, respectively). The 5-year CSS was 79% and 74%, in favor of preop RT (log-rank, p < 0.05). Preop RT was also significantly associated with a reduced risk for local and distant relapse compared with postop RT. Conclusion: Preoperative RT is associated with a reduced cancer-specific mortality compared with postoperative RT in STS. The results of this study may serve as motivation to conduct future prospective studies with larger patient numbers.

Sampath, Sagus, E-mail: sagus.sampath@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Randall, R. Lor [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shrieve, Dennis C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okuno, Yoshishige [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Nishino, Shigeo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sapporo Kosei General Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo [Department of Radiology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane Medical University, Shimane (Japan); Karasawa, Kumiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

Nakamura, Naoki, E-mail: naokinak@luke.or.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan); Wada, Hitoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Miyagi Cancer Center, Natori (Japan); Harada, Hideyuki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, Mishima (Japan); Nozaki, Miwako [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Koshigaya (Japan); Nagakura, Hisayasu [Department of Radiology, KKR Sapporo Medical Center, Sapporo (Japan); Tago, Masao [Department of Radiology, Teikyo University Mizonokuchi Hospital, Kawasaki (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane University Hospital, Izumo (Japan)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Barriers to the Implementation of Surveillance for Stage I Testicular Seminoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Postorchiectomy adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for Stage I seminoma can be associated with long-term toxicity, and management strategies with a lower treatment burden achieve the same excellent cure rate. Because studies suggest that radiation oncologists in the United States continue to recommend RT for these patients, we sought to identify factors associated with management recommendations. Methods and Materials: We conducted a one-time internet-based survey among 491 randomly selected American radiation oncologists self-described as specializing in genitourinary oncology. Results: Response rate was 53% (n = 261). Forty-nine percent of respondents worked in university-affiliated practices. Sixty-two percent of respondents always/usually recommended adjuvant RT for patients with Stage I seminoma, whereas 21% always/usually recommended surveillance and 3% always/usually recommended chemotherapy. One third (33%) expressed concerns that patients who experienced relapse during surveillance could not be salvaged. Although 88% of physicians were aware of an increased risk of second malignant neoplasms (SMN) after adjuvant RT, 85% underestimated its magnitude. Compared with physicians not typically recommending RT, physicians who always/usually recommended RT were more likely to believe that patients might not be salvaged at relapse during surveillance (p = 0.008) and were less aware of the association between RT and SMN (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Respondents who always/usually recommend postorchiectomy RT for patients with Stage I seminoma are more likely to underestimate late RT morbidity and to believe that surveillance is associated with increased mortality. Given the equivalent efficacy and reduced morbidity of surveillance compared with RT, our findings underscore the need for ongoing physician education to increase appropriate clinical implementation of surveillance strategies.

Arvold, Nils D. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Catalano, Paul J. [Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, and Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, and Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sweeney, Christopher J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Nguyen, Paul L.; Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fossa, Sophie D. [Department of Clinical Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University, Oslo (Norway)] [Department of Clinical Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University, Oslo (Norway); Travis, Lois B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Beard, Clair J., E-mail: cbeard@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Can Drugs Enhance Hypofractionated Radiotherapy? A Novel Method of Modeling Radiosensitization Using In Vitro Data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy (hRT) is being explored for a number of malignancies. The potential benefit of giving concurrent chemotherapy with hRT is not known. We sought to predict the effects of combined modality treatments by using mathematical models derived from laboratory data. Methods and Materials: Data from 26 published clonogenic survival assays for cancer cell lines with and without the use of radiosensitizing chemotherapy were collected. The first three data points of the RT arm of each assay were used to derive parameters for the linear quadratic (LQ) model, the multitarget (MT) model, and the generalized linear quadratic (gLQ) model. For each assay and model, the difference between the predicted and observed surviving fractions at the highest tested RT dose was calculated. The gLQ model was fitted to all the data from each RT cell survival assay, and the biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2s) of clinically relevant hRT regimens were calculated. The increase in cell kill conferred by the addition of chemotherapy was used to estimate the EQD2 of hRT along with a radiosensitizing agent. For comparison, this was repeated using conventionally fractionated RT regimens. Results: At a mean RT dose of 8.0 Gy, the average errors for the LQ, MT, and gLQ models were 1.63, 0.83, and 0.56 log units, respectively, favoring the gLQ model (p < 0.05). Radiosensitizing chemotherapy increased the EQD2 of hRT schedules by an average of 28% to 82%, depending on disease site. This increase was similar to the gains predicted for the addition of chemotherapy to conventionally fractionated RT. Conclusions: Based on published in vitro assays, the gLQ equation is superior to the LQ and MT models in predicting cell kill at high doses of RT. Modeling exercises demonstrate that significant increases in biologically equivalent dose may be achieved with the addition of radiosensitizing agents to hRT. Clinical study of this approach is warranted.

Ohri, Nitin; Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Center for Translational Research in Radiation Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer (Israel)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Experiência do LBA e Outras Perspectivas M. Batistella,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

páginas 1 a 9. páginas 1 a 9. 1 Sociedade e Meio Ambiente na Amazônia A Experiência do LBA e Outras Perspectivas M. Batistella, 1 D. S. Alves, 2 E. F. Moran, 3 C. Souza Jr., 4 R. Walker, 5 e S. J. Walsh 6 A Amazônia é a arena de uma extraordinária e contínua transformação da natureza e da sociedade. Esse processo de mudança pode ser descrito de várias formas e por várias disciplinas, com ênfase tanto na biosfera como na atmosfera, conforme demonstrado pelo Experimento de Grande Escala da Biosfera- Atmosfera na Amazônia (LBA). Entretanto, fatores humanos subjacentes à mudança ambiental não devem ser negligenciados. Este capítulo introduz a seção sobre a sociedade e o ambiente na região e propõe um exame das dimensões humanas do uso e da

294

In-Born Radio Frequency Identification Devices for Safeguards Use at Gas-Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global expansion of nuclear power has made the need for improved safeguards measures at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants (GCEPs) imperative. One technology under consideration for safeguards applications is Radio Frequency Identification Devices (RFIDs). RFIDs have the potential to increase IAEA inspector"s efficiency and effectiveness either by reducing the number of inspection visits necessary or by reducing inspection effort at those visits. This study assesses the use of RFIDs as an integral component of the "Option 4" safeguards approach developed by Bruce Moran, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for a model GCEP [1]. A previous analysis of RFIDs was conducted by Jae Jo, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which evaluated the effectiveness of an RFID tag applied by the facility operator [2]. This paper presents a similar evaluation carried out in the framework of Jos paper, but it is predicated on the assumption that the RFID tag is applied by the manufacturer at the birth of the cylinder, rather than by the operator. Relevant diversion scenarios are examined to determine if RFIDs increase the effectiveness and/ or efficiency of safeguards in these scenarios. Conclusions on the benefits offered to inspectors by using in-born RFID tagging are presented.

Ward,R.; Rosenthal,M.

2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

295

Water Masers in W49 North and Sagittarius B2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in the A and B configurations, we have obtained simultaneous high resolution observations of both the 22 GHz water maser lines as well as the 22 GHz continuum for the H II regions W49N and Sagittarius B2. The angular resolution of both observations is ~0.1", which at the distance of W49N (11.4 kpc; Gwinn, Moran, & Reid 1992) and Sgr B2 (8.5 kpc) corresponds to a physical size of water maser components were obtained. The velocity coverage for Sgr B2 is -40 to +120 km/s; positions for 68 maser components were determined in Sgr B2 Main, 79 in Sgr B2 North, 14 in Sgr B2 Mid-North, and 17 in Sgr B2 South, for a total of 178 water maser positions in Sgr B2. The cross calibration scheme of Reid & Menten (1990, 1997) was used. Using this procedure, high dynamic range continuum images were obtained with accurate registration (rms ~0.01") of the continuum and maser positions. A detailed comparison between H II components and maser positions for both Sgr B2 and W49N is presented. In Sgr B2 Main, the water masers are predominantly located at the outside edge of the high-frequency continuum, lending support to the proposal that entrainment by stellar winds may play an important role in water maser emission.

E. J. McGrath; W. M. Goss; C. G. De Pree

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Evaluate Major Salivary Gland Function Before and After Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI as a noninvasive tool to investigate major salivary gland function before and after radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: DW-MRI was performed in 8 HNC patients before and after parotid-sparing RT (mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland glands were calculated. Findings were compared with salivary gland scintigraphy. Results: Before RT, the mean ADC value at rest was significantly lower in the parotid than in the submandibular glands. During the first 5 min of stimulation, the ADC value of the salivary glands showed a decrease, followed by a steady increase until a peak ADC, significantly higher than the baseline value, was reached after a median of 17 min. The baseline ADC value at rest was significantly higher after RT than before RT in the nonspared salivary glands but not in the spared parotid glands. In the contralateral parotid glands, the same response was seen as before RT. This pattern was completely lost in the nonspared glands. These results corresponded with remaining or loss of salivary function, respectively, as confirmed by salivary gland scintigraphy. Conclusions: Diffusion-weighted-MRI allows noninvasive evaluation of functional changes in the major salivary glands after RT and is a promising tool for investigating radiation-induced xerostomia.

Dirix, Piet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: piet.dirix@uzleuven.be; Keyzer, Frederik de; Vandecaveye, Vincent [Department of Radiology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Stroobants, Sigrid [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, Robert [Department of Radiology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Nuyts, Sandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuvens Kankerinstituut (LKI), University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Central neurocytoma: Management recommendations based on a 35-year experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with histologically confirmed central neurocytomas. Methods and Materials: The data from 45 patients with central neurocytomas diagnosed between 1971 and 2003 were retrospectively evaluated. Various combinations of surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy had been used for treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 10.0 years. The 10-year overall survival and local control rate was 83% and 60%, respectively. Patients whose tumor had a mitotic index of =}3. The 10-year survival and local control rate was 90% and 74% for patients with typical tumors compared with 63% (p = 0.055) and 46% (p = 0.41) for those with atypical tumors. A comparison of gross total resection with subtotal resection showed no significant difference in survival or local control. Postoperative RT improved local control at 10 years (75% with RT vs. 51% without RT, p = 0.045); however, this did not translate into a survival benefit. No 1p19q deletions were found in the 19 tumors tested. Conclusion: Although the overall prognosis is quite favorable, one-third of patients experienced tumor recurrence or progression at 10 years, regardless of the extent of the initial resection. Postoperative RT significantly improved local control but not survival, most likely because of the effectiveness of salvage RT. For incompletely resected atypical tumors and/or those with a high mitotic index, consideration should be given to adjuvant RT because of the more aggressive nature.

Leenstra, James L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Rodriguez, Fausto J. [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Frechette, Christina M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Giannini, Caterina [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Scheithauer, Bernd W. [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Jenkins, Robert B. [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Buckner, Jan C. [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Multi-Institutional Review of Repeat Irradiation of Chest Wall and Breast for Recurrent Breast Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To review the toxicity and clinical outcomes for patients who underwent repeat chest wall or breast irradiation (RT) after local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 81 patients underwent repeat RT of the breast or chest wall for locally recurrent breast cancer at eight institutions. The median dose of the first course of RT was 60 Gy and was 48 Gy for the second course. The median total radiation dose was 106 Gy (range, 74.4-137.5 Gy). At the second RT course, 20% received twice-daily RT, 54% were treated with concurrent hyperthermia, and 54% received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up from the second RT course was 12 months (range, 1-144 months). Four patients developed late Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. However, 25 patients had follow-up >20 months, and no late Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were noted. No treatment-related deaths occurred. The development of Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity was not associated with any repeat RT variables. The overall complete response rate was 57%. No repeat RT parameters were associated with an improved complete response rate, although a trend was noted for an improved complete response with the addition of hyperthermia that was close to reaching statistical significance (67% vs. 39%, p = 0.08). The 1-year local disease-free survival rate for patients with gross disease was 53% compared with 100% for those without gross disease (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that repeat RT of the chest wall for patients with locally recurrent breast cancer is feasible, because it is associated with acceptable acute and late morbidity and encouraging local response rates.

Wahl, Andrew O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Rademaker, Alfred [Department of Preventative Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kiel, Krystyna D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Jones, Ellen L.; Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Croog, Victoria; McCormick, Beryl M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hirsch, Arica; Karkar, Ami [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lutheran General Cancer Center, Park Ridge, IL (United States); Motwani, Sabin B.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sher, David; Silverstein, Joshua; Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Kesslering, Christy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alexian Brothers Hospital, Elk Grove Village, IL (United States); Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Small, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)], E-mail: wsmall@nmff.org

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Essential Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Study From the Rare Cancer Network  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the role of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective multicenter study was performed in 180 patients with MCC treated between February 1988 and September 2009. Patients who had had surgery alone were compared with patients who received surgery and postoperative RT or radical RT. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were assessed together with disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Results: Seventy-nine patients were male and 101 patients were female, and the median age was 73 years old (range, 38-93 years). The majority of patients had localized disease (n = 146), and the remaining patients had regional lymph node metastasis (n = 34). Forty-nine patients underwent surgery for the primary tumor without postoperative RT to the primary site; the other 131 patients received surgery for the primary tumor, followed by postoperative RT (n = 118) or a biopsy of the primary tumor followed by radical RT (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 0.2-16.5 years). Patients in the RT group had improved LRFS (93% vs. 64%; p < 0.001), RRFS (76% vs. 27%; p < 0.001), DMFS (70% vs. 42%; p = 0.01), DFS (59% vs. 4%; p < 0.001), and CSS (65% vs. 49%; p = 0.03) rates compared to patients who underwent surgery for the primary tumor alone; LRFS, RRFS, DMFS, and DFS rates remained significant with multivariable Cox regression analysis. However OS was not significantly improved by postoperative RT (56% vs. 46%; p = 0.2). Conclusions: After multivariable analysis, postoperative RT was associated with improved outcome and seems to be an important component in the multimodality treatment of MCC.

Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Institute of Oncology (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philipp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Zaucha, Renata [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University, Gdansk (Poland); Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Lagrange, Jean L. [Service de Radiotherapie, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Oezsoy, Orhan [Department of Radiation Oncology, CHCVs-RSV, Sion (Switzerland); Nguyen, Tan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Jean Godinot, Reims (France); Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Baize, Adele [Department de Radio-Oncologie, Institut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles (Belgium); Boujelbene, Noureddine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Collen, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Scandolaro, Luciano [Radioterapia, Azienda Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Untereiner, Michel [Centre Francois Baclesse, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Goldberg, Hadassah [Oncology Departement, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Pesce, Gianfranco A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Opedale San Giovanni, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Anacak, Yavuz [Department of Radiation Oncology, EGE University, Izmir (Turkey); Friedrich, Esther E.; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Beer, Karl T. [Radio Onkologiezentrum Biel (Switzerland)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Radiotherapy Doses of 80 Gy and Higher Are Associated With Lower Mortality in Men With Gleason Score 8 to 10 Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Men with Gleason score (GS) 8-10 prostate cancer (PCa) are assumed to have a high risk of micrometastatic disease at presentation. However, local failure is also a major problem. We sought to establish the importance of more aggressive local radiotherapy (RT) to {>=}80 Gy. Methods and Materials: There were 226 men treated consecutively with RT {+-} ADT from 1988 to 2002 for GS 8-10 PCa. Conventional, three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated (IM) RT was used. Radiation dose was divided into three groups: (1) <75 Gy (n = 50); (2) 75-79.9 Gy (n = 60); or (3) {>=}80 Gy (n = 116). The endpoints examined included biochemical failure (BF; nadir + 2 definition), distant metastasis (DM), cause-specific mortality, and overall mortality (OM). Results: Median follow-up was 66, 71, and 58 months for Groups 1, 2, and 3. On Fine and Gray's competing risk regression analysis, significant predictors of reduced BF were RT dose {>=}80 Gy (p = 0.011) and androgen deprivation therapy duration {>=}24 months (p = 0.033). In a similar model of DM, only RT dose {>=}80 Gy was significant (p = 0.007). On Cox regression analysis, significant predictors of reduced OM were RT dose {>=}80 Gy (p = 0.035) and T category (T3/4 vs. T1, p = 0.041). Dose was not a significant determinant of cause-specific mortality. Results for RT dose were similar in a model with RT dose and ADT duration as continuous variables. Conclusion: The results indicate that RT dose escalation to {>=}80 Gy is associated with lower risks of BF, DM, and OM in men with GS 8-10 PCa, independently of androgen deprivation therapy.

Pahlajani, Niraj [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ (United States); Ruth, Karen J. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, David Y.T. [Department of Urology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Price, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan, E-mail: apollack@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Use of Palliative Radiotherapy Among Patients With Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is known to effectively palliate many symptoms of patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anecdotally, RT is believed to be commonly used in this setting, but limited population-based data are available. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization patterns of palliative RT among elderly patients with Stage IV NSCLC and, in particular, to identify factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: A retrospective population-based cohort study was performed using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify 11,084 Medicare beneficiaries aged {>=}65 years who presented with Stage IV NSCLC in the 11 SEER regions between 1991 and 1996. The primary outcome was receipt of RT. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with receipt of RT. Results: A total of 58% of these patients received RT, with its use decreasing over time (p = 0.01). Increasing age was negatively associated with receipt of treatment (p <0.001), as was increasing comorbidities (p <0.001). Factors positively associated with the receipt of RT included income (p = 0.001), hospitalization (p <0.001), and treatment with chemotherapy (p <0.001). Although the use varied across the SEER regions (p = 0.001), gender, race/ethnicity, and distance to the nearest RT facility were not associated with treatment. Conclusions: Elderly patients with metastatic NSCLC frequently receive palliative RT, but its use varies, especially with age and receipt of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to determine whether this variability reflects good quality care.

Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)], E-mail: hayman@umich.edu; Abrahamse, Paul H.; Lakhani, Indu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Earle, Craig C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Health Management and Policy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Delay in initiating adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservation surgery and its impact on survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Delays in the diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with advanced stage and poor survival, but the importance of the time interval between lumpectomy and initiation of radiation therapy (RT) has not been well studied. We investigated factors that influence the time interval between lumpectomy and RT, and the association between that interval and survival. Patients and Methods: We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database on women aged 65 years and older, diagnosed with Stages I-II breast cancer, between 1991 and 1999. Among patients who did not receive chemotherapy, we studied factors associated with the time interval between lumpectomy and the initiation of RT, and the association of delay with survival, using linear regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results: Among 24,833 women with who underwent lumpectomy, 13,907 (56%) underwent RT. Among those receiving RT, 97% started treatment within 3 months; older age, black race, advanced stage, more comorbidities, and being unmarried were associated with longer time intervals between surgery and RT. There was no benefit to earlier initiation of RT; however, delays >3 months were associated with higher overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-2.24) and cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval 3.01-4.91). Conclusions: Reassuringly, early initiation of RT was not associated with survival. Although delays of >3 months are uncommon, they are associated with poor survival. Whether this association is causal or due to confounding factors, such as poor health behaviors, is unknown; until it is better understood, efforts should be made to initiate RT in a timely fashion.

Hershman, Dawn L. [Department of Medicine and the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, College of Physicians and Surgeons (United States) and Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University (United States) and New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States)]. E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu; Wang Xiaoyan [Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University (United States); McBride, Russell [Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University (United States)] (and others)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Radiotherapy for Early Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma According to the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG): The Roles of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Involved-Node Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cure rates of early Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are high, and avoidance of late complications and second malignancies have become increasingly important. This comparative treatment planning study analyzes to what extent target volume reduction to involved-node (IN) and intensity-modulated (IM) radiotherapy (RT), compared with involved-field (IF) and three-dimensional (3D) RT, can reduce doses to organs at risk (OAR). Methods and Materials: Based on 20 computed tomography (CT) datasets of patients with early unfavorable mediastinal HL, we created treatment plans for 3D-RT and IMRT for both the IF and IN according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). As OAR, we defined heart, lung, breasts, and spinal cord. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were evaluated for planning target volumes (PTVs) and OAR. Results: Average IF-PTV and IN-PTV were 1705 cm{sup 3} and 1015 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean doses to the PTVs were almost identical for all plans. For IF-PTV/IN-PTV, conformity was better with IMRT and homogeneity was better with 3D-RT. Mean doses to the heart (17.94/9.19 Gy for 3D-RT and 13.76/7.42 Gy for IMRT) and spinal cord (23.93/13.78 Gy for 3D-RT and 19.16/11.55 Gy for IMRT) were reduced by IMRT, whereas mean doses to lung (10.62/8.57 Gy for 3D-RT and 12.77/9.64 Gy for IMRT) and breasts (left 4.37/3.42 Gy for 3D-RT and 6.04/4.59 Gy for IMRT, and right 2.30/1.63 Gy for 3D-RT and 5.37/3.53 Gy for IMRT) were increased. Volume exposed to high doses was smaller for IMRT, whereas volume exposed to low doses was smaller for 3D-RT. Pronounced benefits of IMRT were observed for patients with lymph nodes anterior to the heart. IN-RT achieved substantially better values than IF-RT for almost all OAR parameters, i.e., dose reduction of 20% to 50%, regardless of radiation technique. Conclusions: Reduction of target volume to IN most effectively improves OAR sparing, but is still considered investigational. For the time being, IMRT should be considered for large PTVs especially when the anterior mediastinum is involved.

Koeck, Julia, E-mail: Julia_Koeck@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Abo-Madyan, Yasser [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Lohr, Frank; Stieler, Florian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Kriz, Jan; Mueller, Rolf-Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Eich, Hans Theodor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Khesbn no. 73-74 - October 1973 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1ttr" ;ll:p yrl$tyD .typ,'.rtD! 't-f.tN;r ty] rJ)D fNf nylDnYt! LfY .1Y)tl:t't 7:1tf 4n) ''rtD r''N 'ty:)y1] ,)xprno l5Ni2 9t tgt OY l0t'l'ly) rtD ': r)N iTtNluyr Ds'r tN Jtrl'l '

Admin, LAYCC

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

11686. We start by representing each of the three trigonometric sums in cot x + cot y + cot z  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ tan y + tan z 4(sin2 x + sin2 y + sin2 z) (1) in terms of circumradius R, inradius r are the three roots of st3 - (4R + r)t2 + st - r = 0, (see (9) on p.7); 2) cot x, cot y, and cot z are the three roots of rt3 - st2 + (4R + r)t - s = 0, (see (10) on p.8); 3) sin2 x, sin2 y, and sin2 z are the three

Karaivanov, Borislav

306

Real-Time ALARA Plan Tracking Tool: Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to develop a generic industry template for tracking and trending live, Real Time (RT) exposure data by task and RWP (Radiation Work Permit).

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

307

U.S. Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To:806 477 6256 o FEB 2 3 2010 c0 rt U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Motor 1200 New Jersey Ave .* S.E. Carrier Safety Washington, DC 20590 Administration...

308

Towards the capability of providing power-area-delay trade-off at the register transfer level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new register-transfer level (RT-level) power estimation technique based on technology decomposition. Given the Boolean description of a circuit function, the power consumption of two typical circuit implementations, namely the minimum ...

Chun-hong Chen; Chi-ying Tsui

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michael Scarpino 10106-123110 545 RT 25A, St. James, NY 11780 New York State Retail E85 Fueling Station Project The project funds the development of unique alternative fuel...

310

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michael Scarpino 10106-123111 1241 Rt. 31, Macedon, NY 14534 New York State Retail E85 Fueling Station Project The project funds the the development of unique alternative...

311

Development of an Analytical Model Predicting Microstructure and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L. Anton, T. Khan, R.D. Kissinger, D.L. Klarstrom. The Minerals, Metals & Materials ... law is of the following form: (r?-s)*fl. = A * (Ce/r)lfl * tlfl * exp(-Q/3RT). (

312

SNAP 2008 Collaboration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Take the Rt. 193-Greenbelt Road College Park NASA Goddard Exit. At the first traffic light make a left, make another left at next light onto Greenbelt Road. Follow Greenbelt...

313

Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies -- Addressing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Resources Regional effoRt to Deploy Clean Coal teChnologies Addressing the Water-Energy Interface Background Recent water shortages in various parts of the United States have...

314

User's Guide to VEMAP Phase 1 Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmos. Sci. 44:1211-1235. Manabe, S. and Wetherald, R.T. (1990) Reported in: Mitchell, J.F.B., S. Manabe, V. Meleshko, T. Tokioka. Equilibrium Climate Change and its...

315

Fuel Cell Vehicle World Survey 2003-Fuel Cells in Transit Buses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range of heavy-duty diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and liquefied natural gas (LNG) transit buses. NABI, Inc., is a wholly owned subsidiary of NABI Rt., which was...

316

CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constant Solar Noon Solar Time Sun Cha rt Sunshine Hours Seeof people and sun creates a high potential for solar energyposition of the sun, The relationship between solar time and

Berdahl, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments  

SciTech Connect

In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

The differentially regulated genes TvQR1 and TvPirin of the parasitic plant Triphysaria exhibit distinctive natural allelic diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TGGGGATTTGATGTTTATGAGGA. TvRuvB DNA helicase RT-qPCR (133 ntpeonidin. TvRuvB DNA helicase is a constitutively expressedTvPirin, and TvRuvB DNA helicase partial cDNA clones from

Ngo, Quy A; Albrecht, Huguette; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Grossniklaus, Ueli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

rockyflats2  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

U.S . DE PA RT MENT OF From 1952 to 1994, the plant's primary mission was the production of nuclear and nonnuclear weapons components for the nation's nuclear arsenal. The...

320

Communication and Control of Electric Vehicles Supporting Renewables...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

current state of charge, is the RT energy available in the battery pack, and is the base price of electricity, representing the cost originally paid to get the energy into the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Rick Goeltz - Research Staff - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and B.E. Tonn 1993. Analysis of Artificial Intelligence Applications for Celilo-Sylmar HVDC Intertie Operations, ORNLCF-92201. Goeltz, R.T., et al. 1990. Bonneville Power...

322

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microturbines (34%) Turbochargers Large HVAC Chiller R-134 Single Stage Compressor H 2 0 Vapor Compression Mechanical Limit S ta rt o f A e ro L im it s 2-Stage 200 bar 2-Stage...

323

Evaluation of High-Resolution Satellite Precipitation Products over Very Complex Terrain in Ethiopia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on the evaluation of 3-hourly, 0.25 0.25, satellite-based precipitation products: the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) 3B42RT, the NOAA/Climate Prediction Center ...

Feyera A. Hirpa; Mekonnen Gebremichael; Thomas Hopson

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

SU?GG?J?18: A Surface?Based Respiratory Surrogate for 4D Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Real?time acquisition of three?dimensional surface tracking has potential as an external surrogate for respiratory correlated CTimaging and radiation therapy. This study assesses the GateCT surfacetracking system (VisionRT

C Noel; E Klein; K Moore

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Haynt Iz Eybik (Lider Fun Malke Khayfets Tuzman) / Today is Forever (Poems of Malka Heifetz Tussman)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mya yxaga n aanaito P^sng ly'nyan ps yxgp^ipx "amyayayT//a**rt nga ogn ]yo nyag ,o**sng* agn a m /'nxnn,, px px .ay-

Dr. Israel Stern, Dokter Yisroel Shtern /

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Microsoft Word - Appendix Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of IL Rt. 2 and Sauk Road, in Dixon, Illinois. The 2.5 megawatt turbine will be 418 feet tall. The project will require a gravel access road, and electrical transmission...

327

EUROPEAN MAGAZINEINTERNATIONAL EDITION OF ERDL ERDGAS KOHLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in cellular evolution. However, there are no obvious abiotic pathways for isoprenoid synthesis. Fischer-Tropsch, Simoneit RT (1999) Lipid synthesis under hydrothermal conditions by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions. Orig

328

The Potential for Renewable Energy Sources in Ausilio Bauen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in cellular evolution. However, there are no obvious abiotic pathways for isoprenoid synthesis. Fischer-Tropsch, Simoneit RT (1999) Lipid synthesis under hydrothermal conditions by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions. Orig

329

Echogenic Lipsomes for targeted drug delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Echogenic immunoliposomes (ELIP) are under development to enable ultrasound-controlled drug delivery. Mechanistic studies in vitro have revealed that stable cavitation is correlated with enhanced recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rt-PA) thrombolysis, ...

Christy K. Holland; David D. McPherson

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Communicating Evolution as Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thuringiensis toxins. Science. 1992;258(5087):14515. MillerRT, Ruse M. But is it science? Amherst, NY: Prometheusto the philosophy of science: theory and reality. Chicago:

Thanukos, Anastasia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

American Mineralogist, Volume 88, pages 763769, 2003 0003-004X/03/0506763$05.00 763  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RT Percent 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 -QF AEK AVG DER DMV EER GER GIK GTH GTR IHY LKY PEA PEK PER PTH QER RER

Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

332

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

as all we will do is remove the soil that is in the pile. We will also reseed the ground under the d1rt so that will grow out next 2. What is the legal location? spring....

333

DOE Building Energy Performance Taxonomy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ehicle s toragemaintenance Service --- I ndustrial s hop Service --- D ry---cleaningLaundry Service --- A rtVideoPhotography S tudio Service --- O ther s ervice Parking G...

334

An Observational Estimate of Inferred Ocean Energy Divergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly net surface energy fluxes (FS) over the oceans are computed as residuals of the atmospheric energy budget using top-of-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation (RT) and the complete atmospheric energy (AE) budget tendency (?AE/?t) and divergence ( ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Ecole d'Ete de Probabilites de Saint-Flour 1994 ISOPERIMETRY AND GAUSSIAN ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). It is an immediate consequence of (2.11) applied to Ps-tf that F (t) 2RF(t), t s. Hence, the function e-2Rt F

Ledoux, Michel

336

PHOTOVOLTAIC PROPERTIES OF METAL-MEROCYANINE-TiO2 SANDWICH CELLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used in making the photovoltaic cells. Figure 3. Diagram ofused in making the photovoltaic cells. HO HO ,5 di -t rt.organic compounds in photovoltaic cells. It lies more in the

Skotheim, Terje Asbjorn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of snow in mountainous terrain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and McMillen, R.T. , 1984. Solar radiation within an oak--J.P. et al. , 2004. Solar radiation transmission through1992. Analysis of solar radiation data for Port Harcourt,

Musselman, Keith Newton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Designing Electricity Markets with Large Shares of Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-time (RT) prices in Iowa (MEC interface), May 11­17, 2009. MISO NYISO PJM ERCOT CAISO Wind Power Capacity) and PJM have already introduced rules for mandatory real-time bidding and control of wind power

Kemner, Ken

339

A New Hyperbolic Tangent Modelling Approach for the Creep ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RT. Q. Dc kb t jd p p v j . (15). Time. C reep S train. {Dislocation build-up. Solution in absence of internal back stress. Solution with an internal back stress t0. 517...

340

FREQUENCY AND TIME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Price 60cents. ... oil the hasi.; of need.' Key wottls: Rt-0adca.t of stanilard frequrni ... they commence at intervals of 5,000.000 cycles of the 5-MHz carrier. ...

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Community Radiative Transfer Model for Stratospheric Sounding Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better use the Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU) data for reanalysis and climate studies, issues associated with the fast radiative transfer (RT) model for SSU have recently been revisited and the results have been implemented into the ...

Yong Chen; Yong Han; Quanhua Liu; Paul Van Delst; Fuzhong Weng

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Second International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R.T. Geyer, D. Dal Molin, and A.C.F. Vilela. Recycling of Waste Materials in a Ferrochrome Industry [pp. 741-748] S.A. Platias. Experimental Investigation of...

343

The Development of Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus to RNA Interference Therapies: Understanding Mechanism and Developing Strategies to Overcome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the small molecules doxycycline or tetracycline andculture medium, the doxycycline binds to rtTA and induces ang/mL or 1000 ng/mL of doxycycline for negative controls or

Shah, Priya Shirish

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Three LBA-ECO Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LC-24 Cadastral Property Map of Uruara, Para, Brazil: ca.1975. Data set prepared by R.T. Walker and M.M. Caldas. This data set contains a shapefile of a digitized map of the land...

345

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOFC) .Viability PVPS R&D RT SCE SoCal SOFC tC TOU UL UPS VRB WACSolid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) SOFC is a promising technology

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOFC)..Viability PVPS R&D RT SCE SoCal SOFC tC TOU UL UPS VRB WACSolid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) SOFC is a promising technology

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Shock convergence and mix dynamics in inertial confinement fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the phenomena of shock propagation and of turbulent mix induced by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth is of critical importance for ignition and high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Capsule ...

Rygg, James Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Download PDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

eliminate genomic DNA contamination. qRT-PCR analysis. Total RNA (1.5 ?g) was reverse transcribed using the. RETROscript kit (Ambion), with oligo dT18 as ...

349

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Occurrence of a Positive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), (b) the kinetics of TNF-a expression by RT-PCR (mRNA expression) and ELISA (secreted protein expression), and (c) the involvement of...

350

Rapid and Efficient cDNA Library Screening by Self-Ligation of Inverse PCR Products (SLIP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an arrayed cDNA library by PCR. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA,polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) as a sensitive and rapidA.Y. (2003) Use of inverse PCR to clone cDNA ends. Methods

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

PCR detection of pathogenic viruses in southern California urban rivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10.1111/j.1365-2672.2004.02269.x PCR detection of pathogenicdetected using nested- and RT-PCR from 11 rivers and creeks.by reverse transcrip- tase PCR and of microbial indicators

Jiang, Sunny C; Chu, W

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Characterization of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

acts as a tag for identification of the gene, by cloning the fusion mRNA and using RT-PCR techniques. We have conducted such a screen using moderate dose radiation (2 to 4 Gy,...

353

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jan. 7, at Riverview Banquets, 1117 North Washington Ave. (Rt. 25) in Batavia. The cost is 20. Today is the final day to sign up. Contact Nancy Sells, x4446, to RSVP or for...

354

MATH 158 Assignment 3, Spring 2013 - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(a) In which year did the oil well reach a maximum production rate? (b) Sketch the graph of R(t) for 0 ? t ? 20. (c) How much oil has it produced so far? (d) If the ...

355

MATH 158 Assignment 3, Spring 2011 - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(a) In which year did the oil well reach a maximum production rate? (b) Sketch the graph of R(t) for 0 ? t ? 20. (c) How much oil has it produced so far? (d) If it is ...

356

Effects of recombinant turkey interferon-gamma on development of immunity to coccidia in neonatal turkeys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our interest in gut immunity in commercial poultry led to investigation of the effects of recombinant turkey interferon-gamma (rtIFN?) on parameters of immunity to avian coccidia. In vitro experiments consisted of exposing baby hamster kidney cells (BHK) to increasing concentrations of rtIFN? and measuring subsequent Eimeria tenella (ET) sporozoite invasion in short-term culture. In experiment 1 (EXP 1), when BHK were pretreated with rtIFN? in cell culture medium 45 min prior to the addition of sporozoites to confluent monolayers, ET invasion was significantly reduced. During EXP 2, these reductions were not observed when BHK were pretreated with rtIFN? for 48 hours prior to sporozoite addition. In vivo investigation consisted of three independent experiments (EXP 3, 4, or 5) over time in which rtIFN? was administered to turkey poults one day post-hatch by intraperitoneal injection 30 min prior to per os challenge with Eimeria adenoeides (EA). In EXP 4 and 5, neonatal turkeys received a second challenge with EA on day 21 of age to test for potential adjuvant effects of rtIFN? while immunizing poults with EA by primary challenge. When evaluating body weight gain in the three experiments, improvement in gain following primary challenge was associated (P<.05) with rtIFN? administration in poults challenged with EA as compared to poults challenged with EA alone in EXP 3 and 4, but not EXP 5. Body weight gain 6 days post-secondary challenge in EXP 4 and 5 was not different between neonatal turkeys receiving rtIFN? + EA or turkeys receiving EA alone. Similar effects were seen with regard to gross lesion formation. In EXP 3 and 4, protective effects were observed in poults receiving EA + rtIFN? 6 days post-primary challenge. These positive effects of rtIFN? administration were not observed following secondary EA challenge in EXP 4 or following either primary or secondary challenge in EXP 5. In EXP 3, 4, and 5, mortality was higher (P<.05) in poults receiving both EA and rtIFN? when compared to poults receiving EA alone following primary challenge, but not secondary challenge, as significant differences in mortality were not observed in the older animals.

Beltran, Ruben

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Survival for Patients With Node-Positive Head and Neck Cancer: An Analysis by Primary Site and Nodal Stage  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is frequently recommended for node-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary surgery. The impact of RT on survival for various subgroups of node-positive HNSCC has not been clearly demonstrated. Methods and Materials: Within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Database, we identified 5297 patients with node-positive (N1 to N3) HNSCC treated with definitive surgery with or without adjuvant RT between 1988 and 2001. The median follow-up was 4.4 years. Results: Adjuvant RT significantly improved 5-year overall survival (46.3%: 95% confidence interval [CI], 44.7-48.0% for surgery + RT, vs. 35.2%: 95% CI, 32.0-38.5% for surgery alone, p < 0.001) and cancer-specific survival (54.8%: 95% CI, 53.2-56.4% for surgery + RT, vs. 46.2% for surgery alone 95% CI, 42.4-50.0%, p < 0.05). Use of adjuvant RT remained a significant predictor of survival on multivariable analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.68-0.83; p < 0.001). Subset analyses demonstrated that adjuvant RT was associated with significantly improved survival for N1 (HR, 0.78; 95% CI; 0.67-0.90; p = 0.001), N2a (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-0.99, p = 0.048) and N2b to N3 nodal disease (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.51-0.75; p < 0.001). Adjuvant RT increased overall survival for node-positive patients with oropharynx (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.57-0.90; p 0.004), hypopharynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.88; p = 0.004), larynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.52-0.84; p = 0.001), and oral cavity (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.98; p = 0.025) primary tumors. Conclusions: In a large population-based analysis, adjuvant RT significantly improves overall survival for patients with node-positive HNSCC. All nodal stages, including N1, appear to benefit from the addition of RT to definitive surgery.

Kao, Johnny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: johnny.kao@mountsinai.org; Lavaf, Amir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Teng, Marita S. [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Huang, Delphine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Genden, Eric M. [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Khesbn No. 127 - Spring 1996 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7rx 1ub; oy'] I'lt - D'rp')rti[D r't I'tl ''ll5! ll6n ll'' .l? u! yD lup'ititut'lN ot.r . 'rtI t]DS l,tD rSE B ltgl tr ,Errnp ry lrbyr u'D 1tnfr ''rti pr u? '! ul:tit lryri; .r!

Admin, LAYCC

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Graves' Orbitopathy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review our institutional outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for Graves' orbitopathy (GO), assess the role of orbital reirradiation, and identify prognostic factors of complete response (CR). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of 211 patients who presented with a diagnosis of GO and received RT between January 2000-2010. RT dose was 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Patient median age was 51 years (range, 15-84 years), median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-88 months). Patient symptoms included any combination of proptosis (90.9%), extraocular muscle dysfunction (78.9%), soft tissue signs (68.4%), and diplopia (58.4%). Corticosteroids were used as first-line therapy in 20.6% of patients. Among those who achieved either CR or partial response (PR), prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: Stabilization of disease without recurrence was clinically achieved overall in 202 patients (96.7%). At the completion of RT, 176 patients (84.2%) reported a symptomatic improvement of pretreatment symptoms. CR of GO symptoms was achieved using multiple treatment modalities, including RT by 93 patients (44.5%), of which 32 patients received RT only. Corticosteroids were discontinued in 97.8% of patients who received them as initial therapy. Surgical intervention following radiotherapy was required for 144 (68.9%) of all patients. Fourteen patients received orbital reirradiation for persistent or recurrent symptoms. Five of these achieved a CR, and the other nine achieved disease stabilization but retained persistent ocular symptoms. Long-term side effects of RT included dry eyes (12%). Of the prognostic factors we investigated, only gender predicted CR, which was less common in men (33.9%) than in women (49.7%) p = 0.0471. Conclusions: Orbital radiation for GO is an established treatment modality for patients. Orbital reirradiation is beneficial for patients who do not respond to initial RT or experience symptom recurrence without an apparent risk of increased morbidity.

Matthiesen, Chance, E-mail: chance-matthiesen@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, J. Spencer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, David [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Farris, Bradley; Wilkes, Byron [Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence; Bogardus, Carl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Documentation for the intergalactic radiative transfer code IGMtransfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes the publically available numerical code "IGMtransfer", capable of performing intergalactic radiative transfer (RT) of light in the vicinity of the Lyman alpha (Lya) line. Calculating the RT in a (possibly adaptively refined) grid of cells resulting from a cosmological simulation, the code returns 1) a "transmission function", showing how the intergalactic medium (IGM) affects the Lya line at a given redshift, and 2) the "average transmission" of the IGM, making it useful for studying the results of reionization simulations.

Laursen, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

Urban, Damien [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Mishra, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Onn, Amir [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)] [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel) [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Has the Pattern of Practice in the Prescription of Radiotherapy for the Palliation of Thoracic Symptoms Changed Between 1999 and 2006 at the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Eleven randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing various radiotherapy (RT) schedules for locally advanced lung cancer published since 1991 found no difference in palliation of intrathoracic symptoms. The most commonly prescribed schedule by Canadian Radiation Oncologists (RO) (20 Gy in five fractions [20 Gy/5]), when first evaluated versus 10 Gy/1 in a 2002 RCT, showed a significant survival benefit. A subsequent RCT assessing 20 Gy/5 found worse survival versus 16 Gy/2. This study examines whether the RT prescription for lung cancer palliation in the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program (RRRP) has changed over time. Methods and Materials: Chart review was conducted for patients treated with palliative thoracic RT across three periods (1999-2006). Patient demographics, tumor, treatment, and organizational factors were analyzed descriptively. Chi-square test was used to detect differences in proportions between unordered categorical variables. Continuous variables were tested using analysis of variance. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of RT schedule prescribed. Results: A total of 117 patients received 121 courses of palliative thoracic RT. The most common dose (20 Gy/5) comprised 65% of courses in 1999, 68% in 2003, and 60% in 2005-2006 (p = 0.76). The next most common dose was 30 Gy/10 (13%). Overall, the median survival was 14.9 months, independent of RT schedule (p = 0.68). Multivariate analysis indicated palliative chemotherapy and certification year of RO were significant predictors of prescription of 20 Gy/5. Conclusion: RT schedule for palliation of intrathoracic symptoms did not mirror the results of sequential, conflicting RCTs, suggesting that factors other than the literature influenced practice patterns in palliative thoracic RT.

Fairchild, Alysa [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Goh, Philiz; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth A. [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Department of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Danjoux, Cyril; Barbera, Lisa; Tsao, May [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Post-pruning in regression tree induction: An integrated approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regression tree (RT) induction process has two major phases: the growth phase and the pruning phase. The pruning phase aims to generalize the RT that was generated in the growth phase by generating a subtree that avoids over-fitting to the training ... Keywords: Analytic hierarchy process, Data mining, Decision tree, Mixed integer programming, Multi-objective programming, Performance measures, Post-pruning, Regression tree

Kweku-Muata Osei-Bryson

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hunter Building, Kelburn Campus VICTORIA UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an toàn nht sng. C IM CHNG TR?NH Chng trình D b i hc ca i hc Victoria Wellington là mt chng trình ào, i bng rng và leo núi. Tôi có thêm rt nhiu bn tt và tri nghim rt nhiu iu thú v khi sng ti thành ph

Frean, Marcus

365

Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Akademie vd Cesk republiky Teze disertace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Knapp 1980 2 2w Z . xRT V qVcby cy1 b Z .a T V Z .Kubic 1982 2 Z .RT Vqc Z .a T V Z . Z .Patel-Teja PT 1982 w-Robinson 1976 and Kubic 1982 equations of state and concluded that it was more accurate than either the Peng-Robinson or the Kubic equation of state. Z .Lin et al. 1996 extended the generalized quartic equation Z .of state Eq. 23

Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer

367

PHYSICAL REVIE%' B VOLUME 33, NUMBER 4 15 FEBRUARY 1986 Application of a general self-consistency scheme in the linear combination of atomic orbitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Knapp 1980 2 2w Z . xRT V qVcby cy1 b Z .a T V Z .Kubic 1982 2 Z .RT Vqc Z .a T V Z . Z .Patel-Teja PT 1982 w-Robinson 1976 and Kubic 1982 equations of state and concluded that it was more accurate than either the Peng-Robinson or the Kubic equation of state. Z .Lin et al. 1996 extended the generalized quartic equation Z .of state Eq. 23

Vanderbilt, David

368

Scheduling Optimization under Uncertainty -An Alternative Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Knapp 1980 2 2w Z . xRT V qVcby cy1 b Z .a T V Z .Kubic 1982 2 Z .RT Vqc Z .a T V Z . Z .Patel-Teja PT 1982 w-Robinson 1976 and Kubic 1982 equations of state and concluded that it was more accurate than either the Peng-Robinson or the Kubic equation of state. Z .Lin et al. 1996 extended the generalized quartic equation Z .of state Eq. 23

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

369

Supporting Information Supplemental Table 1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Se-C Forms A. Canola One multi scan 3.60E-04 ND ND 99 B. Indian mustard Two multi scans 4.02E-04 4.28E-04 ND Seeds RT Min. (Canola) % Soluble Selenium (Canola) Selenium Compounds (Canola) 2.54 ± 0.02 14.11 ± 2Cysteine 11.49 ± 1.03 19.64 ± 4.11% Selenate Seed Meals RT Min. (Canola) % Soluble Selenium (Canola) Selenium

370

Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older ({>=}75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term ({>=}5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

Thong, Melissa S.Y., E-mail: M.Thong@uvt.nl [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mols, Floortje [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lemmens, Valery E.P.P. [Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rutten, Harm J.T. [Department of Surgery, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Roukema, Jan A. [Department of Surgery, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Martijn, Hendrik [Department of Radiotherapy, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Ogmios 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alle es a rt ities f r l e ia la a e in t l li tional r a electi s i S. l f t i l t rt l r i isr ti f l tr s issi s i l ts l i ir r i t s f t rs f r r s r i r l s i . pen a et {Jt r . . ssi . I t f t r r s ts tbl l...

Ostler, Nicholas D M

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p =}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)], E-mail: mwahab@med.miami.edu; Reis, Isildinha M. [Division of Biostatistics, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Hamilton, Kara [Division of Biostatistics, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Using economic analysis to evaluate the potential of multimodality therapy for elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Development of new and expensive drugs with activity against pancreatic cancer has made economic considerations more relevant to treatment decision-making for advanced disease. Economic modeling can be used to explore the potential of such novel therapies and to inform clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of radiation plus fluorouracil (RT-FU) relative to no treatment in elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to determine the economic potential of radiation plus gemcitabine (RT-GEM), a novel regimen for this disease. We used the SEER-Medicare database to estimate effectiveness and costs supplemented by data from the literature where necessary. Results: Relative to no treatment, RT-FU was associated with a cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $68,724/QALY in the base case analysis. Compared with RT-FU, the ICER for RT-GEM was below $100,000/QALY when the risk of dying with the new regimen was 1,000 subjects would be necessary to demonstrate this level of efficacy in a randomized trial. The ICER of RT-GEM was most sensitive to utility values, and, at lower efficacy levels, to costs of gemcitabine and treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions: In elderly patients with LAPC, RT-FU is a cost-effective alternative to no treatment. The novel regimen of RT-GEM is likely to be cost-effective at any clinically meaningful benefit, but quality-of-life issues, drug acquisition, and toxicity-related costs may be relevant, especially at lower efficacy levels.

Krzyzanowska, Monika K. [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States) and Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: monika.krzyzanowska@uhn.on.ca; Earle, Craig C. [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Kuntz, Karen M. [Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Weeks, Jane C. [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Forecasting Using Time Varying Meta-Elliptical Distributions with a Study of Commodity Futures Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not pursue this route. 4.2.2 The sample ACF of the absolute values of the data. Assuming that E |R|2 := EX2 ACF for (|Rt|)t?Z. We observed a slowly decaying sample ACF for all the series. If EX2 ACF for Gas Oil. Moreover, a GARCH(1, 1) model was fitted to (Rt)t?Z , the log returns . It turns out that for all of the commodities the estimated GARCH(1...

Sancetta, Alessio; Nikanrova, Arina

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

Yeoh, Eric E., E-mail: eric.yeoh@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Holloway, Richard H. [Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Fowler, Jack [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ubungsblatt 7 Ubungen zur Theoretischen Physik IV, Universitat Heidelberg, WS 06/07  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large is the relative error? Calculate the pressure on the tank and the internal pressure of the gas to the constitutive equation of the van-der-Waals gas: p V = nRT p + a n V 2 [V - nb] = nRT a) Calculate the internal result for U to calculate the internal pressure = U V T of the van-der-Waals gas and compare

Heermann, Dieter W.

377

Long-Term Results of Conformal Radiotherapy for Progressive Airway Amyloidosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of conformal external beam radiotherapy (RT) for local control of progressive airway amyloidosis. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of patients with biopsy-proven progressive airway amyloidosis treated with conformal RT between 2000 and 2006 at Boston Medical Center. The patients were evaluated for performance status and pulmonary function, with computed tomography and endoscopy after RT compared with the pretreatment studies. Local control was defined as the lack of progression of airway wall thickening on computed tomography imaging and stable endobronchial deposits by endoscopy. Results: A total of 10 symptomatic airway amyloidosis patients (3 laryngeal and 7 tracheobronchial) received RT to a median total dose of 20 Gy in 10 fractions within 2 weeks. At a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 1.5-10.3), 8 of the 10 patients had local control. The remaining 2 patients underwent repeat RT 6 and 8.4 months after initial RT, 1 for persistent bronchial obstruction and 1 for progression of subglottic amyloid disease with subsequent disease control. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status improved at a median of 18 months after RT compared with the baseline values, from a median score of 2 to a median of 1 (p = .035). Airflow (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) measurements increased compared with the baseline values at each follow-up evaluation, reaching a 10.7% increase (p = .087) at the last testing (median duration, 64.8 months). Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 esophagitis, occurring in 40% of patients. No late toxicity was observed. Conclusions: RT prevented progressive amyloid deposition in 8 of 10 patients, resulting in a marginally increased forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and improved functional capacity, without late morbidity.

Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Grillone, Gregory A. [Department of Otolaryngology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Bohrs, Harry K.; Lee, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Sakai, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Berk, John L. [Department of Medicine, Amyloid Treatment and Research Program, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Randomized Trial of Postoperative Adjuvant Therapy in Stage II and III Rectal Cancer to Define the Optimal Sequence of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: 10-Year Follow-Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the optimal sequence of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 308 patients were randomized to early (n = 155) or late (n = 153) radiotherapy (RT). Treatment included eight cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of fluorouracil 375 mg/m{sup 2}/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, at 4-week intervals, and pelvic radiotherapy of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Radiotherapy started on Day 1 of the first chemotherapy cycle in the early RT arm and on Day 1 of the third chemotherapy cycle in the late RT arm. Results: At a median follow-up of 121 months for surviving patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 10 years was not statistically significantly different between the early and late RT arms (71% vs. 63%; p = 0.162). A total of 36 patients (26.7%) in the early RT arm and 49 (35.3%) in the late RT arm experienced recurrence (p = 0.151). Overall survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups. However, in patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection, the DFS rate at 10 years was significantly greater in the early RT arm than in the late RT arm (63% vs. 40%; p = 0.043). Conclusions: After the long-term follow-up duration, this study failed to show a statistically significant DFS advantage for early radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy after resection of Stage II and III rectal cancer. Our results, however, suggest that if neoadjuvant chemoradiation is not given before surgery, then early postoperative chemoradiation should be considered for patients requiring an abdominoperineal resection.

Kim, Tae-Won [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Hee [Department of Hematology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kang, Yoon-Koo [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoo-Hyung [Department of Hematology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang-Sik [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ahn, Seung-Do [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Kun [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Cheon [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Shin, E-mail: jayslee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Khesbn no. 108 - Autumn 1986 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ll$r'lyl IES[ry: U'l ;l]rTD "'ly9 Eil ,|l'lj"lD ! -r! t'tlNIJ$l19tJl1N J! ']N .tyizrb'"11! rtD trlI lrEIlD''IN! lyt, 'InllnlUt 1! )yn,EDNlril)'rtD,B''';i)r:)1,611*,;1 lyi2rtynyr

Admin, LAYCC

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Detection of BCR-ABL Fusion mRNA Using Reverse Transcriptase Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RT-PCR is commonly used for the detection of Bcr-Abl fusion transcripts in patients diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia, CML. Two fusion transcripts predominate in CML, Br-Abl e13a2 and e14a2. They have developed reverse transcriptase isothermal loop-mediated amplification (RT-LAMP) assays to detect these two fusion transcripts along with the normal Bcr transcript.

Dugan, L C; Hall, S; Kohlgruber, A; Urbin, S; Torres, C; Wilson, P

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Hopital d'Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Castadot, Pierre [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); MacDermed, Dhara [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vandekerkhove, Christophe [Department of Medical Physics, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Magne, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@igr.f [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gefitinib in Combination With Irradiation With or Without Cisplatin in Patients With Inoperable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase I Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish the feasibility and tolerability of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa) with radiation (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter Phase I study, 5 patients with unresectable NSCLC received 250 mg gefitinib daily starting 1 week before RT at a dose of 63 Gy (Step 1). After a first safety analysis, 9 patients were treated daily with 250 mg gefitinib plus CRT in the form of RT and weekly CDDP 35 mg/m{sup 2} (Step 2). Gefitinib was maintained for up to 2 years until disease progression or toxicity. Results: Fourteen patients were assessed in the two steps. In Step 1 (five patients were administered only gefitinib and RT), no lung toxicities were seen, and there was no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Adverse events were skin and subcutaneous tissue reactions, limited to Grade 1-2. In Step 2, two of nine patients (22.2%) had DLT. One patient suffered from dyspnea and dehydration associated with neutropenic pneumonia, and another showed elevated liver enzymes. In both steps combined, 5 of 14 patients (35.7%) experienced one or more treatment interruptions. Conclusions: Gefitinib (250 mg daily) in combination with RT and CDDP in patients with Stage III NSCLC is feasible, but CDDP likely enhances toxicity. The impact of gefitinib on survival and disease control as a first-line treatment in combination with RT remains to be determined.

Rothschild, Sacha [Radiation Oncology, Zurich University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bucher, Stephan E. [BioConsult GmbH, Statistical and Language Services, Rickenbach (Switzerland); Bernier, Jacques [Radio-Oncologie, Clinique de Genolier, Genolier (Switzerland); Aebersold, Daniel M. [Radiation Oncology, Inselspital and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Zouhair, Aberrahim [Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ries, Gerhard [Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Lombrieser, Norbert [Klinik fuer Radiotherapie, Stadtspital Triemli, Zuerich (Switzerland); Lippuner, Thomas [Radiology, Kantonsspital, 8400 Winterthur (Switzerland); Luetolf, Urs M.; Glanzmann, Christoph [Radiation Oncology, Zurich University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Ciernik, I. Frank, E-mail: ilja.ciernik@usz.c [Center for Clinical Research, Zurich University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: The Combined Michigan and Utrecht Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze the combined and updated results from the University of Michigan and University Medical Center Utrecht on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the parotid gland 1 year after radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck (HN) cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 222 prospectively analyzed patients with various HN malignancies were treated with conventional and intensity-modulated RT. Stimulated individual parotid gland flow rates were measured before RT and 1 year after RT using Lashley cups at both centers. A flow ratio glands (Michigan: 157; Utrecht: 227 glands) was available for analysis 1 year after RT. Combined NTCP analysis based on mean dose resulted in a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to 50% complication probability) of 39.9 Gy and m (steepness of the curve) of 0.40. The resulting NTCP curve had good qualitative agreement with the combined clinical data. Mean doses of 25-30 Gy were associated with 17-26% NTCP. Conclusions: A definite NTCP curve for parotid gland function 1 year after RT is presented, based on mean dose. No threshold dose was observed, and TD{sub 50} was equal to 40 Gy.

Dijkema, Tim, E-mail: T.Dijkema@umcutrecht.n [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Houweling, Anette C.; Moerland, Marinus A. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Eisbruch, Avraham [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Terhaard, Chris H.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Differential action on cancer and normal tissue by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate and cytochrome C combined with radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility that radioprotective effects on potent natural killer (NK) cells by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate (AMM) + cytochrome C during radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer might result in the radiosensitization of human lung cancer cells in vivo is examined. Human lung cancer xenografts in the right hind legs of KSN mice (10 weeks old) were locally irradiated with 20 Gy of X ray. AMM (10 mg/kg/day) and/or cytochrome C (CCC) (5 mg/kg/day) were given intraperitoneally immediately before or after RT, followed by daily administration for 4 days. Natural killer activities of host splenocytes were also tested with the standard [sup 51]Cr releasing assay with YAC-1 cells as target cells. In a clinical study, 65 patients with lung cancer were treated with more than 50 Gy of RT with or without combination with AMM + CCC, OK-432 or AMM + CCC + OK-432. Before and after RT, lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were examined with dichromatic analysis using an Ortho Spectrum IIIFCM system and fluorescent MABs. In this study, the change in the absolute number of each subset was investigated. AMM + cytochrome C augumented NK activity in KSN nude mice, protected potent NK cells in patients with lung cancer against RT and sensitized the human lung cancer xenografts to RT. AMM + cytochrome C may have potential as a differential modulator of radiosensitivity of normal tissues and of tumors. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Nakatsugawa, S. (Fukui Medical School (Japan)); Sugahara, T. (Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan))

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Salvage Treatment for Recurrent Intracranial Germinoma After Reduced-Volume Radiotherapy: A Single-Institution Experience and Review of the Literature  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Intracranial germinomas (IGs) are highly curable with radiotherapy (RT). However, recurrence still occurs, especially when limited-field RT is applied, and the optimal salvage therapy remains controversial. Methods and Materials: Between January 1989 and December 2010, 14 patients with clinically or pathologically diagnosed recurrent IGs after RT were reviewed at our institution. Of these, 11 received focal-field RT, and the other 3 received whole-brain irradiation, whole-ventricle irradiation, and Gamma Knife radiosurgery as the respective first course of RT. In addition, we identified from the literature 88 patients with recurrent IGs after reduced-volume RT, in whom the details of salvage therapy were recorded. Results: The median time to recurrence was 30.3 months (range, 3.8-134.9 months). One patient did not receive further treatment and was lost during follow-up. Of the patients, 7 underwent salvage with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) plus chemotherapy (CT), 4 with CSI alone, 1 with whole-brain irradiation plus CT, and 1 with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The median follow-up time was 105.1 months (range, 24.2-180.9 months). Three patients died without evidence of disease progression: two from second malignancies and one from unknown cause. The others remained disease free. The 3-year survival rate after recurrence was 83.3%. A total of 102 patients from our study and the literature review were analyzed to determine the factors affecting prognosis and outcomes. After recurrence, the 5-year survival rates were 71% and 92.9% for all patients and for those receiving salvage CSI, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that initial RT volume, initial RT dose, initial CT, and salvage RT type were significant prognostic predictors of survival. On multivariable analysis, salvage CSI was the most significant factor (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Protracted follow-up is recommended because late recurrence is not uncommon. CSI with or without CT is an effective salvage treatment for recurrence after reduced-volume RT.

Hu, Yu-Wen [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Pin-I [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wong, Tai-Tong [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ho, Donald Ming-Tak [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kai-Ping [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiau, Cheng-Yin [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Muh-Lii; Lee, Yi-Yen [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); and others

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Does the Intent to Irradiate the Internal Mammary Nodes Impact Survival in Women With Breast Cancer? A Population-Based Analysis in British Columbia  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the value of the intent to include internal mammary nodes (IMNs) in the radiation therapy (RT) volume for patients receiving adjuvant locoregional (breast or chest wall plus axillary and supraclavicular fossa) RT for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 2413 women with node-positive or T3/4N0 invasive breast cancer, treated with locoregional RT from 2001 to 2006, were identified in a prospectively maintained, population-based database. Intent to include IMNs in RT volume was determined through review of patient charts and RT plans. Distant relapse free survival (D-RFS), breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), and overall survival (OS) were compared between the two groups. Prespecified pN1 subgroup analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up time was 6.2 years. Forty-one percent of study participants received IMN RT. The 5-year D-RFS for IMN inclusion and exclusion groups were 82% vs. 82% (p = 0.82), BCSS was 87% vs. 87% (p = 0.81), and OS was 85% vs. 83% (p = 0.06). In the pN1 subgroup, D-RFS was 90% vs. 88% (p = 0.31), BCSS was 94% vs. 92% (p = 0.18), and OS was 91% vs. 88% (p = 0.01). After potential confounding variables were controlled for, women who received IMN RT did not have significantly different D-RFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.24; p = 0.85), BCSS (HR = 0.98 (95% CI, 0.79-1.22; p = 0.88), or OS (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.78-1.15; p = 0.57). In the pN1 subgroup, IMN RT was associated with trends for improved survival that were not statistically significant: D-RFS (HR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.63-1.22; p = 0.42), BCSS (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.57-1.25; p = 0.39), and OS (HR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.56-1.09; p = 0.14). Conclusions: After a median follow-up time of 6.2 years, although intentional IMN RT was not associated with a significant improvement in survival, this population-based study suggests that IMN RT may contribute to improved outcomes in selected patients with N1 disease.

Olson, Robert A., E-mail: rolson2@bccancer.bc.ca [BC Cancer Agency, Radiation Therapy Program, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline [BC Cancer Agency, Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lau, Jeffrey [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lo, Andrea; Truong, Pauline T. [BC Cancer Agency, Radiation Therapy Program, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott; Olivotto, Ivo A. [BC Cancer Agency, Radiation Therapy Program, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Weir, Lorna [BC Cancer Agency, Radiation Therapy Program, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Deep traps in nonpolar m-plane GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep level defects in nonpolar m-plane GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy were characterized using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) and compared with polar c-plane GaN that was grown simultaneously in the same growth run. Significant differences in both the levels present and their concentrations were observed upon comparison of both growth orientations. DLTS revealed electron traps with activation energies of 0.14 eV, 0.20 eV, and 0.66 eV in the m-plane material, with concentrations that were {approx}10-50 x higher than traps of similar activation energies in the c-plane material. Likewise, DLOS measurements showed {approx}20 x higher concentrations of both a C{sub N} acceptor-like state at E{sub C} - 3.26 eV, which correlates with a high background carbon concentration observed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy for the m-plane material [A. Armstrong, A. R. Arehart, B. Moran, S. P. DenBaars, U. K. Mishra, J. S. Speck, and S. A. Ringel, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 374 (2004)], and the V{sub Ga}-related state level at E{sub C} - 2.49 eV, which is consistent with an enhanced yellow luminescence observed by photoluminescence. The findings suggest a strong impact of growth dynamics on the incorporation of impurities and electrically active native point defects as a function of GaN growth plane polarity.

Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Hurni, C. A.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Yang, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Myers, R. C.; Ringel, S. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Cost of Radiotherapy Versus NSAID Administration for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO), or abnormal bone formation, is a common sequela of total hip arthroplasty. This abnormal bone can impair joint function and must be surgically removed to restore mobility. HO can be prevented by postoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use or radiotherapy (RT). NSAIDs are associated with multiple toxicities, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Although RT has been shown to be more efficacious than NSAIDs at preventing HO, its cost-effectiveness has been questioned. Methods and Materials: We performed an analysis of the cost of postoperative RT to the hip compared with NSAID administration, taking into account the costs of surgery for HO formation, treatment-induced morbidity, and productivity loss from missed work. The costs of RT, surgical revision, and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding were estimated using the 2007 Medicare Fee Schedule and inpatient diagnosis-related group codes. The cost of lost wages was estimated using the 2006 median salary data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Results: The cost of administering RT was estimated at $899 vs. $20 for NSAID use. After accounting for the additional costs associated with revision total hip arthroplasty and gastrointestinal bleeding, the corresponding estimated costs were $1,208 vs. $930. Conclusion: If the costs associated with treatment failure and treatment-induced morbidity are considered, the cost of NSAIDs approaches that of RT. Other NSAID morbidities and quality-of-life differences that are difficult to quantify add to the cost of NSAIDs. These considerations have led us to recommend RT as the preferred modality for use in prophylaxis against HO after total hip arthroplasty, even when the cost is considered.

Strauss, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)], E-mail: Jonathan_Strauss@rush.edu; Chen, Sea S.; Shah, Anand P.; Coon, Alan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Dickler, Adam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Little Company of Mary Hospital, Evergreen Park, IL (United States)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Failure to Adhere to Protocol Specified Radiation Therapy Guidelines Was Associated With Decreased Survival in RTOG 9704-A Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Patients With Resected Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704, as previously published, patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma received continuous infusion 5-FU and concurrent radiotherapy (5FU-RT). 5FU-RT treatment was preceded and followed by randomly assigned chemotherapy, either 5-FU or gemcitabine. This analysis explored whether failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines influenced survival and/or toxicity. Methods and Materials: RT requirements were protocol specified. Adherence was scored as per protocol (PP) or less than per protocol (RT was scored for 416 patients: 216 PP and 200 RT protocol guidelines on protocol outcomes. Failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines was associated with reduced survival and, for patients receiving gemcitabine, trend toward increased nonhematologic toxicity.

Abrams, Ross A., E-mail: Ross_a_abrams@rush.edu [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Regine, William F. [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Safran, Howard [Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Hoffman, John P. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lustig, Robert [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Konski, Andre A. [Wayne State Medical Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Benson, Al B. [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Macdonald, John S. [St. Vincent's Cancer Care Center, New York, NY (United States); Rich, Tyvin A. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Quality of Life After Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Painful Bone Metastases: Results of an International Study Validating the EORTC QLQ-BM22  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is an effective method of palliating painful bone metastases and can improve function and reduce analgesic requirements. In advanced cancer patients, quality of life (QOL) is the primary outcome of interest over traditional endpoints such as survival. The purpose of our study was to compare bone metastasis-specific QOL scores among patients who responded differently to palliative RT. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving RT for bone metastases across 6 countries were prospectively enrolled from March 2010-January 2011 in a trial validating the QLQ-BM22 and completed the QLQ-BM22 and the core measure (QLQ-C30) at baseline and after 1 month. Pain scores and analgesic intake were recorded, and response to RT was determined according to the latest published guidelines. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric and Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes in QOL among response groups. A Bonferroni-adjusted P<.003 indicated statistical significance. Results: Of 79 patients who received palliative RT, 59 were assessable. Partial response, pain progression, and indeterminate response were observed in 22, 8, and 29 patients, respectively; there were no patients with a complete response. Patients across all groups had similar baseline QOL scores apart from physical functioning (patients who progressed had better initial functioning). One month after RT, patients who responded had significant improvements in 3 of 4 QLQ-BM22 domains (painful site, P<.0001; painful characteristic, P<.0001; and functional interference, P<.0001) and 3 QLQ-C30 domains (physical functioning, P=.0006; role functioning, P=.0026; and pain, P<.0001). Patients with progression in pain had significantly worse functional interference (P=.0007) and pain (P=.0019). Conclusions: Patients who report pain relief after palliative RT also have better QOL with respect to bone metastasis-specific issues. The QLQ-BM22 and QLQ-C30 are able to discriminate among patients with varying responses and are recommended for use in future bone metastasis clinical trials.

Zeng Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bedard, Gillian; Zhang, Liying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta Faculty of Medicine, Tanta (Egypt)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta Faculty of Medicine, Tanta (Egypt); Jesus-Garcia, Reynaldo [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kumar, Aswin [Division of Gynaecology and Genitourinary Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Center, Trivandrum (India)] [Division of Gynaecology and Genitourinary Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Center, Trivandrum (India); Forges, Fabien [Inserm CIE3, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France) [Inserm CIE3, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Unit of Clinical Research, Innovation, and Pharmacology, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Tseng, Ling-Ming [Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hou, Ming-Feng [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chie, Wei-Chu [Department of Public Health and Institute of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Public Health and Institute of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Bottomley, Andrew [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium)] [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

Braendengen, Morten, E-mail: mortbrae@medisin.uio.no [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Bruheim, Kjersti [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Cvancarova, Milada [Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Berglund, Ake [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

Koshy, Matthew, E-mail: mkoshy@umm.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine and University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goloubeva, Olga; Suntharalingam, Mohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine and University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Survival Outcomes in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Effect of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma has not been clearly established. We analyzed survival outcomes of patients with resected extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and examined the effect of adjuvant RT. Methods and Materials: Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2003. The primary endpoint was the overall survival time. Cox regression analysis was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the following clinical variables: age, year of diagnosis, histologic grade, localized (Stage T1-T2) vs. regional (Stage T3 or greater and/or node positive) stage, gender, race, and the use of adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Results: The records for 2,332 patients were obtained. Patients with previous malignancy, distant disease, incomplete or conflicting records, atypical histologic features, and those treated with preoperative/intraoperative RT were excluded. Of the remaining 1,491 patients eligible for analysis, 473 (32%) had undergone adjuvant RT. After a median follow-up of 27 months (among surviving patients), the median overall survival time for the entire cohort was 20 months. Patients with localized and regional disease had a median survival time of 33 and 18 months, respectively (p < .001). The addition of adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in overall or cause-specific survival for patients with local or regional disease. Conclusion: Patients with localized disease had significantly better overall survival than those with regional disease. Adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in long-term overall survival in patients with resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Key data, including margin status and the use of combined chemotherapy, was not available through the SEER database.

Vern-Gross, Tamara Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Shivnani, Anand T., E-mail: Anand.Shivnani@usoncology.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor-Irving Cancer Center, Irving, TX (United States); Chen, Ke [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Lee, Christopher M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Care Northwest, Spokane, WA (United States); Tward, Jonathan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); MacDonald, O. Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Talamonti, Mark S. [Department of Surgery, Northshore University Healthsystem, Evanston, IL (United States); Munoz, Louis L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Texas Cancer Center at Medical City Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Small, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

Chien, Chun-Ru [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pan, I-Wen [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsai, Yi-Wen [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Teressa [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Shih, Ya-Chen Tina, E-mail: yashih@mdanderson.org [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

McGuire, Sean E., E-mail: semcguir@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cerne, Jasmina Z. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Nitrogen fixation and nitrogenase (nifH) expression in tropical waters of the eastern north atlantic.  

SciTech Connect

Expression of nifH in 28 surface water samples collected during fall 2007 from six stations in the vicinity of the Cape Verde Islands (north-east Atlantic) was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based clone libraries and quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of seven diazotrophic phylotypes. Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) rates and nutrient concentrations were determined for these stations, which were selected based on a range in surface chlorophyll concentrations to target a gradient of primary productivity. BNF rates greater than 6 nmolN I{sup -1} h{sup -1} were measured at two of the near-shore stations where high concentrations of Fe and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} were also measured. Six hundred and five nifH transcripts were amplified by RT-PCR, of which 76% are described by six operational taxonomic units, including Trichodesmium and the uncultivated UCYN-A, and four non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs that clustered with uncultivated Proteobacteria. Although all five cyanobacterial phylotypes quantified in RT-qPCR assays were detected at different stations in this study, UCYN-A contributed most significantly to the pool of nifH transcripts in both coastal and oligotrophic waters. A comparison of results from RT-PCR clone libraries and RT-qPCR indicated that a {gamma}-proteobacterial phylotype was preferentially amplified in clone libraries, which underscores the need to use caution interpreting clone-library-based nifH studies, especially when considering the importance of uncultivated proteobacterial diazotrophs.

Turk, K. A.; Rees, A. P.; Zehr, J. P.; Pereira, N.; Swift, P.; Shelley, R.; Lohan, M.; Woodward, E. M. S.; Gilbert, J. (CLS-CI); (Department of Ocean Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz); (Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place); (NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology); (University of Plymouth, Drake Circus); (Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Extreme-Risk Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting With Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) >40 ng/ml: Prognostic Significance of the Preradiation PSA Nadir  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the impact of patient, disease, and treatment characteristics on survival outcomes in patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radical external-beam radiotherapy (RT) for clinically localized, extreme-risk prostate adenocarcinoma with a presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of >40 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was conducted of 64 patients treated at a single institution between 1991 and 2000 with ADT and RT for prostate cancer with a presenting PSA level of >40 ng/ml. The effects of patient age, tumor (presenting PSA level, Gleason score, and T stage), and treatment (total ADT duration and pre-RT PSA level) characteristics on rates of biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 6.45 years (range, 0.09-15.19 years). Actuarial bDFS, PCSS, and OS rates at 5 years were 39%, 87%, and 78%, respectively, and 17%, 64%, and 45%, respectively, at 10 years. On multivariate analysis, the pre-RT PSA level ({<=}0.1 versus >0.1 ng/ml) was the single most significant prognostic factor for bDFS (p = 0.033) and OS (p = 0.018) rates, whereas age, T stage, Gleason score, and ADT duration ({<=}6 versus >6 months) were not predictive of outcomes. Conclusion: In prostate cancer patients with high presenting PSA levels, >40 ng/ml, treated with combined modality, neoadjuvant ADT, and RT, the pre-RT PSA nadir, rather than ADT duration, was significantly associated with improved survival. This observation supports the use of neoadjuvant ADT to drive PSA levels to below 0.1 ng/ml before initiation of RT, to optimize outcomes for patients with extreme-risk disease.

Alexander, Abraham S. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Radiation Therapy Program, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Mydin, Aminudin; Jones, Stuart O.; Christie, Jennifer [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Radiation Therapy Program, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Lim, Jan T.W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Radiation Therapy Program, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Radiation Therapy Program, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ludgate, Charles M. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Radiation Therapy Program, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Pathological Predictors for Site of Local Recurrence After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Rational design of targeted radiotherapy (RT) in prostate cancer (Pca) hinges on a better understanding of spatial patterns of recurrence. We sought to identify pathological factors predictive for site of local recurrence (LR) after external beam RT. Methods and Materials: Prospective databases were reviewed to identify men with LR after RT from 1997 through 2009. Patients with biochemical failure and biopsy-confirmed Pca more than 2 years after RT were evaluated. Prediction for site of recurrence based on the following pretreatment factors was determined on independent and cluster-sextant basis: presence of malignancy, dominant vs. nondominant percentage core length (PCL) involvement, PCL {>=} or 5% for each patient. Results: Forty-one patients with low-intermediate risk Pca constituted the study cohort. Median time to biopsy after RT was 51 months (range, 24-145). Of 246 sextants, 74 were involved with tumor at baseline. When sextants are treated as independent observations the presence of malignancy (77% vs. 22%, p = 0.0001), dominant PCL (90% vs. 46%, p = 0.0001), and PCL {>=}40% (89% vs. 68 %, p = 0.04) were found to be significant predictors for LR, although PCL {>=}40% did not retain statistical significance if sextants were considered correlated. The vast majority of patients (95%) recurred at the original site of dominant PCL or PCL {>=}40%, and 44% also recurred in regions of nondominant PCL <40% (n = 8) and/or benign sampling (n = 14) at baseline. Conclusions: LR after RT predominantly occurs in regions bearing higher histological tumor burden but are not isolated to these sites. Our data highlights the value of spatially resolved baseline pathological sampling and may assist in the design of clinical trials tailoring RT dose prescriptions to subregions of the prostate gland.

Chopra, Supriya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Toi, Ants [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Taback, Nathan [Division of Biostatistics, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Evans, Andrew [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pathology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Milosevic, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Morton, Gerard; Vesprini, Danny [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto (Canada); Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Menard, Cynthia, E-mail: Cynthia.Menard@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%-77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21-11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further evaluation.

Arvold, Nils D. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ferrone, Cristina R. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Clark, Jeffrey W.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Deshpande, Vikram [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Allen, Jill N.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Warshaw, Andrew L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: Tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Relationship Between Local Recurrence and Radiotherapy Treatment Volume for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy and Function Preservation Surgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the geometric relationship between local recurrence (LR) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) volumes for soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients treated with function-preserving surgery and RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 768 (7.8%) STS patients treated with combined therapy within our institution from 1990 through 2006 developed an LR. Thirty-two received preoperative RT, 16 postoperative RT, and 12 preoperative RT plus a postoperative boost. Treatment records, RT simulation images, and diagnostic MRI/CT data sets of the original and LR disease were retrospectively compared. For LR location analysis, three RT target volumes were defined according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 29 as follows: (1) the gross tumor or operative bed; (2) the treatment volume (TV) extending 5 cm longitudinally beyond the tumor or operative bed unless protected by intact barriers to spread and at least 1-2 cm axially (the TV was enclosed by the isodose curve representing the prescribed target absorbed dose [TAD] and accounted for target/patient setup uncertainty and beam characteristics), and (3) the irradiated volume (IRV) that received at least 50% of the TAD, including the TV. LRs were categorized as developing in field within the TV, marginal (on the edge of the IRV), and out of field (occurring outside of the IRV). Results: Forty-nine tumors relapsed in field (6.4% overall). Nine were out of field (1.1% overall), and 2 were marginal (0.3% overall). Conclusions: The majority of STS tumors recur in field, indicating that the incidence of LR may be affected more by differences in biologic and molecular characteristics rather than aberrations in RT dose or target volume coverage. In contrast, only two patients relapsed at the IRV boundary, suggesting that the risk of a marginal relapse is low when the TV is appropriately defined. These data support the accurate delivery of optimal RT volumes in the most precise way using advanced technology and image guidance.

Dickie, Colleen I., E-mail: Colleen.dickie@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Griffin, Anthony M. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Parent, Amy L. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Svensson, Jon [AngliaRuskin University, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

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401

The effect of load thickness on Rayleigh-Taylor mitigation in high velocity, annular z pinch implosion  

SciTech Connect

Numerical calculations have been performed to investigate the role that load thickness may play in the performance of fast annular z pinch implosions. In particular, the effects of load thickness on the mitigation of the magnetically-driven Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability and energy coupling between the load and generator are addressed. using parameters representative of the Z accelerator [R.B.Spielman et al., Phys.Plasmas, 5, 2105 (1998)] at Sandia National Laboratories, two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations show that increased shell thickness results in lower amplitude, slightly longer wavelength RT modes. In addition, there appears to be an optimum in load velocity which is directly associated with the thickness of the sheath and subsequent RT growth. Thin, annular loads, which should couple efficiently to the accelerator, show a large reduction in implosion velocity due to extreme RT development and increased load inductance. As a consequence, thicker loads on the order of 5 mm, couple almost as efficiently to the generator since the RT growth is reduced. This suggests that z-pinch loads can be tailored for different applications, depending on the need for uniformity or high powers.

DOUGLAS,MELISSA R.; DEENEY,CHRISTOPHER; RODERICK,NORMAN F.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

402

Modeling of Salivary Production Recovery After Radiotherapy Using Mixed Models: Determination of Optimal Dose Constraint for IMRT Planning and Construction of Convenient Tools to Predict Salivary Function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The mathematical relationship between the dose to the parotid glands and salivary gland production needs to be elucidated. This study, which included data from patients included in a French prospective study assessing the benefit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT), sought to elaborate a convenient and original model of salivary recovery. Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and December 2004, 44 patients were included (35 with oropharyngeal and 9 with nasopharyngeal cancer). Of the 44 patients, 24 were treated with intensity-modulated RT, 17 with three-dimensional conformal RT, and 2 with two-dimensional RT. Stimulated salivary production was collected for {gland were modeled using a mixed model. Several models were developed to assess the best-fitting variable for the dose level to the parotid gland. Results: Models developed with the dose to the contralateral parotid fit the data slightly better than those with the dose to both parotids, suggesting that contralateral and ipsilateral parotid glands are not functionally equivalent even with the same dose level to the glands. The best predictive dose-value variable for salivary flow recovery was the volume of the contralateral parotid gland receiving >40 Gy. Conclusion: The results of this study show that the recommendation of a dose constraint for intensity-modulated RT planning should be established at the volume of the contralateral parotid gland receiving >40 Gy rather than the mean dose. For complete salivary production recovery after 24 months, the volume of the contralateral parotid gland receiving >40 Gy should be gland.

Ortholan, Cecile [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Canceropole PACA, Nice (France)], E-mail: c.ortholan@wanadoo.fr; Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar [Department of Biostatistics, Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Canceropole PACA, Nice (France); Benezery, Karen; Thariat, Juliette [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Canceropole PACA, Nice (France); Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Bozec, Alexandre [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Canceropole PACA, Nice (France); Follana, Philippe; Peyrade, Frederique [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Canceropole PACA, Nice (France); Sudaka, Anne [Department of Pathology, Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Canceropole PACA, Nice (France); Gerard, Jean Pierre; Bensadoun, Rene Jean [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Canceropole PACA, Nice (France)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

COHERENT BACKSCATTERING VERIFIED NUMERICALLY FOR A FINITE VOLUME OF SPHERICAL PARTICLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider electromagnetic scattering by a spherical volume sparsely and randomly populated by spherical particles of equal size and optical properties. The far-field scattering matrix of the entire volume is computed using an exact method and an approximate method. The former is a direct computer solver of the Maxwell equations called the superposition T-matrix method (STMM). The latter is a solver based on numerical Monte Carlo integration of the ladder and cyclical diagrams appearing in the microphysical theory of radiative transfer and coherent backscattering (RT-CB). The quantitative agreement between the STMM and RT-CB computations provides verification of the RT-CB theory. Prominent backscattering features exhibited by the STMM data cannot be reproduced by keeping only the ladder diagrams of RT. Our results strongly support the CB explanation of opposition brightness and polarization phenomena observed for a class of atmosphereless solar-system objects. Further research is necessary to determine the range of quantitative applicability of the RT-CB theory to densely packed particulate media.

Muinonen, K.; Zubko, E.; Penttilae, A. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2a, FI-00014 U. Helsinki (Finland); Mishchenko, M. I. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Dlugach, J. M. [Main Astronomical Observatory, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 27 Zabolotny Street, 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Videen, G., E-mail: karri.muinonen@helsinki.fi, E-mail: evgenij.zubko@helsinki.fi, E-mail: antti.i.penttila@helsinki.fi, E-mail: michael.i.mishchenko@nasa.gov, E-mail: dl@mao.kiev.ua, E-mail: gorden.videen@gmail.com [Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Antisense-MDM2 Sensitizes LNCaP Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen Deprivation, Radiation, and the Combination In Vivo  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test the effects of antisense (AS)-MDM2 alone and with androgen deprivation (AD), radiotherapy (RT), and AD + RT on wild-type LNCaP cells in an orthotopic in vivo model. Methods: Androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of nude mice. Magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor volume and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements were used to assess effects on tumor response. Tumor response was measured by biochemical and tumor volume failure definitions and doubling time estimates from fitted PSA and tumor volume growth curves. Expression of MDM2, p53, p21, and Ki-67 was quantified using immunohistochemical staining and image analysis of formalin-fixed tissue, analogous to methods used clinically. Results: Antisense-MDM2 significantly inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors over the mismatch controls. The most significant increase in tumor growth delay and tumor doubling time was from AS-MDM2 + AD + RT, although the effect of AS-MDM2 + AD was substantial. Expression of MDM2 was significantly reduced by AS-MDM2 in the setting of RT. Conclusions: This is the first in vivo investigation of the effects of AS-MDM2 in an orthotopic model and the first to demonstrate incremental sensitization when added to AD and AD + RT. The results with AD underscore the potential to affect micrometastatic disease, which is probably responsible for treatment failure in 30-40% of men with high-risk disease.

Stoyanova, Radka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hachem, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hensley, Harvey [Department of Basic Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Khor, L.-Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mu Zhaomei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hammond, M. Elizabeth H. [Department of Pathology, LDS Hospital, Intermountain Health Care, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Agrawal, Sudhir [Idera Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, MA (United States); Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]. E-mail: Alan.Pollack@fccc.edu

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Water bath calorimetric study of excess heat generation in 'resonant transfer' plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water bath calorimetry was used to demonstrate one more peculiar phenomenon associated with a certain class of mixed gas plasmas termed resonant transfer, or RT plasmas. Specifically, He/H2 (10%) (500 mTorr), Ar/H2 (10%) (500 mTorr), and H2O(g) (500 and 200 mTorr) plasmas generated with an Evenson microwave cavity consistently yielded on the order of 50% more heat than non RT plasma (controls) such as He, Kr, Kr/H2 (10%), under identical conditions of gas flow, pressure, and microwave operating conditions. The excess power density of RT plasmas was of the order 10 W / cm-3. In earlier studies with these same RT plasmas it was demonstrated that other unusual features were present including dramatic broadening of the hydrogen Balmer series lines, unique vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lines, and in the case of water plasmas, population inversion of the hydrogen excited states. Both the current results and the earlier results are completely consistent with the existence of a hitherto unknown exothermic chemical reaction, such as that predicted by Mills, occurring in RT plasmas.

J. Phillips; R. L. Mills; X. Chen

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiotherapy, McGill University Heath Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gois Manso, Paulo [Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Araujo Segreto, Roberto, E-mail: segreto.dmed@epm.br [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Gastric Cancer-Rapid, Yet Incomplete Adoption Following Results of Intergroup 0116 Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The Southwest Oncology Group/Intergroup 0116 (INT-0116) trial showed that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves survival in high-risk gastric adenocarcinoma patients. This study examined the adoption of adjuvant treatment following the trial results and the factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, patients aged 18-85 years with resected gastric adenocarcinoma were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database and classified as diagnosed before (January 1996 to April 2000) or after (May 2000 to December 2003) presentation of the INT-0116 trial findings. Univariate and multivariable models were used to determine the factors associated with use of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Results: Of 10,230 patients studied, 14.6% were given adjuvant RT before the INT-0116 trial, increasing to 30.4% afterward (p SEER regions. On multiple logistic regression analysis, age, SEER region, marital status, assessed lymph nodes, tumor depth, and nodal status were all significant independent predictors of the use of adjuvant RT. Conclusion: Use of adjuvant RT doubled after the INT-0116 trial results became public; however, the fraction of patients receiving adjuvant RT is still low. Additional examination of the statistically significant and clinically relevant variability between different SEER regions, tumor characteristics, and patient demographics is warranted.

Coburn, Natalie G. [Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)], E-mail: natalie.coburn@sunnybrook.ca; Guller, Ulrich; Baxter, Nancy N. [Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Kiss, Alex [Department of Research Design and Biostatistics, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ringash, Jolie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Swallow, Carol J.; Law, Calvin H.L. [Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Manufacturing Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOT_RT_Sub_Template.ppt | 1/6/2009 | 1 EOT_RT_Sub_Template.ppt | 1/6/2009 | 1 BOEING is a trademark of Boeing Management Company. Copyright © 2009 Boeing. All rights reserved. Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Manufacturing Perspective Karl M. Nelson (karl.m.nelson@boeing.com) Boeing Research & Technology Engineering, Operations & Technology | Boeing Research & Technology Materials & Fabrication Technology EOT_RT_Sub_Template.ppt | 1/12/2009 | Structural Tech 2 Copyright © 2009 Boeing. All rights reserved. DOE Hydrogen Program Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels Mark Leavitt, Alex Ly Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc. Karl Nelson, Brice Johnson The Boeing Company Ken Johnson, Kyle Alvine, Stan Pitman, Michael Dahl, Daryl Brown

409

Growth condition dependence of spin-polarized electroluminescence in Fe/MgO/light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

We compared the electroluminescence (EL) polarization of two Fe/MgO/light-emitting-diode (LED) structures grown at different substrate temperatures for MgO growth: room temperature and 400 deg. C. Two spin-LED wafers were prepared on molecular beam epitaxy grown LEDs by e-beam evaporation: one was LED/MgO (RT)/Fe (RT)/Au cap (RT), and the other was LED/MgO (400 deg. C)/Fe (150 deg. C)/Au cap (90 deg. C). Spin-polarized EL was clearly observed in the latter sample, while the EL polarization was hardly observed in the former sample. The reasons for the near absence of EL polarization in the former sample are considered to be the degradation of the tunneling junction resulting from the crystallinity and the As-rich surface of the LED.

Manago, Takashi; Sinsarp, Asawin; Akinaga, Hiro [Department of Electronics and Computer Science, Tokyo University of Science, Yamaguchi, 1-1-1 Daigaku-Dori, Sanyo-Onoda, Yamaguchi 756-0884 (Japan); Nanotechnology Research Institute (NRI), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Data:3ecf55b6-1020-4bb7-a123-24306f10c4ae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5b6-1020-4bb7-a123-24306f10c4ae 5b6-1020-4bb7-a123-24306f10c4ae No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Potomac Electric Power Co Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rapid Transit Service - Schedule RT Sector: Commercial Description: RAPID TRANSIT SERVICE SCHEDULE RT Source or reference: http://www.pepco.com/_res/documents/DCRates_RT.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

411

Microsoft Word - qa_plan1.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SJ-RT SJ-RT Smith Jones Rapid Transit Software Quality Assurance Plan February 1997 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Replace with appropriate organization name qa_plan1.doc ii 02/27/07 Change Control Page The following information is being used to control and track modifications made to this document. 1) Revision Date: mm/dd/yy Author: Section(s): Page Number(s): Summary of Change(s): 2) Revision Date: mm/dd/yy Author: Section(s): Page Number(s): Summary of Change(s): qa_plan1.doc iii 02/27/07 Title Page Document Name: Smith Jones Rapid Transit (SJ-RT) Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) Publication Date: February 2007 Revision Date: Contract Number: Project Number: Prepared by: M. Polo Approval: __________________________

412

Clock Distribution Networks for 3-D Integrated Circuits Vasilis F. Pavlidis, Ioannis Savidis, and Eby G. Friedman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

©d d ¬ W (14) ¯ «±³ ° ´ ¨eT4aa)¬ ² e TVaba¬T t Q ©d ¬xµ (15) ¯ ® « ³ ° ¨d ¬{µ ©TVaba ´ ² e© ¬ Y T U ·g ¨ª© (17) T U ·W ¨%©@« ° d ² e¨d d W© TVaba ¨ ² e TVaba)¬RT t E © ¨d d W© ° ² e¨d W© TVaba ¨eTVaba¬ ² e TVabaG¬RT t Q ©¨d W© (18) T U ·i ¨%©@« ° d ¨ ² e TVaba¬RT t E ©d d ¬ ° ¨eT4aa

Friedman, Eby G.

413

Effects of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and its influence on the topography of the Fe thin film grown in pulsed laser deposition facility  

SciTech Connect

The effect of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities in laser induced Fe plasma is investigated using time-resolved fast gated imaging. The snow plow and shock wave models are fitted to the experimental results and used to estimate the ablation parameters and the density of gas atoms that interact with the ablated species. It is observed that RT instability develops during the interface deceleration stage and grows for a considerable time for higher laser energy fluence. The effects of RT instabilities formation on the surface topography of the Fe thin films grown in pulsed laser deposition system are investigated (i) using different laser energy fluences for the same wavelength of laser radiation and (ii) using different laser wavelengths keeping the energy fluence fixed. It is concluded that the deposition achieved under turbulent condition leads to less smooth deposition surfaces with bigger sized particle agglomerates or network.

Mahmood, S. [National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Department of Physics, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270 (Pakistan); Rawat, R. S.; Wang, Y.; Lee, S.; Tan, T. L.; Springham, S. V.; Lee, P. [National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Zakaullah, M. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Crystallographic Terms and Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Crystal structures of the elements...K) Tb oC 4 1 δ (60 kbar at RT) Sm hR 3 8 Tc (technetium) ? Mg hP 2 1 , 8 Te (tellurium) ? Se hP 3 1 Te II (>15 kbar) As hR 2(?) 1 Te II (>70 kbar) Hg hR 1 8 Th (thorium) α (RT) Cu cF 4 1 β (HT) W cI 2 1 Ti (titanium) α (RT) Mg hP 2 1 β (HT) W cI 2 1 Ti II (HP; retained when pressure removed) Ti hP 3 (?...

415

Investigation of forced and isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical properties of two different layups for each of the forced CVI (41 specimens) and isothermal CVI (36 specimens) materials were investigated in air at room temperature (RT), 1000C, and at room temperature after thermal shock (RT/TS) and exposure to oxidation (RT/OX). The FCVI specimens had a nominal interfacial coating thickness of 0.3 {mu}m of pyrolytic carbon, while CVI specimens had a coating thickness of 0.1 {mu}m. Effect of reinforcement and interfacial bond on mechanical properties of composite were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the fiber-matrix interface and the toughening mechanisms in this ceramic composite system.

Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Vaidyanathan, R. [North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Univ., Greensboro, NC (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Electron Scattering in InSb Quantum Wells due to Micro-twin Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport electron scattering due to micro-twin (MT) defects in InSb quantum wells (QWs) has been investigated at room temperature (RT). A linear-regression-based scattering analysis showed that Matthiessen's rule is applicable to the RT electron mobility in 20-nm-thick InSb QWs that contain MTs (whose density is 5.6x10{sup 2}-1.2x10{sup 4} /cm) and threading dislocations (8.7x10{sup 8}-3.2x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2}) as dominant structural defects. For such an InSb QW whose local electron mobility in its non-MT regions is 2.8x10{sup 4}-4.5x10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/(Vs), the MT-originated energy barrier against the electron transport is deduced to be 0.081-0.093 eV at RT.

Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructure University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

Numeric Definition of the Clinical Performance of the Nested Reverse Transcription-PCR for Detection of Hematogenous Epithelial Cells and Correction for Specific mRNA of Non-Target Cell Origin as Evaluated for Prostate Cancer Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Inappropriate quality management of reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays for the detection of blood-borne prostate cancer (PCa) cells hampers clinical conclusions. Improvement of the RT-PCR methodology for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) mRNA should focus on an appropriate numeric definition of the performance of the assay and correction for PSA mRNA that is not associated with PCa cells. Methods and Results: Repeated (RT-)PCR tests for PSA mRNA in single blood specimens from PCa patients and PCa-free controls, performed by four international institutions, showed a large percentage (?50%) of divergent test results. The best estimates of the mean, ? (SD), of the expected Poisson frequency distributions of the number of positive tests among five replicate assays of

Genetics; Denis Schamhart; Johannes Swinnen; Karl-heinz Kurth; Alex Westerhof; Ron Kusters; Holger Borchers; Cora Sternberg; Nl Den

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A small but nonzero cosmological constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent astrophysical observations seem to indicate that the cosmological constant is small but nonzero and positive. The old cosmological constant problem asks why it is so small; we must now ask, in addition, why it is nonzero (and is in the range found by recent observations), and why it is positive. In this essay, we try to kill these three metaphorical birds with one stone. That stone is the unimodular theory of gravity, which is the ordinary theory of gravity, except for the way the cosmological constant arises in the theory. We argue that the cosmological constant becomes dynamical, and eventually, in terms of the cosmic scale factor $R(t)$, it takes the form $\\Lambda(t) = \\Lambda(t_0)(R(t_0)/R(t))^2$, but not before the epoch corresponding to the redshift parameter $z \\sim 1$.

Y. Jack Ng; H. van Dam

1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Final Report - ILAW PCT, VHT, Viscosity, and Electrical Conductivity Model Development, VSL-07R1230-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of work and testing specified by the Test Specifications (24590-LAW-TSP-RT-01-013 Rev.1 and 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-02-001 Rev.0), Test Plans (VSL-02T4800-1 Rev.1 & TP-RPP-WTP-179 Rev.1), and Text Exception (24590-WTP-TEF-RT-03-040). The work and any associated testing followed established quality assurance requirements and conducted as authorized. The descriptions provided in this test report are an accurate account of both the conduct of the work and the data collected. Results required by the Test Plans are reported. Also reported are any unusual or anomalous occurrences that are different from the starting hypotheses. The test results and this report have been reviewed and verified.

Kruger, Albert A.; Cooley, S. K.; Joseph, I.; Pegg, I. L.; Piepel, G. F.; Gan, H.; Muller, I.

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Timing of Salvage Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy: A Systematic Review  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy can potentially eradicate residual microscopic disease. Defining the optimal patient and treatment factors is essential and is particularly relevant within the context of adjuvant vs early vs delayed postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A systematic review of all published SRT studies was performed to identify the pathologic, clinical, and treatment factors associated with relapse-free survival (RFS) after SRT. A total of 41 studies encompassing 5597 patients satisfied the study entry criteria. Radiobiologic interpretation of biochemical tumor control was used to provide the framework for the observed relationships. Results: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level before SRT (P<.0001) and RT dose (P=.0052) had a significant and independent association with RFS. There was an average 2.6% loss of RFS for each incremental 0.1 ng/mL PSA at the time of SRT (95% CI, {approx}2.2-3.1). With a PSA level of 0.2 ng/mL or less before SRT, the RFS approached 64%. The dose for salvage RT in the range of 60-70 Gy seemed to be on the steep part of the sigmoidal dose-response curve, with a dose of 70 Gy achieving 54% RFS compared with only 34% for 60 Gy. There was a 2% improvement in RFS for each additional Gy (95% CI, {approx}0.9-3.2). The observed dose-response was less robust on sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: This study provides Level 2a evidence for initiating SRT at the lowest possible PSA. Dose escalation is also suggested by the data. Progressively better tumor control rates with SRT after radical prostatectomy are achieved with a lower PSA at initiation and with a higher RT dose. Early salvage RT may be an equivalent strategy to adjuvant RT.

King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Preliminary Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Plus Adjuvant Chemotherapy With Radiotherapy Alone in Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in Endemic Regions of China  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A prospective randomized trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy of concurrent chemotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in endemic regions of China. Methods and Materials: Between July 2002 and September 2005, 316 eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive either radiotherapy alone (RT) or chemoradiotherapy concurrent with adjuvant chemotherapy (CRT). All patients received 70 Gy in 7 weeks using standard RT portals and techniques. The CRT patients were given concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1) weekly during RT, followed by cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1) and fluorouracil (800 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1-5) every 4 weeks (Weeks 5, 9, and 13) for three cycles after completion of RT. All patients were analyzed by intent-to-treat analysis. Results: The two groups were well-balanced in all prognostic factors and RT parameters. The CRT group experienced significantly more acute toxicity (62.6% vs. 32%, p = 0.000). A total of 107 patients (68%) and 97 patients (61%) completed all cycles of concurrent chemotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, with a median follow-up time of 29 months. The 2-year overall survival rate, failure-free survival rate, distant failure-free survival rate, and locoregional failure-free survival rate for the CRT and RT groups were 89.8% vs. 79.7% (p = 0.003), 84.6% vs. 72.5% (p = 0.001), 86.5% vs. 78.7% (p = 0.024), and 98.0% vs. 91.9% (p = 0.007), respectively. Conclusions: This trial demonstrated the significant survival benefits of concurrent chemotherapy plus adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locoregionally advanced NPC in endemic regions of China.

Chen Yong; Liu Mengzhong; Liang Shaobo [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zong Jingfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Mao Yanping; Tang Linglong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Guo Ying [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Department of National Clinical Study Center for Anticancer Drugs, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin Aihua [Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zeng Xiangfa [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Ma Jun [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)], E-mail: majun2@mail.sysu.edu.cn

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Angiogenic Blockade and Radiotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report our preliminary experience of combining sunitinib and helical tomotherapy in patients with advanced HCC. Methods and Materials: Records of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with helical tomotherapy and sunitinib after radiation therapy (RT) from March 2007 to August 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. We report acute toxicities, radiologic response, serial {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP) kinetics, and survival. Results: Of 23 evaluable patients, 60% had {>=}2 hepatic lesions, extrahepatic disease was present in 5 (21.7%), and all received 2 tablets (25 mg) of sunitinib at least 1 week before, during, and 2 weeks after RT. Thirteen patients continued maintenance sunitinib after RT until disease progression. Hypofractionated RT with a median target dose of 52.5 Gy/15 fractions was delivered. An objective response was achieved in 74% of patients. The 1-year survival rate was 70%, with median survival of 16 months. Multivariate analysis showed that maintenance sunitinib was the most significant factor for survival. The time to progression was 10 months in the maintenance group compared with 4 months in the control group. Eighteen out of 21 patients with elevated AFP (85.7%) had {>=}50% decline of AFP within 2 months after RT. There were three episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and one episode of pancreatitis; 10 patients had {>=}Grade 2 elevation of liver enzymes, and 15 had {>=}Grade 2 thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that sunitinib and helical tomotherapy yield high Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and AFP response rates in advanced HCC with an acceptable safety profile. Maintenance sunitinib after RT potentially prolongs survival. A randomized trial is warranted.

Chi, Kwan-Hwa, E-mail: M006565@ms.skh.org.t [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin-Kong Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Radiation Science and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liao, Chao-Sheng [Department of Gastroenterology, Shin-Kong Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chih-Chia; Ko, Hui-Ling; Tsang, Yuk-Wah [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Shin-Kong Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Kuo-Ching [Department of Gastroenterology, Shin-Kong Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mehta, Minesh P. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Madison, WI (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

Kan, Tomoko, E-mail: tkan@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide [Department of Radiology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Role of Radiotherapy in the Management of Desmoid Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify high-risk patients with desmoid tumors who could benefit from postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and to determine the efficacy of postoperative and definitive RT. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of clinical data for all patients with desmoid tumors who underwent definitive local therapy at the University of Michigan from 1984 through 2008. Estimates for local control were calculated using the product-limit method of Kaplan and Meier, and associations with patient, tumor, and RT characteristics were explored using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: Treatment for 95 patients who qualified for the study included surgery, RT, or both in 54, 13, and 28 cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 38 months, the actuarial 3-year local control (95% confidence interval [CI]) was not significantly different (p = 0.3) among the three treatment groups: 84.6% (70.2-92.4), 92.3% (56.6-98.9), and 69.0% (43.1-84.9), respectively. Tumor site in the head/neck (p = 0.03) and history of previous surgical therapy (p = 0.01) were associated with increased recurrence risk (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.4, and HR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.3-7.8), whereas gender, age, use of RT, and positive margins were not (p > 0.2). Conclusions: Our findings suggest equivalent local control rates after surgery, RT, or a combination of both. Although history of previous surgical therapy or site of origin in the head/neck region were found to be associated with increased risk of recurrence after local therapy, there was no clear association between surgical margin status and local control.

Gluck, Iris [Institute of Oncology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Core, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Biermann, J. Sybil [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lucas, David R. [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgarb@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Pulmonary Changes After Radiotherapy for Conservative Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery for breast cancer involves part of the pulmonary parenchyma with a potential detrimental effect of reducing the normal functional reserve. Such an effect deserves to be studied in depth, considering the given long life expectancy of these women. We prospectively analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) with correlation with dosimetric data from RT. Methods and Materials: Lung HRCT and PFTs were performed in 41 women who had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer before and 3 and 9 months after postoperative RT. The PFTs included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, total lung capacity, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of vital capacity, and the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. HRCT was matched with the RT treatment plan images to analyze the dosimetric correlation. Results: At 3 months after RT, the lung alterations were classified at HRCT as follows: 46.3% were Grade 1, 24.4% Grade 2, and 7.3% Grade 3, and at 9 months, 58.5% were Grade 1, 19.5% Grade 2, and 0% Grade 3. The PFTs showed a significant decrease at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months. Chemotherapy, but not hormonal therapy, was associated with PFT changes. The grade of fibrosis increased with increasing lung volume treated to a dose {>=}25 Gy. Conclusion: Lung changes, mainly related to damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier and smallest airway ramifications, were observed at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months after RT. Minimizing the lung volume receiving {>=}25 Gy could reduce pulmonary toxicity.

Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy)], E-mail: krengli@med.unipmn.it; Sacco, Mariano [Department of Radiology, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Loi, Gianfranco [Department of Medical Physics, Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Masini, Laura [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Ferrante, Daniela [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Gambaro, Giuseppina [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Ronco, Marco [Department of Pneumology, Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Magnani, Corrado [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Carriero, Alessandro [Department of Radiology, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Radiation-Induced Cardiac Toxicity After Therapy for Breast Cancer: Interaction Between Treatment Era and Follow-Up Duration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Cardiac toxicity after breast radiotherapy (RT) has been widely described in 'older' RT trials (i.e., using larger fraction sizes, wide RT fields, and orthovoltage energy). The results from more 'modern' RT trials have shown less cardiac toxicity. The comparisons between the 'older' and 'modern' trials are confounded by the longer follow-up time in the 'older' trials. We systematically assessed the effect of treatment era and follow-up duration on the reported rates of cardiac toxicity associated with RT. Methods and Materials: The published data were surveyed using PubMed to identify studies using 'breast cancer,' 'irradiation/radiotherapy,' 'cardiac/heart,' and 'toxicity/morbidity/mortality' in a keyword search. Relevant data were extracted from the identified trials. The trials were defined as 'older' (patient accrual start year before 1980) and 'modern' (patient accrual start year in or after 1980) to segregate the trials and assess the treatment era effect. A 10-year follow-up duration was used as a cutoff to segregate and analyze trials with varying lengths of follow-up. Results: We analyzed 19 published reports of patients treated between 1968 and 2002 (5 randomized controlled trials, 5 single- or multi-institutional studies, and 9 national cancer registry database reviews). In the reviewed trials, all the older trials reported excess cardiac toxicity, typically with a median of >10-15 years of follow-up. However, the vast majority of modern RT trials had shorter median follow-up durations, typically {<=}10 years and did not report an excess toxicity risk. The modern studies lacked longer follow-up. Conclusion: Additional follow-up is needed to ensure that modern methods effectively reduce cardiac toxicity. Continued diligence to minimize cardiac exposure remains prudent.

Demirci, Senem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ege University School of Medicine, Izmir (Turkey); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Nam, Jiho; Hubbs, Jessica L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Nguyen, Thu [Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: marks@med.unc.edu

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Impact of Cranial Irradiation Added to Intrathecal Conditioning in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Central Nervous System Involvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Neither the prognostic importance nor the appropriate management of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is known for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We examined the impact of a CNS irradiation boost to standard intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2005, a total of 648 adult AML patients received a myeloablative HCT: 577 patients were CNS negative (CNS-), and 71 were CNS positive (CNS+). Of the 71 CNS+ patients, 52 received intrathecal chemotherapy alone (CNS+ITC), and 19 received ITC plus an irradiation boost (CNS+RT). Results: The CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT patients had 1- and 5-year relapse-free survivals (RFS) of 43% and 35%, 15% and 6%, and 37% and 32%, respectively. CNS+ITC patients had a statistically significant worse RFS compared with CNS- patients (hazard ratio [HR], 2.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6; p < 0.0001). CNS+RT patients had improved relapse free survival over that of CNS+ITC patients (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p = 0.01). The 1- and 5-year overall survivals (OS) of patients with CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT, were 50% and 38%, 21% and 6%, and 53% and 42%, respectively. The survival of CNS+RT were significantly better than CNS+ITC patients (p = 0.004). After adjusting for known risk factors, CNS+RT patients had a trend toward lower relapse rates and reduced nonrelapse mortality. Conclusions: CNS+ AML is associated with a poor prognosis. The role of a cranial irradiation boost to intrathecal chemotherapy appears to mitigate the risk of CNS disease, and needs to be further investigated to define optimal treatment strategies.

Mayadev, Jyoti S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology University of California-Davis Medical Center, Davis, CA (United States); Douglas, James G., E-mail: drjay@u.washington.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Storer, Barry E. [University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, WA (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storb, Rainer [Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Impact of Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy/5-Fluorouracil on Quality of Life of Patients Managed for Pancreatic Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL) results for patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients (n=41 locally advanced, n=22 postsurgery) entered the B9E-AY-S168 study and received 1 cycle of induction gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly Multiplication-Sign 3 with 1-week break) followed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) (54 Gy locally advanced and 45 Gy postsurgery) and concomitant continuous-infusion 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mg/m{sup 2}/d throughout RT). After 4 weeks, patients received an additional 3 cycles of consolidation gemcitabine chemotherapy. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires at baseline, before RT/5FU, at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion. Results: The patterns of change in global QOL scores differed between groups. In the locally advanced group global QOL scores were +13, +8, +3, and +1 compared with baseline before RT/5FU (P=.008), at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion, respectively. In the postsurgery group, global QOL scores were -3, +4, +15, and +17 compared with baseline at the same time points, with a significant improvement in global QOL before consolidation gemcitabine (P=.03). No significant declines in global QOL were reported by either cohort. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that global QOL and associated function and symptom profiles for pancreatic chemoradiation therapy differ between locally advanced and postsurgery patients, likely owing to differences in underlying disease status. For both groups, the treatment protocol was well tolerated and did not have a negative impact on patients' global QOL.

Short, Michala [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia) [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care/Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Goldstein, David [Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Halkett, Georgia [Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care/Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)] [Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care/Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Reece, William [Covance Asia Pacific, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)] [Covance Asia Pacific, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Borg, Martin [Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)] [Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Zissiadis, Yvonne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)] [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Spry, Nigel, E-mail: Nigel.Spry@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

TOWARD TIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST LUMINOSITY RELATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large scatters of luminosity relations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been one of the most important reasons preventing the extensive application of GRBs in cosmology. Many efforts have been made to seek tight luminosity relations. With the latest sample of 116 GRBs with measured redshift and spectral parameters, we investigate 6 two-dimensional (2D) correlations and 14 derived three-dimensional (3D) correlations of GRBs to explore the possibility of decreasing the intrinsic scatters of the luminosity relations of GRBs. We find the 3D correlation of E{sub peak}-{tau}{sub RT}-L to be evidently tighter (at the 2{sigma} confidence level) than its corresponding 2D correlations, i.e., the E{sub peak}-L and {tau}{sub RT}-L correlations. In addition, the coefficients before the logarithms of E{sub peak} and {tau}{sub RT} in the E{sub peak}-{tau}{sub RT}-L correlation are almost exact opposites of each other. Inputting this situation as a prior reduces the relation to L{proportional_to}(E'{sub peak}/{tau}{sub RT}'){sup 0.842{+-}0.064}, where E'{sub peak} and {tau}'{sub RT} denote the peak energy and minimum rise time in the GRB rest frame. We discuss how our findings can be interpreted/understood in the framework of the definition of the luminosity (energy released in units of time). Our argument about the connection between the luminosity relations of GRBs and the definition of the luminosity provides a clear direction for exploring tighter luminosity relations of GRBs in the future.

Qi Shi; Lu Tan, E-mail: qishi11@gmail.com, E-mail: t.lu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

430

Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ritter, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Quint, Douglas J. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hurkmans, Coen W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Timmerman, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Bezjak, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Marsh, Lon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Okunieff, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University Cancer Center, and Winship Cancer institute, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Metabolic Imaging Biomarkers of Postradiotherapy Xerostomia  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Xerostomia is a major complication of head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Available xerostomia measures remain flawed. [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET-CT) is routinely used for staging and response assessment of head and neck cancer. We investigated quantitative measurement of parotid gland FDG uptake as a potential biomarker for post-RT xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight locally advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving definitive RT underwent baseline and post-RT FDG-PET-CT on a prospective imaging trial. A separate validation cohort of 14 patients underwent identical imaging while prospectively enrolled in a second trial collecting sialometry and patient-reported outcomes. Radiation dose and pre- and post-RT standard uptake values (SUVs) for all voxels contained within parotid gland ROI were deformably registered. Results: Average whole-gland or voxel-by-voxel models incorporating parotid D{sub Met} (defined as the pretreatment parotid SUV weighted by dose) accurately predicted posttreatment changes in parotid FDG uptake (e.g., fractional parotid SUV). Fractional loss of parotid FDG uptake closely paralleled early parotid toxicity defined by posttreatment salivary output (p < 0.01) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia scores (p < 0.01). Conclusions: In this pilot series, loss of parotid FDG uptake was strongly associated with acute clinical post-RT parotid toxicity. D{sub Met} may potentially be used to guide function-sparing treatment planning. Prospective validation of FDG-PET-CT as a convenient, quantifiable imaging biomarker of parotid function is warranted and ongoing.

Cannon, Blake [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Memory Function Before and After Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With and Without Brain Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To prospectively compare the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on memory function in patients with and without brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with and without brain metastases (n = 44) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before RT (T0), after starting RT (T1), at the end of RT (T2), and 6-8 weeks (T3) after RT completion. Data were obtained from small-cell lung cancer patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation, patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic cranial irradiation (TCI), and breast cancer patients treated with RT to the breast. Results: Before therapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation patients performed worse than TCI patients or than controls on most test scores. During and after WBRT, verbal memory function was influenced by pretreatment cognitive status (p radiation effects on verbal memory function were only observed in TCI patients (p = 0.031). Subacute (T3) radiation effects on verbal memory function were observed in both TCI and prophylactic cranial irradiation patients (p = 0.006). These effects were more pronounced in patients with above-average performance at baseline. Visual memory and attention were not influenced by WBRT. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that WBRT causes cognitive dysfunction immediately after the beginning of RT in patients with brain metastases only. At 6-8 weeks after the end of WBRT, cognitive dysfunction was seen in patients with and without brain metastases. Because cognitive dysfunction after WBRT is restricted to verbal memory, patients should not avoid WBRT because of a fear of neurocognitive side effects.

Welzel, Grit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)], E-mail: grit.welzel@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Fleckenstein, Katharina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Schaefer, Joerg; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

Higgins, Kristin, E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); D'Amico, Thomas A. [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Conditional Volatility and Correlations of Weekly Returns and the VaR Analysis of 2008 Stock Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intensive and requires in- tradaily observations. Although, intradaily observations are becoming increas- ingly available across a large number of assets, it would still be desirable to work with a version of ~rit that does not require intradaily... Consider a portfolio based on the m assets with the return vector rt using the m #2; 1 vector of pre-determined weights, wt#0;1. The return on this portfolio is given by #26;t = w 0 t#0;1rt: (19) Suppose that we are interested in computing the capital Value...

Pesaran, M Hashem

435

Evaluation of the Role of Radiation Therapy in the Management of Malignant Thymoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The management of patients diagnosed with thymoma remains unclear. This report attempts to identify the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) in patients diagnosed with thymoma. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with thymic malignancy between 1973 and 2003 were retrospectively identified from centers participating in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. Those patients classified as having thymic carcinoma were excluded from this analysis. OS and CSS were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Outcomes for patients treated with and without radiation therapy were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed with the Cox proportional hazards model to analyze factors predictive of OS and CSS. Results: A total of 1,464 patients were identified as having thymic malignancy, and of these, 1,254 patients were identified as having malignant thymoma. The median follow-up time was 41 months (range, 4-337 months). Among patients who did not receive radiotherapy (RT), the 10-year rate of OS was 41% compared to 42% for those who did receive RT (p = 0.06). The median OS for the patients who did not receive RT was 80 months compared to 97 months for those who did receive RT. In patients with Masaoka stage II-III malignancy, OS was significantly improved with RT (p = 0.002), and a trend in improved CSS was observed (p = 0.1). Patients were also analyzed based on resection status. For those patients who had an incomplete excision, the 10-year OS was 63% with RT and 46% without RT (p = 0.38). On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of OS included age, extent of surgery, stage, and number of lymph nodes examined. Conclusions: This study reports treatment results of a large cohort of patients who were diagnosed with malignant thymoma. This study demonstrates that the use of RT following resection for thymoma significantly improves OS for those with regional disease and marginally improves CSS.

Patel, Shilpen, E-mail: Shilpenp@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Macdonald, O. Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Providence Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas (United States); Nagda, Suneel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Center, Tacoma, Washington (United States); Suntharalingam, Mohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Regulation of expression of two Ly-6 family genes by intron retention and transcription induced chimerism.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in increasing proteome complexity, [1-3]. In relation to this, alterations of splic- ing patterns or mis-splicing of genes are involved in sev- eral pathologies, [4-6] including several genetic diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), myotonic dystro- phy... and for LY6G5B were PR_1 and PR_5. Real-time RT-PCR for LY6G5B was performed by using SYBR green PCR master mix and the ABI PRISM 7700 sequence detection system (Applied Biosystems). Primers for real-time RT-PCR were designed for the differential...

Calvanese, Vincenzo; Mallya, Meera; Campbell, R Duncan; Aguado, Begona

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

Khesbn no.109 - Spring 1987 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l! )b J1D n))2 ,'1 tlsn DbND rtD ']uu N 'rts! 'lBr ''t p:3;r11:1grr 1y:rp4ry)ry1i 1y .51! l:rTD yltrytfyn yEbrtNt l:yrrgpbN tN tyT tt g'tNl ''tjy b:rtD Jui :lt DllD l'D )Sl l']sD

Admin, LAYCC

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Khesbn no. 45-46 - January 1967 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1lt I tND Dt3ll JD)']"j "rtD llN .lJl_tb Eyl '1*l lEPxlly],i7 u'l ul)n l'N ;0lNl 'l.l 'rTd .rtsu ul? n I'N ,iuTirT I'Nl*:nu ri2"lyll lru'byB! j1N D/rtD il! IrlS'ri7 N ,t:Nry), ,

Admin, LAYCC

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

May 12, 2011, Visiting Speakers Program Events - Special Report - Counterfeit Parts: Increasing Awareness and Developing Countermeasures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SpeciAl RepoRt SpeciAl RepoRt counterfeit parts: increasing Awareness and Developing countermeasures March 2011 Counterfeit Parts: Increasing Awareness and Developing Countermeasures March 2011 © 2010 Aerospace Industries Association of America, Inc. 1000 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1700, Arlington, Virginia 22209 n www.aia-aerospace.org Counterfeit Parts: Increasing Awareness and Developing Countermeasures i December 2010 Counterfeit Parts: Increasing Awareness and Developing Countermeasures Counterfeiting has a long and ignoble history, ranging from art and literature to manufactured goods. Unlike other industries, counterfeiting in the aerospace industry may have life or death

440

Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate outcome and toxicity of high-dose conformal radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2007, 182 consecutive patients with positive resection margins and/or pT3-4, node-negative prostate adenocarcinoma underwent postoperative conformal RT. The prescribed median dose to the prostate/seminal vesicle bed was 66.6 Gy (range 50-70). Hormone therapy (a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue and/or antiandrogen) was administered to 110/182 (60.5%) patients with high-risk features. Biochemical relapse was defined as an increase of more than 0.2 ng/mL over the lowest postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured on 3 occasions, each at least 2 weeks apart. Results: Median follow-up was 55.6 months (range 7.6-141.9 months). The 3- and 5-year probability of biochemical relapse-free survival were 87% and 81%, respectively. In univariate analysis, more advanced T stages, preoperative PSA values {>=}10 ng/mL, and RT doses <70 Gy were significant factors for biochemical relapse. Pre-RT PSA values >0.2 ng/mL were significant for distant metastases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for biochemical relapse were higher preoperative and pre-RT PSA values, hormone therapy for under 402 days and RT doses of <70 Gy. Higher pre-RT PSA values were the only independent predictor of distant metastases. Acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 72 (39.6%) and 91 (50%) patients, respectively. There were 2 cases of Grade III GI toxicity but no cases of Grade IV. Late GU and GI toxicities occurred in 28 (15.4%) and 14 (7.7%) patients, respectively: 11 cases of Grade III toxicity: 1 GI (anal stenosis) and 10 GU, all urethral strictures requiring endoscopic urethrotomy. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity.

Bellavita, Rita, E-mail: ritabellavita@libero.it [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Massetti, Michela [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Abraha, Iosief [Regional Health Authority of Umbria, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Regional Health Authority of Umbria, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Lupattelli, Marco [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Mearini, Luigi [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Farneti, Alessia; Palumbo, Isabella [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Porena, Massimo [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Urology Department, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy); Aristei, Cynthia [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)] [Institute of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital and Perugia University, Perugia (Italy)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

rrts t t s t srr strtr t q q  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1007/s10409-009-0327-6 #12;-Sk(r) r -Sk(0) -Sk() r t t t rt sss str tr ts r t t r r s r r t tr r hal-00566035,version1-28Nov2011 #12; rr t rrst t trst t s t r t tr rs trt r r t strtr t ts rst s s t t t r t s t r s s stt s r s rs s ts st t s r ss t s rs rt t rts t rst t rst rsts t trst

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 Available online 24 March 2009 Keywords: Ion mobility spectrometry Proteomics Multidimensional IMS a b s t r a c t A drift tube mass spectrometer that utilizes back-to-back ion mobility regions separated by a colli- sional activation zone and new autosampling [R.T. Kurulugama, S.J. Valentine, R

Clemmer, David E.

443

Portal fr Organische Chemie Chemie-Nachrichten > Juni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portal für Organische Chemie Chemie-Nachrichten > Juni 22.06.11 Mechanismus des Protontransfers diesem Zweck an Mechanismus des Protontransfers in Membranprotein aufgeklärt http://www.organische-chemie.ch/chemie. Experimentelle Physik und theoretische Chemie kombiniert Um die Prozesse auf Nanoebene mit hoher räumlicher und

Gerwert, Klaus

444

Homotopy invariance for homology of linear groups: the case SL_4.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate homotopy invariance for homology of SL_4. For any commutative ring, the group E_4(R[t]) acts on a simplicial complex whose contractibility implies homotopy invariance. We show that for a local factorial ring R, this complex satisfies the CAT(0)-property for the induced length metric from the Bruhat-Tits building.

Matthias Wendt

445

Fusion in a Staged Z-pinch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York (1978) Teller, E. : Fusion. Academic Press, New York (O R I G I N A L A RT I C L E Fusion in a Staged Z-pinch H.U.implosion the sim- ulated fusion-energy yield is 7.6 MJ,

Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Rostoker, N.; Wessel, F. J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Evaluation of the relationship between cathode microstructure and electrochemical behavior for SOFCs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for SOFCs J.R. Smith, A. Chen, D. Gostovic, D. Hickey, D. Kundinger, K.L. Duncan, R.T. DeHoff, K.S. Jones, E spectroscopy SOFC The need for high ef ciency and low emissions power sources has created signi cant interest in fuel cells. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are desirable for their fuel versatility. Because high

Florida, University of

447

A switch level fault simulation environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fault simulation environment which accepts pure switch level or mixed switch/RT level descriptions of the design under test. Switch level fault injection strategies for the stuck-at, transition and logic bridge models are presented. ...

V. Krishnaswamy; J. Casas; T. Tetzlaff

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Rationale for and Preliminary Results of Proton Beam Therapy for Mediastinal Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the potential of three-dimensional proton beam therapy (3D-PBT) for reducing doses to normal structures in patients with mediastinal lymphomas compared with conventional photon radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We treated 10 consecutive patients with mediastinal masses from lymphomas with 3D-PBT between July 2007 and February 2009 to 30.6-50.4 cobalt-Gray equivalents (CGE). Of those patients, 7 had primary refractory or recurrent disease, and 8 had Hodgkin lymphoma. Dosimetric endpoints were compared with those from conventional RT plans. Results: PBT delivered lower mean doses to the lung (6.2 vs. 9.5 Gy), esophagus (9.5 vs. 22.3 Gy), and heart (8.8 vs. 17.7 Gy) but not the breasts (5.9 vs. 6.1 Gy) than did conventional RT. Percentages of lung, esophagus, heart, and coronary artery (particularly the left anterior descending artery) volumes receiving radiation were consistently lower in the 3D-PBT plans over a wide range of radiation doses. Of the 7 patients who had residual disease on positron emission tomography before PBT, 6 (86%) showed a complete metabolic response. Conclusions: In patients with mediastinal lymphomas, 3D-PBT produced significantly lower doses to the lung, esophagus, heart, and coronary arteries than did the current conventional RT. These lower doses would be expected to reduce the risk of late toxicities in these major organs.

Li Jing; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Reed, Valerie; Allen, Pamela K.; Cai, Haihong; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D., E-mail: jcox@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A rose bengal amended medium for selecting nitrate-metabolism mutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~rtUlria cassiar (Jurair and Khan), Alternaria mocrospora (Zimmerman), and Alternaria /agttiC'Q (Snome and Muslafec Khan), I'AllcfrUln'a mocrospora (Zimmerman), et I'A/umaria lagclica (Shome et Muslafee). Le milieu mftabolisrne du niuale, II panir de champignons dont 1a sensibilite au chk>rate est r6:1uite. Des isolats de pl

Cotty, Peter J.

450

WhyFord Escort's success was easy to forecast.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were heated to 57.5°C for 10 min in a PTC200 thermocycler (MJ Re- search), rapidly cooled to 4°C and conformational studies of [Orn-10, Nle-13]-S-peptide. J Am Chem Soc 91:492­496. Ruettinger RT, Wen LP, Fulco AJ

Queitsch, Christine

451

Strong stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability by material strength at megabar pressures  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results showing significant reductions from classical in the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate due to high pressure effective lattice viscosity in metal foils are presented. Stabilization of RT instability (RTI) by ablation and density gradients has been studied for decades. The regime of stabilized RTI due to material strength at high pressure is new. On the Omega Laser in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, target samples of polycrystalline vanadium are compressed and accelerated quasi-isentropically at approx1 Mbar pressures, while maintaining the samples in the solid-state. Provided strong shocks are avoided, the higher the applied peak pressure, the higher the predicted foil strength, and hence, the higher the degree of strength stabilization of RTI. Several experiments were conducted where the amount of RT growth is measured by face-on radiography. The vanadium samples are probed by a laser driven He-alpha x-ray backlighter which produced 5.2 keV radiation. Comparison of the results with constitutive models for solid state strength under these conditions show that the measured RT growth is substantially lower than predictions using existing models that work well at low pressures and long time scales. High pressure, high strain rate data can be explained by the enhanced strength due to a phonon drag mechanism, creating a high effective lattice viscosity.

Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, B. A.; Becker, R. C.; Bernier, J. V.; Cavallo, R. M.; Lorenz, K. T.; Pollaine, S. M.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Rudd, R. E.; Barton, N. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Long-term behaviour of twin tunnels in London clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state settlement RT, RTi Tunnel radius, and initial value S Settlement s Deviatoric stress tensor xxxi CONTENTS s Deviatoric stress tensor stated relative to rotated yield surface axis Sintc , S int cmid Additional Scmax(ss) due to twin-tunnel interaction...

Laver, Richard George

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Progress Details 1. 1 Renewable Energy Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it without permission. 9-59 9-80E An ideal Stirling engine with air as the working fluid is consideredRT P 9-81 An ideal Stirling engine with air as the working fluid operates between specified pressure

Guo, Zaoyang

454

High Performance Solar Control Office Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing For the first four systems investigated (brass-SiO ' brass-AI 0 , Z Z 3 Al- Si0 , AI-AI ), families ofP substrate II Z3 R&T vs A; Brass-SiO II Z ; G substrate II

King, William J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Benchmarking a Visual-Basic based multi-component one-dimensional reactive transport modeling tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the details of a comprehensive numerical modeling tool, RT1D, which can be used for simulating biochemical and geochemical reactive transport problems. The code can be run within the standard Microsoft EXCEL Visual Basic platform, and it does ... Keywords: Bioremediation, Geochemical transport, Groundwater models, Numerical model, Reactive transport

Jagadish Torlapati; T. Prabhakar Clement

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Energirigtige pumpekoblinger i HVAC-systemer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energirigtige pumpekoblinger i HVAC-systemer PSO 2003 - FORSKNING & UDVIKLING I EFFEKTIV energieffektive HVAC-aggregater #12;InformationomProjektnr.:335-021 PROCESSEN: Projektet er gennemført af en reguleringsprincipper, mens Exhausto har leveret HVAC-aggregat og knowhow inden for klimasystemer. Grundfos

457

A comparative study of artificial neural networks, and decision trees for digital game content stocks price prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precise prediction of stock prices is difficult chiefly because of the many intervening factors. Unpredictability is particularly notable in the aftermath of the global financial crisis. Data mining may however be used to discover highly correlated estimation ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks (ANN), C&RT, Decision tree, Stock price forecasting

Tsung-Sheng Chang

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Clean Slate Design of Internet's Congestion Control Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Clean Slate Design of Internet's Congestion Control Algorithm Nandita Dukkipati (Collaborators. Slow additive increase means flows take a long time to acquire spare capacity 2. Unsustainable large delay 1 RT T p = 3/(2w2 ) #12;Explicit Control Protocol (XCP) · Proposed by Katabi et. al Sigcomm 2002

Duffy, Ken

459

ANALYSIS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE EFFECT OF INHIBITORS ON THE GROWTH OF TUMORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Gansu 730000, People's Republic of China and Institute for Mathematics and its Applications, University function r = R(t). Within the tumor the concentration of nutrient and the concentration of inhibitor (drug of healthy cells, as well as from drugs administered for therapy. The paper develops mathematical techniques

460

To be presented at the Eighth Topical Meeting on Technology of Fusion Energy, Salt Lake City, UT,October 9-13, 1988.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To be presented at the Eighth Topical Meeting on Technology of Fusion Energy, Salt Lake City, UT fc rt,^ O U. S. Government purposes. *Work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion few microns (2 2 microns) to avoid sticking problems on the cold surfaces of the heat exchanger

Harilal, S. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "moran rt marchand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I?%7 STGTE m rtExm ICmFIED cm&B fi re3xf.H ROJECT TIM % HER M JWDlCTICd Cf M W.&f&t ff NIF, Ml TtE FKILIIY If0 LICWSES TO WRE ffiDliXClIVE tt%iML. IVJ R&w mm IS h-m. STTE SW...

462

On Web Quality of Service: Approaches to Measurement of End-to-End Response Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tools for direct measurement of Quality of Service (QoS) as represented by End-To-End Response Time (ETE RT) are gaining acceptance. However, classifications of such tools were developed before the wide commercial adoption of the Web and are, thus, out ...

Mike Tsykin

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAP = cyclic capacity. eyec The steady state run time (RT) is defined as space heating or cooling load of annual heating and cooling load of the house and hot water usage. The level of insulation in the home and cooling load parameters. The method developed is relatively straightforward and consists of the following

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

464

Efficacy and treatment-related toxicity of radiotherapy for early-stage primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the parotid gland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) in the treatment of primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) of the parotid gland. Methods and materials: Data on 35 consecutive patients seen at Mayo Clinic between 1974 and 2000 with Ann Arbor Stage I and II NHL of the parotid gland were reviewed retrospectively. Radiotherapy was given to 23 patients, and 12 patients were observed. Eight patients received RT to local fields only. In addition to local fields, 9 patients received ipsilateral neck irradiation, and 6 patients received both ipsilateral and contralateral neck irradiation. Results: Median follow-up was 6.5 years (range, 2 months-24 years). Local control was significantly improved in the RT group compared with the observation group (p = 0.03). Both overall survival and disease-specific survival were 90% at 5 years and 71% at 10 years. There was no significant difference in disease-specific survival or overall survival between the RT and observation groups. Conclusions: The overall prognosis for this rare presentation of NHL is excellent. Radiotherapy provided significant improvement in local control with minimal morbidity and should be considered in the treatment of these patients.

Olivier, Kenneth R. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)]. E-mail: kolivier@ufl.edu; Brown, Paul D. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Ansell, Stephen M. [Division of Hematology and Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Martenson, James A. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z