National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for monte carlo method

  1. A hybrid Monte Carlo method for equilibrium equation of state...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MONTE CARLO SIMULATION METHODS Benchmark for perturbation theory methods NPT, NVT - single ... EXPLOSIVES; MIXTURES; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PERTURBATION THEORY; SHOCK WAVES; SIMULATION

  2. Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Gupta, R.; Wilson, K. G.; Umrigar, C.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive program to analyze critical systems using an Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method (IMCRG) being undertaken at LANL and Cornell is described. Here we first briefly review the method and then list some of the topics being investigated.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, Joseph A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, Rocco; Schmidt, K. E,; Wiringa, Robert B.

    2014-10-19

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-bodymore » interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.« less

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, J.; Gandolfi, S.; Pederiva, F.; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, R.; Schmidt, K. E.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2015-09-09

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments, and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. The nuclear interactions and currents are reviewed along with a description of the continuum quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit,more » and three-body interactions. A variety of results are presented, including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. Low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars are also described. Furthermore, a coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.« less

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, J.; Gandolfi, S.; Pederiva, F.; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, R.; Schmidt, K. E.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2015-09-09

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments, and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. The nuclear interactions and currents are reviewed along with a description of the continuum quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. A variety of results are presented, including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. Low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars are also described. Furthermore, a coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joseph A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, Rocco; Schmidt, K. E,; Wiringa, Robert B.

    2014-10-19

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  7. Bayesian Monte Carlo Method for Nuclear Data Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koning, A.J.

    2015-01-15

    A Bayesian Monte Carlo method is outlined which allows a systematic evaluation of nuclear reactions using TALYS. The result will be either an EXFOR-weighted covariance matrix or a collection of random files, each accompanied by an experiment based weight.

  8. DOE Science Showcase - Monte Carlo Methods | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Scientific and Technical Information Monte Carlo Methods Monte Carlo calculation methods are algorithms for solving various kinds of computational problems by using (pseudo)random numbers. Developed in the 1940s during the Manhattan Project, the Monte Carlo method signified a radical change in how scientists solved problems. Learn about the ways these methods are used in DOE's research endeavors today in "Monte Carlo Methods" by Dr. William Watson, Physicist, OSTI staff. Image

  9. Calculations of pair production by Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe some of the technical design issues associated with the production of particle-antiparticle pairs in very large accelerators. To answer these questions requires extensive calculation of Feynman diagrams, in effect multi-dimensional integrals, which we evaluate by Monte Carlo methods on a variety of supercomputers. We present some portable algorithms for generating random numbers on vector and parallel architecture machines. 12 refs., 14 figs.

  10. Monte Carlo Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-10-20

    The "Monte Carlo Benchmark" (MCB) is intended to model the computatiional performance of Monte Carlo algorithms on parallel architectures. It models the solution of a simple heuristic transport equation using a Monte Carlo technique. The MCB employs typical features of Monte Carlo algorithms such as particle creation, particle tracking, tallying particle information, and particle destruction. Particles are also traded among processors using MPI calls.

  11. Modeling granular phosphor screens by Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaparinos, Panagiotis F.; Kandarakis, Ioannis S.; Cavouras, Dionisis A.; Delis, Harry B.; Panayiotakis, George S.

    2006-12-15

    The intrinsic phosphor properties are of significant importance for the performance of phosphor screens used in medical imaging systems. In previous analytical-theoretical and Monte Carlo studies on granular phosphor materials, values of optical properties, and light interaction cross sections were found by fitting to experimental data. These values were then employed for the assessment of phosphor screen imaging performance. However, it was found that, depending on the experimental technique and fitting methodology, the optical parameters of a specific phosphor material varied within a wide range of values, i.e., variations of light scattering with respect to light absorption coefficients were often observed for the same phosphor material. In this study, x-ray and light transport within granular phosphor materials was studied by developing a computational model using Monte Carlo methods. The model was based on the intrinsic physical characteristics of the phosphor. Input values required to feed the model can be easily obtained from tabulated data. The complex refractive index was introduced and microscopic probabilities for light interactions were produced, using Mie scattering theory. Model validation was carried out by comparing model results on x-ray and light parameters (x-ray absorption, statistical fluctuations in the x-ray to light conversion process, number of emitted light photons, output light spatial distribution) with previous published experimental data on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb phosphor material (Kodak Min-R screen). Results showed the dependence of the modulation transfer function (MTF) on phosphor grain size and material packing density. It was predicted that granular Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb screens of high packing density and small grain size may exhibit considerably better resolution and light emission properties than the conventional Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb screens, under similar conditions (x-ray incident energy, screen thickness)

  12. Monte Carlo Example Programs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-05-09

    The Monte Carlo example programs VARHATOM and DMCATOM are two small, simple FORTRAN programs that illustrate the use of the Monte Carlo Mathematical technique for calculating the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom.

  13. MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO POSTERIOR SAMPLING WITH THE HAMILTONIAN METHOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. HANSON

    2001-02-01

    The Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique provides a means for drawing random samples from a target probability density function (pdf). MCMC allows one to assess the uncertainties in a Bayesian analysis described by a numerically calculated posterior distribution. This paper describes the Hamiltonian MCMC technique in which a momentum variable is introduced for each parameter of the target pdf. In analogy to a physical system, a Hamiltonian H is defined as a kinetic energy involving the momenta plus a potential energy {var_phi}, where {var_phi} is minus the logarithm of the target pdf. Hamiltonian dynamics allows one to move along trajectories of constant H, taking large jumps in the parameter space with relatively few evaluations of {var_phi} and its gradient. The Hamiltonian algorithm alternates between picking a new momentum vector and following such trajectories. The efficiency of the Hamiltonian method for multidimensional isotropic Gaussian pdfs is shown to remain constant at around 7% for up to several hundred dimensions. The Hamiltonian method handles correlations among the variables much better than the standard Metropolis algorithm. A new test, based on the gradient of {var_phi}, is proposed to measure the convergence of the MCMC sequence.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) [0.1981], 0.1895(9) [0.1874(4)], 0.1530(34) [0.1599(73)], 0.1664(37) [0.1724(110)], 0.1613(43) [0.1675(110)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) [0.0203(12)], 0.0188(10) [0.0220(21)], 0.0247(8) [0.0310(12)], 0.0253(8) [0.0351(8)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  16. CONTINUOUS-ENERGY MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR CALCULATING GENERALIZED RESPONSE SENSITIVITIES USING TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces a new approach for calculating sensitivity coefficients for generalized neutronic responses to nuclear data uncertainties using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. The approach presented in this paper, known as the GEAR-MC method, allows for the calculation of generalized sensitivity coefficients for multiple responses in a single Monte Carlo calculation with no nuclear data perturbations or knowledge of nuclear covariance data. The theory behind the GEAR-MC method is presented here, and proof of principle is demonstrated by using the GEAR-MC method to calculate sensitivity coefficients for responses in several 3D, continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications.

  17. Application of Monte Carlo Methods in Molecular Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann Siantar, C; Descalle, M-A; DeNardo, G L; Nigg, D W

    2002-02-19

    Targeted radionuclide therapy promises to expand the role of radiation beyond the treatment of localized tumors. This novel form of therapy targets metastatic cancers by combining radioactive isotopes with tumor-seeking molecules such as monoclonal antibodies and custom-designed synthetic agents. Ultimately, like conventional radiotherapy, the effectiveness of targeted radionuclide therapy is limited by the maximum dose that can be given to a critical, normal tissue, such as bone marrow, kidneys, and lungs. Because radionuclide therapy relies on biological delivery of radiation, its optimization and characterization are necessarily different than for conventional radiation therapy. We have initiated the development of a new, Monte Carlo transport-based treatment planning system for molecular targeted radiation therapy as part of the MINERVA treatment planning system. This system calculates patient-specific radiation dose estimates using a set of computed tomography scans to describe the 3D patient anatomy, combined with 2D (planar image) and 3D (SPECT, or single photon emission computed tomography) to describe the time-dependent radiation source. The accuracy of such a dose calculation is limited primarily by the accuracy of the initial radiation source distribution, overlaid on the patient's anatomy. This presentation provides an overview of MINERVA functionality for molecular targeted radiation therapy, and describes early validation and implementation results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. APR1400 LBLOCA uncertainty quantification by Monte Carlo method and comparison with Wilks' formula

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, M.; Bae, S.; Chung, B. D.

    2012-07-01

    An analysis of the uncertainty quantification for the PWR LBLOCA by the Monte Carlo calculation has been performed and compared with the tolerance level determined by Wilks' formula. The uncertainty range and distribution of each input parameter associated with the LBLOCA accident were determined by the PIRT results from the BEMUSE project. The Monte-Carlo method shows that the 95. percentile PCT value can be obtained reliably with a 95% confidence level using the Wilks' formula. The extra margin by the Wilks' formula over the true 95. percentile PCT by the Monte-Carlo method was rather large. Even using the 3 rd order formula, the calculated value using the Wilks' formula is nearly 100 K over the true value. It is shown that, with the ever increasing computational capability, the Monte-Carlo method is accessible for the nuclear power plant safety analysis within a realistic time frame. (authors)

  19. First collision source method for coupling Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates for localized source problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcouffe, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    A difficult class of problems for the discrete-ordinates neutral particle transport method is to accurately compute the flux due to a spatially localized source. Because the transport equation is solved for discrete directions, the so-called ray effect causes the flux at space points far from the source to be inaccurate. Thus, in general, discrete ordinates would not be the method of choice to solve such problems. It is better suited for calculating problems with significant scattering. The Monte Carlo method is suited to localized source problems, particularly if the amount of collisional interactions in minimal. However, if there are many scattering collisions and the flux at all space points is desired, then the Monte Carlo method becomes expensive. To take advantage of the attributes of both approaches, we have devised a first collision source method to combine the Monte Carlo and discrete-ordinates solutions. That is, particles are tracked from the source to their first scattering collision and tallied to produce a source for the discrete-ordinates calculation. A scattered flux is then computed by discrete ordinates, and the total flux is the sum of the Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates calculated fluxes. In this paper, we present calculational results using the MCNP and TWODANT codes for selected two-dimensional problems that show the effectiveness of this method.

  20. A Hybrid Monte Carlo-Deterministic Method for Global Binary Stochastic Medium Transport Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keady, K P; Brantley, P

    2010-03-04

    Global deep-penetration transport problems are difficult to solve using traditional Monte Carlo techniques. In these problems, the scalar flux distribution is desired at all points in the spatial domain (global nature), and the scalar flux typically drops by several orders of magnitude across the problem (deep-penetration nature). As a result, few particle histories may reach certain regions of the domain, producing a relatively large variance in tallies in those regions. Implicit capture (also known as survival biasing or absorption suppression) can be used to increase the efficiency of the Monte Carlo transport algorithm to some degree. A hybrid Monte Carlo-deterministic technique has previously been developed by Cooper and Larsen to reduce variance in global problems by distributing particles more evenly throughout the spatial domain. This hybrid method uses an approximate deterministic estimate of the forward scalar flux distribution to automatically generate weight windows for the Monte Carlo transport simulation, avoiding the necessity for the code user to specify the weight window parameters. In a binary stochastic medium, the material properties at a given spatial location are known only statistically. The most common approach to solving particle transport problems involving binary stochastic media is to use the atomic mix (AM) approximation in which the transport problem is solved using ensemble-averaged material properties. The most ubiquitous deterministic model developed specifically for solving binary stochastic media transport problems is the Levermore-Pomraning (L-P) model. Zimmerman and Adams proposed a Monte Carlo algorithm (Algorithm A) that solves the Levermore-Pomraning equations and another Monte Carlo algorithm (Algorithm B) that is more accurate as a result of improved local material realization modeling. Recent benchmark studies have shown that Algorithm B is often significantly more accurate than Algorithm A (and therefore the L-P model

  1. The LSNDMC Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIlhany, K.; Whitehouse, D.; Smith, D.; Eisner, A.M.; Wang, Y.X.

    1994-12-31

    A Monte Carlo program describing the response of the Liquid Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) was written using the GEANT geometry and simulation package. Neutrino interactions were simulated in the detector through the production of Cerenkov and scintillation light in the range of 2-3 eV. Since GEANT does not normally track photons to electron-volt energies, the tracking program (TRAK) was modified to produce both Cerenkov and scintillator light, the latter being simulated using the Birks equation. The LSND Monte Carlo program was used to predict the quantity of scintillator (b-PBD) used in the mineral oil to provide a ratio of roughly 4:1 light output resulting from scintillation and Cerenkov light respectively.

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Monte Carlo for the Electronic Structure of Atoms and Molecules Brian Austin Lester Group, U.C. Berkeley BES Requirements Workshop Rockville, MD February 9, 2010 Outline  Applying QMC to diverse chemical systems  Select systems with high interest and impact  Phenol: bond dissociation energy  Retinal: excitation energy  Algorithmic details  Parallel Strategy  Wave function evaluation O-H Bond Dissociation Energy of Phenol  Ph-OH Ph-O * + H * (36 valence electrons)

  3. Exact Monte Carlo for molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, W.A. Jr.; Reynolds, P.J.

    1985-03-01

    A brief summary of the fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo method is presented. Results obtained for binding energies, the classical barrier height for H + H2, and the singlet-triplet splitting in methylene are presented and discussed. 17 refs.

  4. On-the-fly nuclear data processing methods for Monte Carlo simulations of fast spectrum systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, Jon

    2015-08-31

    The presentation summarizes work performed over summer 2015 related to Monte Carlo simulations. A flexible probability table interpolation scheme has been implemented and tested with results comparing favorably to the continuous phase-space on-the-fly approach.

  5. Refinement of overlapping local/global iteration method based on Monte Carlo/p-CMFD calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Y.; Yun, S.; Cho, N. Z.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the overlapping local/global (OLG) iteration method based on Monte Carlo/p-CMFD calculations is refined in two aspects. One is the consistent use of estimators to generate homogenized scattering cross sections. Another is that the incident or exiting angular interval is divided into multi-angular bins to modulate albedo boundary conditions for local problems. Numerical tests show that, compared to the one angle bin case in a previous study, the four angle bin case shows significantly improved results. (authors)

  6. MCMini: Monte Carlo on GPGPU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus, Ryan C.

    2012-07-25

    MCMini is a proof of concept that demonstrates the possibility for Monte Carlo neutron transport using OpenCL with a focus on performance. This implementation, written in C, shows that tracing particles and calculating reactions on a 3D mesh can be done in a highly scalable fashion. These results demonstrate a potential path forward for MCNP or other Monte Carlo codes.

  7. Nuclear reactor transient analysis via a quasi-static kinetics Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, YuGwon; Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-12-31

    The predictor-corrector quasi-static (PCQS) method is applied to the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for reactor transient analysis. To solve the transient fixed-source problem of the PCQS method, fission source iteration is used and a linear approximation of fission source distributions during a macro-time step is introduced to provide delayed neutron source. The conventional particle-tracking procedure is modified to solve the transient fixed-source problem via MC calculation. The PCQS method with MC calculation is compared with the direct time-dependent method of characteristics (MOC) on a TWIGL two-group problem for verification of the computer code. Then, the results on a continuous-energy problem are presented.

  8. Isotropic Monte Carlo Grain Growth

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-25

    IMCGG performs Monte Carlo simulations of normal grain growth in metals on a hexagonal grid in two dimensions with periodic boundary conditions. This may be performed with either an isotropic or a misorientation - and incliantion-dependent grain boundary energy.

  9. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Sampling Methods for 1D Seismic and EM Data Inversion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-09-22

    This software provides several Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods for the Bayesian model developed for inverting 1D marine seismic and controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. The current software can be used for individual inversion of seismic AVO and CSEM data and for joint inversion of both seismic and EM data sets. The structure of the software is very general and flexible, and it allows users to incorporate their own forward simulation codes and rockmore » physics model codes easily into this software. Although the softwae was developed using C and C++ computer languages, the user-supplied codes can be written in C, C++, or various versions of Fortran languages. The software provides clear interfaces for users to plug in their own codes. The output of this software is in the format that the R free software CODA can directly read to build MCMC objects.« less

  10. Hybrid and Parallel Domain-Decomposition Methods Development to Enable Monte Carlo for Reactor Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, John C; Mosher, Scott W; Evans, Thomas M; Peplow, Douglas E.; Turner, John A

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes code and methods development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory focused on enabling high-fidelity, large-scale reactor analyses with Monte Carlo (MC). Current state-of-the-art tools and methods used to perform real commercial reactor analyses have several undesirable features, the most significant of which is the non-rigorous spatial decomposition scheme. Monte Carlo methods, which allow detailed and accurate modeling of the full geometry and are considered the gold standard for radiation transport solutions, are playing an ever-increasing role in correcting and/or verifying the deterministic, multi-level spatial decomposition methodology in current practice. However, the prohibitive computational requirements associated with obtaining fully converged, system-wide solutions restrict the role of MC to benchmarking deterministic results at a limited number of state-points for a limited number of relevant quantities. The goal of this research is to change this paradigm by enabling direct use of MC for full-core reactor analyses. The most significant of the many technical challenges that must be overcome are the slow, non-uniform convergence of system-wide MC estimates and the memory requirements associated with detailed solutions throughout a reactor (problems involving hundreds of millions of different material and tally regions due to fuel irradiation, temperature distributions, and the needs associated with multi-physics code coupling). To address these challenges, our research has focused on the development and implementation of (1) a novel hybrid deterministic/MC method for determining high-precision fluxes throughout the problem space in k-eigenvalue problems and (2) an efficient MC domain-decomposition (DD) algorithm that partitions the problem phase space onto multiple processors for massively parallel systems, with statistical uncertainty estimation. The hybrid method development is based on an extension of the FW-CADIS method, which

  11. Hybrid and Parallel Domain-Decomposition Methods Development to Enable Monte Carlo for Reactor Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, John C; Mosher, Scott W; Evans, Thomas M; Peplow, Douglas E.; Turner, John A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes code and methods development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory focused on enabling high-fidelity, large-scale reactor analyses with Monte Carlo (MC). Current state-of-the-art tools and methods used to perform ''real'' commercial reactor analyses have several undesirable features, the most significant of which is the non-rigorous spatial decomposition scheme. Monte Carlo methods, which allow detailed and accurate modeling of the full geometry and are considered the ''gold standard'' for radiation transport solutions, are playing an ever-increasing role in correcting and/or verifying the deterministic, multi-level spatial decomposition methodology in current practice. However, the prohibitive computational requirements associated with obtaining fully converged, system-wide solutions restrict the role of MC to benchmarking deterministic results at a limited number of state-points for a limited number of relevant quantities. The goal of this research is to change this paradigm by enabling direct use of MC for full-core reactor analyses. The most significant of the many technical challenges that must be overcome are the slow, non-uniform convergence of system-wide MC estimates and the memory requirements associated with detailed solutions throughout a reactor (problems involving hundreds of millions of different material and tally regions due to fuel irradiation, temperature distributions, and the needs associated with multi-physics code coupling). To address these challenges, our research has focused on the development and implementation of (1) a novel hybrid deterministic/MC method for determining high-precision fluxes throughout the problem space in k-eigenvalue problems and (2) an efficient MC domain-decomposition (DD) algorithm that partitions the problem phase space onto multiple processors for massively parallel systems, with statistical uncertainty estimation. The hybrid method development is based on an extension of the FW-CADIS method

  12. The Metropolis Monte Carlo method with CUDA enabled Graphic Processing Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Clifford; School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Dr., Fairfax, VA 22030 ; Ji, Weixiao; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela; School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Dr., Fairfax, VA 22030

    2014-02-01

    We present a CPU–GPU system for runtime acceleration of large molecular simulations using GPU computation and memory swaps. The memory architecture of the GPU can be used both as container for simulation data stored on the graphics card and as floating-point code target, providing an effective means for the manipulation of atomistic or molecular data on the GPU. To fully take advantage of this mechanism, efficient GPU realizations of algorithms used to perform atomistic and molecular simulations are essential. Our system implements a versatile molecular engine, including inter-molecule interactions and orientational variables for performing the Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) algorithm, which is one type of Markov chain Monte Carlo. By combining memory objects with floating-point code fragments we have implemented an MMC parallel engine that entirely avoids the communication time of molecular data at runtime. Our runtime acceleration system is a forerunner of a new class of CPU–GPU algorithms exploiting memory concepts combined with threading for avoiding bus bandwidth and communication. The testbed molecular system used here is a condensed phase system of oligopyrrole chains. A benchmark shows a size scaling speedup of 60 for systems with 210,000 pyrrole monomers. Our implementation can easily be combined with MPI to connect in parallel several CPU–GPU duets. -- Highlights: •We parallelize the Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) algorithm on one CPU—GPU duet. •The Adaptive Tempering Monte Carlo employs MMC and profits from this CPU—GPU implementation. •Our benchmark shows a size scaling-up speedup of 62 for systems with 225,000 particles. •The testbed involves a polymeric system of oligopyrroles in the condensed phase. •The CPU—GPU parallelization includes dipole—dipole and Mie—Jones classic potentials.

  13. Development of a generalized perturbation theory method for sensitivity analysis using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools of the ORNL SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system that have been developed over the last decade have proven indispensable for numerous application and design studies for nuclear criticality safety and reactor physics. SCALE contains tools for analyzing the uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, but cannot quantify uncertainty in important neutronic parameters such as multigroup cross sections, fuel fission rates, activation rates, and neutron fluence rates with realistic three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. A more complete understanding of the sources of uncertainty in these design-limiting parameters could lead to improvements in processmore » optimization, reactor safety, and help inform regulators when setting operational safety margins. A novel approach for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was recently explored as academic research and has been found to accurately and rapidly calculate sensitivity coefficients in criticality safety applications. The work presented here describes a new method, known as the GEAR-MC method, which extends the CLUTCH theory for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients to enable sensitivity coefficient calculations and uncertainty analysis for a generalized set of neutronic responses using high-fidelity continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculations. Here, several criticality safety systems were examined to demonstrate proof of principle for the GEAR-MC method, and GEAR-MC was seen to produce response sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with reference direct perturbation sensitivity coefficients.« less

  14. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakagemore » frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.« less

  15. Feasibility of a Monte Carlo-deterministic hybrid method for fast reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heo, W.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.; Yun, S.

    2013-07-01

    A Monte Carlo and deterministic hybrid method is investigated for the analysis of fast reactors in this paper. Effective multi-group cross sections data are generated using a collision estimator in the MCNP5. A high order Legendre scattering cross section data generation module was added into the MCNP5 code. Both cross section data generated from MCNP5 and TRANSX/TWODANT using the homogeneous core model were compared, and were applied to DIF3D code for fast reactor core analysis of a 300 MWe SFR TRU burner core. For this analysis, 9 groups macroscopic-wise data was used. In this paper, a hybrid calculation MCNP5/DIF3D was used to analyze the core model. The cross section data was generated using MCNP5. The k{sub eff} and core power distribution were calculated using the 54 triangle FDM code DIF3D. A whole core calculation of the heterogeneous core model using the MCNP5 was selected as a reference. In terms of the k{sub eff}, 9-group MCNP5/DIF3D has a discrepancy of -154 pcm from the reference solution, 9-group TRANSX/TWODANT/DIF3D analysis gives -1070 pcm discrepancy. (authors)

  16. Calculation of complete fusion cross sections of heavy ion reactions using the Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghodsi, O. N.; Mahmoodi, M.; Ariai, J.

    2007-03-15

    The nucleus-nucleus potential for the fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 48}Ca, {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 48}Ca has been calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The results obtained indicate that the technique employed for the calculation of the nucleus-nucleus potential is an efficient one. The effects of the spin and the isospin terms have also been studied using the same technique. The analysis of the results obtained for the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 48}Ca reaction reveal that the isospin-dependent term in the nucleon-nucleon potential causes the nuclear potential to drop by an amount of 0.5 MeV. The analytical calculations of the fusion cross section, particularly those at energies less than the fusion barrier, are in good agreement with the experimental data. In these calculations the effective nucleon-nucleon potential chosen is of the M3Y-Paris potential form and no adjustable parameter has been used.

  17. SU-E-T-569: Neutron Shielding Calculation Using Analytical and Multi-Monte Carlo Method for Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, S; Shin, E H; Kim, J; Ahn, S H; Chung, K; Kim, D-H; Han, Y; Choi, D H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the shielding wall design to protect patients, staff and member of the general public for secondary neutron using a simply analytic solution, multi-Monte Carlo code MCNPX, ANISN and FLUKA. Methods: An analytical and multi-Monte Carlo method were calculated for proton facility (Sumitomo Heavy Industry Ltd.) at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The NCRP-144 analytical evaluation methods, which produced conservative estimates on the dose equivalent values for the shielding, were used for analytical evaluations. Then, the radiation transport was simulated with the multi-Monte Carlo code. The neutron dose at evaluation point is got by the value using the production of the simulation value and the neutron dose coefficient introduced in ICRP-74. Results: The evaluation points of accelerator control room and control room entrance are mainly influenced by the point of the proton beam loss. So the neutron dose equivalent of accelerator control room for evaluation point is 0.651, 1.530, 0.912, 0.943 mSv/yr and the entrance of cyclotron room is 0.465, 0.790, 0.522, 0.453 mSv/yr with calculation by the method of NCRP-144 formalism, ANISN, FLUKA and MCNP, respectively. The most of Result of MCNPX and FLUKA using the complicated geometry showed smaller values than Result of ANISN. Conclusion: The neutron shielding for a proton therapy facility has been evaluated by the analytic model and multi-Monte Carlo methods. We confirmed that the setting of shielding was located in well accessible area to people when the proton facility is operated.

  18. Forward treatment planning for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) employing Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzen, D. Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Lssl, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Neuenschwander, H.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the development of a forward planning process for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT). The approach is based on a previously developed electron beam model used to calculate dose distributions of electron beams shaped by a photon multi leaf collimator (pMLC). Methods: As the electron beam model has already been implemented into the Swiss Monte Carlo Plan environment, the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) can be included in the planning process for MERT. In a first step, CT data are imported into Eclipse and a pMLC shaped electron beam is set up. This initial electron beam is then divided into segments, with the electron energy in each segment chosen according to the distal depth of the planning target volume (PTV) in beam direction. In order to improve the homogeneity of the dose distribution in the PTV, a feathering process (Gaussian edge feathering) is launched, which results in a number of feathered segments. For each of these segments a dose calculation is performed employing the in-house developed electron beam model along with the macro Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. Finally, an automated weight optimization of all segments is carried out and the total dose distribution is read back into Eclipse for display and evaluation. One academic and two clinical situations are investigated for possible benefits of MERT treatment compared to standard treatments performed in our clinics and treatment with a bolus electron conformal (BolusECT) method. Results: The MERT treatment plan of the academic case was superior to the standard single segment electron treatment plan in terms of organs at risk (OAR) sparing. Further, a comparison between an unfeathered and a feathered MERT plan showed better PTV coverage and homogeneity for the feathered plan, with V{sub 95%} increased from 90% to 96% and V{sub 107%} decreased from 8% to nearly 0%. For a clinical breast boost irradiation, the MERT plan

  19. Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method Preprint Michael Kuss, Tony Markel, and William Kramer Presented at the 25th World Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition Shenzhen, China November 5 - 9, 2010 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5400-48827 January 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor

  20. Monte Carlo Simulations of APEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, G.

    1995-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulationsof the APEX apparatus, a spectrometer designed to meausre positron-electron pairs produced in heavy-ion collisions, carried out using GEANT are reported. The results of these simulations are compared with data from measurements of conversion electron, positron and part emitting sources as well as with the results of in-beam measurements of positrons and electrons. The overall description of the performance of the apparatus is excellent.

  1. Monte Carlo without chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chorin, Alexandre J.

    2007-12-12

    A sampling method for spin systems is presented. The spin lattice is written as the union of a nested sequence of sublattices, all but the last with conditionally independent spins, which are sampled in succession using their marginals. The marginals are computed concurrently by a fast algorithm; errors in the evaluation of the marginals are offset by weights. There are no Markov chains and each sample is independent of the previous ones; the cost of a sample is proportional to the number of spins (but the number of samples needed for good statistics may grow with array size). The examples include the Edwards-Anderson spin glass in three dimensions.

  2. Optimized nested Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling: theory (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimized nested Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling: theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimized nested Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling: theory Metropolis Monte ...

  3. Final Technical Report - Large Deviation Methods for the Analysis and Design of Monte Carlo Schemes in Physics and Chemistry - DE-SC0002413

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupuis, Paul

    2014-03-14

    This proposal is concerned with applications of Monte Carlo to problems in physics and chemistry where rare events degrade the performance of standard Monte Carlo. One class of problems is concerned with computation of various aspects of the equilibrium behavior of some Markov process via time averages. The problem to be overcome is that rare events interfere with the efficient sampling of all relevant parts of phase space. A second class concerns sampling transitions between two or more stable attractors. Here, rare events do not interfere with the sampling of all relevant parts of phase space, but make Monte Carlo inefficient because of the very large number of samples required to obtain variance comparable to the quantity estimated. The project uses large deviation methods for the mathematical analyses of various Monte Carlo techniques, and in particular for algorithmic analysis and design. This is done in the context of relevant application areas, mainly from chemistry and biology.

  4. Energy Monte Carlo (EMCEE) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with a specific set of distributions. Both programs run as spreadsheet workbooks in Microsoft Excel. EMCEE and Emc2 require Crystal Ball, a commercially available Monte Carlo...

  5. Analysis of Radiation Effects in Silicon using Kinetic Monte Carlo Methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hehr, Brian Douglas

    2014-11-25

    The transient degradation of semiconductor device performance under irradiation has long been an issue of concern. Neutron irradiation can instigate the formation of quasi-stable defect structures, thereby introducing new energy levels into the bandgap that alter carrier lifetimes and give rise to such phenomena as gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Normally, the initial defect formation phase is followed by a recovery phase in which defect-defect or defect-dopant interactions modify the characteristics of the damaged structure. A kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) code has been developed to model both thermal and carrier injection annealing of initial defect structures in semiconductor materials.more » The code is employed to investigate annealing in electron-irradiated, p-type silicon as well as the recovery of base current in silicon transistors bombarded with neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) “Blue Room” facility. Our results reveal that KMC calculations agree well with these experiments once adjustments are made, within the appropriate uncertainty bounds, to some of the sensitive defect parameters.« less

  6. Analysis of Radiation Effects in Silicon using Kinetic Monte Carlo Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hehr, Brian Douglas

    2014-11-25

    The transient degradation of semiconductor device performance under irradiation has long been an issue of concern. Neutron irradiation can instigate the formation of quasi-stable defect structures, thereby introducing new energy levels into the bandgap that alter carrier lifetimes and give rise to such phenomena as gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Normally, the initial defect formation phase is followed by a recovery phase in which defect-defect or defect-dopant interactions modify the characteristics of the damaged structure. A kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) code has been developed to model both thermal and carrier injection annealing of initial defect structures in semiconductor materials. The code is employed to investigate annealing in electron-irradiated, p-type silicon as well as the recovery of base current in silicon transistors bombarded with neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) “Blue Room” facility. Our results reveal that KMC calculations agree well with these experiments once adjustments are made, within the appropriate uncertainty bounds, to some of the sensitive defect parameters.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo by message passing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonca, J.; Gubernatis, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    We summarize results of quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the degenerate single-impurity Anderson model using the impurity algorithm of Hirsch and Fye. Using methods of Bayesian statistical inference, coupled with the principle of maximum entropy, we extracted the single-particle spectral density from the imaginary-time Green's function. The variations of resulting spectral densities with model parameters agree qualitatively with the spectral densities predicted by NCA calculations. All the simulations were performed on a cluster of 16 IBM R6000/560 workstations under the control of the message-passing software PVM. We described the trivial parallelization of our quantum Monte Carlo code both for the cluster and the CM-5 computer. Other issues for effective parallelization of the impurity algorithm are also discussed.

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo by message passing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonca, J.; Gubernatis, J.E.

    1993-05-01

    We summarize results of quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the degenerate single-impurity Anderson model using the impurity algorithm of Hirsch and Fye. Using methods of Bayesian statistical inference, coupled with the principle of maximum entropy, we extracted the single-particle spectral density from the imaginary-time Green`s function. The variations of resulting spectral densities with model parameters agree qualitatively with the spectral densities predicted by NCA calculations. All the simulations were performed on a cluster of 16 IBM R6000/560 workstations under the control of the message-passing software PVM. We described the trivial parallelization of our quantum Monte Carlo code both for the cluster and the CM-5 computer. Other issues for effective parallelization of the impurity algorithm are also discussed.

  9. Monte%20Carlo.jpg | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Information Monte%20Carlo

  10. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Densmore, J.D.; Park, H.; Wollaber, A.B.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; Knoll, D.A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption–emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck–Cummings algorithm.

  11. Recent advances and future prospects for Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Forrest B

    2010-01-01

    The history of Monte Carlo methods is closely linked to that of computers: The first known Monte Carlo program was written in 1947 for the ENIAC; a pre-release of the first Fortran compiler was used for Monte Carlo In 1957; Monte Carlo codes were adapted to vector computers in the 1980s, clusters and parallel computers in the 1990s, and teraflop systems in the 2000s. Recent advances include hierarchical parallelism, combining threaded calculations on multicore processors with message-passing among different nodes. With the advances In computmg, Monte Carlo codes have evolved with new capabilities and new ways of use. Production codes such as MCNP, MVP, MONK, TRIPOLI and SCALE are now 20-30 years old (or more) and are very rich in advanced featUres. The former 'method of last resort' has now become the first choice for many applications. Calculations are now routinely performed on office computers, not just on supercomputers. Current research and development efforts are investigating the use of Monte Carlo methods on FPGAs. GPUs, and many-core processors. Other far-reaching research is exploring ways to adapt Monte Carlo methods to future exaflop systems that may have 1M or more concurrent computational processes.

  12. Monte-Carlo particle dynamics in a variable specific impulse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monte-Carlo particle dynamics in a variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Monte-Carlo particle dynamics in a variable specific ...

  13. Applications of FLUKA Monte Carlo Code for Nuclear and Accelerator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Applications of FLUKA Monte Carlo Code for Nuclear and Accelerator Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Applications of FLUKA Monte Carlo Code for Nuclear and ...

  14. Fundamentals of Monte Carlo (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fundamentals of Monte Carlo Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fundamentals of Monte Carlo Authors: Wollaber, Allan Benton 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos ...

  15. Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector for multiple gamma energy using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirawan, Rahadi; Waris, Abdul; Djamal, Mitra; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    The spectrum of gamma energy absorption in the NaI crystal (scintillation detector) is the interaction result of gamma photon with NaI crystal, and it’s associated with the photon gamma energy incoming to the detector. Through a simulation approach, we can perform an early observation of gamma energy absorption spectrum in a scintillator crystal detector (NaI) before the experiment conducted. In this paper, we present a simulation model result of gamma energy absorption spectrum for energy 100-700 keV (i.e. 297 keV, 400 keV and 662 keV). This simulation developed based on the concept of photon beam point source distribution and photon cross section interaction with the Monte Carlo method. Our computational code has been successfully predicting the multiple energy peaks absorption spectrum, which derived from multiple photon energy sources.

  16. Four decades of implicit Monte Carlo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wollaber, Allan B.

    2016-04-25

    In 1971, Fleck and Cummings derived a system of equations to enable robust Monte Carlo simulations of time-dependent, thermal radiative transfer problems. Denoted the “Implicit Monte Carlo” (IMC) equations, their solution remains the de facto standard of high-fidelity radiative transfer simulations. Over the course of 44 years, their numerical properties have become better understood, and accuracy enhancements, novel acceleration methods, and variance reduction techniques have been suggested. In this review, we rederive the IMC equations—explicitly highlighting assumptions as they are made—and outfit the equations with a Monte Carlo interpretation. We put the IMC equations in context with other approximate formsmore » of the radiative transfer equations and present a new demonstration of their equivalence to another well-used linearization solved with deterministic transport methods for frequency-independent problems. We discuss physical and numerical limitations of the IMC equations for asymptotically small time steps, stability characteristics and the potential of maximum principle violations for large time steps, and solution behaviors in an asymptotically thick diffusive limit. We provide a new stability analysis for opacities with general monomial dependence on temperature. Here, we consider spatial accuracy limitations of the IMC equations and discussion acceleration and variance reduction techniques.« less

  17. Substantiation of parameters of the geometric model of the research reactor core for the calculation using the Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radaev, A. I. Schurovskaya, M. V.

    2015-12-15

    The choice of the spatial nodalization for the calculation of the power density and burnup distribution in a research reactor core with fuel assemblies of the IRT-3M and VVR-KN type using the program based on the Monte Carlo code is described. The influence of the spatial nodalization on the results of calculating basic neutronic characteristics and calculation time is investigated.

  18. Multilevel Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosin, M.S.; Ricketson, L.F.; Dimits, A.M.; Caflisch, R.E.; Cohen, B.I.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new, for plasma physics, highly efficient multilevel Monte Carlo numerical method for simulating Coulomb collisions. The method separates and optimally minimizes the finite-timestep and finite-sampling errors inherent in the Langevin representation of the Landau–Fokker–Planck equation. It does so by combining multiple solutions to the underlying equations with varying numbers of timesteps. For a desired level of accuracy ε, the computational cost of the method is O(ε{sup −2}) or O(ε{sup −2}(lnε){sup 2}), depending on the underlying discretization, Milstein or Euler–Maruyama respectively. This is to be contrasted with a cost of O(ε{sup −3}) for direct simulation Monte Carlo or binary collision methods. We successfully demonstrate the method with a classic beam diffusion test case in 2D, making use of the Lévy area approximation for the correlated Milstein cross terms, and generating a computational saving of a factor of 100 for ε=10{sup −5}. We discuss the importance of the method for problems in which collisions constitute the computational rate limiting step, and its limitations.

  19. Monte Carlo Ion Transport Analysis Code.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-04-15

    Version: 00 TRIPOS is a versatile Monte Carlo ion transport analysis code. It has been applied to the treatment of both surface and bulk radiation effects. The media considered is composed of multilayer polyatomic materials.

  20. Multiscale MonteCarlo equilibration: Pure Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endres, Michael G.; Brower, Richard C.; Orginos, Kostas; Detmold, William; Pochinsky, Andrew V.

    2015-12-29

    In this study, we present a multiscale thermalization algorithm for lattice gauge theory, which enables efficient parallel generation of uncorrelated gauge field configurations. The algorithm combines standard Monte Carlo techniques with ideas drawn from real space renormalization group and multigrid methods. We demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for pure Yang-Mills gauge theory for both heat bath and hybrid Monte Carlo evolution, and show that it ameliorates the problem of topological freezing up to controllable lattice spacing artifacts.

  1. Binding and Diffusion of Lithium in Graphite: Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmarks and Validation of van der Waals Density Functional Methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ganesh, P.; Kim, Jeongnim; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Kent, Paul R. C.

    2014-11-03

    In highly accurate diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) studies of the adsorption and diffusion of atomic lithium in AA-stacked graphite are compared with van der Waals-including density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Predicted QMC lattice constants for pure AA graphite agree with experiment. Pure AA-stacked graphite is shown to challenge many van der Waals methods even when they are accurate for conventional AB graphite. Moreover, the highest overall DFT accuracy, considering pure AA-stacked graphite as well as lithium binding and diffusion, is obtained by the self-consistent van der Waals functional vdW-DF2, although errors in binding energies remain. Empirical approaches based onmore » point charges such as DFT-D are inaccurate unless the local charge transfer is assessed. Our results demonstrate that the lithium carbon system requires a simultaneous highly accurate description of both charge transfer and van der Waals interactions, favoring self-consistent approaches.« less

  2. Calculation of Nonlinear Thermoelectric Coefficients of InAs1-xSbx Using Monte Carlo Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghian, RB; Bahk, JH; Bian, ZX; Shakouri, A

    2011-12-28

    It was found that the nonlinear Peltier effect could take place and increase the cooling power density when a lightly doped thermoelectric material is under a large electrical field. This effect is due to the Seebeck coefficient enhancement from an electron distribution far from equilibrium. In the nonequilibrium transport regime, the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation-time approximation ceases to apply. The Monte Carlo method, on the other hand, proves to be a capable tool for simulation of semiconductor devices at small scales as well as thermoelectric effects with local nonequilibrium charge distribution. InAs1-xSb is a favorable thermoelectric material for nonlinear operation owing to its high mobility inherited from the binary compounds InSb and InAs. In this work we report simulation results on the nonlinear Peltier power of InAs1-xSb at low doping levels, at room temperature and at low temperatures. The thermoelectric power factor in nonlinear operation is compared with the maximum value that can be achieved with optimal doping in the linear transport regime.

  3. Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Kramer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrated purchasing patterns of plug-in vehicles may result in localized distribution transformer overload scenarios. Prolonged periods of transformer overloading causes service life decrements, and in worst-case scenarios, results in tripped thermal relays and residential service outages. This analysis will review distribution transformer load models developed in the IEC 60076 standard, and apply the model to a neighborhood with plug-in hybrids. Residential distribution transformers are sized such that night-time cooling provides thermal recovery from heavy load conditions during the daytime utility peak. It is expected that PHEVs will primarily be charged at night in a residential setting. If not managed properly, some distribution transformers could become overloaded, leading to a reduction in transformer life expectancy, thus increasing costs to utilities and consumers. A Monte-Carlo scheme simulated each day of the year, evaluating 100 load scenarios as it swept through the following variables: number of vehicle per transformer, transformer size, and charging rate. A general method for determining expected transformer aging rate will be developed, based on the energy needs of plug-in vehicles loading a residential transformer.

  4. Calculating infinite-medium α-eigenvalue spectra with Monte Carlo using a transition rate matrix method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betzler, Benjamin R.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Brown, Forrest B.; Martin, William R.

    2015-08-28

    The time-dependent behavior of the energy spectrum in neutron transport was investigated with a formulation, based on continuous-time Markov processes, for computing α eigenvalues and eigenvectors in an infinite medium. In this study, a research Monte Carlo code called “TORTE” (To Obtain Real Time Eigenvalues) was created and used to estimate elements of a transition rate matrix. TORTE is capable of using both multigroup and continuous-energy nuclear data, and verification was performed. Eigenvalue spectra for infinite homogeneous mixtures were obtained, and an eigenfunction expansion was used to investigate transient behavior of the neutron energy spectrum.

  5. Calculating infinite-medium α-eigenvalue spectra with Monte Carlo using a transition rate matrix method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Betzler, Benjamin R.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Brown, Forrest B.; Martin, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent behavior of the energy spectrum in neutron transport was investigated with a formulation, based on continuous-time Markov processes, for computing α eigenvalues and eigenvectors in an infinite medium. In this study, a research Monte Carlo code called “TORTE” (To Obtain Real Time Eigenvalues) was created and used to estimate elements of a transition rate matrix. TORTE is capable of using both multigroup and continuous-energy nuclear data, and verification was performed. Eigenvalue spectra for infinite homogeneous mixtures were obtained, and an eigenfunction expansion was used to investigate transient behavior of the neutron energy spectrum.

  6. Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte Carlo sampling with an approximat...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte Carlo sampling with an approximate potential Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte ...

  7. MO-E-18C-02: Hands-On Monte Carlo Project Assignment as a Method to Teach Radiation Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pater, P; Vallieres, M; Seuntjens, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a hands-on project on Monte Carlo methods (MC) recently added to the curriculum and to discuss the students' appreciation. Methods: Since 2012, a 1.5 hour lecture dedicated to MC fundamentals follows the detailed presentation of photon and electron interactions. Students also program all sampling steps (interaction length and type, scattering angle, energy deposit) of a MC photon transport code. A handout structured in a step-by-step fashion guides student in conducting consistency checks. For extra points, students can code a fully working MC simulation, that simulates a dose distribution for 50 keV photons. A kerma approximation to dose deposition is assumed. A survey was conducted to which 10 out of the 14 attending students responded. It compared MC knowledge prior to and after the project, questioned the usefulness of radiation physics teaching through MC and surveyed possible project improvements. Results: According to the survey, 76% of students had no or a basic knowledge of MC methods before the class and 65% estimate to have a good to very good understanding of MC methods after attending the class. 80% of students feel that the MC project helped them significantly to understand simulations of dose distributions. On average, students dedicated 12.5 hours to the project and appreciated the balance between hand-holding and questions/implications. Conclusion: A lecture on MC methods with a hands-on MC programming project requiring about 14 hours was added to the graduate study curriculum since 2012. MC methods produce “gold standard” dose distributions and slowly enter routine clinical work and a fundamental understanding of MC methods should be a requirement for future students. Overall, the lecture and project helped students relate crosssections to dose depositions and presented numerical sampling methods behind the simulation of these dose distributions. Research funding from governments of Canada and Quebec. PP acknowledges

  8. SU-E-T-224: Is Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Method Necessary for Cyberknife Brain Treatment Planning?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L; Fourkal, E; Hayes, S; Jin, L; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric difference resulted in using the pencil beam algorithm instead of Monte Carlo (MC) methods for tumors adjacent to the skull. Methods: We retrospectively calculated the dosimetric differences between RT and MC algorithms for brain tumors treated with CyberKnife located adjacent to the skull for 18 patients (total of 27 tumors). The median tumor sizes was 0.53-cc (range 0.018-cc to 26.2-cc). The absolute mean distance from the tumor to the skull was 2.11 mm (range - 17.0 mm to 9.2 mm). The dosimetric variables examined include the mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the target, the target coverage (TC) and conformality index. The MC calculation used the same MUs as the RT dose calculation without further normalization and 1% statistical uncertainty. The differences were analyzed by tumor size and distance from the skull. Results: The TC was generally reduced with the MC calculation (24 out of 27 cases). The average difference in TC between RT and MC was 3.3% (range 0.0% to 23.5%). When the TC was deemed unacceptable, the plans were re-normalized in order to increase the TC to 99%. This resulted in a 6.9% maximum change in the prescription isodose line. The maximum changes in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses were 5.4 %, 7.7%, and 8.4%, respectively, before re-normalization. When the TC was analyzed with regards to target size, it was found that the worst coverage occurred with the smaller targets (0.018-cc). When the TC was analyzed with regards to the distance to the skull, there was no correlation between proximity to the skull and TC between the RT and MC plans. Conclusions: For smaller targets (< 4.0-cc), MC should be used to re-evaluate the dose coverage after RT is used for the initial dose calculation in order to ensure target coverage.

  9. OSTIblog Articles in the Monte Carlo Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Scientific and Technical Information Monte Carlo Topic The Unbelievable Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Method by Kathy Chambers 18 Jan, 2013 in Science Communications 4680 Monte%20Carlo.jpg The Unbelievable Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Method Read more about 4680 The year was 1945, the year I was born. That in itself is of great significance to me. However, it was a momentous year in history. World War II came to its merciful end and the development of the first electronic computer - the

  10. Monte Carlo studies of APEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    An essential component in the assessment of the significance of the results from APEX is a demonstrated understanding of the acceptance and response of the apparatus. This requires detailed simulations which can be compared to the results of various source and in-beam measurements. These simulations were carried out using the computer codes EGS and GEANT, both specifically designed for this purpose. As far as is possible, all details of the geometry of APEX were included. We compared the results of these simulations with measurements using electron conversion sources, positron sources and pair sources. The overall agreement is quite acceptable and some of the details are still being worked on. The simulation codes were also used to compare the results of measurements of in-beam positron and conversion electrons with expectations based on known physics or other methods. Again, satisfactory agreement is achieved. We are currently working on the simulation of various pair-producing scenarios such as the decay of a neutral object in the mass range 1.5-2.0 MeV and also the emission of internal pairs from nuclear transitions in the colliding ions. These results are essential input to the final results from APEX on cross section limits for various, previously proposed, sharp-line producing scenarios.

  11. Implementation and testing of the on-the-fly thermal scattering Monte Carlo sampling method for graphite and light water in MCNP6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pavlou, Andrew T.; Ji, Wei; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-01-23

    Here, a proper treatment of thermal neutron scattering requires accounting for chemical binding through a scattering law S(α,β,T). Monte Carlo codes sample the secondary neutron energy and angle after a thermal scattering event from probability tables generated from S(α,β,T) tables at discrete temperatures, requiring a large amount of data for multiscale and multiphysics problems with detailed temperature gradients. We have previously developed a method to handle this temperature dependence on-the-fly during the Monte Carlo random walk using polynomial expansions in 1/T to directly sample the secondary energy and angle. In this paper, the on-the-fly method is implemented into MCNP6 andmore » tested in both graphite-moderated and light water-moderated systems. The on-the-fly method is compared with the thermal ACE libraries that come standard with MCNP6, yielding good agreement with integral reactor quantities like k-eigenvalue and differential quantities like single-scatter secondary energy and angle distributions. The simulation runtimes are comparable between the two methods (on the order of 5–15% difference for the problems tested) and the on-the-fly fit coefficients only require 5–15 MB of total data storage.« less

  12. Status of Monte-Carlo Event Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeche, Stefan; /SLAC

    2011-08-11

    Recent progress on general-purpose Monte-Carlo event generators is reviewed with emphasis on the simulation of hard QCD processes and subsequent parton cascades. Describing full final states of high-energy particle collisions in contemporary experiments is an intricate task. Hundreds of particles are typically produced, and the reactions involve both large and small momentum transfer. The high-dimensional phase space makes an exact solution of the problem impossible. Instead, one typically resorts to regarding events as factorized into different steps, ordered descending in the mass scales or invariant momentum transfers which are involved. In this picture, a hard interaction, described through fixed-order perturbation theory, is followed by multiple Bremsstrahlung emissions off initial- and final-state and, finally, by the hadronization process, which binds QCD partons into color-neutral hadrons. Each of these steps can be treated independently, which is the basic concept inherent to general-purpose event generators. Their development is nowadays often focused on an improved description of radiative corrections to hard processes through perturbative QCD. In this context, the concept of jets is introduced, which allows to relate sprays of hadronic particles in detectors to the partons in perturbation theory. In this talk, we briefly review recent progress on perturbative QCD in event generation. The main focus lies on the general-purpose Monte-Carlo programs HERWIG, PYTHIA and SHERPA, which will be the workhorses for LHC phenomenology. A detailed description of the physics models included in these generators can be found in [8]. We also discuss matrix-element generators, which provide the parton-level input for general-purpose Monte Carlo.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Varisano, A.; Attili, A.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Carpinelli, M.

    2013-07-26

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery.

  14. A Monte Carlo algorithm for degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrell, A.E. Sherlock, M.; Rose, S.J.

    2013-09-15

    A procedure for performing Monte Carlo calculations of plasmas with an arbitrary level of degeneracy is outlined. It has possible applications in inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. Degenerate particles are initialised according to the FermiDirac distribution function, and scattering is via a Pauli blocked binary collision approximation. The algorithm is tested against degenerate electronion equilibration, and the degenerate resistivity transport coefficient from unmagnetised first order transport theory. The code is applied to the cold fuel shell and alpha particle equilibration problem of inertial confinement fusion.

  15. Hybrid Deterministic/Monte Carlo Solutions to the Neutron Transport k-Eigenvalue Problem with a Comparison to Pure Monte Carlo Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hybrid Deterministic/Monte Carlo Solutions to the Neutron Transport k-Eigenvalue Problem with a Comparison to Pure Monte Carlo Solutions Jeffrey A. Willert Los Alamos National Laboratory September 16, 2013 Joint work with: Dana Knoll (LANL), Ryosuke Park (LANL), and C. T. Kelley (NCSU) Jeffrey A. Willert Hybrid k-Eigenvalue Methods September 16, 2013 1 / 25 CASL-U-2013-0309-000 1 Introduction 2 Nonlinear Diffusion Acceleration for k-Eigenvalue Problems 3 Hybrid Methods 4 Classic Monte Carlo

  16. THE MCNPX MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSPORT CODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WATERS, LAURIE S.; MCKINNEY, GREGG W.; DURKEE, JOE W.; FENSIN, MICHAEL L.; JAMES, MICHAEL R.; JOHNS, RUSSELL C.; PELOWITZ, DENISE B.

    2007-01-10

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4B, and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics; particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development.

  17. Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico 5-7 permanent magnets This content will become publicly available on March 5, 2016 Prev Next...

  18. Evaluation of Monte Carlo Electron-Transport Algorithms in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Series Codes for Stochastic-Media Simulations. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of Monte Carlo Electron-Transport Algorithms in the Integrated Tiger Series ...

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei Using Chiral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei Using Chiral Potentials Authors: Lynn, J. E. ; Carlson, J. ; Epelbaum, E. ; Gandolfi, S. ; Gezerlis, A. ; Schwenk, A. ...

  20. Molecular Monte Carlo Simulations Using Graphics Processing Units...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    allocation of the GPU hardware resources. We make comparisons between the GPU and the serial CPU Monte Carlo implementations to assess speedup over conventional microprocessors....

  1. HILO: Quasi Diffusion Accelerated Monte Carlo on Hybrid Architectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fidelity simulation of a diverse range of kinetic systems. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email HILO: Quasi Diffusion Accelerated Monte Carlo on Hybrid...

  2. Improving the efficiency of configurational-bias Monte Carlo: A density-guided method for generating bending angle trials for linear and branched molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehri, Aliasghar; Loeffler, Troy D.; Chen, Bin

    2014-08-21

    A new method has been developed to generate bending angle trials to improve the acceptance rate and the speed of configurational-bias Monte Carlo. Whereas traditionally the trial geometries are generated from a uniform distribution, in this method we attempt to use the exact probability density function so that each geometry generated is likely to be accepted. In actual practice, due to the complexity of this probability density function, a numerical representation of this distribution function would be required. This numerical table can be generated a priori from the distribution function. This method has been tested on a united-atom model of alkanes including propane, 2-methylpropane, and 2,2-dimethylpropane, that are good representatives of both linear and branched molecules. It has been shown from these test cases that reasonable approximations can be made especially for the highly branched molecules to reduce drastically the dimensionality and correspondingly the amount of the tabulated data that is needed to be stored. Despite these approximations, the dependencies between the various geometrical variables can be still well considered, as evident from a nearly perfect acceptance rate achieved. For all cases, the bending angles were shown to be sampled correctly by this method with an acceptance rate of at least 96% for 2,2-dimethylpropane to more than 99% for propane. Since only one trial is required to be generated for each bending angle (instead of thousands of trials required by the conventional algorithm), this method can dramatically reduce the simulation time. The profiling results of our Monte Carlo simulation code show that trial generation, which used to be the most time consuming process, is no longer the time dominating component of the simulation.

  3. Equation of state of a weakly interacting two-dimensional Bose gas studied at zero temperature by means of quantum Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astrakharchik, G. E.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.; Kurbakov, I. L.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2009-05-15

    The equation of state of a weakly interacting two-dimensional Bose gas is studied at zero temperature by means of quantum Monte Carlo methods. Going down to as low densities as na{sup 2}{proportional_to}10{sup -100} permits us to obtain agreement on beyond mean-field level between predictions of perturbative methods and direct many-body numerical simulation, thus providing an answer to the fundamental question of the equation of state of a two-dimensional dilute Bose gas in the universal regime (i.e., entirely described by the gas parameter na{sup 2}). We also show that the measure of the frequency of a breathing collective oscillation in a trap at very low densities can be used to test the universal equation of state of a two-dimensional Bose gas.

  4. Exploring theory space with Monte Carlo reweighting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gainer, James S.; Lykken, Joseph; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Mrenna, Stephen; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-10-13

    Theories of new physics often involve a large number of unknown parameters which need to be scanned. Additionally, a putative signal in a particular channel may be due to a variety of distinct models of new physics. This makes experimental attempts to constrain the parameter space of motivated new physics models with a high degree of generality quite challenging. We describe how the reweighting of events may allow this challenge to be met, as fully simulated Monte Carlo samples generated for arbitrary benchmark models can be effectively re-used. Specifically, we suggest procedures that allow more efficient collaboration between theorists andmore » experimentalists in exploring large theory parameter spaces in a rigorous way at the LHC.« less

  5. Exploring theory space with Monte Carlo reweighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gainer, James S.; Lykken, Joseph; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Mrenna, Stephen; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-10-13

    Theories of new physics often involve a large number of unknown parameters which need to be scanned. Additionally, a putative signal in a particular channel may be due to a variety of distinct models of new physics. This makes experimental attempts to constrain the parameter space of motivated new physics models with a high degree of generality quite challenging. We describe how the reweighting of events may allow this challenge to be met, as fully simulated Monte Carlo samples generated for arbitrary benchmark models can be effectively re-used. Specifically, we suggest procedures that allow more efficient collaboration between theorists and experimentalists in exploring large theory parameter spaces in a rigorous way at the LHC.

  6. Exploring theory space with Monte Carlo reweighting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gainer, James S.; Lykken, Joseph; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Mrenna, Stephen; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-10-13

    Theories of new physics often involve a large number of unknown parameters which need to be scanned. Additionally, a putative signal in a particular channel may be due to a variety of distinct models of new physics. This makes experimental attempts to constrain the parameter space of motivated new physics models with a high degree of generality quite challenging. We describe how the reweighting of events may allow this challenge to be met, as fully simulated Monte Carlo samples generated for arbitrary benchmark models can be effectively re-used. In particular, we suggest procedures that allow more efficient collaboration between theoristsmoreand experimentalists in exploring large theory parameter spaces in a rigorous way at the LHC.less

  7. SU-E-T-188: Film Dosimetry Verification of Monte Carlo Generated Electron Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enright, S; Asprinio, A; Lu, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions from film measurements to Monte Carlo generated electron treatment plans. Irradiation with electrons offers the advantages of dose uniformity in the target volume and of minimizing the dose to deeper healthy tissue. Using the Monte Carlo algorithm will improve dose accuracy in regions with heterogeneities and irregular surfaces. Methods: Dose distributions from GafChromic{sup } EBT3 films were compared to dose distributions from the Electron Monte Carlo algorithm in the Eclipse{sup } radiotherapy treatment planning system. These measurements were obtained for 6MeV, 9MeV and 12MeV electrons at two depths. All phantoms studied were imported into Eclipse by CT scan. A 1 cm thick solid water template with holes for bonelike and lung-like plugs was used. Different configurations were used with the different plugs inserted into the holes. Configurations with solid-water plugs stacked on top of one another were also used to create an irregular surface. Results: The dose distributions measured from the film agreed with those from the Electron Monte Carlo treatment plan. Accuracy of Electron Monte Carlo algorithm was also compared to that of Pencil Beam. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo had much higher pass rates than distributions from Pencil Beam when compared to the film. The pass rate for Monte Carlo was in the 80%99% range, where the pass rate for Pencil Beam was as low as 10.76%. Conclusion: The dose distribution from Monte Carlo agreed with the measured dose from the film. When compared to the Pencil Beam algorithm, pass rates for Monte Carlo were much higher. Monte Carlo should be used over Pencil Beam for regions with heterogeneities and irregular surfaces.

  8. Monte Carlo Implementation Of Up- Or Down-Scattering Due To Collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monte Carlo Implementation Of Up- Or Down-Scattering Due To Collisions With Material At Finite Temperature Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Monte Carlo Implementation Of ...

  9. Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach Calculations of Prompt Fission Neutrons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach Calculations of Prompt Fission Neutrons and Gamma Rays: Application to Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission Reactions on U-235 and Pu-239 ...

  10. Generalizing the self-healing diffusion Monte Carlo approach...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Generalizing the self-healing diffusion Monte Carlo approach to finite temperature: A path for the optimization of low-energy many-body bases Citation Details In-Document Search ...

  11. Efficient Monte Carlo Simulations of Gas Molecules Inside Porous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficient Monte Carlo Simulations of Gas Molecules Inside Porous Materials Previous Next List J. Kim and B. Smit, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8 (7), 2336 (2012) DOI: 10.1021ct3003699 ...

  12. Optimization of Gutzwiller wave functions in quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, E.; Gunnarsson, O.; Martin, R.M.

    1999-06-01

    Gutzwiller functions are popular variational wave functions for correlated electrons in Hubbard models. Following the variational principle, we are interested in the Gutzwiller parameters that minimize, e.g., the expectation value of the energy. Rewriting the expectation value as a rational function in the Gutzwiller parameters, we find a very efficient way for performing that minimization. The method can be used to optimize general Gutzwiller-type wave functions both in variational and in fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the PEREGRINE Project (Conference)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | SciTech Connect Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the PEREGRINE Project Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the PEREGRINE Project × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy

  14. Monte Carlo Hybrid Applied to Binary Stochastic Mixtures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-08-11

    The purpose of this set of codes isto use an inexpensive, approximate deterministic flux distribution to generate weight windows, wihich will then be used to bound particle weights for the Monte Carlo code run. The process is not automated; the user must run the deterministic code and use the output file as a command-line argument for the Monte Carlo code. Two sets of text input files are included as test problems/templates.

  15. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-07

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N{sup 3} ? N{sup 4}, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  16. Fast transit portal dosimetry using density-scaled layer modeling of aSi-based electronic portal imaging device and Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Cho, Young-Bin; Kim, Sun Mo; DiBiase, Steven

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Fast and accurate transit portal dosimetry was investigated by developing a density-scaled layer model of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and applying it to a clinical environment. Methods: The model was developed for fast Monte Carlo dose calculation. The model was validated through comparison with measurements of dose on EPID using first open beams of varying field sizes under a 20-cm-thick flat phantom. After this basic validation, the model was further tested by applying it to transit dosimetry and dose reconstruction that employed our predetermined dose-response-based algorithm developed earlier. The application employed clinical intensity-modulated beams irradiated on a Rando phantom. The clinical beams were obtained through planning on pelvic regions of the Rando phantom simulating prostate and large pelvis intensity modulated radiation therapy. To enhance agreement between calculations and measurements of dose near penumbral regions, convolution conversion of acquired EPID images was alternatively used. In addition, thickness-dependent image-to-dose calibration factors were generated through measurements of image and calculations of dose in EPID through flat phantoms of various thicknesses. The factors were used to convert acquired images in EPID into dose. Results: For open beam measurements, the model showed agreement with measurements in dose difference better than 2% across open fields. For tests with a Rando phantom, the transit dosimetry measurements were compared with forwardly calculated doses in EPID showing gamma pass rates between 90.8% and 98.8% given 4.5 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA) and 3% dose difference (DD) for all individual beams tried in this study. The reconstructed dose in the phantom was compared with forwardly calculated doses showing pass rates between 93.3% and 100% in isocentric perpendicular planes to the beam direction given 3 mm DTA and 3% DD for all beams. On isocentric axial planes, the pass rates varied

  17. Coupled Monte Carlo neutronics and thermal hydraulics for power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernnat, W.; Buck, M.; Mattes, M.; Zwermann, W.; Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K.

    2012-07-01

    The availability of high performance computing resources enables more and more the use of detailed Monte Carlo models even for full core power reactors. The detailed structure of the core can be described by lattices, modeled by so-called repeated structures e.g. in Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 or MCNPX. For cores with mainly uniform material compositions, fuel and moderator temperatures, there is no problem in constructing core models. However, when the material composition and the temperatures vary strongly a huge number of different material cells must be described which complicate the input and in many cases exceed code or memory limits. The second problem arises with the preparation of corresponding temperature dependent cross sections and thermal scattering laws. Only if these problems can be solved, a realistic coupling of Monte Carlo neutronics with an appropriate thermal-hydraulics model is possible. In this paper a method for the treatment of detailed material and temperature distributions in MCNP5 is described based on user-specified internal functions which assign distinct elements of the core cells to material specifications (e.g. water density) and temperatures from a thermal-hydraulics code. The core grid itself can be described with a uniform material specification. The temperature dependency of cross sections and thermal neutron scattering laws is taken into account by interpolation, requiring only a limited number of data sets generated for different temperatures. Applications will be shown for the stationary part of the Purdue PWR benchmark using ATHLET for thermal- hydraulics and for a generic Modular High Temperature reactor using THERMIX for thermal- hydraulics. (authors)

  18. Multiscale Monte Carlo equilibration: Pure Yang-Mills theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endres, Michael G.; Brower, Richard C.; Orginos, Kostas; Detmold, William; Pochinsky, Andrew V.

    2015-12-29

    In this study, we present a multiscale thermalization algorithm for lattice gauge theory, which enables efficient parallel generation of uncorrelated gauge field configurations. The algorithm combines standard Monte Carlo techniques with ideas drawn from real space renormalization group and multigrid methods. We demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for pure Yang-Mills gauge theory for both heat bath and hybrid Monte Carlo evolution, and show that it ameliorates the problem of topological freezing up to controllable lattice spacing artifacts.

  19. Experiments and Theoretical Data for Studying the Impact of Fission Yield Uncertainties on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle with TALYS/GEF and the Total Monte Carlo Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomp, S.; Al-Adili, A.; Alhassan, E.; Gustavsson, C.; Helgesson, P.; Hellesen, C.; Koning, A.J.; Lantz, M.; Österlund, M.; Rochman, D.; Simutkin, V.; Sjöstrand, H.; Solders, A.

    2015-01-15

    We describe the research program of the nuclear reactions research group at Uppsala University concerning experimental and theoretical efforts to quantify and reduce nuclear data uncertainties relevant for the nuclear fuel cycle. We briefly describe the Total Monte Carlo (TMC) methodology and how it can be used to study fuel cycle and accident scenarios, and summarize our relevant experimental activities. Input from the latter is to be used to guide the nuclear models and constrain parameter space for TMC. The TMC method relies on the availability of good nuclear models. For this we use the TALYS code which is currently being extended to include the GEF model for the fission channel. We present results from TALYS-1.6 using different versions of GEF with both default and randomized input parameters and compare calculations with experimental data for {sup 234}U(n,f) in the fast energy range. These preliminary studies reveal some systematic differences between experimental data and calculations but give overall good and promising results.

  20. Fuel temperature reactivity coefficient calculation by Monte Carlo perturbation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, H. J.; Kim, C. H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an efficient method to estimate the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient (FTC) by the Monte Carlo adjoint-weighted correlated sampling method. In this method, a fuel temperature change is regarded as variations of the microscopic cross sections and the temperature in the free gas model which is adopted to correct the asymptotic double differential scattering kernel. The effectiveness of the new method is examined through the continuous energy MC neutronics calculations for PWR pin cell problems. The isotope-wise and reaction-type-wise contributions to the FTCs are investigated for two free gas models - the constant scattering cross section model and the exact model. It is shown that the proposed method can efficiently predict the reactivity change due to the fuel temperature variation. (authors)

  1. Optimization of Monte Carlo transport simulations in stochastic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, C.; Ji, W.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an accurate and efficient approach to optimize radiation transport simulations in a stochastic medium of high heterogeneity, like the Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) configurations packed with TRISO fuel particles. Based on a fast nearest neighbor search algorithm, a modified fast Random Sequential Addition (RSA) method is first developed to speed up the generation of the stochastic media systems packed with both mono-sized and poly-sized spheres. A fast neutron tracking method is then developed to optimize the next sphere boundary search in the radiation transport procedure. In order to investigate their accuracy and efficiency, the developed sphere packing and neutron tracking methods are implemented into an in-house continuous energy Monte Carlo code to solve an eigenvalue problem in VHTR unit cells. Comparison with the MCNP benchmark calculations for the same problem indicates that the new methods show considerably higher computational efficiency. (authors)

  2. System and method for radiation dose calculation within sub-volumes of a monte carlo based particle transport grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergstrom, Paul M.; Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Jr., Ralph W.; Schach von Wittenau, Alexis E.; Garrett, Dewey N.; House, Ronald K.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Cox, Lawrence J.; Fujino, Donald H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method is disclosed for radiation dose calculation within sub-volumes of a particle transport grid. In a first step of the method voxel volumes enclosing a first portion of the target mass are received. A second step in the method defines dosel volumes which enclose a second portion of the target mass and overlap the first portion. A third step in the method calculates common volumes between the dosel volumes and the voxel volumes. A fourth step in the method identifies locations in the target mass of energy deposits. And, a fifth step in the method calculates radiation doses received by the target mass within the dosel volumes. A common volume calculation module inputs voxel volumes enclosing a first portion of the target mass, inputs voxel mass densities corresponding to a density of the target mass within each of the voxel volumes, defines dosel volumes which enclose a second portion of the target mass and overlap the first portion, and calculates common volumes between the dosel volumes and the voxel volumes. A dosel mass module, multiplies the common volumes by corresponding voxel mass densities to obtain incremental dosel masses, and adds the incremental dosel masses corresponding to the dosel volumes to obtain dosel masses. A radiation transport module identifies locations in the target mass of energy deposits. And, a dose calculation module, coupled to the common volume calculation module and the radiation transport module, for calculating radiation doses received by the target mass within the dosel volumes.

  3. Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang Yuan; Badal, Andreu; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) method for the coupled transport of ionizing particles and charge carriers in amorphous selenium (a-Se) semiconductor x-ray detectors, and model the effect of statistical variations on the detected signal. Methods: A detailed transport code was developed for modeling the signal formation process in semiconductor x-ray detectors. The charge transport routines include three-dimensional spatial and temporal models of electron-hole pair transport taking into account recombination and trapping. Many electron-hole pairs are created simultaneously in bursts from energy deposition events. Carrier transport processes include drift due to external field and Coulombic interactions, and diffusion due to Brownian motion. Results: Pulse-height spectra (PHS) have been simulated with different transport conditions for a range of monoenergetic incident x-ray energies and mammography radiation beam qualities. Two methods for calculating Swank factors from simulated PHS are shown, one using the entire PHS distribution, and the other using the photopeak. The latter ignores contributions from Compton scattering and K-fluorescence. Comparisons differ by approximately 2% between experimental measurements and simulations. Conclusions: The a-Se x-ray detector PHS responses simulated in this work include three-dimensional spatial and temporal transport of electron-hole pairs. These PHS were used to calculate the Swank factor and compare it with experimental measurements. The Swank factor was shown to be a function of x-ray energy and applied electric field. Trapping and recombination models are all shown to affect the Swank factor.

  4. Peelle's pertinent puzzle using the Monte Carlo technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Burr, Thomas; Pan, Feng

    2009-01-01

    We try to understand the long-standing problem of the Peelle's Pertinent Puzzle (PPP) using the Monte Carlo technique. We allow the probability density functions to be any kind of form to assume the impact of distribution, and obtain the least-squares solution directly from numerical simulations. We found that the standard least squares method gives the correct answer if a weighting function is properly provided. Results from numerical simulations show that the correct answer of PPP is 1.1 {+-} 0.25 if the common error is multiplicative. The thought-provoking answer of 0.88 is also correct, if the common error is additive, and if the error is proportional to the measured values. The least squares method correctly gives us the most probable case, where the additive component has a negative value. Finally, the standard method fails for PPP due to a distorted (non Gaussian) joint distribution.

  5. Fission matrix-based Monte Carlo criticality analysis of fuel storage pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farlotti, M.; Larsen, E. W.

    2013-07-01

    Standard Monte Carlo transport procedures experience difficulties in solving criticality problems in fuel storage pools. Because of the strong neutron absorption between fuel assemblies, source convergence can be very slow, leading to incorrect estimates of the eigenvalue and the eigenfunction. This study examines an alternative fission matrix-based Monte Carlo transport method that takes advantage of the geometry of a storage pool to overcome this difficulty. The method uses Monte Carlo transport to build (essentially) a fission matrix, which is then used to calculate the criticality and the critical flux. This method was tested using a test code on a simple problem containing 8 assemblies in a square pool. The standard Monte Carlo method gave the expected eigenfunction in 5 cases out of 10, while the fission matrix method gave the expected eigenfunction in all 10 cases. In addition, the fission matrix method provides an estimate of the error in the eigenvalue and the eigenfunction, and it allows the user to control this error by running an adequate number of cycles. Because of these advantages, the fission matrix method yields a higher confidence in the results than standard Monte Carlo. We also discuss potential improvements of the method, including the potential for variance reduction techniques. (authors)

  6. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P.; Ballester, Facundo; Siebert, Frank-Andr

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 201090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (201090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation, Health Phys. 44, 507517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities, Med. Phys. 34, 13981404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions: The data of

  7. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  8. Optimized nested Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling: theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coe, Joshua D; Shaw, M Sam; Sewell, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    Metropolis Monte Carlo sampling of a reference potential is used to build a Markov chain in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. At the endpoints of the chain, the energy is reevaluated at a different level of approximation (the 'full' energy) and a composite move encompassing all of the intervening steps is accepted on the basis of a modified Metropolis criterion. By manipulating the thermodynamic variables characterizing the reference system we maximize the average acceptance probability of composite moves, lengthening significantly the random walk made between consecutive evaluations of the full energy at a fixed acceptance probability. This provides maximally decorrelated samples of the full potential, thereby lowering the total number required to build ensemble averages of a given variance. The efficiency of the method is illustrated using model potentials appropriate to molecular fluids at high pressure. Implications for ab initio or density functional theory (DFT) treatment are discussed.

  9. Stochastic Engine Final Report: Applying Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods with Importance Sampling to Large-Scale Data-Driven Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, R E; Johannesson, G; Sengupta, S; Kosovic, B; Carle, S; Franz, G A; Aines, R D; Nitao, J J; Hanley, W G; Ramirez, A L; Newmark, R L; Johnson, V M; Dyer, K M; Henderson, K A; Sugiyama, G A; Hickling, T L; Pasyanos, M E; Jones, D A; Grimm, R J; Levine, R A

    2004-03-11

    Accurate prediction of complex phenomena can be greatly enhanced through the use of data and observations to update simulations. The ability to create these data-driven simulations is limited by error and uncertainty in both the data and the simulation. The stochastic engine project addressed this problem through the development and application of a family of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods utilizing importance sampling driven by forward simulators to minimize time spent search very large state spaces. The stochastic engine rapidly chooses among a very large number of hypothesized states and selects those that are consistent (within error) with all the information at hand. Predicted measurements from the simulator are used to estimate the likelihood of actual measurements, which in turn reduces the uncertainty in the original sample space via a conditional probability method called Bayesian inferencing. This highly efficient, staged Metropolis-type search algorithm allows us to address extremely complex problems and opens the door to solving many data-driven, nonlinear, multidimensional problems. A key challenge has been developing representation methods that integrate the local details of real data with the global physics of the simulations, enabling supercomputers to efficiently solve the problem. Development focused on large-scale problems, and on examining the mathematical robustness of the approach in diverse applications. Multiple data types were combined with large-scale simulations to evaluate systems with {approx}{sup 10}20,000 possible states (detecting underground leaks at the Hanford waste tanks). The probable uses of chemical process facilities were assessed using an evidence-tree representation and in-process updating. Other applications included contaminant flow paths at the Savannah River Site, locating structural flaws in buildings, improving models for seismic travel times systems used to monitor nuclear proliferation, characterizing the source

  10. Accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations compared to in-vivo MDCT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Mueller, Jonathon W.; Cody, Dianna D.; DeMarco, John J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of a Monte Carlo simulation-based method for estimating radiation dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by comparing simulated doses in ten patients to in-vivo dose measurements. Methods: MD Anderson Cancer Center Institutional Review Board approved the acquisition of in-vivo rectal dose measurements in a pilot study of ten patients undergoing virtual colonoscopy. The dose measurements were obtained by affixing TLD capsules to the inner lumen of rectal catheters. Voxelized patient models were generated from the MDCT images of the ten patients, and the dose to the TLD for all exposures was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations. The Monte Carlo simulation results were compared to the in-vivo dose measurements to determine accuracy. Results: The calculated mean percent difference between TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations was −4.9% with standard deviation of 8.7% and a range of −22.7% to 5.7%. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate very good agreement between simulated and measured doses in-vivo. Taken together with previous validation efforts, this work demonstrates that the Monte Carlo simulation methods can provide accurate estimates of radiation dose in patients undergoing CT examinations.

  11. Monte Carlo event generators for hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowles, I.G.; Protopopescu, S.D.

    1993-06-01

    A brief review of Monte Carlo event generators for simulating hadron-hadron collisions is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on comparisons of the approaches used to describe physics elements and identifying their relative merits and weaknesses. This review summarizes a more detailed report.

  12. MONTE-CARLO BURNUP CALCULATION UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION AND PROPAGATION DETERMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, T.; Sternat, M.; Charlton, W.

    2011-05-08

    MONTEBURNS is a Monte-Carlo depletion routine utilizing MCNP and ORIGEN 2.2. Uncertainties exist in the MCNP transport calculation, but this information is not passed to the depletion calculation in ORIGEN or saved. To quantify this transport uncertainty and determine how it propagates between burnup steps, a statistical analysis of a multiple repeated depletion runs is performed. The reactor model chosen is the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) in a single assembly, infinite lattice configuration. This model was burned for a 25.5 day cycle broken down into three steps. The output isotopics as well as effective multiplication factor (k-effective) were tabulated and histograms were created at each burnup step using the Scott Method to determine the bin width. It was expected that the gram quantities and k-effective histograms would produce normally distributed results since they were produced from a Monte-Carlo routine, but some of results do not. The standard deviation at each burnup step was consistent between fission product isotopes as expected, while the uranium isotopes created some unique results. The variation in the quantity of uranium was small enough that, from the reaction rate MCNP tally, round off error occurred producing a set of repeated results with slight variation. Statistical analyses were performed using the {chi}{sup 2} test against a normal distribution for several isotopes and the k-effective results. While the isotopes failed to reject the null hypothesis of being normally distributed, the {chi}{sup 2} statistic grew through the steps in the k-effective test. The null hypothesis was rejected in the later steps. These results suggest, for a high accuracy solution, MCNP cell material quantities less than 100 grams and greater kcode parameters are needed to minimize uncertainty propagation and minimize round off effects.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations Applied to Magnetic Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Engelhardt

    2006-08-09

    We have calculated the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of Heisenberg spin systems using a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method. We have used some of these systems as models to describe recently synthesized magnetic molecules, and-upon comparing the results of these calculations with experimental data-have obtained accurate estimates for the basic parameters of these models. We have also performed calculations for other systems that are of more general interest, being relevant both for existing experimental data and for future experiments. Utilizing the concept of importance sampling, these calculations can be carried out in an arbitrarily large quantum Hilbert space, while still avoiding any approximations that would introduce systematic errors. The only errors are statistical in nature, and as such, their magnitudes are accurately estimated during the course of a simulation. Frustrated spin systems present a major challenge to the QMC method, nevertheless, in many instances progress can be made. In this chapter, the field of magnetic molecules is introduced, paying particular attention to the characteristics that distinguish magnetic molecules from other systems that are studied in condensed matter physics. We briefly outline the typical path by which we learn about magnetic molecules, which requires a close relationship between experiments and theoretical calculations. The typical experiments are introduced here, while the theoretical methods are discussed in the next chapter. Each of these theoretical methods has a considerable limitation, also described in Chapter 2, which together serve to motivate the present work. As is shown throughout the later chapters, the present QMC method is often able to provide useful information where other methods fail. In Chapter 3, the use of Monte Carlo methods in statistical physics is reviewed, building up the fundamental ideas that are necessary in order to understand the method that has been used in this work. With these

  14. Monte-Carlo simulation of noise in hard X-ray Transmission Crystal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monte-Carlo simulation of noise in hard X-ray Transmission Crystal Spectrometers: ... Title: Monte-Carlo simulation of noise in hard X-ray Transmission Crystal Spectrometers: ...

  15. Crossing the mesoscale no-mans land via parallel kinetic Monte Carlo.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia Cardona, Cristina (San Diego State University); Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Wagner, Gregory John; Tikare, Veena; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Plimpton, Steven James; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Slepoy, Alexander (U. S. Department of Energy, NNSA); Zhou, Xiao Wang; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Chandross, Michael Evan

    2009-10-01

    The kinetic Monte Carlo method and its variants are powerful tools for modeling materials at the mesoscale, meaning at length and time scales in between the atomic and continuum. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing a parallel kinetic Monte Carlo capability and applying it to materials modeling problems of interest to Sandia. In this report we give an overview of the methods and algorithms developed, and describe our new open-source code called SPPARKS, for Stochastic Parallel PARticle Kinetic Simulator. We also highlight the development of several Monte Carlo models in SPPARKS for specific materials modeling applications, including grain growth, bubble formation, diffusion in nanoporous materials, defect formation in erbium hydrides, and surface growth and evolution.

  16. Advanced Mesh-Enabled Monte carlo capability for Multi-Physics Reactor Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Paul; Evans, Thomas; Tautges, Tim

    2012-12-24

    This project will accumulate high-precision fluxes throughout reactor geometry on a non- orthogonal grid of cells to support multi-physics coupling, in order to more accurately calculate parameters such as reactivity coefficients and to generate multi-group cross sections. This work will be based upon recent developments to incorporate advanced geometry and mesh capability in a modular Monte Carlo toolkit with computational science technology that is in use in related reactor simulation software development. Coupling this capability with production-scale Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can provide advanced and extensible test-beds for these developments. Continuous energy Monte Carlo methods are generally considered to be the most accurate computational tool for simulating radiation transport in complex geometries, particularly neutron transport in reactors. Nevertheless, there are several limitations for their use in reactor analysis. Most significantly, there is a trade-off between the fidelity of results in phase space, statistical accuracy, and the amount of computer time required for simulation. Consequently, to achieve an acceptable level of statistical convergence in high-fidelity results required for modern coupled multi-physics analysis, the required computer time makes Monte Carlo methods prohibitive for design iterations and detailed whole-core analysis. More subtly, the statistical uncertainty is typically not uniform throughout the domain, and the simulation quality is limited by the regions with the largest statistical uncertainty. In addition, the formulation of neutron scattering laws in continuous energy Monte Carlo methods makes it difficult to calculate adjoint neutron fluxes required to properly determine important reactivity parameters. Finally, most Monte Carlo codes available for reactor analysis have relied on orthogonal hexahedral grids for tallies that do not conform to the geometric boundaries and are thus generally not well

  17. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  18. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, William P.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Rathkopf, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  19. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficientmore » as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.« less

  20. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficient as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.

  1. Reduced Variance for Material Sources in Implicit Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-06-25

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC), a time-implicit method due to Fleck and Cummings, is used for simulating supernovae and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems where x-rays tightly and nonlinearly interact with hot material. The IMC algorithm represents absorption and emission within a timestep as an effective scatter. Similarly, the IMC time-implicitness splits off a portion of a material source directly into the radiation field. We have found that some of our variance reduction and particle management schemes will allow large variances in the presence of small, but important, material sources, as in the case of ICF hot electron preheat sources. We propose a modification of our implementation of the IMC method in the Jayenne IMC Project. Instead of battling the sampling issues associated with a small source, we bypass the IMC implicitness altogether and simply deterministically update the material state with the material source if the temperature of the spatial cell is below a user-specified cutoff. We describe the modified method and present results on a test problem that show the elimination of variance for small sources.

  2. Improving computational efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations with variance reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, A.

    2013-07-01

    CCFE perform Monte-Carlo transport simulations on large and complex tokamak models such as ITER. Such simulations are challenging since streaming and deep penetration effects are equally important. In order to make such simulations tractable, both variance reduction (VR) techniques and parallel computing are used. It has been found that the application of VR techniques in such models significantly reduces the efficiency of parallel computation due to 'long histories'. VR in MCNP can be accomplished using energy-dependent weight windows. The weight window represents an 'average behaviour' of particles, and large deviations in the arriving weight of a particle give rise to extreme amounts of splitting being performed and a long history. When running on parallel clusters, a long history can have a detrimental effect on the parallel efficiency - if one process is computing the long history, the other CPUs complete their batch of histories and wait idle. Furthermore some long histories have been found to be effectively intractable. To combat this effect, CCFE has developed an adaptation of MCNP which dynamically adjusts the WW where a large weight deviation is encountered. The method effectively 'de-optimises' the WW, reducing the VR performance but this is offset by a significant increase in parallel efficiency. Testing with a simple geometry has shown the method does not bias the result. This 'long history method' has enabled CCFE to significantly improve the performance of MCNP calculations for ITER on parallel clusters, and will be beneficial for any geometry combining streaming and deep penetration effects. (authors)

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo for electronic structure: Recent developments and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriquez, M. M.S.

    1995-04-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods have been found to give excellent results when applied to chemical systems. The main goal of the present work is to use QMC to perform electronic structure calculations. In QMC, a Monte Carlo simulation is used to solve the Schroedinger equation, taking advantage of its analogy to a classical diffusion process with branching. In the present work the author focuses on how to extend the usefulness of QMC to more meaningful molecular systems. This study is aimed at questions concerning polyatomic and large atomic number systems. The accuracy of the solution obtained is determined by the accuracy of the trial wave function`s nodal structure. Efforts in the group have given great emphasis to finding optimized wave functions for the QMC calculations. Little work had been done by systematically looking at a family of systems to see how the best wave functions evolve with system size. In this work the author presents a study of trial wave functions for C, CH, C{sub 2}H and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The goal is to study how to build wave functions for larger systems by accumulating knowledge from the wave functions of its fragments as well as gaining some knowledge on the usefulness of multi-reference wave functions. In a MC calculation of a heavy atom, for reasonable time steps most moves for core electrons are rejected. For this reason true equilibration is rarely achieved. A method proposed by Batrouni and Reynolds modifies the way the simulation is performed without altering the final steady-state solution. It introduces an acceleration matrix chosen so that all coordinates (i.e., of core and valence electrons) propagate at comparable speeds. A study of the results obtained using their proposed matrix suggests that it may not be the optimum choice. In this work the author has found that the desired mixing of coordinates between core and valence electrons is not achieved when using this matrix. A bibliography of 175 references is included.

  4. Monte Carlo calculations for r-process nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumpower, Matthew Ryan

    2015-11-12

    A Monte Carlo framework is developed for exploring the impact of nuclear model uncertainties on the formation of the heavy elements. Mass measurements tightly constrain the macroscopic sector of FRDM2012. For r-process nucleosynthesis, it is necessary to understand the microscopic physics of the nuclear model employed. A combined approach of measurements and a deeper understanding of the microphysics is thus warranted to elucidate the site of the r-process.

  5. The Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation Model Intercomparison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project (McMIP) The Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation Model Intercomparison Project (McMIP) Barker, Howard Meteorological Service of Canada Cole, Jason Meteorological Service of Canada Raisanen, Petri Finnish Meteorological Institute Pincus, Robert NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Morcrette, Jean-Jacques European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Li, Jiangnan Canadian Center for Climate Modelling Stephens, Graeme Colorado State University Vaillancourt, Paul

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations in Nuclear Theory | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility Blue Gene/Q scaling This figure shows Blue Gene/Q scaling with respect to increasing number of nodes for calculations of the first isospin-1 state of $^{12}$C. The good multinode scaling is a result of the ADLB library. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations in Nuclear Theory PI Name: Steven Pieper PI Email: spieper@anl.gov Institution: Argonne National Laboratory Allocation Program: ESP Year: 2015 Research Domain: Physics Tier 2 Code Development Project Numerical

  7. Green's function Monte Carlo calculation for the ground state of helium trimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, F.; Kalos, M.H.

    1981-02-01

    The ground state energy of weakly bound boson trimers interacting via Lennard-Jones (12,6) pair potentials is calculated using a Monte Carlo Green's Function Method. Threshold coupling constants for self binding are obtained by extrapolation to zero binding.

  8. Ensemble bayesian model averaging using markov chain Monte Carlo sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Diks, Cees G H; Clark, Martyn P

    2008-01-01

    Bayesian model averaging (BMA) has recently been proposed as a statistical method to calibrate forecast ensembles from numerical weather models. Successful implementation of BMA however, requires accurate estimates of the weights and variances of the individual competing models in the ensemble. In their seminal paper (Raftery etal. Mon Weather Rev 133: 1155-1174, 2(05)) has recommended the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for BMA model training, even though global convergence of this algorithm cannot be guaranteed. In this paper, we compare the performance of the EM algorithm and the recently developed Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for estimating the BMA weights and variances. Simulation experiments using 48-hour ensemble data of surface temperature and multi-model stream-flow forecasts show that both methods produce similar results, and that their performance is unaffected by the length of the training data set. However, MCMC simulation with DREAM is capable of efficiently handling a wide variety of BMA predictive distributions, and provides useful information about the uncertainty associated with the estimated BMA weights and variances.

  9. Bias in Dynamic Monte Carlo Alpha Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweezy, Jeremy Ed; Nolen, Steven Douglas; Adams, Terry R.; Trahan, Travis John

    2015-02-06

    A 1/N bias in the estimate of the neutron time-constant (commonly denoted as α) has been seen in dynamic neutronic calculations performed with MCATK. In this paper we show that the bias is most likely caused by taking the logarithm of a stochastic quantity. We also investigate the known bias due to the particle population control method used in MCATK. We conclude that this bias due to the particle population control method is negligible compared to other sources of bias.

  10. Complete Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutron Scattering Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drosg, M.

    2011-12-13

    In the far past, it was not possible to accurately correct for the finite geometry and the finite sample size of a neutron scattering set-up. The limited calculation power of the ancient computers as well as the lack of powerful Monte Carlo codes and the limitation in the data base available then prevented a complete simulation of the actual experiment. Using e.g. the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNPX [1], neutron scattering experiments can be simulated almost completely with a high degree of precision using a modern PC, which has a computing power that is ten thousand times that of a super computer of the early 1970s. Thus, (better) corrections can also be obtained easily for previous published data provided that these experiments are sufficiently well documented. Better knowledge of reference data (e.g. atomic mass, relativistic correction, and monitor cross sections) further contributes to data improvement. Elastic neutron scattering experiments from liquid samples of the helium isotopes performed around 1970 at LANL happen to be very well documented. Considering that the cryogenic targets are expensive and complicated, it is certainly worthwhile to improve these data by correcting them using this comparatively straightforward method. As two thirds of all differential scattering cross section data of {sup 3}He(n,n){sup 3}He are connected to the LANL data, it became necessary to correct the dependent data measured in Karlsruhe, Germany, as well. A thorough simulation of both the LANL experiments and the Karlsruhe experiment is presented, starting from the neutron production, followed by the interaction in the air, the interaction with the cryostat structure, and finally the scattering medium itself. In addition, scattering from the hydrogen reference sample was simulated. For the LANL data, the multiple scattering corrections are smaller by a factor of five at least, making this work relevant. Even more important are the corrections to the Karlsruhe data

  11. Self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of defects in materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Haixuan; Beland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.; Osetskiy, Yury N.

    2015-01-29

    The recent development of on-the-fly atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo methods has led to an increased amount attention on the methods and their corresponding capabilities and applications. In this review, the framework and current status of Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) are discussed. SEAKMC particularly focuses on defect interaction and evolution with atomistic details without assuming potential defect migration/interaction mechanisms and energies. The strength and limitation of using an active volume, the key concept introduced in SEAKMC, are discussed. Potential criteria for characterizing an active volume are discussed and the influence of active volume size on saddle point energies ismore » illustrated. A procedure starting with a small active volume followed by larger active volumes was found to possess higher efficiency. Applications of SEAKMC, ranging from point defect diffusion, to complex interstitial cluster evolution, to helium interaction with tungsten surfaces, are summarized. A comparison of SEAKMC with molecular dynamics and conventional object kinetic Monte Carlo is demonstrated. Overall, SEAKMC is found to be complimentary to conventional molecular dynamics, especially when the harmonic approximation of transition state theory is accurate. However it is capable of reaching longer time scales than molecular dynamics and it can be used to systematically increase the accuracy of other methods such as object kinetic Monte Carlo. Furthermore, the challenges and potential development directions are also outlined.« less

  12. K-effective of the world: and other concerns for Monte Carlo Eigenvalue calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Forrest B

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods have been used to compute k{sub eff} and the fundamental model eigenfunction of critical systems since the 1950s. Despite the sophistication of today's Monte Carlo codes for representing realistic geometry and physics interactions, correct results can be obtained in criticality problems only if users pay attention to source convergence in the Monte Carlo iterations and to running a sufficient number of neutron histories to adequately sample all significant regions of the problem. Recommended best practices for criticality calculations are reviewed and applied to several practical problems for nuclear reactors and criticality safety, including the 'K-effective of the World' problem. Numerical results illustrate the concerns about convergence and bias. The general conclusion is that with today's high-performance computers, improved understanding of the theory, new tools for diagnosing convergence (e.g., Shannon entropy of the fission distribution), and clear practical guidance for performing calculations, practitioners will have a greater degree of confidence than ever of obtaining correct results for Monte Carlo criticality calculations.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Overpressurized Liquid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vranjes, L.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.; Cazorla, C.

    2005-09-30

    A diffusion Monte Carlo simulation of superfluid {sup 4}He at zero temperature and pressures up to 275 bar is presented. Increasing the pressure beyond freezing ({approx}25 bar), the liquid enters the overpressurized phase in a metastable state. In this regime, we report results of the equation of state and the pressure dependence of the static structure factor, the condensate fraction, and the excited-state energy corresponding to the roton. Along this large pressure range, both the condensate fraction and the roton energy decrease but do not become zero. The roton energies obtained are compared with recent experimental data in the overpressurized regime.

  14. Communication: Water on hexagonal boron nitride from diffusion Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S.; Ma, Ming; Michaelides, Angelos; Alf, Dario; Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von

    2015-05-14

    Despite a recent flurry of experimental and simulation studies, an accurate estimate of the interaction strength of water molecules with hexagonal boron nitride is lacking. Here, we report quantum Monte Carlo results for the adsorption of a water monomer on a periodic hexagonal boron nitride sheet, which yield a water monomer interaction energy of ?84 5 meV. We use the results to evaluate the performance of several widely used density functional theory (DFT) exchange correlation functionals and find that they all deviate substantially. Differences in interaction energies between different adsorption sites are however better reproduced by DFT.

  15. Cluster Monte Carlo simulations of the nematic-isotropic transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priezjev, N. V.; Pelcovits, Robert A.

    2001-06-01

    We report the results of simulations of the three-dimensional Lebwohl-Lasher model of the nematic-isotropic transition using a single cluster Monte Carlo algorithm. The algorithm, first introduced by Kunz and Zumbach to study two-dimensional nematics, is a modification of the Wolff algorithm for spin systems, and greatly reduces critical slowing down. We calculate the free energy in the neighborhood of the transition for systems up to linear size 70. We find a double well structure with a barrier that grows with increasing system size. We thus obtain an upper estimate of the value of the transition temperature in the thermodynamic limit.

  16. A Post-Monte-Carlo Sensitivity Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-04-04

    SATOOL (Sensitivity Analysis TOOL) is a code for sensitivity analysis, following an uncertainity analysis with Monte Carlo simulations. Sensitivity analysis identifies those input variables, whose variance contributes dominatly to the variance in the output. This analysis can be used to reduce the variance in the output variables by redefining the "sensitive" variables with greater precision, i.e. with lower variance. The code identifies a group of sensitive variables, ranks them in the order of importance andmore » also quantifies the relative importance among the sensitive variables.« less

  17. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multilevel Monte-Carlo Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-02-19

    ElagMC is a parallel C++ library for Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations with algebraically constructed coarse spaces. ElagMC enables Multilevel variance reduction techniques in the context of general unstructured meshes by using the specialized element-based agglomeration techniques implemented in ELAG (the Element-Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library developed by U. Villa and P. Vassilevski and currently under review for public release). The ElabMC library can support different type of deterministic problems, including mixed finite element discretizationsmore » of subsurface flow problems.« less

  18. The effects of mapping CT images to Monte Carlo materials on GEANT4 proton simulation accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Samuel; McAuley, Grant; Slater, James; Wroe, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy require conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) in CT images to an exact tissue composition and density. The number of discrete densities (or density bins) used in this mapping affects the simulation accuracy, execution time, and memory usage in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo code. The relationship between the number of density bins and CT noise was examined in general for all simulations that use HU conversion to density. Additionally, the effect of this on simulation accuracy was examined for proton radiation. Methods: Relative uncertainty from CT noise was compared with uncertainty from density binning to determine an upper limit on the number of density bins required in the presence of CT noise. Error propagation analysis was also performed on continuously slowing down approximation range calculations to determine the proton range uncertainty caused by density binning. These results were verified with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: In the presence of even modest CT noise (5 HU or 0.5%) 450 density bins were found to only cause a 5% increase in the density uncertainty (i.e., 95% of density uncertainty from CT noise, 5% from binning). Larger numbers of density bins are not required as CT noise will prevent increased density accuracy; this applies across all types of Monte Carlo simulations. Examining uncertainty in proton range, only 127 density bins are required for a proton range error of <0.1 mm in most tissue and <0.5 mm in low density tissue (e.g., lung). Conclusions: By considering CT noise and actual range uncertainty, the number of required density bins can be restricted to a very modest 127 depending on the application. Reducing the number of density bins provides large memory and execution time savings in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo packages.

  19. Reactor physics simulations with coupled Monte Carlo calculation and computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seker, V.; Thomas, J. W.; Downar, T. J.; Purdue Univ.

    2007-01-01

    A computational code system based on coupling the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code STAR-CD was developed as an audit tool for lower order nuclear reactor calculations. This paper presents the methodology of the developed computer program 'McSTAR'. McSTAR is written in FORTRAN90 programming language and couples MCNP5 and the commercial CFD code STAR-CD. MCNP uses a continuous energy cross section library produced by the NJOY code system from the raw ENDF/B data. A major part of the work was to develop and implement methods to update the cross section library with the temperature distribution calculated by STARCD for every region. Three different methods were investigated and implemented in McSTAR. The user subroutines in STAR-CD are modified to read the power density data and assign them to the appropriate variables in the program and to write an output data file containing the temperature, density and indexing information to perform the mapping between MCNP and STAR-CD cells. Preliminary testing of the code was performed using a 3x3 PWR pin-cell problem. The preliminary results are compared with those obtained from a STAR-CD coupled calculation with the deterministic transport code DeCART. Good agreement in the k{sub eff} and the power profile was observed. Increased computational capabilities and improvements in computational methods have accelerated interest in high fidelity modeling of nuclear reactor cores during the last several years. High-fidelity has been achieved by utilizing full core neutron transport solutions for the neutronics calculation and computational fluid dynamics solutions for the thermal-hydraulics calculation. Previous researchers have reported the coupling of 3D deterministic neutron transport method to CFD and their application to practical reactor analysis problems. One of the principal motivations of the work here was to utilize Monte Carlo methods to validate the coupled deterministic neutron

  20. Utility of Monte Carlo Modelling for Holdup Measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belian, Anthony P.; Russo, P. A.; Weier, Dennis R. ,

    2005-01-01

    Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements performed to locate and quantify holdup in the Oak Ridge K25 enrichment cascade used neutron totals counting and low-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. This facility housed the gaseous diffusion process for enrichment of uranium, in the form of UF{sub 6} gas, from {approx} 20% to 93%. Inventory of {sup 235}U inventory in K-25 is all holdup. These buildings have been slated for decontaminatino and decommissioning. The NDA measurements establish the inventory quantities and will be used to assure criticality safety and meet criteria for waste analysis and transportation. The tendency to err on the side of conservatism for the sake of criticality safety in specifying total NDA uncertainty argues, in the interests of safety and costs, for obtaining the best possible value of uncertainty at the conservative confidence level for each item of process equipment. Variable deposit distribution is a complex systematic effect (i.e., determined by multiple independent variables) on the portable NDA results for very large and bulk converters that contributes greatly to total uncertainty for holdup in converters measured by gamma or neutron NDA methods. Because the magnitudes of complex systematic effects are difficult to estimate, computational tools are important for evaluating those that are large. Motivated by very large discrepancies between gamma and neutron measurements of high-mass converters with gamma results tending to dominate, the Monte Carlo code MCNP has been used to determine the systematic effects of deposit distribution on gamma and neutron results for {sup 235}U holdup mass in converters. This paper details the numerical methodology used to evaluate large systematic effects unique to each measurement type, validates the methodology by comparison with measurements, and discusses how modeling tools can supplement the calibration of instruments used for holdup measurements by providing realistic values at well

  1. Monte Carlo Bayesian search for the plausible source of the Telescope...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Monte Carlo Bayesian search for the plausible source of the Telescope Array hotspot Authors: He, Hao-Ning ; Kusenko, Alexander ; Nagataki, Shigehiro ; Zhang, Bin-Bin ; Yang, ...

  2. Monte Carlo Fundamentals E B. BROWN and T M. S N

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    or reflect those of the United States Government or any ... Monte Carlo approach: Generate a sequence of states, (pol ... partide from birth to death During the particle ...

  3. Self-consistent inclusion of classical large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasma Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrell, A.E. Sherlock, M.; Rose, S.J.

    2015-10-15

    Large-angle Coulomb collisions allow for the exchange of a significant proportion of the energy of a particle in a single collision, but are not included in models of plasmas based on fluids, the Vlasov–Fokker–Planck equation, or currently available plasma Monte Carlo techniques. Their unique effects include the creation of fast ‘knock-on’ ions, which may be more likely to undergo certain reactions, and distortions to ion distribution functions relative to what is predicted by small-angle collision only theories. We present a computational method which uses Monte Carlo techniques to include the effects of large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasmas and which self-consistently evolves distribution functions according to the creation of knock-on ions of any generation. The method is used to demonstrate ion distribution function distortions in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) relevant scenario of the slowing of fusion products.

  4. Rotational fluctuation of molecules in quantum clusters. I. Path integral hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miura, Shinichi [Institute for Molecular Science, 38 Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2007-03-21

    In this paper, we present a path integral hybrid Monte Carlo (PIHMC) method for rotating molecules in quantum fluids. This is an extension of our PIHMC for correlated Bose fluids [S. Miura and J. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 2160 (2004)] to handle the molecular rotation quantum mechanically. A novel technique referred to be an effective potential of quantum rotation is introduced to incorporate the rotational degree of freedom in the path integral molecular dynamics or hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm. For a permutation move to satisfy Bose statistics, we devise a multilevel Metropolis method combined with a configurational-bias technique for efficiently sampling the permutation and the associated atomic coordinates. Then, we have applied the PIHMC to a helium-4 cluster doped with a carbonyl sulfide molecule. The effects of the quantum rotation on the solvation structure and energetics were examined. Translational and rotational fluctuations of the dopant in the superfluid cluster were also analyzed.

  5. Theoretically informed Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals by sampling of alignment-tensor fields.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro; Guzman, Orlando; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-07-27

    A theoretically informed coarse-grained Monte Carlo method is proposed for studying liquid crystals. The free energy functional of the system is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. The alignment field and its gradients are approximated by finite differences, and the free energy is minimized through a stochastic sampling technique. The validity of the proposed method is established by comparing the results of the proposed approach to those of traditional free energy minimization techniques. Its usefulness is illustrated in the context of three systems, namely, a nematic liquid crystal confined in a slit channel, a nematic liquid crystal droplet, and a chiral liquid crystal in the bulk. It is found that for systems that exhibit multiple metastable morphologies, the proposed Monte Carlo method is generally able to identify lower free energy states that are often missed by traditional approaches. Importantly, the Monte Carlo method identifies such states from random initial configurations, thereby obviating the need for educated initial guesses that can be difficult to formulate.

  6. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back Bombardment in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Corlett, John; Staples, John

    2009-03-02

    In this paper, we report on studies of ion back bombardment in high average current dc and rf photoinjectors using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo method. Using H{sub 2} ion as an example, we observed that the ion density and energy deposition on the photocathode in rf guns are order of magnitude lower than that in a dc gun. A higher rf frequency helps mitigate the ion back bombardment of the cathode in rf guns.

  7. Capabilities, Implementation, and Benchmarking of Shift, a Massively Parallel Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pandya, Tara M; Johnson, Seth R; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G; Hamilton, Steven P; Godfrey, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    This work discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Somemorespecific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000 R problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.less

  8. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-15

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  9. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Somemore » specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.« less

  10. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.

  11. Monte Carlo prompt dose calculations for the National Ingition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J.F.; Phillips, T.W.

    1997-01-01

    During peak operation, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will conduct as many as 600 experiments per year and attain deuterium- tritium fusion yields as high as 1200 MJ/yr. The radiation effective dose equivalent (EDE) to workers is limited to an average of 03 mSv/yr (30 mrem/yr) in occupied areas of the facility. Laboratory personnel determined located outside the facility will receive EDEs <= 0.5 mSv/yr (<= 50 mrem/yr). The total annual occupational EDE for the facility will be maintained at <= 0.1 person-Sv/yr (<= 10 person- rem/yr). To ensure that prompt EDEs meet these limits, three- dimensional Monte Carlo calculations have been completed.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of spin-polarized H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markic, L. Vranjes; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.

    2007-02-01

    The ground-state properties of spin polarized hydrogen H{down_arrow} are obtained by means of diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. Using the most accurate to date ab initio H{down_arrow}-H{down_arrow} interatomic potential we have studied its gas phase, from the very dilute regime until densities above its freezing point. At very small densities, the equation of state of the gas is very well described in terms of the gas parameter {rho}a{sup 3}, with a the s-wave scattering length. The solid phase has also been studied up to high pressures. The gas-solid phase transition occurs at a pressure of 173 bar, a much higher value than suggested by previous approximate descriptions.

  13. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P.

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  14. Monte-Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-08-31

    Version 00 MCB is a Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code for a general-purpose use to calculate a nuclide density time evolution with burnup or decay. It includes eigenvalue calculations of critical and subcritical systems as well as neutron transport calculations in fixed source mode or k-code mode to obtain reaction rates and energy deposition that are necessary for burnup calculations. The MCB-1C patch file and data packages as distributed by the NEADB are verymore » well organized and are being made available through RSICC as received. The RSICC package includes the MCB-1C patch and MCB data libraries. Installation of MCB requires MCNP4C source code and utility programs, which are not included in this MCB distribution. They were provided with the now obsolete CCC-700/MCNP-4C package.« less

  15. Monte Carlo Simulation Tool Installation and Operation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.; Troy, Meredith D.; Wiseman, Clinton G.

    2013-09-02

    This document provides information on software and procedures for Monte Carlo simulations based on the Geant4 toolkit, the ROOT data analysis software and the CRY cosmic ray library. These tools have been chosen for its application to shield design and activation studies as part of the simulation task for the Majorana Collaboration. This document includes instructions for installation, operation and modification of the simulation code in a high cyber-security computing environment, such as the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory network. It is intended as a living document, and will be periodically updated. It is a starting point for information collection by an experimenter, and is not the definitive source. Users should consult with one of the authors for guidance on how to find the most current information for their needs.

  16. Improved version of the PHOBOS Glauber Monte Carlo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Loizides, C.; Nagle, J.; Steinberg, P.

    2015-09-01

    “Glauber” models are used to calculate geometric quantities in the initial state of heavy ion collisions, such as impact parameter, number of participating nucleons and initial eccentricity. Experimental heavy-ion collaborations, in particular at RHIC and LHC, use Glauber Model calculations for various geometric observables for determination of the collision centrality. In this document, we describe the assumptions inherent to the approach, and provide an updated implementation (v2) of the Monte Carlo based Glauber Model calculation, which originally was used by the PHOBOS collaboration. The main improvement w.r.t. the earlier version (v1) (Alver et al. 2008) is the inclusion of Tritium,more » Helium-3, and Uranium, as well as the treatment of deformed nuclei and Glauber–Gribov fluctuations of the proton in p +A collisions. A users’ guide (updated to reflect changes in v2) is provided for running various calculations.« less

  17. Multiparticle Monte Carlo Code System for Shielding and Criticality Use.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    Version 00 COG is a modern, full-featured Monte Carlo radiation transport code that provides accurate answers to complex shielding, criticality, and activation problems.COG was written to be state-of-the-art and free of physics approximations and compromises found in earlier codes. COG is fully 3-D, uses point-wise cross sections and exact angular scattering, and allows a full range of biasing options to speed up solutions for deep penetration problems. Additionally, a criticality option is available for computingmore » Keff for assemblies of fissile materials. ENDL or ENDFB cross section libraries may be used. COG home page: http://cog.llnl.gov. Cross section libraries are included in the package. COG can use either the LLNL ENDL-90 cross section set or the ENDFB/VI set. Analytic surfaces are used to describe geometric boundaries. Parts (volumes) are described by a method of Constructive Solid Geometry. Surface types include surfaces of up to fourth order, and pseudo-surfaces such as boxes, finite cylinders, and figures of revolution. Repeated assemblies need be defined only once. Parts are visualized in cross-section and perspective picture views. A lattice feature simplifies the specification of regular arrays of parts. Parallel processing under MPI is supported for multi-CPU systems. Source and random-walk biasing techniques may be selected to improve solution statistics. These include source angular biasing, importance weighting, particle splitting and Russian roulette, pathlength stretching, point detectors, scattered direction biasing, and forced collisions. Criticality – For a fissioning system, COG will compute Keff by transporting batches of neutrons through the system. Activation – COG can compute gamma-ray doses due to neutron-activated materials, starting with just a neutron source. Coupled Problems – COG can solve coupled problems involving neutrons, photons, and electrons. COG 11.1 is an updated version of COG11.1 BETA 2 (RSICC C00777MNYCP02

  18. “Full Model” Nuclear Data and Covariance Evaluation Process Using TALYS, Total Monte Carlo and Backward-forward Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauge, E.

    2015-01-15

    The “Full model” evaluation process, that is used in CEA DAM DIF to evaluate nuclear data in the continuum region, makes extended use of nuclear models implemented in the TALYS code to account for experimental data (both differential and integral) by varying the parameters of these models until a satisfactory description of these experimental data is reached. For the evaluation of the covariance data associated with this evaluated data, the Backward-forward Monte Carlo (BFMC) method was devised in such a way that it mirrors the process of the “Full model” evaluation method. When coupled with the Total Monte Carlo method via the T6 system developed by NRG Petten, the BFMC method allows to make use of integral experiments to constrain the distribution of model parameters, and hence the distribution of derived observables and their covariance matrix. Together, TALYS, TMC, BFMC, and T6, constitute a powerful integrated tool for nuclear data evaluation, that allows for evaluation of nuclear data and the associated covariance matrix, all at once, making good use of all the available experimental information to drive the distribution of the model parameters and the derived observables.

  19. Monte Carlo and analytical model predictions of leakage neutron exposures from passively scattered proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prez-Andjar, Anglica [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Zhang, Rui; Newhauser, Wayne [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Stray neutron radiation is of concern after radiation therapy, especially in children, because of the high risk it might carry for secondary cancers. Several previous studies predicted the stray neutron exposure from proton therapy, mostly using Monte Carlo simulations. Promising attempts to develop analytical models have also been reported, but these were limited to only a few proton beam energies. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model to predict leakage neutron equivalent dose from passively scattered proton beams in the 100-250-MeV interval.Methods: To develop and validate the analytical model, the authors used values of equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) predicted with Monte Carlo simulations. The authors also characterized the behavior of the mean neutron radiation-weighting factor, w{sub R}, as a function of depth in a water phantom and distance from the beam central axis.Results: The simulated and analytical predictions agreed well. On average, the percentage difference between the analytical model and the Monte Carlo simulations was 10% for the energies and positions studied. The authors found that w{sub R} was highest at the shallowest depth and decreased with depth until around 10 cm, where it started to increase slowly with depth. This was consistent among all energies.Conclusion: Simple analytical methods are promising alternatives to complex and slow Monte Carlo simulations to predict H/D values. The authors' results also provide improved understanding of the behavior of w{sub R} which strongly depends on depth, but is nearly independent of lateral distance from the beam central axis.

  20. SU-E-J-144: Low Activity Studies of Carbon 11 Activation Via GATE Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L; Butuceanu, C; Qu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of a Monte Carlo simulation code with low levels of activity (∼1,000Bq). Such activity levels are expected from phantoms and patients activated via a proton therapy beam. Methods: Three different ranges for a therapeutic proton radiation beam were examined in a Monte Carlo simulation code: 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm. For each range, the decay of an equivalent length{sup 11}C source and additional sources of length plus or minus one cm was studied in a benchmark PET simulation for activities of 1000, 2000 and 3000Bq. The ranges were chosen to coincide with a previous activation study, and the activities were chosen to coincide with the approximate level of isotope creation expected in a phantom or patient irradiated by a therapeutic proton beam. The GATE 7.0 simulation was completed on a cluster node, running Scientific Linux Carbon 6 (Red Hat©). The resulting Monte Carlo data were investigated with the ROOT (CERN) analysis tool. The half-life of{sup 11}C was extracted via a histogram fit to the number of simulated PET events vs. time. Results: The average slope of the deviation of the extracted carbon half life from the expected/nominal value vs. activity showed a generally positive value. This was unexpected, as the deviation should, in principal, decrease with increased activity and lower statistical uncertainty. Conclusion: For activity levels on the order of 1,000Bq, the behavior of a benchmark PET test was somewhat unexpected. It is important to be aware of the limitations of low activity PET images, and low activity Monte Carlo simulations. This work was funded in part by the Philips corporation.

  1. Nonequilibrium candidate Monte Carlo: A new tool for efficient equilibrium simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilmeier, Jerome P.; Crooks, Gavin E.; Minh, David D. L.; Chodera, John D.

    2011-11-08

    Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation is a powerful tool for studying the equilibrium properties of matter. In complex condensed-phase systems, however, it is difficult to design Monte Carlo moves with high acceptance probabilities that also rapidly sample uncorrelated configurations. Here, we introduce a new class of moves based on nonequilibrium dynamics: candidate configurations are generated through a finite-time process in which a system is actively driven out of equilibrium, and accepted with criteria that preserve the equilibrium distribution. The acceptance rule is similar to the Metropolis acceptance probability, but related to the nonequilibrium work rather than the instantaneous energy difference. Our method is applicable to sampling from both a single thermodynamic state or a mixture of thermodynamic states, and allows both coordinates and thermodynamic parameters to be driven in nonequilibrium proposals. While generating finite-time switching trajectories incurs an additional cost, driving some degrees of freedom while allowing others to evolve naturally can lead to large enhancements in acceptance probabilities, greatly reducing structural correlation times. Using nonequilibrium driven processes vastly expands the repertoire of useful Monte Carlo proposals in simulations of dense solvated systems.

  2. PROBLEM DEPENDENT DOPPLER BROADENING OF CONTINUOUS ENERGY CROSS SECTIONS IN THE KENO MONTE CARLO COMPUTER CODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, S. W. D.; Maldonado, G. Ivan; Celik, Cihangir; Leal, Luiz C

    2014-01-01

    For many Monte Carlo codes cross sections are generally only created at a set of predetermined temperatures. This causes an increase in error as one moves further and further away from these temperatures in the Monte Carlo model. This paper discusses recent progress in the Scale Monte Carlo module KENO to create problem dependent, Doppler broadened, cross sections. Currently only broadening the 1D cross sections and probability tables is addressed. The approach uses a finite difference method to calculate the temperature dependent cross-sections for the 1D data, and a simple linear-logarithmic interpolation in the square root of temperature for the probability tables. Work is also ongoing to address broadening theS (alpha , beta) tables. With the current approach the temperature dependent cross sections are Doppler broadened before transport starts, and, for all but a few isotopes, the impact on cross section loading is negligible. Results can be compared with those obtained by using multigroup libraries, as KENO currently does interpolation on the multigroup cross sections to determine temperature dependent cross-sections. Current results compare favorably with these expected results.

  3. Equation of state of an interacting Bose gas at finite temperature: A path-integral Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilati, S.; Giorgini, S.; Sakkos, K.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.

    2006-10-15

    By using exact path-integral Monte Carlo methods we calculate the equation of state of an interacting Bose gas as a function of temperature both below and above the superfluid transition. The universal character of the equation of state for dilute systems and low temperatures is investigated by modeling the interatomic interactions using different repulsive potentials corresponding to the same s-wave scattering length. The results obtained for the energy and the pressure are compared to the virial expansion for temperatures larger than the critical temperature. At very low temperatures we find agreement with the ground-state energy calculated using the diffusion Monte Carlo method.

  4. Radiation doses in cone-beam breast computed tomography: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Ying; Lai, Chao-Jen; Han Tao; Zhong Yuncheng; Shen Youtao; Liu Xinming; Ge Shuaiping; You Zhicheng; Wang Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: In this article, we describe a method to estimate the spatial dose variation, average dose and mean glandular dose (MGD) for a real breast using Monte Carlo simulation based on cone beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) images. We present and discuss the dose estimation results for 19 mastectomy breast specimens, 4 homogeneous breast models, 6 ellipsoidal phantoms, and 6 cylindrical phantoms. Methods: To validate the Monte Carlo method for dose estimation in CBBCT, we compared the Monte Carlo dose estimates with the thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements at various radial positions in two polycarbonate cylinders (11- and 15-cm in diameter). Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 19 mastectomy breast specimens, obtained with a bench-top experimental scanner, were segmented and used to construct 19 structured breast models. Monte Carlo simulation of CBBCT with these models was performed and used to estimate the point doses, average doses, and mean glandular doses for unit open air exposure at the iso-center. Mass based glandularity values were computed and used to investigate their effects on the average doses as well as the mean glandular doses. Average doses for 4 homogeneous breast models were estimated and compared to those of the corresponding structured breast models to investigate the effect of tissue structures. Average doses for ellipsoidal and cylindrical digital phantoms of identical diameter and height were also estimated for various glandularity values and compared with those for the structured breast models. Results: The absorbed dose maps for structured breast models show that doses in the glandular tissue were higher than those in the nearby adipose tissue. Estimated average doses for the homogeneous breast models were almost identical to those for the structured breast models (p=1). Normalized average doses estimated for the ellipsoidal phantoms were similar to those for the structured breast models (root mean square (rms

  5. Study of DCX reaction on medium nuclei with Monte-Carlo Shell Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H. C.; Gibbs, W. R.

    2010-08-04

    In this work a method is introduced to calculate the DCX reaction in the framework of Monte-Carlo Shell Model (MCSM). To facilitate the use of Zero-temperature formalism of MCSM, the Double-Isobaric-Analog State (DIAS) is derived from the ground state by using isospin shifting operator. The validity of this method is tested by comparing the MCSM results to those of the SU(3) symmetry case. Application of this method to DCX on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 93}Nb is discussed.

  6. Exponentially-convergent Monte Carlo for the 1-D transport equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J. R.; Morel, J. E.; Ragusa, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    We define a new exponentially-convergent Monte Carlo method for solving the one-speed 1-D slab-geometry transport equation. This method is based upon the use of a linear discontinuous finite-element trial space in space and direction to represent the transport solution. A space-direction h-adaptive algorithm is employed to restore exponential convergence after stagnation occurs due to inadequate trial-space resolution. This methods uses jumps in the solution at cell interfaces as an error indicator. Computational results are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the new approach. (authors)

  7. Kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique and Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo: Comparison of on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beland, Laurent Karim; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-02-07

    Here, we present a comparison of the Kinetic Activation–Relaxation Technique (k-ART) and the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC), two off-lattice, on-the-fly Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) techniques that were recently used to solve several materials science problems. We show that if the initial displacements are localized the dimer method and the Activation–Relaxation Technique nouveau provide similar performance. We also show that k-ART and SEAKMC, although based on different approximations, are in agreement with each other, as demonstrated by the examples of 50 vacancies in a 1950-atom Fe box and of interstitial loops in 16,000-atom boxes. Generally speaking, k-ART’s treatment ofmore » geometry and flickers is more flexible, e.g. it can handle amorphous systems, and rigorous than SEAKMC’s, while the later’s concept of active volumes permits a significant speedup of simulations for the systems under consideration and therefore allows investigations of processes requiring large systems that are not accessible if not localizing calculations.« less

  8. CASL-U-2015-0170-000-a SHIFT: A New Monte Carlo Package Seth R. Johnson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -a SHIFT: A New Monte Carlo Package Seth R. Johnson Tara M. Pandya, Gregory G. Davidson, Thomas M. Evans, and Steven P. Hamilton , Cihangir Celik, Aarno Isotalo, Chris Peretti Oak Ridge National Laboratory April 19, 2015 CASL-U-2015-0170-000-a ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Seth R Johnson R&D Staff, Monte Carlo Methods Radiation Transport Group Exnihilo team: Greg Davidson Tom Evans Stephen Hamilton Seth Johnson Tara Pandya Associate developers: Cihangir

  9. Theory of melting at high pressures: Amending density functional theory with quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shulenburger, L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-10-01

    We present an improved first-principles description of melting under pressure based on thermodynamic integration comparing Density Functional Theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) treatments of the system. The method is applied to address the longstanding discrepancy between density functional theory (DFT) calculations and diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments on the melting curve of xenon, a noble gas solid where van der Waals binding is challenging for traditional DFT methods. The calculations show excellent agreement with data below 20 GPa and that the high-pressure melt curve is well described by a Lindemann behavior up to at least 80 GPa, a finding in stark contrast to DAC data.

  10. Replica-exchange Wang Landau sampling: pushing the limits of Monte Carlo simulations in materials sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Li, Ying Wai; Eisenbach, Markus; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David P

    2015-01-01

    We describe the study of thermodynamics of materials using replica-exchange Wang Landau (REWL) sampling, a generic framework for massively parallel implementations of the Wang Landau Monte Carlo method. To evaluate the performance and scalability of the method, we investigate the magnetic phase transition in body-centered cubic (bcc) iron using the classical Heisenberg model parameterized with first principles calculations. We demonstrate that our framework leads to a significant speedup without compromising the accuracy and precision and facilitates the study of much larger systems than is possible with its serial counterpart.

  11. Monte Carlo Simulations of Cosmic Rays Hadronic Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Orrell, John L.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2011-04-01

    This document describes the construction and results of the MaCoR software tool, developed to model the hadronic interactions of cosmic rays with different geometries of materials. The ubiquity of cosmic radiation in the environment results in the activation of stable isotopes, referred to as cosmogenic activities. The objective is to use this application in conjunction with a model of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR components, from extraction to deployment, to evaluate cosmogenic activation of such components before and after deployment. The cosmic ray showers include several types of particles with a wide range of energy (MeV to GeV). It is infeasible to compute an exact result with a deterministic algorithm for this problem; Monte Carlo simulations are a more suitable approach to model cosmic ray hadronic interactions. In order to validate the results generated by the application, a test comparing experimental muon flux measurements and those predicted by the application is presented. The experimental and simulated results have a deviation of 3%.

  12. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo studies of transition metal oxides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-02-22

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high-quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major plane-wave electronic structure codes. We have generated a set of neon-core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of density functional theory. The pseudopotentials have been directly tested for accuracy within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (M) atoms and the binding curve of each M-O dimer. We find the ionization potentialsmore » to be accurate to 0.16(1) eV, on average, relative to experiment. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 0.5(1)% of experimental values, on average, and the binding energies are also typically accurate to 0.18(3) eV. The level of accuracy we find for atoms and dimers is comparable to what has recently been observed for bulk metals and oxides using the same pseudopotentials. Our QMC pseudopotential results compare well with the findings of previous QMC studies and benchmark quantum chemical calculations.« less

  13. High order Chin actions in path integral Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakkos, K.; Casulleras, J.; Boronat, J.

    2009-05-28

    High order actions proposed by Chin have been used for the first time in path integral Monte Carlo simulations. Contrary to the Takahashi-Imada action, which is accurate to the fourth order only for the trace, the Chin action is fully fourth order, with the additional advantage that the leading fourth-order error coefficients are finely tunable. By optimizing two free parameters entering in the new action, we show that the time step error dependence achieved is best fitted with a sixth order law. The computational effort per bead is increased but the total number of beads is greatly reduced and the efficiency improvement with respect to the primitive approximation is approximately a factor of 10. The Chin action is tested in a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator, a H{sub 2} drop, and bulk liquid {sup 4}He. In all cases a sixth-order law is obtained with values of the number of beads that compare well with the pair action approximation in the stringent test of superfluid {sup 4}He.

  14. Random Number Generation for Petascale Quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashok Srinivasan

    2010-03-16

    The quality of random number generators can affect the results of Monte Carlo computations, especially when a large number of random numbers are consumed. Furthermore, correlations present between different random number streams in a parallel computation can further affect the results. The SPRNG software, which the author had developed earlier, has pseudo-random number generators (PRNGs) capable of producing large numbers of streams with large periods. However, they had been empirically tested on only thousand streams earlier. In the work summarized here, we tested the SPRNG generators with over a hundred thousand streams, involving over 10^14 random numbers per test, on some tests. We also tested the popular Mersenne Twister. We believe that these are the largest tests of PRNGs, both in terms of the numbers of streams tested and the number of random numbers tested. We observed defects in some of these generators, including the Mersenne Twister, while a few generators appeared to perform well. We also corrected an error in the implementation of one of the SPRNG generators.

  15. Cohesion Energetics of Carbon Allotropes: Quantum Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Hyeondeok; Kang, Sinabro; Koo, Jahyun; Lee, Hoonkyung; Kim, Jeongnim; Kwon, Yongkyung

    2014-01-01

    We have performed quantum Monte Carlo calculations to study the cohesion energetics of carbon allotropes, including sp3-bonded diamond, sp2-bonded graphene, sp-sp2 hybridized graphynes, and sp-bonded carbyne. The comput- ed cohesive energies of diamond and graphene are found to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding values de- termined experimentally for diamond and graphite, respectively, when the zero-point energies, along with the interlayer binding in the case of graphite, are included. We have also found that the cohesive energy of graphyne decreases system- atically as the ratio of sp-bonded carbon atoms increases. The cohesive energy of -graphyne, the most energetically- stable graphyne, turns out to be 6.766(6) eV/atom, which is smaller than that of graphene by 0.698(12) eV/atom. Experi- mental difficulty in synthesizing graphynes could be explained by their significantly smaller cohesive energies. Finally we conclude that the cohesive energy of a newly-proposed two-dimensional carbon network can be accurately estimated with the carbon-carbon bond energies determined from the cohesive energies of graphene and three different graphynes.

  16. Status of the MORSE multigroup Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmett, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    There are two versions of the MORSE multigroup Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MORSE-CGA is the most well-known and has undergone extensive use for many years. MORSE-SGC was originally developed in about 1980 in order to restructure the cross-section handling and thereby save storage. However, with the advent of new computer systems having much larger storage capacity, that aspect of SGC has become unnecessary. Both versions use data from multigroup cross-section libraries, although in somewhat different formats. MORSE-SGC is the version of MORSE that is part of the SCALE system, but it can also be run stand-alone. Both CGA and SGC use the Multiple Array System (MARS) geometry package. In the last six months the main focus of the work on these two versions has been on making them operational on workstations, in particular, the IBM RISC 6000 family. A new version of SCALE for workstations is being released to the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). MORSE-CGA, Version 2.0, is also being released to RSIC. Both SGC and CGA have undergone other revisions recently. This paper reports on the current status of the MORSE code system.

  17. Monte Carlo analysis of localization errors in magnetoencephalography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medvick, P.A.; Lewis, P.S.; Aine, C.; Flynn, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    In magnetoencephalography (MEG), the magnetic fields created by electrical activity in the brain are measured on the surface of the skull. To determine the location of the activity, the measured field is fit to an assumed source generator model, such as a current dipole, by minimizing chi-square. For current dipoles and other nonlinear source models, the fit is performed by an iterative least squares procedure such as the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Once the fit has been computed, analysis of the resulting value of chi-square can determine whether the assumed source model is adequate to account for the measurements. If the source model is adequate, then the effect of measurement error on the fitted model parameters must be analyzed. Although these kinds of simulation studies can provide a rough idea of the effect that measurement error can be expected to have on source localization, they cannot provide detailed enough information to determine the effects that the errors in a particular measurement situation will produce. In this work, we introduce and describe the use of Monte Carlo-based techniques to analyze model fitting errors for real data. Given the details of the measurement setup and a statistical description of the measurement errors, these techniques determine the effects the errors have on the fitted model parameters. The effects can then be summarized in various ways such as parameter variances/covariances or multidimensional confidence regions. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Radiation doses in volume-of-interest breast computed tomography—A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Chao-Jen Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical

  19. On-the-Fly Doppler Broadening for Monte Carlo Codes (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: On-the-Fly Doppler Broadening for Monte Carlo Codes Authors: Yesilyurt, G. ; Martin, W. ; Brown, F. 1 ; Univ. of Michigan) 2 ; Los Alamos National Laboratory) 2 + Show ...

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of a two-dimensional Bose gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilati, S.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.; Giorgini, S.

    2005-02-01

    The equation of state of a homogeneous two-dimensional Bose gas is calculated using quantum Monte Carlo methods. The low-density universal behavior is investigated using different interatomic model potentials, both finite ranged and strictly repulsive and zero ranged, supporting a bound state. The condensate fraction and the pair distribution function are calculated as a function of the gas parameter, ranging from the dilute to the strongly correlated regime. In the case of the zero-range pseudopotential we discuss the stability of the gaslike state for large values of the two-dimensional scattering length, and we calculate the critical density where the system becomes unstable against cluster formation.

  1. Neutron matter with Quantum Monte Carlo: chiral 3N forces and static response

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buraczynski, M.; Gandolfi, S.; Gezerlis, A.; Schwenk, A.; Tews, I.

    2016-03-01

    Neutron matter is related to the physics of neutron stars and that of neutron-rich nuclei. Moreover, Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods offer a unique way of solving the many-body problem non-perturbatively, providing feedback on features of nuclear interactions and addressing scenarios that are inaccessible to other approaches. Our contribution goes over two recent accomplishments in the theory of neutron matter: a) the fusing of QMC with chiral effective field theory interactions, focusing on local chiral 3N forces, and b) the first attempt to find an ab initio solution to the problem of static response.

  2. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF METASTABLE OXYGEN PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN COMETARY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I. [Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Grard, J.-C.; Hubert, B. [Laboratory for Planetary and Atmospheric Physics (LPAP), University of Lige, Lige (Belgium); Jehin, E.; Decock, A. [Origines Cosmologiques et Astrophysiques (ORCA), University of Lige (Belgium); Hutsemkers, D. [Extragalactic Astrophysics and Space Observations (EASO), University of Lige (Belgium); Manfroid, J., E-mail: B.Hubert@ulg.ac.be [High Energy Astrophysics Group (GAPHE), University of Lige (Belgium)

    2015-01-01

    Cometary atmospheres are produced by the outgassing of material, mainly H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} from the nucleus of the comet under the energy input from the Sun. Subsequent photochemical processes lead to the production of other species generally absent from the nucleus, such as OH. Although all comets are different, they all have a highly rarefied atmosphere, which is an ideal environment for nonthermal photochemical processes to take place and influence the detailed state of the atmosphere. We develop a Monte Carlo model of the coma photochemistry. We compute the energy distribution functions (EDF) of the metastable O({sup 1}D) and O({sup 1}S) species and obtain the red (630nm) and green (557.7nm) spectral line shapes of the full coma, consistent with the computed EDFs and the expansion velocity. We show that both species have a severely non-Maxwellian EDF, that results in broad spectral lines and the suprathermal broadening dominates due to the expansion motion. We apply our model to the atmosphere of comet C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) and 103P/Hartley 2. The computed width of the green line, expressed in terms of speed, is lower than that of the red line. This result is comparable to previous theoretical analyses, but in disagreement with observations. We explain that the spectral line shape does not only depend on the exothermicity of the photochemical production mechanisms, but also on thermalization, due to elastic collisions, reducing the width of the emission line coming from the O({sup 1}D) level, which has a longer lifetime.

  3. PyMercury: Interactive Python for the Mercury Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iandola, F N; O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J

    2010-11-29

    Monte Carlo particle transport applications are often written in low-level languages (C/C++) for optimal performance on clusters and supercomputers. However, this development approach often sacrifices straightforward usability and testing in the interest of fast application performance. To improve usability, some high-performance computing applications employ mixed-language programming with high-level and low-level languages. In this study, we consider the benefits of incorporating an interactive Python interface into a Monte Carlo application. With PyMercury, a new Python extension to the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code, we improve application usability without diminishing performance. In two case studies, we illustrate how PyMercury improves usability and simplifies testing and validation in a Monte Carlo application. In short, PyMercury demonstrates the value of interactive Python for Monte Carlo particle transport applications. In the future, we expect interactive Python to play an increasingly significant role in Monte Carlo usage and testing.

  4. Massively parallel Monte Carlo for many-particle simulations on GPUs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Joshua A.; Jankowski, Eric; Grubb, Thomas L.; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2013-12-01

    Current trends in parallel processors call for the design of efficient massively parallel algorithms for scientific computing. Parallel algorithms for Monte Carlo simulations of thermodynamic ensembles of particles have received little attention because of the inherent serial nature of the statistical sampling. In this paper, we present a massively parallel method that obeys detailed balance and implement it for a system of hard disks on the GPU. We reproduce results of serial high-precision Monte Carlo runs to verify the method. This is a good test case because the hard disk equation of state over the range where the liquid transforms into the solid is particularly sensitive to small deviations away from the balance conditions. On a Tesla K20, our GPU implementation executes over one billion trial moves per second, which is 148 times faster than on a single Intel Xeon E5540 CPU core, enables 27 times better performance per dollar, and cuts energy usage by a factor of 13. With this improved performance we are able to calculate the equation of state for systems of up to one million hard disks. These large system sizes are required in order to probe the nature of the melting transition, which has been debated for the last forty years. In this paper we present the details of our computational method, and discuss the thermodynamics of hard disks separately in a companion paper.

  5. Speciation model selection by Monte Carlo analysis of optical absorption spectra: Plutonium(IV) nitrate complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, John M.; Veirs, D. Kirk; Vaughn, Randolph B.; Cisneros, Michael R.; Smith, Coleman A.

    2000-06-01

    Standard modeling approaches can produce the most likely values of the formation constants of metal-ligand complexes if a particular set of species containing the metal ion is known or assumed to exist in solution equilibrium with complexing ligands. Identifying the most likely set of species when more than one set is plausible is a more difficult problem to address quantitatively. A Monte Carlo method of data analysis is described that measures the relative abilities of different speciation models to fit optical spectra of open-shell actinide ions. The best model(s) can be identified from among a larger group of models initially judged to be plausible. The method is demonstrated by analyzing the absorption spectra of aqueous Pu(IV) titrated with nitrate ion at constant 2 molal ionic strength in aqueous perchloric acid. The best speciation model supported by the data is shown to include three Pu(IV) species with nitrate coordination numbers 0, 1, and 2. Formation constants are {beta}{sub 1}=3.2{+-}0.5 and {beta}{sub 2}=11.2{+-}1.2, where the uncertainties are 95% confidence limits estimated by propagating raw data uncertainties using Monte Carlo methods. Principal component analysis independently indicates three Pu(IV) complexes in equilibrium. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  6. Surface Structures of Cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo Catalyst Nanoparticles from Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guofeng; Van Hove, M.A.; Ross, P.N.; Baskes, M.I.

    2005-03-31

    The surface structures of cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo nanoparticles have been investigated using the Monte Carlo method and modified embedded atom method potentials that we developed for Pt-Mo alloys. The cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo nanoparticles are constructed with disordered fcc configurations, with sizes from 2.5 to 5.0 nm, and with Pt concentrations from 60 to 90 at. percent. The equilibrium Pt-Mo nanoparticle configurations were generated through Monte Carlo simulations allowing both atomic displacements and element exchanges at 600 K. We predict that the Pt atoms weakly segregate to the surfaces of such nanoparticles. The Pt concentrations in the surface are calculated to be 5 to 14 at. percent higher than the Pt concentrations of the nanoparticles. Moreover, the Pt atoms preferentially segregate to the facet sites of the surface, while the Pt and Mo atoms tend to alternate along the edges and vertices of these nanoparticles. We found that decreasing the size or increasing the Pt concentration leads to higher Pt concentrations but fewer Pt-Mo pairs in the Pt-Mo nanoparticle surfaces.

  7. Monte Carlo analysis of neutron slowing-down-time spectrometer for fast reactor spent fuel assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jianwei; Lineberry, Michael

    2007-07-01

    Using the neutron slowing-down-time method as a nondestructive assay tool to improve input material accountancy for fast reactor spent fuel reprocessing is under investigation at Idaho State University. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to simulate the neutron slowing down process in different slowing down spectrometers, namely, lead and graphite, and determine their main parameters. {sup 238}U threshold fission chamber response was simulated in the Monte Carlo model to represent the spent fuel assay signals, the signature (fission/time) signals of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu were simulated as a convolution of fission cross sections and neutron flux inside the spent fuel. {sup 238}U detector signals were analyzed using linear regression model based on the signatures of fissile materials in the spent fuel to determine weight fractions of fissile materials in the Advanced Burner Test Reactor spent fuel. The preliminary results show even though lead spectrometer showed a better assay performance than graphite, graphite spectrometer could accurately determine weight fractions of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu given proper assay energy range were chosen. (authors)

  8. Energy density matrix formalism for interacting quantum systems: a quantum Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krogel, Jaron T; Kim, Jeongnim; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2014-01-01

    We develop an energy density matrix that parallels the one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) for many-body quantum systems. Just as the density matrix gives access to the number density and occupation numbers, the energy density matrix yields the energy density and orbital occupation energies. The eigenvectors of the matrix provide a natural orbital partitioning of the energy density while the eigenvalues comprise a single particle energy spectrum obeying a total energy sum rule. For mean-field systems the energy density matrix recovers the exact spectrum. When correlation becomes important, the occupation energies resemble quasiparticle energies in some respects. We explore the occupation energy spectrum for the finite 3D homogeneous electron gas in the metallic regime and an isolated oxygen atom with ground state quantum Monte Carlo techniques imple- mented in the QMCPACK simulation code. The occupation energy spectrum for the homogeneous electron gas can be described by an effective mass below the Fermi level. Above the Fermi level evanescent behavior in the occupation energies is observed in similar fashion to the occupation numbers of the 1RDM. A direct comparison with total energy differences demonstrates a quantita- tive connection between the occupation energies and electron addition and removal energies for the electron gas. For the oxygen atom, the association between the ground state occupation energies and particle addition and removal energies becomes only qualitative. The energy density matrix provides a new avenue for describing energetics with quantum Monte Carlo methods which have traditionally been limited to total energies.

  9. Incorporating Experimental Information in the Total Monte Carlo Methodology Using File Weights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helgesson, P.; Sjöstrand, H.; Koning, A.J.; Rochman, D.; Alhassan, E.; Pomp, S.

    2015-01-15

    Some criticism has been directed towards the Total Monte Carlo method because experimental information has not been taken into account in a statistically well-founded manner. In this work, a Bayesian calibration method is implemented by assigning weights to the random nuclear data files and the method is illustratively applied to a few applications. In some considered cases, the estimated nuclear data uncertainties are significantly reduced and the central values are significantly shifted. The study suggests that the method can be applied both to estimate uncertainties in a more justified way and in the search for better central values. Some improvements are however necessary; for example, the treatment of outliers and cross-experimental correlations should be more rigorous and random files that are intended to be prior files should be generated.

  10. A Proposal for a Standard Interface Between Monte Carlo Tools And One-Loop Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Dissertori, G.; Lazopoulos, A.; Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.; Frederix, R.; Greiner, N.; Hoeche, Stefan; Giele, W.; Skands, P.; Winter, J.; Gleisberg, T.; Archibald, J.; Heinrich, G.; Krauss, F.; Maitre, D.; Huber, M.; Huston, J.; Kauer, N.; Maltoni, F.; /Louvain U., CP3 /Milan Bicocca U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /Granada U., Theor. Phys. Astrophys. /CERN /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Heidelberg U. /Oxford U., Theor. Phys.

    2011-11-11

    Many highly developed Monte Carlo tools for the evaluation of cross sections based on tree matrix elements exist and are used by experimental collaborations in high energy physics. As the evaluation of one-loop matrix elements has recently been undergoing enormous progress, the combination of one-loop matrix elements with existing Monte Carlo tools is on the horizon. This would lead to phenomenological predictions at the next-to-leading order level. This note summarises the discussion of the next-to-leading order multi-leg (NLM) working group on this issue which has been taking place during the workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders at Les Houches, France, in June 2009. The result is a proposal for a standard interface between Monte Carlo tools and one-loop matrix element programs.

  11. Billion-atom synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of critical 3D Ising systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, E.; Monasterio, P.R.; Marian, J.

    2011-02-20

    An extension of the synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (spkMC) algorithm developed by Martinez et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 227 (2008) 3804] to discrete lattices is presented. The method solves the master equation synchronously by recourse to null events that keep all processors' time clocks current in a global sense. Boundary conflicts are resolved by adopting a chessboard decomposition into non-interacting sublattices. We find that the bias introduced by the spatial correlations attendant to the sublattice decomposition is within the standard deviation of serial calculations, which confirms the statistical validity of our algorithm. We have analyzed the parallel efficiency of spkMC and find that it scales consistently with problem size and sublattice partition. We apply the method to the calculation of scale-dependent critical exponents in billion-atom 3D Ising systems, with very good agreement with state-of-the-art multispin simulations.

  12. Direct Monte Carlo simulation of the chemical equilibrium composition of detonation products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, M.S.

    1993-06-01

    A new Monte Carlo simulation method has been developed by the author which gives the equilibrium chemical composition of a molecular fluid directly. The usual NPT ensemble (isothermal-isobaric) is implemented with N being the number of atoms instead of molecules. Changes in chemical composition are treated as correlated spatial moves of atoms. Given the interaction potentials between molecular products, ``exact`` EOS points including the equilibrium chemical composition can be determined from the simulations. This method is applied to detonation products at conditions in the region near the Chapman- Jouget state. For the example of NO, it is shown that the CJ detonation velocity can be determined to a few meters per second. A rather small change in cross potentials is shown to shift the chemical equilibrium and the CJ conditions significantly.

  13. Theory of melting at high pressures: Amending density functional theory with quantum Monte Carlo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shulenburger, L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-10-01

    We present an improved first-principles description of melting under pressure based on thermodynamic integration comparing Density Functional Theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) treatments of the system. The method is applied to address the longstanding discrepancy between density functional theory (DFT) calculations and diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments on the melting curve of xenon, a noble gas solid where van der Waals binding is challenging for traditional DFT methods. The calculations show excellent agreement with data below 20 GPa and that the high-pressure melt curve is well described by a Lindemann behavior up to at least 80 GPa, amore » finding in stark contrast to DAC data.« less

  14. Multilevel Monte Carlo for two phase flow and BuckleyLeverett transport in random heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mller, Florian Jenny, Patrick Meyer, Daniel W.

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) is a well known method for quantifying uncertainty arising for example in subsurface flow problems. Although robust and easy to implement, MC suffers from slow convergence. Extending MC by means of multigrid techniques yields the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method. MLMC has proven to greatly accelerate MC for several applications including stochastic ordinary differential equations in finance, elliptic stochastic partial differential equations and also hyperbolic problems. In this study, MLMC is combined with a streamline-based solver to assess uncertain two phase flow and BuckleyLeverett transport in random heterogeneous porous media. The performance of MLMC is compared to MC for a two dimensional reservoir with a multi-point Gaussian logarithmic permeability field. The influence of the variance and the correlation length of the logarithmic permeability on the MLMC performance is studied.

  15. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of Eclipse treatment planning system for effects on dose distribution of the hip prostheses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    atl?, Serap; Tan?r, Gne?

    2013-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium, titanium alloy, and stainless steel hip prostheses on dose distribution based on the Monte Carlo simulation method, as well as the accuracy of the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 and 18 MV photon energies. In the present study the pencil beam convolution (PBC) method implemented in the Eclipse TPS was compared to the Monte Carlo method and ionization chamber measurements. The present findings show that if high-Z material is used in prosthesis, large dose changes can occur due to scattering. The variance in dose observed in the present study was dependent on material type, density, and atomic number, as well as photon energy; as photon energy increased back scattering decreased. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses was significant and could not be predicted accurately by the PBC method for hip prostheses. The findings show that for accurate dose calculation the Monte Carlo-based TPS should be used in patients with hip prostheses.

  16. An Advanced Neutronic Analysis Toolkit with Inline Monte Carlo capability for BHTR Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William R. Martin; John C. Lee

    2009-12-30

    Monte Carlo capability has been combined with a production LWR lattice physics code to allow analysis of high temperature gas reactor configurations, accounting for the double heterogeneity due to the TRISO fuel. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 has been used in conjunction with CPM3, which was the testbench lattice physics code for this project. MCNP5 is used to perform two calculations for the geometry of interest, one with homogenized fuel compacts and the other with heterogeneous fuel compacts, where the TRISO fuel kernels are resolved by MCNP5.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of elongating metallic nanowires in the presence of surfactants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimenez, M. Cecilia; Reinaudi, Luis Leiva, Ezequiel P. M.

    2015-12-28

    Nanowires of different metals undergoing elongation were studied by means of canonical Monte Carlo simulations and the embedded atom method representing the interatomic potentials. The presence of a surfactant medium was emulated by the introduction of an additional stabilization energy, represented by a parameter Q. Several values of the parameter Q and temperatures were analyzed. In general, it was observed for all studied metals that, as Q increases, there is a greater elongation before the nanowire breaks. In the case of silver, linear monatomic chains several atoms long formed at intermediate values of Q and low temperatures. Similar observations were made for the case of silver-gold alloys when the medium interacted selectively with Ag.

  18. Direct simulation Monte Carlo investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Torczynski, John R.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-08-14

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Due to the inherent statistical noise and the significant computational requirements, DSMC is hardly ever applied to hydrodynamic flows. Here, DSMC RMI simulations are performed to quantify the shock-driven growth of a single-mode perturbation on the interface between two atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases prior to re-shocking as a function of the Atwood and Mach numbers. The DSMC results qualitatively reproduce all features of the RMI and are in reasonable quantitative agreement with existing theoretical and empirical models. The DSMC simulations indicate that theremore » is a universal behavior, consistent with previous work in this field that RMI growth follows.« less

  19. Use of decision tree analysis and Monte Carlo simulation for downhole material selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheldi, T.; Cavassi, P.; Lazzari, L.; Pezzotta, L.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes how corrosion engineers can use the decision tree analysis in order to evaluate and select the best materials for the compilation of a new oil field, characterized by high CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S content. The method has been based on the decision tree analysis and the Monte Carlo simulation to obtain the probability distribution of some events to occur (for instance, number of workovers, corrosion inhibitor efficiency, coating damage rate). The corrosion study leads to four different technical solutions, showing different risk and reliability: carbon steel with corrosion allowance and inhibitor injection, coated tubing, and two corrosion resistant alloys, a superduplex stainless steel and a superaustenitic stainless steel. The cost comparison has been carried out by using the Expected Monetary Value criterion applied to the Life Cycle Cost evaluation. The paper presents and discusses the decision tree and the results of simulations.

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye Mazzola, Guglielmo Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2015-04-14

    Although liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on the earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article, we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in good agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous density functional theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  1. Density-functional Monte-Carlo simulation of CuZn order-disorder transition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khan, Suffian N.; Eisenbach, Markus

    2016-01-25

    We perform a Wang-Landau Monte Carlo simulation of a Cu0.5Zn0.5 order-disorder transition using 250 atoms and pairwise atom swaps inside a 5 x 5 x 5 BCC supercell. Each time step uses energies calculated from density functional theory (DFT) via the all-electron Korringa-Kohn- Rostoker method and self-consistent potentials. Here we find CuZn undergoes a transition from a disordered A2 to an ordered B2 structure, as observed in experiment. Our calculated transition temperature is near 870 K, comparing favorably to the known experimental peak at 750 K. We also plot the entropy, temperature, specific-heat, and short-range order as a function ofmore » internal energy.« less

  2. Direct simulation Monte Carlo investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Torczynski, John R.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-08-14

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Due to the inherent statistical noise and the significant computational requirements, DSMC is hardly ever applied to hydrodynamic flows. Here, DSMC RMI simulations are performed to quantify the shock-driven growth of a single-mode perturbation on the interface between two atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases prior to re-shocking as a function of the Atwood and Mach numbers. The DSMC results qualitatively reproduce all features of the RMI and are in reasonable quantitative agreement with existing theoretical and empirical models. The DSMC simulations indicate that there is a universal behavior, consistent with previous work in this field that RMI growth follows.

  3. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 ; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-coupled- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the BortzKalosLebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  4. On-the-fly generation of differential resonance scattering probability distribution functions for Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunny, E. E.; Martin, W. R. [University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Current Monte Carlo codes use one of three models to model neutron scattering in the epithermal energy range: (1) the asymptotic scattering model, (2) the free gas scattering model, or (3) the S({alpha},{beta}) model, depending on the neutron energy and the specific Monte Carlo code. The free gas scattering model assumes the scattering cross section is constant over the neutron energy range, which is usually a good approximation for light nuclei, but not for heavy nuclei where the scattering cross section may have several resonances in the epithermal region. Several researchers in the field have shown that using the free gas scattering model in the vicinity of the resonances in the lower epithermal range can under-predict resonance absorption due to the up-scattering phenomenon. Existing methods all involve performing the collision analysis in the center-of-mass frame, followed by a conversion back to the laboratory frame. In this paper, we will present a new sampling methodology that (1) accounts for the energy-dependent scattering cross sections in the collision analysis and (2) acts in the laboratory frame, avoiding the conversion to the center-of-mass frame. The energy dependence of the scattering cross section was modeled with even-ordered polynomials to approximate the scattering cross section in Blackshaw's equations for the moments of the differential scattering PDFs. These moments were used to sample the outgoing neutron speed and angle in the laboratory frame on-the-fly during the random walk of the neutron. Results for criticality studies on fuel pin and fuel assembly calculations using these methods showed very close comparison to results using the reference Doppler-broadened rejection correction (DBRC) scheme. (authors)

  5. MUSiC - An Automated Scan for Deviations between Data and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Arnd

    2010-02-10

    A model independent analysis approach is presented, systematically scanning the data for deviations from the standard model Monte Carlo expectation. Such an analysis can contribute to the understanding of the CMS detector and the tuning of event generators. The approach is sensitive to a variety of models of new physics, including those not yet thought of.

  6. Use of single scatter electron monte carlo transport for medical radiation sciences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Svatos, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    The single scatter Monte Carlo code CREEP models precise microscopic interactions of electrons with matter to enhance physical understanding of radiation sciences. It is designed to simulate electrons in any medium, including materials important for biological studies. It simulates each interaction individually by sampling from a library which contains accurate information over a broad range of energies.

  7. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code Which Solves for Geometrics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-01-13

    Pegasus is a 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code which solves for geometries which can be represented by bodies of revolution. Included are all the surface chemistry enhancements in the 2D code Icarus as well as a real vacuum pump model. The code includes multiple species transport.

  8. Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico 5–7 permanent magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-03-05

    The concerns about the supply and resource of rare earth (RE) metals have generated a lot of interests in searching for high performance RE-free permanent magnets. Alnico alloys are traditional non-RE permanent magnets and have received much attention recently due their good performance at high temperature. In this paper, we develop an accurate and efficient cluster expansion energy model for alnico 5–7. Monte Carlo simulations using the cluster expansion method are performed to investigate the structure of alnico 5–7 at atomistic and nano scales. The alnico 5–7 master alloy is found to decompose into FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases at lowmore » temperature. The boundary between these two phases is quite sharp (~2 nm) for a wide range of temperature. The compositions of the main constituents in these two phases become higher when the temperature gets lower. Both FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases are in B2 ordering with Fe and Al on α-site and Ni and Co on β-site. The degree of order of the NiAl-rich phase is much higher than that of the FeCo-rich phase. In addition, a small magnetic moment is also observed in NiAl-rich phase but the moment reduces as the temperature is lowered, implying that the magnetic properties of alnico 5–7 could be improved by lowering annealing temperature to diminish the magnetism in NiAl-rich phase. Furthermore, the results from our Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with available experimental results.« less

  9. Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico 5–7 permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-03-05

    The concerns about the supply and resource of rare earth (RE) metals have generated a lot of interests in searching for high performance RE-free permanent magnets. Alnico alloys are traditional non-RE permanent magnets and have received much attention recently due their good performance at high temperature. In this paper, we develop an accurate and efficient cluster expansion energy model for alnico 5–7. Monte Carlo simulations using the cluster expansion method are performed to investigate the structure of alnico 5–7 at atomistic and nano scales. The alnico 5–7 master alloy is found to decompose into FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases at low temperature. The boundary between these two phases is quite sharp (~2 nm) for a wide range of temperature. The compositions of the main constituents in these two phases become higher when the temperature gets lower. Both FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases are in B2 ordering with Fe and Al on α-site and Ni and Co on β-site. The degree of order of the NiAl-rich phase is much higher than that of the FeCo-rich phase. In addition, a small magnetic moment is also observed in NiAl-rich phase but the moment reduces as the temperature is lowered, implying that the magnetic properties of alnico 5–7 could be improved by lowering annealing temperature to diminish the magnetism in NiAl-rich phase. Furthermore, the results from our Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with available experimental results.

  10. SU-E-T-578: MCEBRT, A Monte Carlo Code for External Beam Treatment Plan Verifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chibani, O; Ma, C; Eldib, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Present a new Monte Carlo code (MCEBRT) for patient-specific dose calculations in external beam radiotherapy. The code MLC model is benchmarked and real patient plans are re-calculated using MCEBRT and compared with commercial TPS. Methods: MCEBRT is based on the GEPTS system (Med. Phys. 29 (2002) 835846). Phase space data generated for Varian linac photon beams (6 15 MV) are used as source term. MCEBRT uses a realistic MLC model (tongue and groove, rounded ends). Patient CT and DICOM RT files are used to generate a 3D patient phantom and simulate the treatment configuration (gantry, collimator and couch angles; jaw positions; MLC sequences; MUs). MCEBRT dose distributions and DVHs are compared with those from TPS in absolute way (Gy). Results: Calculations based on the developed MLC model closely matches transmission measurements (pin-point ionization chamber at selected positions and film for lateral dose profile). See Fig.1. Dose calculations for two clinical cases (whole brain irradiation with opposed beams and lung case with eight fields) are carried out and outcomes are compared with the Eclipse AAA algorithm. Good agreement is observed for the brain case (Figs 2-3) except at the surface where MCEBRT dose can be higher by 20%. This is due to better modeling of electron contamination by MCEBRT. For the lung case an overall good agreement (91% gamma index passing rate with 3%/3mm DTA criterion) is observed (Fig.4) but dose in lung can be over-estimated by up to 10% by AAA (Fig.5). CTV and PTV DVHs from TPS and MCEBRT are nevertheless close (Fig.6). Conclusion: A new Monte Carlo code is developed for plan verification. Contrary to phantombased QA measurements, MCEBRT simulate the exact patient geometry and tissue composition. MCEBRT can be used as extra verification layer for plans where surface dose and tissue heterogeneity are an issue.

  11. SU-E-T-277: Raystation Electron Monte Carlo Commissioning and Clinical Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, C; Sansourekidou, P; Pavord, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the Raystation v4.0 Electron Monte Carlo algorithm for an Elekta Infinity linear accelerator and commission for clinical use. Methods: A total of 199 tests were performed (75 Export and Documentation, 20 PDD, 30 Profiles, 4 Obliquity, 10 Inhomogeneity, 55 MU Accuracy, and 5 Grid and Particle History). Export and documentation tests were performed with respect to MOSAIQ (Elekta AB) and RadCalc (Lifeline Software Inc). Mechanical jaw parameters and cutout magnifications were verified. PDD and profiles for open cones and cutouts were extracted and compared with water tank measurements. Obliquity and inhomogeneity for bone and air calculations were compared to film dosimetry. MU calculations for open cones and cutouts were performed and compared to both RadCalc and simple hand calculations. Grid size and particle histories were evaluated per energy for statistical uncertainty performance. Acceptability was categorized as follows: performs as expected, negligible impact on workflow, marginal impact, critical impact or safety concern, and catastrophic impact of safety concern. Results: Overall results are: 88.8% perform as expected, 10.2% negligible, 2.0% marginal, 0% critical and 0% catastrophic. Results per test category are as follows: Export and Documentation: 100% perform as expected, PDD: 100% perform as expected, Profiles: 66.7% perform as expected, 33.3% negligible, Obliquity: 100% marginal, Inhomogeneity 50% perform as expected, 50% negligible, MU Accuracy: 100% perform as expected, Grid and particle histories: 100% negligible. To achieve distributions with satisfactory smoothness level, 5,000,000 particle histories were used. Calculation time was approximately 1 hour. Conclusion: Raystation electron Monte Carlo is acceptable for clinical use. All of the issues encountered have acceptable workarounds. Known issues were reported to Raysearch and will be resolved in upcoming releases.

  12. SU-E-T-239: Monte Carlo Modelling of SMC Proton Nozzles Using TOPAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, K; Kim, J; Shin, J; Han, Y; Ju, S; Hong, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Shin, E; Ahn, S; Chung, S; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To expedite and cross-check the commissioning of the proton therapy nozzles at Samsung Medical Center using TOPAS. Methods: We have two different types of nozzles at Samsung Medical Center (SMC), a multi-purpose nozzle and a pencil beam scanning dedicated nozzle. Both nozzles have been modelled in Monte Carlo simulation by using TOPAS based on the vendor-provided geometry. The multi-purpose nozzle is mainly composed of wobbling magnets, scatterers, ridge filters and multi-leaf collimators (MLC). Including patient specific apertures and compensators, all the parts of the nozzle have been implemented in TOPAS following the geometry information from the vendor.The dedicated scanning nozzle has a simpler structure than the multi-purpose nozzle with a vacuum pipe at the down stream of the nozzle.A simple water tank volume has been implemented to measure the dosimetric characteristics of proton beams from the nozzles. Results: We have simulated the two proton beam nozzles at SMC. Two different ridge filters have been tested for the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) generation of wobbling mode in the multi-purpose nozzle. The spot sizes and lateral penumbra in two nozzles have been simulated and analyzed using a double Gaussian model. Using parallel geometry, both the depth dose curve and dose profile have been measured simultaneously. Conclusion: The proton therapy nozzles at SMC have been successfully modelled in Monte Carlo simulation using TOPAS. We will perform a validation with measured base data and then use the MC simulation to interpolate/extrapolate the measured data. We believe it will expedite the commissioning process of the proton therapy nozzles at SMC.

  13. Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico 57 permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-03-05

    The concerns about the supply and resource of rare earth (RE) metals have generated a lot of interests in searching for high performance RE-free permanent magnets. Alnico alloys are traditional non-RE permanent magnets and have received much attention recently due their good performance at high temperature. In this paper, we develop an accurate and efficient cluster expansion energy model for alnico 57. Monte Carlo simulations using the cluster expansion method are performed to investigate the structure of alnico 57 at atomistic and nano scales. The alnico 57 master alloy is found to decompose into FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases at low temperature. The boundary between these two phases is quite sharp (~2 nm) for a wide range of temperature. The compositions of the main constituents in these two phases become higher when the temperature gets lower. Both FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases are in B2 ordering with Fe and Al on ?-site and Ni and Co on ?-site. The degree of order of the NiAl-rich phase is much higher than that of the FeCo-rich phase. In addition, a small magnetic moment is also observed in NiAl-rich phase but the moment reduces as the temperature is lowered, implying that the magnetic properties of alnico 57 could be improved by lowering annealing temperature to diminish the magnetism in NiAl-rich phase. Furthermore, the results from our Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with available experimental results.

  14. SciThur AM: YIS - 04: Gold Nanoparticle Enhanced Arc Radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koger, B; Kirkby, C

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: The use of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in radiotherapy has shown promise for therapeutic enhancement. In this study, we explore the feasibility of enhancing radiotherapy with GNPs in an arc-therapy context. We use Monte Carlo simulations to quantify the macroscopic dose-enhancement ratio (DER) and tumour to normal tissue ratio (TNTR) as functions of photon energy over various tumour and body geometries. Methods: GNP-enhanced arc radiotherapy (GEART) was simulated using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code and penEasy main program. We simulated 360 arc-therapy with monoenergetic photon energies 50 1000 keV and several clinical spectra used to treat a spherical tumour containing uniformly distributed GNPs in a cylindrical tissue phantom. Various geometries were used to simulate different tumour sizes and depths. Voxel dose was used to calculate DERs and TNTRs. Inhomogeneity effects were examined through skull dose in brain tumour treatment simulations. Results: Below 100 keV, DERs greater than 2.0 were observed. Compared to 6 MV, tumour dose at low energies was more conformai, with lower normal tissue dose and higher TNTRs. Both the DER and TNTR increased with increasing cylinder radius and decreasing tumour radius. The inclusion of bone showed excellent tumour conformality at low energies, though with an increase in skull dose (40% of tumour dose with 100 keV compared to 25% with 6 MV). Conclusions: Even in the presence of inhomogeneities, our results show promise for the treatment of deep-seated tumours with low-energy GEART, with greater tumour dose conformality and lower normal tissue dose than 6 MV.

  15. Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements of dosimetric parameters of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hosseini, S. Hamed; Shavar, Arzhang

    2008-04-15

    This article presents a brachytherapy source having {sup 103}Pd adsorbed onto a cylindrical silver rod that has been developed by the Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School for permanent implant applications. Dosimetric characteristics (radial dose function, anisotropy function, and anisotropy factor) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined in terms of the updated AAPM Task group 43 (TG-43U1) recommendations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the dose rate constant. Measurements were performed using TLD-GR200A circular chip dosimeters using standard methods employing thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Perspex phantom. Precision machined bores in the phantom located the dosimeters and the source in a reproducible fixed geometry, providing for transverse-axis and angular dose profiles over a range of distances from 0.5 to 5 cm. The Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code, version 4C simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around this model {sup 103}Pd source in water and Perspex phantoms. The Monte Carlo calculated dose rate constant of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd source in water was found to be 0.678 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} with an approximate uncertainty of {+-}0.1%. The anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and the radial dose function, g(r), of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd source were also measured in a Perspex phantom and calculated in both Perspex and liquid water phantoms.

  16. Evaluation of vectorized Monte Carlo algorithms on GPUs for a neutron Eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, X.; Liu, T.; Ji, W.; Xu, X. G.; Brown, F. B.

    2013-07-01

    Conventional Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport computations are 'history-based', which means that one particle history at a time is tracked. Simulations based on such methods suffer from thread divergence on the graphics processing unit (GPU), which severely affects the performance of GPUs. To circumvent this limitation, event-based vectorized MC algorithms can be utilized. A versatile software test-bed, called ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous Environments - was used for this study. ARCHER facilitates the development and testing of a MC code based on the vectorized MC algorithm implemented on GPUs by using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The ARCHER{sub GPU} code was designed to solve a neutron eigenvalue problem and was tested on a NVIDIA Tesla M2090 Fermi card. We found that although the vectorized MC method significantly reduces the occurrence of divergent branching and enhances the warp execution efficiency, the overall simulation speed is ten times slower than the conventional history-based MC method on GPUs. By analyzing detailed GPU profiling information from ARCHER, we discovered that the main reason was the large amount of global memory transactions, causing severe memory access latency. Several possible solutions to alleviate the memory latency issue are discussed. (authors)

  17. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations resolve apparent diffusion rate differences for proteins confined in nanochannels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, J. W.; Ileri, N.; Levie, H. W.; Stroeve, P.; Ustach, V.; Faller, R.; Renaud, P.

    2015-08-01

    We use Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to examine molecular transport phenomena in nanochannels, explaining four orders of magnitude difference in wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) protein diffusion rates observed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and by direct imaging of fluorescently-labeled proteins. We first use the ESPResSo Molecular Dynamics code to estimate the surface transport distance for neutral and charged proteins. We then employ a Monte Carlo model to calculate the paths of protein molecules on surfaces and in the bulk liquid transport medium. Our results show that the transport characteristics depend strongly on the degree of molecular surface coverage. Atomic force microscope characterization of surfaces exposed to WGA proteins for 1000 s show large protein aggregates consistent with the predicted coverage. These calculations and experiments provide useful insight into the details of molecular motion in confined geometries.

  18. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations resolve apparent diffusion rate differences for proteins confined in nanochannels

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tringe, J. W.; Ileri, N.; Levie, H. W.; Stroeve, P.; Ustach, V.; Faller, R.; Renaud, P.

    2015-08-01

    We use Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to examine molecular transport phenomena in nanochannels, explaining four orders of magnitude difference in wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) protein diffusion rates observed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and by direct imaging of fluorescently-labeled proteins. We first use the ESPResSo Molecular Dynamics code to estimate the surface transport distance for neutral and charged proteins. We then employ a Monte Carlo model to calculate the paths of protein molecules on surfaces and in the bulk liquid transport medium. Our results show that the transport characteristics depend strongly on the degree of molecular surface coverage.more » Atomic force microscope characterization of surfaces exposed to WGA proteins for 1000 s show large protein aggregates consistent with the predicted coverage. These calculations and experiments provide useful insight into the details of molecular motion in confined geometries.« less

  19. Residual Monte Carlo high-order solver for Moment-Based Accelerated Thermal Radiative Transfer equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willert, Jeffrey Park, H.

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the possibility of replacing Standard Monte Carlo (SMC) transport sweeps within a Moment-Based Accelerated Thermal Radiative Transfer (TRT) algorithm with a Residual Monte Carlo (RMC) formulation. Previous Moment-Based Accelerated TRT implementations have encountered trouble when stochastic noise from SMC transport sweeps accumulates over several iterations and pollutes the low-order system. With RMC we hope to significantly lower the build-up of statistical error at a much lower cost. First, we display encouraging results for a zero-dimensional test problem. Then, we demonstrate that we can achieve a lower degree of error in two one-dimensional test problems by employing an RMC transport sweep with multiple orders of magnitude fewer particles per sweep. We find that by reformulating the high-order problem, we can compute more accurate solutions at a fraction of the cost.

  20. Posters Monte Carlo Simulation of Longwave Fluxes Through Broken Scattering Cloud Fields

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Posters Monte Carlo Simulation of Longwave Fluxes Through Broken Scattering Cloud Fields E. E. Takara and R. G. Ellingson University of Maryland College Park, Maryland To simplify the analysis, we made several assumptions: the clouds were cuboidal; they were all identically sized and shaped; and they had constant optical properties. Results and Discussion The model was run for a set of cloud fields with clouds of varying optical thickness and scattering albedo. The predicted effective cloud

  1. Fullrmc, A Rigid Body Reverse Monte Carlo Modeling Package Enabled With

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Machine Learning And Artificial Intelligence - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research January 22, 2016, Research Highlights Fullrmc, A Rigid Body Reverse Monte Carlo Modeling Package Enabled With Machine Learning And Artificial Intelligence Liquid Sulfur. Sx≤8 molecules recognized and built upon modelling Scientific Achievement Novel approach to reverse modelling atomic and molecular systems from a set of experimental data and constraints. New fitting concepts such as 'Group',

  2. Application of Diffusion Monte Carlo to Materials Dominated by van der Waals Interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Benali, Anouar; Shulenburger, Luke; Romero, Nichols A.; Kim, Jeongnim; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2014-06-12

    Van der Waals forces are notoriously difficult to account for from first principles. We perform extensive calculation to assess the usefulness and validity of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo when applied to van der Waals forces. We present results for noble gas solids and clusters - archetypical van der Waals dominated assemblies, as well as a relevant pi-pi stacking supramolecular complex: DNA + intercalating anti-cancer drug Ellipticine.

  3. Non-Covalent Bonding in Complex Molecular Systems with Quantum Monte Carlo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility DFT, and a box including 64 molecules. By performing benchmark QMC calculations on snapshots of this type, researchers are able to ascertain DFT errors. Dario Alfè, University College London Non-Covalent Bonding in Complex Molecular Systems with Quantum Monte Carlo PI Name: Dario Alfe PI Email: d.alfe@ucl.ac.uk Institution: University College London Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 56 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Materials

  4. Non-covalent Bonding in Complex Molecular Systems with Quantum Monte Carlo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility DFT A snapshot of a liquid water simulation performed with DFT, and a box including 64 molecules. By performing benchmark QMC calculations on snapshots of this type, researchers are able to ascertain DFT errors. Credit: Dario Alfè, University College London Non-covalent Bonding in Complex Molecular Systems with Quantum Monte Carlo PI Name: Dario Alfè PI Email: d.alfe@ucl.ac.uk Institution: University College London Allocation Program: INCITE

  5. Automatic mesh adaptivity for hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic neutronics modeling of difficult shielding problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Wilson, Paul P.H.; Sawan, Mohamed E.; Mosher, Scott W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C.; Evans, Thomas M.; Grove, Robert E.

    2015-06-30

    The CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques dramatically increase the efficiency of neutronics modeling, but their use in the accurate design analysis of very large and geometrically complex nuclear systems has been limited by the large number of processors and memory requirements for their preliminary deterministic calculations and final Monte Carlo calculation. Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to reduce the memory requirements of CADIS and FW-CADIS without sacrificing their efficiency improvement. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility. Using these algorithms resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation and, additionally, increased the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation by a factor of at least 3.4. The three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved using an FW-CADIS simulation on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.

  6. Automatic mesh adaptivity for hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic neutronics modeling of difficult shielding problems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Wilson, Paul P.H.; Sawan, Mohamed E.; Mosher, Scott W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C.; Evans, Thomas M.; Grove, Robert E.

    2015-06-30

    The CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques dramatically increase the efficiency of neutronics modeling, but their use in the accurate design analysis of very large and geometrically complex nuclear systems has been limited by the large number of processors and memory requirements for their preliminary deterministic calculations and final Monte Carlo calculation. Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to reduce the memory requirements of CADIS and FW-CADIS without sacrificing their efficiency improvement. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as muchmore » geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility. Using these algorithms resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation and, additionally, increased the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation by a factor of at least 3.4. The three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved using an FW-CADIS simulation on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.« less

  7. Fully Differential Monte-Carlo Generator Dedicated to TMDs and Bessel-Weighted Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aghasyan, Mher M.; Avakian, Harut A.

    2013-10-01

    We present studies of double longitudinal spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator, which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model based on the fully differential cross section for the process. Additionally, we apply Bessel-weighting to the simulated events to extract transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and also discuss possible uncertainties due to kinematic correlation effects.

  8. Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC): Fundamentals and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Haixuan; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E

    2012-01-01

    The fundamentals of the framework and the details of each component of the self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) are presented. The strength of this new technique is the ability to simulate dynamic processes with atomistic fidelity that is comparable to molecular dynamics (MD) but on a much longer time scale. The observation that the dimer method preferentially finds the saddle point (SP) with the lowest energy is investigated and found to be true only for defects with high symmetry. In order to estimate the fidelity of dynamics and accuracy of the simulation time, a general criterion is proposed and applied to two representative problems. Applications of SEAKMC for investigating the diffusion of interstitials and vacancies in bcc iron are presented and compared directly with MD simulations, demonstrating that SEAKMC provides results that formerly could be obtained only through MD. The correlation factor for interstitial diffusion in the dumbbell configuration, which is extremely difficult to obtain using MD, is predicted using SEAKMC. The limitations of SEAKMC are also discussed. The paper presents a comprehensive picture of the SEAKMC method in both its unique predictive capabilities and technically important details.

  9. Monte Carlo Solution for Uncertainty Propagation in Particle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the International Conference on Math. and Comp. Methods Applied to Nucl. Sci. and Engg. (M&C 2013) held May 5-9, 2013 in Sun Valley, ID. Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories

  10. Monte Carlo simulation based study of a proposed multileaf collimator for a telecobalt machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahani, G.; Dash Sharma, P. K.; Hussain, S. A.; Dutt Sharma, Sunil; Sharma, D. N.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of the present work was to propose a design of a secondary multileaf collimator (MLC) for a telecobalt machine and optimize its design features through Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: The proposed MLC design consists of 72 leaves (36 leaf pairs) with additional jaws perpendicular to leaf motion having the capability of shaping a maximum square field size of 35 Multiplication-Sign 35 cm{sup 2}. The projected widths at isocenter of each of the central 34 leaf pairs and 2 peripheral leaf pairs are 10 and 5 mm, respectively. The ends of the leaves and the x-jaws were optimized to obtain acceptable values of dosimetric and leakage parameters. Monte Carlo N-Particle code was used for generating beam profiles and depth dose curves and estimating the leakage radiation through the MLC. A water phantom of dimension 50 Multiplication-Sign 50 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 3} with an array of voxels (4 Multiplication-Sign 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 0.6 cm{sup 3}= 0.72 cm{sup 3}) was used for the study of dosimetric and leakage characteristics of the MLC. Output files generated for beam profiles were exported to the PTW radiation field analyzer software through locally developed software for analysis of beam profiles in order to evaluate radiation field width, beam flatness, symmetry, and beam penumbra. Results: The optimized version of the MLC can define radiation fields of up to 35 Multiplication-Sign 35 cm{sup 2} within the prescribed tolerance values of 2 mm. The flatness and symmetry were found to be well within the acceptable tolerance value of 3%. The penumbra for a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} field size is 10.7 mm which is less than the generally acceptable value of 12 mm for a telecobalt machine. The maximum and average radiation leakage through the MLC were found to be 0.74% and 0.41% which are well below the International Electrotechnical Commission recommended tolerance values of 2% and 0.75%, respectively. The maximum leakage through the

  11. MO-G-BRF-09: Investigating Magnetic Field Dose Effects in Mice: A Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, A; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-linac treatments, radiation dose distributions are affected by magnetic fields, especially at high-density/low-density interfaces. Radiobiological consequences of magnetic field dose effects are presently unknown; therefore, preclinical studies are needed to ensure the safe clinical use of MRI-linacs. This study investigates the optimal combination of beam energy and magnetic field strength needed for preclinical murine studies. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a magnetic field when irradiating a mouse-sized lung phantom with a 1.0cmx1.0cm photon beam. Magnetic field effects were examined using various beam energies (225kVp, 662keV[Cs-137], and 1.25MeV[Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75T, 1.5T, and 3T). The resulting dose distributions were compared to Monte Carlo results for humans with various field sizes and patient geometries using a 6MV/1.5T MRI-linac. Results: In human simulations, the addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused an average dose increase of 49% (range:36%60%) to lung at the soft tissue-to-lung interface and an average dose decrease of 30% (range:25%36%) at the lung-to-soft tissue interface. In mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no effect on the 225kVp dose distribution. The dose increases for the Cs-137 beam were 12%, 33%, and 49% for 0.75T, 1.5T, and 3.0T magnetic fields, respectively while the dose decreases were 7%, 23%, and 33%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 14%, 45%, and 41%, and the dose decreases were 18%, 35%, and 35%. Conclusion: The magnetic field dose effects observed in mouse phantoms using a Co-60 beam with 1.5T or 3T fields and a Cs-137 beam with a 3T field compare well with those seen in simulated human treatments with an MRI-linac. These irradiator/magnet combinations are suitable for preclinical studies investigating potential biological effects of delivering radiation therapy in the presence of a magnetic field. Partially funded by Elekta.

  12. Accurate and precise determination of critical properties from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Bai, Peng; Allan, Douglas A.; Siepmann, J. Ilja

    2015-09-21

    Since the seminal paper by Panagiotopoulos [Mol. Phys. 61, 813 (1997)], the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) method has been the most popular particle-based simulation approach for the computation of vapor–liquid phase equilibria. However, the validity of GEMC simulations in the near-critical region has been questioned because rigorous finite-size scaling approaches cannot be applied to simulations with fluctuating volume. Valleau [Mol. Simul. 29, 627 (2003)] has argued that GEMC simulations would lead to a spurious overestimation of the critical temperature. More recently, Patel et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 024101 (2011)] opined that the use of analytical tail corrections would be problematic in the near-critical region. To address these issues, we perform extensive GEMC simulations for Lennard-Jones particles in the near-critical region varying the system size, the overall system density, and the cutoff distance. For a system with N = 5500 particles, potential truncation at 8σ and analytical tail corrections, an extrapolation of GEMC simulation data at temperatures in the range from 1.27 to 1.305 yields T{sub c} = 1.3128 ± 0.0016, ρ{sub c} = 0.316 ± 0.004, and p{sub c} = 0.1274 ± 0.0013 in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic limit determined by Potoff and Panagiotopoulos [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 10914 (1998)] using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling. Critical properties estimated using GEMC simulations with different overall system densities (0.296 ≤ ρ{sub t} ≤ 0.336) agree to within the statistical uncertainties. For simulations with tail corrections, data obtained using r{sub cut} = 3.5σ yield T{sub c} and p{sub c} that are higher by 0.2% and 1.4% than simulations with r{sub cut} = 5 and 8σ but still with overlapping 95% confidence intervals. In contrast, GEMC simulations with a truncated and shifted potential show that r{sub cut} = 8σ is insufficient to obtain accurate results. Additional GEMC simulations for hard

  13. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva-Rodrguez, Jess Aguiar, Pablo; Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela , 15782, Galicia; Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigacin Sanitarias , Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia ; Snchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Vctor; Corts, Julia; Garrido, Miguel; Pombar, Miguel; Ruibal, lvaro; Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigacin Sanitarias , Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia; Fundacin Tejerina, 28003, Madrid

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deible, Michael J.; Kessler, Melody; Gasperich, Kevin E.; Jordan, Kenneth D.

    2015-08-28

    The accurate calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer is a challenging theoretical problem. In this study, the binding energy of Be{sub 2} is calculated using the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method, using single Slater determinant and multiconfigurational trial functions. DMC calculations using single-determinant trial wave functions of orbitals obtained from density functional theory calculations overestimate the binding energy, while DMC calculations using Hartree-Fock or CAS(4,8), complete active space trial functions significantly underestimate the binding energy. In order to obtain an accurate value of the binding energy of Be{sub 2} from DMC calculations, it is necessary to employ trial functions that include excitations outside the valence space. Our best estimate DMC result for the binding energy of Be{sub 2}, obtained by using configuration interaction trial functions and extrapolating in the threshold for the configurations retained in the trial function, is 908 cm{sup −1}, only slightly below the 935 cm{sup −1} value derived from experiment.

  15. Benchmarking density functionals for hydrogen-helium mixtures with quantum Monte Carlo: Energetics, pressures, and forces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clay, Raymond C.; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.; Morales, Maguel A.

    2016-01-19

    An accurate understanding of the phase diagram of dense hydrogen and helium mixtures is a crucial component in the construction of accurate models of Jupiter, Saturn, and Jovian extrasolar planets. Though DFT based rst principles methods have the potential to provide the accuracy and computational e ciency required for this task, recent benchmarking in hydrogen has shown that achieving this accuracy requires a judicious choice of functional, and a quanti cation of the errors introduced. In this work, we present a quantum Monte Carlo based benchmarking study of a wide range of density functionals for use in hydrogen-helium mixtures atmore » thermodynamic conditions relevant for Jovian planets. Not only do we continue our program of benchmarking energetics and pressures, but we deploy QMC based force estimators and use them to gain insights into how well the local liquid structure is captured by di erent density functionals. We nd that TPSS, BLYP and vdW-DF are the most accurate functionals by most metrics, and that the enthalpy, energy, and pressure errors are very well behaved as a function of helium concentration. Beyond this, we highlight and analyze the major error trends and relative di erences exhibited by the major classes of functionals, and estimate the magnitudes of these e ects when possible.« less

  16. Directed nanoscale self-assembly of molecular wires interconnecting nodal points using Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boscoboinik, A. M.; Manzi, S. J.; Tysoe, W. T.; Pereyra, V. D.; Boscoboinik, J. A.

    2015-09-10

    The influence of directing agents in the self-assembly of molecular wires to produce two-dimensional electronic nanoarchitectures is studied here using a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the effect of arbitrarily locating nodal points on a surface, from which the growth of self-assembled molecular wires can be nucleated. This is compared to experimental results reported for the self-assembly of molecular wires when 1,4-phenylenediisocyanide (PDI) is adsorbed on Au(111). The latter results in the formation of (Au-PDI)n organometallic chains, which were shown to be conductive when linked between gold nanoparticles on an insulating substrate. The present study analyzes, by means of stochastic methods, the influence of variables that affect the growth and design of self-assembled conductive nanoarchitectures, such as the distance between nodes, coverage of the monomeric units that leads to the formation of the desired architectures, and the interaction between the monomeric units. As a result, this study proposes an approach and sets the stage for the production of complex 2D nanoarchitectures using a bottom-up strategy but including the use of current state-of-the-art top-down technology as an integral part of the self-assembly strategy.

  17. Directed nanoscale self-assembly of molecular wires interconnecting nodal points using Monte Carlo simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boscoboinik, A. M.; Manzi, S. J.; Tysoe, W. T.; Pereyra, V. D.; Boscoboinik, J. A.

    2015-09-10

    The influence of directing agents in the self-assembly of molecular wires to produce two-dimensional electronic nanoarchitectures is studied here using a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the effect of arbitrarily locating nodal points on a surface, from which the growth of self-assembled molecular wires can be nucleated. This is compared to experimental results reported for the self-assembly of molecular wires when 1,4-phenylenediisocyanide (PDI) is adsorbed on Au(111). The latter results in the formation of (Au-PDI)n organometallic chains, which were shown to be conductive when linked between gold nanoparticles on an insulating substrate. The present study analyzes, by means of stochasticmore » methods, the influence of variables that affect the growth and design of self-assembled conductive nanoarchitectures, such as the distance between nodes, coverage of the monomeric units that leads to the formation of the desired architectures, and the interaction between the monomeric units. As a result, this study proposes an approach and sets the stage for the production of complex 2D nanoarchitectures using a bottom-up strategy but including the use of current state-of-the-art top-down technology as an integral part of the self-assembly strategy.« less

  18. Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandervoort, Eric J. Cygler, Joanna E.; The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5; Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 ; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 ; La Russa, Daniel J.; The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Methods: Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Results: Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 5 cm{sup 2}. Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm ?-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.

  19. Development of Subspace-based Hybrid Monte Carlo-Deterministric Algorithms for Reactor Physics Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Zhang, Qiong

    2014-05-20

    The development of hybrid Monte-Carlo-Deterministic (MC-DT) approaches, taking place over the past few decades, have primarily focused on shielding and detection applications where the analysis requires a small number of responses, i.e. at the detector locations(s). This work further develops a recently introduced global variance reduction approach, denoted by the SUBSPACE approach is designed to allow the use of MC simulation, currently limited to benchmarking calculations, for routine engineering calculations. By way of demonstration, the SUBSPACE approach is applied to assembly level calculations used to generate the few-group homogenized cross-sections. These models are typically expensive and need to be executed in the order of 103 - 105 times to properly characterize the few-group cross-sections for downstream core-wide calculations. Applicability to k-eigenvalue core-wide models is also demonstrated in this work. Given the favorable results obtained in this work, we believe the applicability of the MC method for reactor analysis calculations could be realized in the near future.

  20. Accelerating Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation by differential evolution with self-adaptive randomized subspace sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Hyman, James M; Robinson, Bruce A; Higdon, Dave; Ter Braak, Cajo J F; Diks, Cees G H

    2008-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have found widespread use in many fields of study to estimate the average properties of complex systems, and for posterior inference in a Bayesian framework. Existing theory and experiments prove convergence of well constructed MCMC schemes to the appropriate limiting distribution under a variety of different conditions. In practice, however this convergence is often observed to be disturbingly slow. This is frequently caused by an inappropriate selection of the proposal distribution used to generate trial moves in the Markov Chain. Here we show that significant improvements to the efficiency of MCMC simulation can be made by using a self-adaptive Differential Evolution learning strategy within a population-based evolutionary framework. This scheme, entitled DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis or DREAM, runs multiple different chains simultaneously for global exploration, and automatically tunes the scale and orientation of the proposal distribution in randomized subspaces during the search. Ergodicity of the algorithm is proved, and various examples involving nonlinearity, high-dimensionality, and multimodality show that DREAM is generally superior to other adaptive MCMC sampling approaches. The DREAM scheme significantly enhances the applicability of MCMC simulation to complex, multi-modal search problems.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of adult and pediatric computed tomography exams: Validation studies of organ doses with physical phantoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Daniel J.; Lee, Choonsik; Tien, Christopher; Fisher, Ryan; Hoerner, Matthew R.; Hintenlang, David; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo source model of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT scanner using organ doses measured in physical anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The x-ray output of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX version 2.6. The resulting source model was able to perform various simulated axial and helical computed tomographic (CT) scans of varying scan parameters, including beam energy, filtration, pitch, and beam collimation. Two custom-built anthropomorphic phantoms were used to take dose measurements on the CT scanner: an adult male and a 9-month-old. The adult male is a physical replica of University of Florida reference adult male hybrid computational phantom, while the 9-month-old is a replica of University of Florida Series B 9-month-old voxel computational phantom. Each phantom underwent a series of axial and helical CT scans, during which organ doses were measured using fiber-optic coupled plastic scintillator dosimeters developed at University of Florida. The physical setup was reproduced and simulated in MCNPX using the CT source model and the computational phantoms upon which the anthropomorphic phantoms were constructed. Average organ doses were then calculated based upon these MCNPX results. Results: For all CT scans, good agreement was seen between measured and simulated organ doses. For the adult male, the percent differences were within 16% for axial scans, and within 18% for helical scans. For the 9-month-old, the percent differences were all within 15% for both the axial and helical scans. These results are comparable to previously published validation studies using GE scanners and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms. Conclusions: Overall results of this study show that the Monte Carlo source model can be used to accurately and reliably calculate organ doses for patients undergoing a variety of axial or helical CT

  2. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen; Sawkey, Daren

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. Methods: In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, R{sub p}, and R{sub p+} for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Results: Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, and R{sub p} were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. Conclusions: We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo estimation of complex-time correlations for the study of the ground-state dynamic structure function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rota, R.; Casulleras, J.; Mazzanti, F.; Boronat, J.

    2015-03-21

    We present a method based on the path integral Monte Carlo formalism for the calculation of ground-state time correlation functions in quantum systems. The key point of the method is the consideration of time as a complex variable whose phase δ acts as an adjustable parameter. By using high-order approximations for the quantum propagator, it is possible to obtain Monte Carlo data all the way from purely imaginary time to δ values near the limit of real time. As a consequence, it is possible to infer accurately the spectral functions using simple inversion algorithms. We test this approach in the calculation of the dynamic structure function S(q, ω) of two one-dimensional model systems, harmonic and quartic oscillators, for which S(q, ω) can be exactly calculated. We notice a clear improvement in the calculation of the dynamic response with respect to the common approach based on the inverse Laplace transform of the imaginary-time correlation function.

  4. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W; Grove, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  5. Monte Carlo determination of the low-energy constants of a spin-(1/2) Heisenberg model with spatial anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, F.-J.; Nyfeler, M.; Kaempfer, F.

    2009-07-15

    Motivated by the possible mechanism for the pinning of the electronic liquid crystal direction in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.45} as proposed by Pardini et al. [Phys. Rev. B 78, 024439 (2008)], we use the first-principles Monte Carlo method to study the spin-(1/2) Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic couplings J{sub 1} and J{sub 2} on the square lattice. In particular, the low-energy constants spin stiffness {rho}{sub s}, staggered magnetization M{sub s}, and spin wave velocity c are determined by fitting the Monte Carlo data to the predictions of magnon chiral perturbation theory. Further, the spin stiffnesses {rho}{sub s1} and {rho}{sub s2} as a function of the ratio J{sub 2}/J{sub 1} of the couplings are investigated in detail. Although we find a good agreement between our results with those obtained by the series expansion method in the weakly anisotropic regime, for strong anisotropy we observe discrepancies.

  6. SU-E-T-586: Field Size Dependence of Output Factor for Uniform Scanning Proton Beams: A Comparison of TPS Calculation, Measurement and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Y; Singh, H; Islam, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Output dependence on field size for uniform scanning beams, and the accuracy of treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are not well studied. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dependence of output on field size for uniform scanning beams and compare it among TPS calculation, measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Field size dependence was studied using various field sizes between 2.5 cm diameter to 10 cm diameter. The field size factor was studied for a number of proton range and modulation combinations based on output at the center of spread out Bragg peak normalized to a 10 cm diameter field. Three methods were used and compared in this study: 1) TPS calculation, 2) ionization chamber measurement, and 3) Monte Carlos simulation. The XiO TPS (Electa, St. Louis) was used to calculate the output factor using a pencil beam algorithm; a pinpoint ionization chamber was used for measurements; and the Fluka code was used for Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The field size factor varied with proton beam parameters, such as range, modulation, and calibration depth, and could decrease over 10% from a 10 cm to 3 cm diameter field for a large range proton beam. The XiO TPS predicted the field size factor relatively well at large field size, but could differ from measurements by 5% or more for small field and large range beams. Monte Carlo simulations predicted the field size factor within 1.5% of measurements. Conclusion: Output factor can vary largely with field size, and needs to be accounted for accurate proton beam delivery. This is especially important for small field beams such as in stereotactic proton therapy, where the field size dependence is large and TPS calculation is inaccurate. Measurements or Monte Carlo simulations are recommended for output determination for such cases.

  7. A User's Manual for MASH V1.5 - A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. O. Slater; J. M. Barnes; J. O. Johnson; J.D. Drischler

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo ~djoint ~ielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma- ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air- over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system includes the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. The current version, MASH v 1.5, is the successor to the original MASH v 1.0 code system initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the "dose importance" of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response as a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem.

  8. Structural Stability and Defect Energetics of ZnO from Diffusion Quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kim, Jeongnim; Kent, Paul R.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2015-04-28

    We have applied the many-body ab-initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to study Zn and ZnO crystals under pressure, and the energetics of the oxygen vacancy, zinc interstitial and hydrogen impurities in ZnO. We show that DMC is an accurate and practical method that can be used to characterize multiple properties of materials that are challenging for density functional theory approximations. DMC agrees with experimental measurements to within 0.3 eV, including the band-gap of ZnO, the ionization potential of O and Zn, and the atomization energy of O2, ZnO dimer, and wurtzite ZnO. DMC predicts the oxygen vacancy as a deep donor with a formation energy of 5.0(2) eV under O-rich conditions and thermodynamic transition levels located between 1.8 and 2.5 eV from the valence band maximum. Our DMC results indicate that the concentration of zinc interstitial and hydrogen impurities in ZnO should be low under n-type, and Zn- and H-rich conditions because these defects have formation energies above 1.4 eV under these conditions. Comparison of DMC and hybrid functionals shows that these DFT approximations can be parameterized to yield a general correct qualitative description of ZnO. However, the formation energy of defects in ZnO evaluated with DMC and hybrid functionals can differ by more than 0.5 eV.

  9. Structural Stability and Defect Energetics of ZnO from Diffusion Quantum Monte Carlo

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kim, Jeongnim; Kent, Paul R.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2015-04-28

    We have applied the many-body ab-initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to study Zn and ZnO crystals under pressure, and the energetics of the oxygen vacancy, zinc interstitial and hydrogen impurities in ZnO. We show that DMC is an accurate and practical method that can be used to characterize multiple properties of materials that are challenging for density functional theory approximations. DMC agrees with experimental measurements to within 0.3 eV, including the band-gap of ZnO, the ionization potential of O and Zn, and the atomization energy of O2, ZnO dimer, and wurtzite ZnO. DMC predicts the oxygen vacancy asmore » a deep donor with a formation energy of 5.0(2) eV under O-rich conditions and thermodynamic transition levels located between 1.8 and 2.5 eV from the valence band maximum. Our DMC results indicate that the concentration of zinc interstitial and hydrogen impurities in ZnO should be low under n-type, and Zn- and H-rich conditions because these defects have formation energies above 1.4 eV under these conditions. Comparison of DMC and hybrid functionals shows that these DFT approximations can be parameterized to yield a general correct qualitative description of ZnO. However, the formation energy of defects in ZnO evaluated with DMC and hybrid functionals can differ by more than 0.5 eV.« less

  10. Minibeam radiation therapy for the management of osteosarcomas: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martnez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) exploits the well-established tissue-sparing effect provided by the combination of submillimetric field sizes and a spatial fractionation of the dose. The aim of this work is to evaluate the feasibility and potential therapeutic gain of MBRT, in comparison with conventional radiotherapy, for osteosarcoma treatments. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE/PENEASY code) were used as a method to study the dose distributions resulting from MBRT irradiations of a rat femur and a realistic human femur phantoms. As a figure of merit, peak and valley doses and peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) were assessed. Conversion of absorbed dose to normalized total dose (NTD) was performed in the human case. Several field sizes and irradiation geometries were evaluated. Results: It is feasible to deliver a uniform dose distribution in the target while the healthy tissue benefits from a spatial fractionation of the dose. Very high PVDR values (?20) were achieved in the entrance beam path in the rat case. PVDR values ranged from 2 to 9 in the human phantom. NTD{sub 2.0} of 87 Gy might be reached in the tumor in the human femur while the healthy tissues might receive valley NTD{sub 2.0} lower than 20 Gy. The doses in the tumor and healthy tissues might be significantly higher and lower than the ones commonly delivered used in conventional radiotherapy. Conclusions: The obtained dose distributions indicate that a gain in normal tissue sparing might be expected. This would allow the use of higher (and potentially curative) doses in the tumor. Biological experiments are warranted.