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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish, Wildlife & Parks Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-0701 Phone number 406-444-2535 Website http://fwp.mt.gov/doingBusines Coordinates 46.586864°, -112.01525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.586864,"lon":-112.01525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks 490 North Meridian Road  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish and Wildlife Office, Boise, Idaho, Pacific Region, Portland, Oregon. USWS.. 1999. Status review Department of the Interior IDAHO FISH AND WILDLIFE OFFICE 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Room 368 Boise, Idaho 83709 Inspector General Report disclosing irregularities in development of its 2005 bull trout final critical

3

Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

Drais, Gregory

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Studies of fish passage through culverts in Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and biological criteria. Fish Passage Development andHeritage Program and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks,G.M. 1995. Nonanadromous fish passage in highway culverts.

Blank, Matt; Cahoon, Joel; Burford, Drake; McMahon, Tom; Stein, Otto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

EA-1932: Bass Lake Native Fish Restoration, Eureka, Lincoln County, Montana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA was initiated to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to help restore native fish populations to the Tobacco River and Lake Koocanusa. The project has been cancelled.

6

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Kootenai River Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project : Long-term Bighorn Sheep/Mule Deer Winter and Spring Habitat Improvement Project : Wildlife Mitigation Project, Libby Dam, Montana : Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Libby hydroelectric project, located on the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana, resulted in several impacts to the wildlife communities which occupied the habitats inundated by Lake Koocanusa. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, in cooperation with the other management agencies, developed an impact assessment and a wildlife and wildlife habitat mitigation plan for the Libby hydroelectric facility. In response to the mitigation plan, Bonneville Power Administration funded a cooperative project between the Kootenai National Forest and Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to develop a long-term habitat enhancement plan for the bighorn sheep and mule deer winter and spring ranges adjacent to Lake Koocanusa. The project goal is to rehabilitate 3372 acres of bighorn sheep and 16,321 acres of mule deer winter and spring ranges on Kootenai National Forest lands adjacent to Lake Koocanusa and to monitor and evaluate the effects of implementing this habitat enhancement work. 2 refs.

Yde, Chis

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish and wildlife agencies are facing the challenge of balancing the known and potential impacts to wildlife from lead in spent ammunition and sport fishing tackle with the public perception of the lead issue. Reports about the effect of lead on wildlife, the environment, and/or human health whether real or perceived create social, political and legal pressure to act. Fish and

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: 1: Environmental Analyses DOE/EIS-0312 April 2003 Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0312) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Title of Proposed Action: Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan States and Provinces Involved: Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, and British Columbia Abstract: Despite the efforts of BPA and other regional entities in the Pacific Northwest, some populations of fish and wildlife continue to decline. Reasons for the lack of success include the following: different groups have different values and priorities; there is no clear and agreed-upon scientific answer; and there are conflicting

11

Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Notices My stuff Energy blogs Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon Fish and Wildlife Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(150) Contributor 4 September,...

12

Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name Fish and Wildlife Service Place Washington, DC Year founded 1940 Phone number (303) 275-2370 Website http://www.fws.gov/ Coordinates 38.8951118°, -77.0363658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8951118,"lon":-77.0363658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: 2: Appendices DOE/EIS-0312 April 2003 Appendix A Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles for Bonneville Power Administration Rates and Contracts Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Appendix A: Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles Appendix A/ 1 Appendix A FISH AND WILDLIFE FUNDING PRINCIPLES FOR BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION RATES AND CONTRACTS September 16, 1998 Preamble The purpose of these principles is to conclude the fish and wildlife funding process in which Bonneville has been engaged with various interests in the Region, and provide a set of guidelines for structuring Bonneville's subscription and power rate processes. The principles are intended to "keep the options open" for future fish and wildlife decisions that are anticipated to be made in late 1999 on reconfiguration of the hydrosystem and in

15

Montana Rangeland Resources Act (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Montana Rangeland Resources Act establishes a program of rangeland management, to preserve Montana rangeland for livestock, wildlife habitat, high-quality water production, pollution control,...

16

Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material:...

17

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of volumes that together comprise a Recovery and Subbasin Plan for Washington lower Columbia River salmon Subbasin Plans Subbasin vision, assessments, and management plan for each of 12 Washington lower Columbia of Engineers Lee VanTussenbrook, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board

19

EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan 2: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan SUMMARY In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with the benefit of public comment and participation, BPA has developed and proposes a Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) that substantially combines elements of the Weak Stock and Sustainable Use alternatives and that falls within the established range of potential Policy Direction alternatives. This FEIS evaluates the environmental consequences of BPA's implementation and funding of sample actions that could emerge from any of the Policy Directions. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 26, 2012 EIS-0312: Notice of Availability of the Bonneville Power Administration

20

Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the central effort to protect and restore habitat and avoid adverse impacts to native fish and wildlife

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Fish and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on AddThis.com...

22

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place Salem, Oregon Zip 97303 Phone number 800-720-ODFW Website http://www.dfw.state.or.us/ Coordinates 44.974582°, -123.020498° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.974582,"lon":-123.020498,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of combustion turbine power plants (Table 1) should allow these plants to be developed "from scratch," providing, 1994 C-5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Table 1 Representative Combustion Turbine Power Plant Development as well as the effects of contingencies in large thermal plant operation and intertie availability were

24

Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program (Water Entity); National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Launched in 2002, the Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program (CBWTP) is anticipated to be a five-year effort to test new strategies for enhancing tributary flows. The premise of the CBWTP is that water can most readily be made available for instream flows not by attempting to regulate senior water users but, instead, by acquiring water rights from willing sellers and transferring those rights to instream flows within the prior appropriation framework ('first in time, first in right'). The primary goals for this water initiative included: (1) To implement Action 151 of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion on the Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. (2) To implement Provision A.8 of the Council's 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program related to securing water for instream flows. (3) To integrate components of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Program and Watershed Assessment process with the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion. (4) To ensure actions taken under the program would be effective, fiscally efficient, and biologically beneficial to fish and wildlife in the region. In the spring of 2002, BPA and a group of water experts selected ten local entities in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana with a demonstrated potential to innovate and implement tributary flow improvements. We also selected the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) to serve as the regional entity for this initiative. BPA then set up the funding agreement and scope of work to establish what is now known as the Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program. In FY 2003, BPA provided over $1.5 million in funding to the CBWTP and approved 33 water transactions. In FY 2004, BPA will provide up to $4 million to the project to enhance habitat. Thanks to the dedicated efforts of partners throughout the Basin, the CBWTP is off to a strong start in improving tributary flows in key areas across the region.

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Volume 3: Sample Implementation Actions, Research Monitoring and Evaluation, and Policy and Planning Volume 3/ 1 VOLUME 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING One of the major challenges within the Region has been understanding the interrelationships among the numerous proposed fish and wildlife mitigation and recovery actions. One reason for this difficulty is that these actions are derived from many different regional proposals, each of which has been designed to meet a specific goal. In addition, the lack of an effective tool to illustrate these interrelationships has hampered understanding.

26

US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

GRR/Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies [[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife]] Regulations & Policies Oregon Administrative Rules 635-415-0025 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedures required when a project will

28

Division of Fish and Wildlife Programs, 1984-1985 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes the organization and functions of the Division of Fish and Wildlife, and lists the projects conducted during FY 1985. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2003 1, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33) Ron Morinaka Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Gooderich Bayou Culvert Replacement (Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program) Project No: 1991-019-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 8.2 Control of Predators and Nuisance Animals - Removal or Reduction of Undesirable Wildlife Species. Location: Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish,

30

Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia October 7, 2013 - 10:09am Addthis Photo of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective. The passive solar design features include an east-west orientation that provides good solar exposure. In winter, large southern windows capture solar gain and brick floors behind windows store heat. Windows are made of

32

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) GRR/Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-MT-b - Montana Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 87-5-501 et seq Montana Stream Protection Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17MTBMontanaStreamProtectionActSPA124Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Montana has a policy to preserve fish and wildlife habitat as well as

33

Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Annual Report--2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) Biodiversity Conservation areas Reserve selection Stochastic programming

McGuire, A. David

34

Final Department of Energy US Fish & Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Memorandum of Understanding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

between between THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Regarding Implementation of Executive Order 13186, "Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds" Prepared by: United States Department of Energy and United States Fish and Wildlife Service September 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING between THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Regarding Implementation of Executive Order 13186, "Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds" This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by and between the United States Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) and the United States Department of the Interior,

35

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.); Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Division of Fish and Wildlife Program Summary, 1985-1986 Progress Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the organization of the Division of Fish and Wildlife programs of Bonneville Power Administration, its budget, and research programs funded by it during FY 1986. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana) Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana) Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks Department Game preserves and closed areas exist within the state of Montana for the

39

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below Libby Dam. The reservoir operation in spring largely works toward project refill while otherwise operations in the mid-Columbia River to support fall Chinook spawning and rearing in the Hanford Reach to fish. Action item F&W-2 (see the Action Plan) calls for the Council to work with fish and wildlife

40

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 1, 2011 June 1, 2011 CX-005969: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks for Purchase of the Perry Creek Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/01/2011 Location(s): Lake County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration May 6, 2011 CX-005842: Categorical Exclusion Determination Anaconda Substation 3G Radio Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 05/06/2011 Location(s): Deer Lodge County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration April 15, 2011 CX-005675: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiscal Year 2011 Kalispell District Wood Pole Replacement Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/15/2011 Location(s): Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 29, 2011 CX-005529: Categorical Exclusion Determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wildlife affected by the development, operation, and management of [hydropower] facilities while assuring and financially viable Bonneville Power Administration is essential to carrying out those purposes. The Council

42

FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 The definitions in this list have no legal significance and are provided only for clarification of terms used  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOSSARY FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 GLOSSARY The definitions in this list have flow. baseload #12;GLOSSARY December 14, 1994 G-2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM In a demand sense, a load

43

Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

Yde, Chris A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Notes From the Chair 2 Fish and Wildlife Amendment 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Rather like turning over a compost pile, upwelling brings nutrients up to feed the organisms that fish

46

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2001 fishing season has been especially successful with great fishing for both rainbow and kokanee throughout Lake Roosevelt. The results of the Two Rivers Fishing Derby identified 100 percent of the rainbow and 47 percent of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin.

Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with kokanee production. Fish food, materials, and other supplies associated with this program are also funded by BPA. Other funds from BPA will also improve water quality and supply at the Ford Hatchery, enabling the increased fall kokanee fingerling program. Monitoring and evaluation of the Ford stocking programs will include existing WDFW creel and lake survey programs to assess resident trout releases in trout managed waters. BPA is also funding a creel survey to assess the harvest of hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 11, 2002 June 11, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25) Ron Morinaka, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Purchase of Fisher River Conservation Easement (Fiscal Years 2002-2004) Project No: 2002-044-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: near Libby, Lincoln County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a portion of the cost of a conservation easement on 56,400 acres of land along the Fisher River to preclude development

52

United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvement in storage charac- teri tic i obtained thereby. nle s keep- ing quality of dehydrated fi h can Fe search. vol. 9, DO. 4, pp. 319-327, July- st. Coen, Camillo. 1931. Preserving fish. French Patent and Industrial Re- search, British Ministry of Food, unpublished report, pp. 1-16, June. Scott, Geo. G

53

Record of Decision for the Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0312) (10/31/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FISH AND WILDLIFE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FISH AND WILDLIFE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT ADMINISTRATOR'S RECORD OF DECISION Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt the Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) Policy Direction in its Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Environmental Impact Statement (FWIP EIS, DOE/EIS-0312, April 2003) as a comprehensive and consistent policy to guide the implementation and funding of the agency's fish and wildlife mitigation and recovery efforts. PA 2002 focuses on enhancing fish and wildlife habitat, modifying hydro operations and structures, and reforming hatcheries to both increase populations of listed fish stocks and provide long-term harvest opportunities. PA 2002 reflects regional fish and wildlife policy guidance and

54

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring for Washington Department of Wildlife, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The augmented fish health monitoring project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with the mandate to collect fish health data on anadromous fish stocks of the BPA Columbia River Basin in a standardized manner. The project began in 1986 and the data reported here was collected in the fourth year. This segment of the project was carried out by the Washington Department of Wildlife and summarizes fish health findings at anadromous game fish hatcheries in Washington State operated by the BPA. Information gathered to data has provided impetus to alter facility design and management practices for improved fish health through prevention. Treatment efficacy can be better assessed due to the monthly monitoring of fish stocks and insight is being gained into disease prevention and control. The ultimate goal, of course, is to improve fish health for better survival in the wild. Tagged returns at index hatcheries within this project area will provide some indication of the impact of improving fish health on providing greater adult returns as well as an improved product for the fishery. 3 refs., 2 figs., 16 tabs.

Kerwin, John L.; Roberts, Steve; Oman, Leni; Bolding, Bruce

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring for Washington Department of Wildlife, 1988 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The augmented fish health monitoring project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration with the mandate to collect fish health data on anadromous fish stocks of the Columbia River Basin in a standardized manner. The project began in 1986 and the data reported here was collected in the third year. This segment of the project was carried out by the Washington Department of Wildlife and summarizes fish health findings at anadromous game hatcheries in Washington State operated by the BPA. Information gathered to date has provided impetus to alter facility design and management practices for improved fish health through prevention. Treatment efficacy can be better assessed due to the monthly monitoring of fish stocks and insight is being gained into disease prevention and control. The ultimate goal, of course, is to improve fish health for better survival in the wild. Tagged returns at index hatcheries within this project area will indicate the impact of improving fish health on providing greater adult returns as well as an improved product for the fishery. 2 refs., 3 figs., 15 tabs.

Gearheard, Jim

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status for resident fish projects currently implemented by the Bonneville Power Administration under the amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Projects that have been in place for a sufficient length of time are discussed in greater detail with a brief evaluation presented.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents a brief synopsis and discussion of wildlife activities undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration. The objectives of the program were wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Review of BPA Funded Sturgeon, Resident Fish and Wildlife Projects for 1990/1991.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) held a public meeting on November 19--21, 1991, for the purpose of review, coordination, and consultation of the BPA-funded projects for sturgeon, resident fish, and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin (Basin). The comments received after the meeting were favorable and the participants agreed that the meeting was stimulating and productive. The information exchanged should lead to better coordination with other projects throughout the Basin. This document list the projects by title, the project leaders and BPA's project officers, and an abstract of each leader's presentation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

refuge showcases wetland areas and forests that are home to a myriad of migra- refuge showcases wetland areas and forests that are home to a myriad of migra- tory birds and other wildlife. The design team's vision became a reality when the new visitor's center opened its doors in 2010. The 5,879-square foot building provides a starting point for visi- tors to to learn about the wildlife on the refuge. The facility also houses hands-on exhibits, office and classroom space, and a nature-themed store. "The design of this visitor center exemplifies the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's commitment to lowering our carbon footprint," said Libby Herland, Project Leader, Eastern Massachusetts National Wildlife Refuge Complex. "We want this center to help promote the importance of environmental stewardship and connect the public with the beauty

63

Montana Rivers Information System : Edit/Entry Program User's Manual.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Montana Rivers Information System (MRIS) was initiated to assess the state`s fish, wildlife, and recreation value; and natural cultural, and geologic features. The MRIS is now a set of data bases containing part of the information in the Natural Heritage Program natural features and threatened and endangered species data bases and comprises of the Montana Interagency Stream Fisheries Database; the MDFWP Recreation Database; and the MDFWP Wildlife Geographic Information System. The purpose of this User`s Manual is to describe to the user how to maintain the MRIS database of their choice by updating, changing, deleting, and adding records using the edit/entry programs; and to provide to the user all information and instructions necessary to complete data entry into the MRIS databases.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Review of BPA Funded Sturgeon, Resident Fish and Wildlife Projects, 1989/1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) held a public meeting on November 6-7, 1990, for the purpose of review, coordination, and consultation of the BPA-funded projects for sturgeon, resident fish, and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin (Basin). The comments received after the meeting were favorable and the participants agreed that the meeting was stimulating and productive. The information exchanged should lead to better coordination with other projects throughout the Basin. The following pages list the projects by title, the project leaders and BPA's project officers, and an abstract of each leaders presentation. These summaries are in some cases preliminary; they are subject to change and should not be quoted without consulting the project leader.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Atlas of coal/minerals and important resource problem areas for fish and wildlife in the conterminous United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atlas highlights areas in the conterminous US of potential concern involving coal and minerals development activities and fish and wildlife resources, in particular the Important Resource Problem Areas (IRPs) designated in 1980 by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as areas of emphasis in policymaking. The atlas serves as an initial screening tool for national and regional planners and administrators to help define areas that may require additional analysis prior to development in order to minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish and wildlife resources and to protect and enhance these resources where practicable. The publication contains maps of selected mineral resources (coal, copper, geothermal resources, gold, iron, molybdenum, nickel, oil shale/tar sands, peat, phosphate, silver, uranium), IRPs, and Federal Endangered and Threatened Animal Species. An overlay of the IRP map is provided: by placing this on a mineral map, counties containing both mineral and wildlife resources will be highlighted. Background information on IRPs, the mineral commodities, and environmental impacts of mineral mining is provided, as well as appendices which tabulate the data displayed in the maps. The document can also be used with a series of 1:7,500,000-scale reproductions of the maps.

Honig, R.A.; Olson, R.J.; Mason, W.T. Jr.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1990-1994 Investigations of Fish Entrainment Through Libby Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated fish entrainment through Libby Dam from December 1990 to June 1994. This study was one portion of the effort by the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to quantify Libby Dam operations necessary to maintain or enhance Libby Reservoir fisheries.

Skaar, Don

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were done to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear 200,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake.

Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Montana Rivers Information System : Edit/Entry Program User's Manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Montana Rivers Information System (MRIS) was initiated to assess the state`s fish, wildlife, and recreation value; and natural cultural, and geologic features. The MRIS is now a set of data bases containing part of the information in the Natural Heritage Program natural features and threatened and endangered species data bases and comprises of the Montana Interagency Stream Fisheries Database; the MDFWP Recreation Database; and the MDFWP Wildlife Geographic Information System. The purpose of this User`s Manual is to describe to the user how to maintain the MRIS database of their choice by updating, changing, deleting, and adding records using the edit/entry programs; and to provide to the user all information and instructions necessary to complete data entry into the MRIS databases.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2004 14, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Proposed Weaver Slough Conservation Easement Project No: 2002-042 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS [page A/2]): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Flathead River System, Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Flathead Land Trust Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that

75

Fabricate and Install Yakima Basin Phase II Fish Screens; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2006 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to restore ESA listed and resident fish stocks within the Yakima Basin by preventing mortality and/or injury to all life stages of anadromous and resident fish at irrigation diversions. This goal is being accomplished through an on-going effort by the Yakima Basin Phase II Technical Work Group (TWG), which is comprised of local, state, federal, tribal and private groups who prioritize and assign screening projects.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Staff, (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring for Washington Department of Wildlife; Five-year Project Report, 1986-1991 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with the mandate to collect fish health data on the anadromous fish stocks of the Columbia River Basin in a standardized manner. The Washington Department of Wildlife began the project in 1986. Cumulative data and a final summary for this project are presented in this document. Fish stocks were examined monthly for length, weight, and health status at all Washington Department of Wildlife Columbia River Basin hatcheries. Assays for specific fish pathogens were conducted on all stocks of broodfish and smolts in the study area. Pathogens of interest were replicating viral agents, erythrocytic inclusion body syndrome virus (EIBSV), and Renibacterium salmoninarum. Sea-run cutthroat (SCT) were also sampled midway through the rearing cycle for R. salmoninarum. Juvenile fish were examined for the presence of any pathogen. Assays for Myxobolus cerebralis were conducted on fish stocks in several locations along the Columbia River. An organosomatic index analysis was made on each stock of smolts at the Cowlitz and Wells hatcheries. Results of the organosomatic index analysis were consistent between the years at each facility. However, the fish reared at Cowlitz displayed tissue changes associated with ceratomyxosis while those reared at Wells had a more desirable color and quality. Cell culture assays for viral agents in broodfish were positive for infectious hematopoeitic necrosis virus (IHNV) in all stocks at the Cowlitz Hatchery four out of five years in the study. Other stations were less consistent over the years. Only the sea-run cutthroat stock spawned at Beaver Creek was negative for any virus. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was isolated from summer-run steelhead (SS) broodfish at Wells in 1989 and 1991 and at Yakima in 1991. Inclusions that are characteristic of EIBSV were found in red blood cells of brood fish from the Wells Hatchery in 1990 and 1991. Data collected on EIBSV during the first two years of the project cannot be compared with the later three years due to changes in laboratory protocol. Isolations of IHNV in smolts were made from Cowlitz and Skamania hatcheries and the Gobar Rearing Pond. Epizootics of IHN occurred at Lyons Ferry, Beaver Creek, Cowlitz and Skamania hatcheries during the project, EIBSV inclusions were identified in very low levels from smolts from Beaver Creek, Chelan, Cowlitz, Eastbank, and Ringold. Assays for R. salmoninarum on broodfish and smolts revealed very low levels of infection and the disease was not a problem. Enteric redmouth disease was not observed in the project area. Cytophaga psychrophila was a chronic problem in young fish at Vancouver, Beaver Creek and Cowlitz hatcheries. Ceratomyxa Shasta was the only reportable parasite observed in the fish within the study area and caused yearly outbreaks of ceratomyxosis at the Cowlitz Hatchery. Fish at the Beaver Creek Hatchery were treated for furunculosis three of the five years of the project. An ozone water treatment plant has been installed to minimize the disease. Flow and density indexes and feed conversion did not vary significantly at the hatcheries during this project. Egg mortality averaged 12.94% throughout the project with a range from 4.39% to 29.10%. The mean fry mortality during the project was 15.08% with a range of 2.01 to 37.43%. The overall mortality for early rearing was 20.43%. Prespawning broodstock mortality was recorded for SS and SCT and averaged 5.18% with a range from 0 to 38.8%. Fungal invasion was the primary cause of death in adult fish. Epizootics of furunculosis, ceratomyxosis, bacterial coldwater disease, and IHN occurred during the project. Fewer cases were reported in more recent years. The BPA augmented fish health project helped WDW identify problem areas in fish health while they were occurring. This knowledge allowed us to develop strategies for improved fish quality. Overall the project has been invaluable in assisting us in the improvement of the health of our fish.

Kerwin, John; Roberts, Steve; Oman, Leni; Bolding, Bruce

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

DOE/EIS-0312; Bonneville Power Administration, Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Draft EIS (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft EIS Draft EIS "Piecing The Puzzle Together" DOE/EIS-0312 June 2001 B i o l o g i c a l O p i n i o n s P u b l i c B e n e f i t s P a c i f i c S a l m o n T r e a t y C o l u m b i a R i v e r F i s h e r y M a n a g e m e n t P l a n S t a t e P la n s T r i b a l P l a n s A r t i f i c i a l P r o p a g a t i o n B . A . L o w e r S n a k e F e a s i b i l i t y S t u d y E I S Wy-Kan-Ush- Mi Wa- Kush-Wit P o w e r C o u n c i l P l a n M O A ( M e m o r a n d u m o f A g r e e m e n t ) F e d e r a l C a u c u s A l l H P a p e r Wildlife Program EIS F r a m e w o r k P a p e r W a t e r s h e d M g m t . P r o g r a m E I S S O R E I S ( S y s t e m O p e r a t io n s R e v i e w ) BPA Business Plan EIS I C B E M P E I S ( I n t e r io r C o l u m b ia B a s in E c o s y s t e m M g m t . P r o je c t ) Governance Structure C a n a d i a n I s s u e s P r i v a t e I n t e r e s t s C o m m e r c i a l I n t e r e s t s ? ? Volume 1: Environmental Analyses Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan DEIS Cover Sheet Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0312) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

79

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Montana Rivers Information System: Edit/entry program user`s manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Montana Rivers Information System (MRIS) was initiated to assess the state`s fish, wildlife, and recreation value; and natural cultural and geologic features. The MRIS is now a set of data bases containing part of the information in the Natural Heritage Program natural features and threatened and endangered species data bases. The purpose of this User`s Manual is to: (1) describe to the user how to maintain the MRIS database of their choice by updating, changing, deleting, and adding records using the edit/entry programs; and (2) provide to the user all information and instructions necessary to complete data entry into the MRIS databases.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ARIZONA COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT OCTOBER 2005 Upper Temperature Tolerance of Loach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tolerance. Furthermore, the results of a low-cost method may be useful for identifying the range (45% protein), and 2 parts tropical fish flakes made from brine shrimp, bloodmeal, and spirulina (40 costs associated with remaining at temperatures close to the upper thermal limit for a long period

Bonar, Scott A.

82

ARIZONA COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT SEPTEMBER 2005 TTrraannssppoorrtt aanndd CCaarree ooff SSmmaallll  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, recent studies suggest that spermatogenesis can be energetically costly, and therefore limit male. Fish were fed O.S.I. Spirulina Flake mixed with O.S.I. Freshwater Flake food (Ocean Start International that sperm is costly and may be more costly for smaller males. Relative to larger males, smaller males have

Bonar, Scott A.

83

Montana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana State Regulations: Montana State of Montana The Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation (MBOGC) is a quasi-judicial body that is attached to the Department of Natural...

84

Mining (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section provides general rules and regulations pertaining to mining practices in the state of Montana. It addresses mining locations and claims, procedures for rights-of-way and eminent domain...

85

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and central Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The goal is to determine how the detection The Washington Unit

86

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

87

Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State...

88

Montana Clean Renewable Energy Bond Act (Montana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Renewable Energy Bond Act (Montana) Montana Clean Renewable Energy Bond Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility StateProvincial Govt Local Government Tribal Government Savings...

89

Post-Closure Land Jurisdiction Transfer to the US Fish and Wildlife Service at Rocky Flats: Surviving the Safari Through Old Records and Other Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Rocky Flats Site (Rocky Flats), located near Denver, Colorado, was listed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Subsequent cleanup and closure activities were completed in October 2005 and the final remedy was selected in September 2006. The remedy is 'no further action' for the generally un-impacted Peripheral Operable Unit (OU), formerly known as the Buffer Zone, and institutional and physical controls with continued monitoring for the Central OU, formerly the industrialized area. The Peripheral OU has been deleted from the NPL and jurisdiction over the majority of land in that OU (3,953 acres) was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) on July 12, 2007, to establish the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge. The remaining approximately 929 acres in the Peripheral OU were retained by DOE's Office of Legacy Management where outstanding mineral leases and mining operations exist. As mineral rights are purchased or mining operations and mineral leases are completed and fully reclaimed, jurisdiction of portions of the 929 acres will also be transferred to USFWS for inclusion into the refuge. During the almost 2 years since cleanup and closure work was completed at Rocky Flats, DOE and USFWS have worked the specific legal parameters, timing, and constraints of the 3,953-acre transfer. Many lessons have been learned, based on these early experiences. (authors)

Schiesswohl, S. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, CO (United States); Hanson, M. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Westminster, CO (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Methodologies for Assessing the Cumulative Environmental Effects of Hydroelectric Development of Fish and Wildlife in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1, Recommendations, 1987 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume is the first of a two-part set addressing methods for assessing the cumulative effects of hydropower development on fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Species and habitats potentially affected by cumulative impacts are identified for the basin, and the most significant effects of hydropower development are presented. Then, current methods for measuring and assessing single-project effects are reviewed, followed by a review of methodologies with potential for use in assessing the cumulative effects associated with multiple projects. Finally, two new approaches for cumulative effects assessment are discussed in detail. Overall, this report identifies and reviews the concepts, factors, and methods necessary for understanding and conducting a cumulative effects assessment in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 will present a detailed procedural handbook for performing a cumulative assessment using the integrated tabular methodology introduced in this volume. 308 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

Stull, Elizabeth Ann

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Evaluation of Carrying Capacity : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 1 of 4, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is one of four that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared to address Measure 7.1A in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council) Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) dated december 1994 (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.1A calls for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund an evaluation of salmon survival, ecology, carrying capacity, and limiting factors in freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats. Additionally, the Measure asks for development of a study plan based on critical uncertainties and research needs identified during the evaluation. This report deals with the evaluation of carrying capacity. It describes the analysis of different views of capacity as it relates to salmon survival and abundance. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for studying carrying capacity.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Johnson, Gary E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Forest Preserve Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve Wildlife Forest Preserve Wildlife Nature Bulletin No. 437-A December 11, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FOREST PRESERVE WILDLIFE The Forest Preserve District now comprises about 62,512 acres of native landscape, mostly wooded, acquired and held as the statute prescribes: for the purpose of protecting the flora, fauna and scenic beauties in their natural state and condition as nearly as may be. It is a huge wildlife sanctuary wherein no weapon may be carried and no hunting, trapping or molestation of any mammal or bird is permitted. Aside from fish management, the wildlife has been left alone to work out its own systems of checks and balances. There has been no attempt to remove surplus populations; no control of any predator other than wild cats and dogs. None is needed. Dead or hollow trees have been allowed to stand, or lie where they fall, because they furnish homes for many kinds of wildlife and go back into the soil to maintain the health of the woodland. There has been considerable reforestation of open tracts formerly farmed and, in some areas, planting of shrubs and vines which provide food for wildlife.

94

Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water.

Leitzinger, Eric J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), 6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Finding of No Significant Impact Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic) July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Final Environmental Assessment Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic)

96

DOE/EIS-0312; Bonneville Power Administration, Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Draft EIS (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia River Basin Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area NZ20027a April 02, 2001 Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area than 10 micrometers ) Maintenance Moderate Serious Maintenance Moderate Serious Maintenance Federal Class I Area Coal Oil Gas Biomass* Nuclear Municipal Solid Waste Black Liquor Raw Sulfur Biogas / Methane Multiple types Solar Wind Gas Solar Wind Geothermal * Some biomass can be considered renewable. * Locations of proposed plants are approximate and not intended represent legal or claimed locations. NZ20027b April 03, 2001 Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area Flow Limited Temperature Limited Flow and Temperature Limited NZ20027j April 03, 2001 Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area Anadromous Fish Extinct Listed Anadromous Fish Species Listed Resident Fish - Bull Trout

97

Retail Unbundling - Montana  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Approval of Energy West Montana's interim rates, gas cost tracking procedures, and choice selection or cancellation times (Docket ...

98

Retail Unbundling - Montana  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Natural Gas Restructuring and Customers Choice ... which would provide management services for 5 ... the Montana Department of Environmental ...

99

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Smolt Monitoring Program; Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, Washington, 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1996 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows, spill, cool spring and early summer water temperatures and comparatively low numbers of fish, particularly yearling chinook, collected and transported. A total of 5,227,672 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite, the fewest since 1986. Of these, 5,117,685 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 4,990,798 by barge and 126,887 by truck. An additional 102,430 fish were bypassed back to the river, most of these being part of the National Marine Fisheries Service transportation evaluation study. New extended length submersible bar screens (ESBS) and new vertical barrier screens were installed in all units and a prototype surface collector was installed in front of units 4, 5 and 6 and operated from 23 April through 3 June. Smolt Monitoring Program and National Biologic Survey biologists examined 4,581 fish, collected at the separator, for symptoms of Gas Bubble Disease.

Verhey, Peter; Ross, Doug; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part C; Lake Roosevelt Pelagic Fish Study: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pelagic fishes, such as kokanee and rainbow trout, provide an important fishery in Lake Roosevelt; however, spawner returns and creel results have been below management goals in recent years. Our objective was to identify factors that potentially limit pelagic fish production in Lake Roosevelt including entrainment, food limitation, piscivory, and other abiotic factors. We estimated the ratio of total fish entrained through Grand Coulee Dam to the pelagic fish abundance for September and October, 1998. If the majority of these fish were pelagic species, then entrainment averaged 10-13% of pelagic fish abundance each month. This rate of entrainment could impose considerable losses to pelagic fish populations on an annual basis. Therefore, estimates of species composition of entrained fish will be important in upcoming years to estimate the proportion of stocked pelagic fish lost through the dam. Food was not limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout populations since growth rates were high and large zooplankton were present in the reservoir. Estimates of survival for kokanee were low (< 0.01 annual) and unknown for rainbow trout. We estimated that the 1997 standing stock biomass of large (>1.1 mm) Daphnia could have supported 0.08 annual survival by kokanee and rainbow trout before fish consumption would have exceeded available biomass during late winter and early spring. Therefore, if recruitment goals are met in the future there may be a bottleneck in food supply for pelagic planktivores. Walleye and northern pikeminnow were the primary piscivores of salmonids in 1996 and 1997. Predation on salmonid prey was rare for rainbow trout and not detected for burbot or smallmouth bass. Northern pikeminnow had the greatest individual potential as a salmonid predator due to their high consumptive demand; however, their overall impact was limited because of their low relative abundance. We modeled the predation impact of 273,524 walleye in 1996, and 39,075 northern pikeminnow in 1997 because diet data revealed predation on salmonids during these years. We could not determine the absolute impact of piscivores on each salmonid species because identification of fish prey was limited to families. Our estimate of salmonid consumption by walleye in 1996 and northern pikeminnow in 1997 shows that losses of stocked kokanee and rainbow trout could be substantial (up to 73% of kokanee) if piscivores were concentrating on one salmonid species, but were most likely lower, assuming predation was spread among kokanee, rainbow trout, and whitefish. Dissolved oxygen was never limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout, but temperatures were up to 6 EC above the growth optimum for kokanee from July to September in the upper 33 meters of water. Critical data needed for a more complete analysis in the future include species composition of entrainment estimates, entrainment estimates expanded to include unmonitored turbines, seasonal growth of planktivorous salmonids, species composition of salmonid prey, piscivore diet during hatchery releases of salmonids, and collection of temperature and dissolved oxygen data throughout all depths of the reservoir during warm summer months.

Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt; Bonar, Scott

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Use of Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities (03/08/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03) David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204 Location: Yakima, Yakima County, Washington; and Easton, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of research and supplementation projects in the Yakima basin in an

102

Smolt Monitoring Program Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS); Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We PIT-tagged juvenile spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery in October 2001 as part of the Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) for migratory year (MY) 2002. We tagged 20,998 Imnaha stock spring chinook salmon, and after mortality and tag loss, we allowed the remaining 20,920 fish to leave the acclimation pond at our Imnaha River satellite facility beginning 21 March 2002 to begin their seaward migration. The fish remaining in the pond were forced out on 17 April 2002. We tagged 20,973 Catherine Creek stock captive brood progeny spring chinook salmon, and after mortality and tag loss, we allowed the remaining 20,796 fish to leave the acclimation ponds at our Catherine Creek satellite facility beginning 1 April 2001 to begin their seaward migration. The fish remaining in the ponds were forced out on 15 April 2001. We estimated survival rates, from release to Lower Granite Dam in MY 2002, for three stocks of hatchery spring chinook salmon tagged at Lookingglass Hatchery to determine their relative migration performance. Imnaha River stock and Lostine River stock survival rates were similar and were higher than the survival rate of Catherine Creek stock. We PIT-tagged 20,950 BY 2001 Imnaha River stock and 20,820 BY 2001 Catherine Creek stock captive brood progeny in October 2002 as part of the CSS for MY 2003. At the time the fish were transferred from Lookingglass Hatchery to the acclimation site, the rates of mortality and tag loss for Imnaha River stock were 0.14% and 0.06%, respectively. Catherine Creek stock, during the same period, had rates of mortality and tag loss of 0.57% and 0.31%, respectively. There was slightly elevated mortality, primarily from BKD, in one raceway of Catherine Creek stock at Lookingglass Hatchery for BY 2001.

Jonasson, Brian; Carmichael, Richard

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Culvert test bed: fish-passage research facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of juvenile salmonids and other fish through culverts is aappropriate hydraulic and fish-passage designs forWashington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Alaska

Pearson, Dr. Walter H.; May, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project probability/coordination study resident fish and wildlife impacts, Phase III. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased white sturgeon habitat for most life stages. Rainbow trout adult and spawning habitat increased while juvenile and fry habitat generally decreased. Whether or not these short term increases in habitat result in long term benefits to the fish populations has yet to be determined.

Leitzinger, E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Statistical Survival Analysis of Fish and Wildlife Tagging Studies; SURPH.1 Manual - Analysis of Release-Recapture Data for Survival Studies, 1994 Technical Manual.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program SURPH is the culmination of several years of research to develop a comprehensive computer program to analyze survival studies of fish and wildlife populations. Development of this software was motivated by the advent of the PIT-tag (Passive Integrated Transponder) technology that permits the detection of salmonid smolt as they pass through hydroelectric facilities on the Snake and Columbia Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Repeated detections of individually tagged smolt and analysis of their capture-histories permits estimates of downriver survival probabilities. Eventual installation of detection facilities at adult fish ladders will also permit estimation of ocean survival and upstream survival of returning salmon using the statistical methods incorporated in SURPH.1. However, the utility of SURPH.1 far exceeds solely the analysis of salmonid tagging studies. Release-recapture and radiotelemetry studies from a wide range of terrestrial and aquatic species have been analyzed using SURPH.1 to estimate discrete time survival probabilities and investigate survival relationships. The interactive computing environment of SURPH.1 was specifically developed to allow researchers to investigate the relationship between survival and capture processes and environmental, experimental and individual-based covariates. Program SURPH.1 represents a significant advancement in the ability of ecologists to investigate the interplay between morphologic, genetic, environmental and anthropogenic factors on the survival of wild species. It is hoped that this better understanding of risk factors affecting survival will lead to greater appreciation of the intricacies of nature and to improvements in the management of wild resources. This technical report is an introduction to SURPH.1 and provides a user guide for both the UNIX and MS-Windows{reg_sign} applications of the SURPH software.

Smith, Steven G.; Skalski, John R.; Schelechte, J. Warren [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Center for Quantitative Science

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

...31 APPENDIX A MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

107

Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1985 State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This Act establishes the state's interest in the construction of dams for water control and regulation and for hydropower generation purposes. It

108

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

109

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Montana Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Montana Quick Facts. The Bakken shale under Montana and North Dakota, one of the largest accumulations of crude oil in the United States, is currently estimated to be ...

112

Retail Unbundling - Montana  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Retail Unbundling - Montana. Status: The state has two pilot unbundling programs for residential gas customers. Overview: Two local distribution companies (LDCs) in ...

113

Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Credit A resident individual taxpayer of Montana who installs a geothermal heating or cooling system in their principal dwelling can claim a tax credit based on the...

114

Nuclear Regulation (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute establishes a regulatory program for sources of ionizing radiation, to be administered by the Montana Department of Health and Human Services. These regulations address permitting and...

115

Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Presidential Permit Application for Montana Alberta Tie Transmission Line Project May 12, 2006 EIS-0353: DOE Notice of...

116

,"Montana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

117

Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89 Federal Register 89 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 223 / Friday, November 20, 2009 / Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify wildlife-

118

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Wildlife Diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some wildlife diseases can be transmitted to humans. This leaflet explains the causes and symptoms of rabies, giardiasis, bubonic plague, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, tularemia, leptospirosis and histoplasmosis.

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

BLM Montana State Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: BLM Montana State Office Name BLM Montana State Office Short Name Montana Parent Organization Bureau of Land Management Address 5001...

122

Clean Air Act of Montana (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Air Act of Montana (Montana) Clean Air Act of Montana (Montana) Clean Air Act of Montana (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The purpose of the Clean Air Act of Montana is to achieve and maintain

123

Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The Montana Major Facility Siting Act aims to protect the environment from

124

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Montana Environmental Policy Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Policy Act (Montana) Environmental Policy Act (Montana) Montana Environmental Policy Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality Council The Montana Environmental Policy Act aims to provide for the consideration

126

Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana) Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana) Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1974 State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation

127

Model Development to Establish Integrated Operational Rule Curves for Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs - Montana, 1996 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hungry Horse and Libby dams have profoundly affected the aquatic ecosystems in two major tributaries of the Columbia River by altering habitat and water quality, and by imposing barriers to fish migration. In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, designed in part to balance hydropower development with other natural resources in the Columbia System. The Act formed the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) who developed a program to protect, mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Pursuant to the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program for the Columbia River System (1987), we constructed computer models to simulate the trophic dynamics of the reservoir biota as related to dam operation. Results were used to develop strategies to minimize impacts and enhance the reservoir and riverine fisheries, following program measures 903(a)(1-4) and 903(b)(1-5). Two FORTRAN simulation models were developed for Hungry Horse and Libby reservoirs located in northwestern Montana. The models were designed to generate accurate, short-term predictions specific to two reservoirs and are not directly applicable to other waters. The modeling strategy, however, is portable to other reservoir systems where sufficient data are available. Reservoir operation guidelines were developed to balance fisheries concerns in the headwaters with anadromous species recovery actions in the lower Columbia (Biological Rule Curves). These BRCs were then integrated with power production and flood control to reduce the economic impact of basin-wide fisheries recovery actions. These Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) were developed simultaneously in the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR), the Council`s phase IV amendment process and recovery actions associated with endangered Columbia Basin fish species.

Marotz, Brian; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebuild of the Libby (FEC) to Troy Section of BPA's Libby to Bonners Ferry 115-kilovolt Transmission Line, Libby, Lincoln County, Montana February 15, 2008 EIS-0399: EPA Notice...

129

Montana Gasoline Price Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional...

130

Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distribution Facilities on Federal Land November 17, 2008 EIS-0399: Record of Decision Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. 230-kV Transmission Line Project November 6, 2008 EIS-0183:...

131

Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

plants that grind down millions of bushels of corn in the Midwest and breakthroughs in algae along the coasts always garner the most attention. But in states like Montana, a...

132

Montana ICTL Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana ICTL Demonstration Program Montana ICTL Demonstration Program Background The Department of Energy (DOE) funds basic and applied research toward the development of technologies that will allow the U.S. to depend to a greater extent on renewable fuels, especially those derived from domestic sources of energy. Coal is one of the nation's most abundant domestic energy resources; however, conventional technologies using coal release large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO

133

Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana) Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana) Montana Integrated Waste Management Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Program Info State Montana Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This legislation sets goals for the reduction of solid waste generated by households, businesses, and governments, through source reduction, reuse, recycling, and composting. The state aims to achieve recycling and composting rates of: (a) 17% of the state's solid waste by 2008;

134

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

GRR/Section 17-MT-c - Natural Streambed and Land Preservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation District Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-7-101 et seq The Natural Streambed and...

136

Montana.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana Montana www.effi cientwindows.org March 2013 1. Meet the Energy Code and Look for the ENERGY STAR ® Windows must comply with your local energy code. Windows that are ENERGY STAR qualifi ed typically meet or exceed energy code requirements. To verify if specific window energy properties comply with the local code requirements, go to Step 2. 2. Look for Effi cient Properties on the NFRC Label The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) label is needed for verifi cation of energy code compliance (www.nfrc. org). The NFRC label displays whole- window energy properties and appears on all fenestration products which are part of the ENERGY STAR program.

137

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida) Florida) Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and

139

A GIS-based identification of potentially significant wildlife habitats associated with roads in Vermont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capen. 1997. A report on the biophysical regions in Vermont.report prepared for the Vermont Ecomapping Roundtable.scientist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and

Austin, John M.; Viani, Kevin; Hammond, Forrest; Slesar, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Wind powering America: Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet contains a description of Montana's wind energy resources, and the state's green power and net metering programs as well as financial incentives that support the programs. The fact sheet includes a list of contacts for those interested in obtaining more information.

NREL

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Regulations & Policies WAC 232-12-064 Triggers None specified In Washington, it is unlawful to take wildlife from the wild without permission from the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The WDFW issues Live Wildlife Taking Permits under WAC 232-12-064. 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

142

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

143

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2001 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate for construction losses associated with Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, Deadwood, Minidoka and Palisades hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Montana Datos del Precio de la Gasolina  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MontanaGasPrices.com (Busqueda por Ciudad o Cdigo Postal) - GasBuddy.com Montana Gas Prices (Ciudades Selectas) - GasBuddy.com Montana Gas Prices (Organizado por Condado) -...

145

MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE, FISHERIES, AND PARKS Sam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

321-1132. Sincerely, Kathy W. Lunceford Fish and Wildlife Biologist Cc: FWS, Atlanta, GA Attn: Jerry Ziewitz P.O. BOX 3658, TUPELO, MISSISSIPPI 38803-3658 WWW.WILDLIFETECHNICAL...

146

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Coal Severance Tax (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Severance Tax (Montana) Coal Severance Tax (Montana) Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial MunicipalPublic Utility Rural Electric Cooperative...

148

Montana Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

149

Water Quality Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Quality Act (Montana) Water Quality Act (Montana) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility StateProvincial Govt Industrial...

150

Montana | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Commercial Buildings in the State of Montana (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 03262010 Adoption Date 11302009...

151

Montana Natural Gas Plant Processing  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Michigan Mississippi Montana Nebraska New Mexico North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah West Virginia Wyoming Period: Annual Download Series...

152

Geothermal resources of Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology has updated its inventory of low and moderate temperature resources for the state and has assisted the Oregon Institute of Technology - GeoHeat Center and the University of Utah Research Institute in prioritizing and collocating important geothermal resource areas. The database compiled for this assessment contains information on location, flow, water chemistry, and estimated reservoir temperatures for 267 geothermal well and springs in Montana. For this assessment, the minimum temperature for low-temperature resource is defined as 10{degree} C above the mean annual air temperature at the surface. The maximum temperature for a moderate-temperature resource is defined as greater than 50{degree} C. Approximately 12% of the wells and springs in the database have temperatures above 50{degree} C, 17% are between 30{degree} and 50{degree} C, 29% are between 20{degree} and 30{degree}C, and 42% are between 10{degree} and 20{degree} C. Low and moderate temperature wells and springs can be found in nearly all areas of Montana, but most are in the western third of the state. Information sources for the current database include the MBMG Ground Water Information Center, the USGS statewide database, the USGS GEOTHERM database, and new information collected as part of this program. Five areas of Montana were identified for consideration in future investigations of geothermal development. The areas identified are those near Bozeman, Ennis, Butte, Boulder, and Camas Prairie. These areas were chosen based on the potential of the resource and its proximity to population centers.

Metesh, J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Pesticides and their effects on wildlife  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

Driver, C.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We PIT-tagged juvenile spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery in October 2002 as part of the Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) for migratory year (MY) 2003. We tagged 20,950 Imnaha stock spring chinook salmon, and after mortality and tag loss, we allowed the remaining 20,904 fish to leave the acclimation pond at our Imnaha River satellite facility beginning 1 April 2003 to begin their seaward migration. The fish remaining in the pond were forced out on 15 April 2003. We tagged 20,820 Catherine Creek stock captive and conventional brood progeny spring chinook salmon, and after mortality and tag loss, we allowed the remaining 20,628 fish to leave the acclimation ponds at our Catherine Creek satellite facility beginning during two acclimation periods. The volitional release for the early acclimation group began 12 March 2003, and all remaining fish were forced out of the ponds on 23 March 2003. The volitional release for the late acclimation group began 31 March 2003, and all remaining fish were forced out of the ponds on 14 April 2003. We estimated survival rates, from release to Lower Granite Dam in MY 2003, for three stocks of hatchery spring chinook salmon tagged at Lookingglass Hatchery to determine their relative migration performance. Survival rates for the Imnaha River, Lostine River, and Catherine Creek stocks were 0.714, 0.557, and 0.350, respectively. We PIT-tagged 20,944 BY 2002 Imnaha River stock and 20,980 BY 2002 Catherine Creek stock captive and conventional brood progeny in October and November 2003 as part of the CSS for MY 2004. From tagging to January 28, 2004, the rates of mortality and tag loss for Imnaha River stock were 0.16% and 0.04%, respectively. Catherine Creek stock, during the same period, had rates of mortality and tag loss of 0.19% and 0.06%, respectively.

Jonasson, Brian

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Microsoft Word - montana.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Montana NERC Region(s) ....................................................................................................... MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source........................................................................................... Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) ....................................................................... 5,866 41 Electric Utilities ...................................................................................................... 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power ................................ 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) ........................................................................... 29,791,181 41

156

Future fuels from Montana  

SciTech Connect

To make America less dependent on foreign oil, Montana Governor Brain Schweitzer pushes for investment in synfuel technology. He advocates coal as the 'new fuel' for cars and believes synfuels from coal can bridge the gap between the petroleum economy of the past and the hydrogen economy of the future. He is pushing for a 'Future Fuels' project to form a public-private partnership to build 20 coal conversion, synfuel manufacturing plants. This could contribute to making the USA energy self-sufficient, more quickly than the FutureGen project, he believes.

Buchsbaum, L.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Proceedings from a Workshop on Ecological Carrying Capacity of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 3 of 4, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held during 1995 in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the workshop was to assemble a group of experts that could help us define carrying capacity for Columbia River Basin salmonids. The workshop was one activity designed to answer the questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information we learned during the workshop we concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. Measure 7.1A requires a definition of carrying capacity and a list of determinants (limiting factors) of capacity. The implication or inference then follows that by asking what we know and do not know about the determinants will lead to research that increases our understanding of what is limiting salmon survival. It is then assumed that research results will point to management actions that can remove or repair the limiting factors. Most ecologists and fisheries scientists that have studied carrying capacity clearly conclude that this approach is an oversimplification of complex ecological processes. To pursue the capacity parameter, that is, a single number or set of numbers that quantify how many salmon the basin or any part of the basin can support, is meaningless by itself and will not provide useful information.

Johnson, Gary E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Mavros, William V.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind and Wildlife Interactions | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wildlife Interactions and Wildlife Interactions Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind and Wildlife Interactions November 23, 2011 - 2:08pm Addthis This webinar is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America 2011 webinar series. This webinar will provide an overview of wind turbine and wildlife issues, including a summary of research plans by the American Wind and Wildlife Institute. Other topics will include an update of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wind regulations and bat/wind turbine interactions. The webinar is free; no registration is required. More Addthis Related Articles Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends DOE Announces Webinar on Tying Energy Efficiency to Compensation and Performance Reviews, and More

159

Grass Conservation Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grass Conservation Act (Montana) Grass Conservation Act (Montana) Grass Conservation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The Grass Conservation Act provides for the conservation, protection, restoration, and proper utilization of grass, forage, and range resource of the state of Montana. The Act establishes the Montana Grass Conservation Commission to coordinate between the Department and Conservation Districts

160

Strategies for restoring ecological connectivity and establishing wildlife passage for the upgrade of Route 78 in Swanton, Vermont: an overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Black bears in Vermont. Stratton Mountain Black BearStudy. Final Report. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources,biologist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department.

Austin, John M.; Ferguson, Mark; Gingras, Glenn; Bakos, Greg

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd Presidential permit authorizing Montana Alberta Tie Ltd to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission...

162

EA-1940: Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for Montana Advanced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40: Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for Montana Advanced Biofuels EA-1940: Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for Montana Advanced Biofuels SUMMARY Montana Advanced Biofuels (MAB)...

163

Montana/Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Montana/Incentives < Montana Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Financial Incentive Programs for Montana 2 Rules, Regulations and Policies for Montana Download All Financial Incentives and Policies for Montana CSV (rows 1 - 138) Financial Incentive Programs for Montana Download Financial Incentives for Montana CSV (rows 1 - 49) Incentive Incentive Type Active Alternative Energy Investment Tax Credit (Montana) Industry Recruitment/Support Yes Alternative Energy Investment Tax Credit (Corporate) (Montana) Corporate Tax Credit Yes Alternative Energy Investment Tax Credit (Personal) (Montana) Personal Tax Credit Yes

164

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Information  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Montana Information to Montana Information to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Information on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Information on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Information on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Information on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Information on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Information on AddThis.com... Montana Information This state page compiles information related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles in Montana and includes new incentives and laws, alternative fueling station locations, truck stop electrification sites, fuel prices, and local points of contact. Select a new state Select a State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas

165

Montana Beginning Farm/Ranch Loan Program (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Loans subsidized by tax-exempt bonds issued by the Montana Agricultural Loan Authority may be used for the production of energy using an alternative renewable energy source. The program is run...

166

Montana Oil and Natural Gas Production Tax Act (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The State of Montana imposes a quarterly tax on the gross taxable value of oil and natural gas production. This tax replaces several previous taxes, simplifying fees and rates as well as compliance...

167

Fish Oil Industry in South America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish Oil Industry in South America UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Fish Oil Industry in South America By -J. R. SANCHEZ TORRES Chief, "Fish Oils, " M. E. Stansby, editor, Avi Publishing Company, Westport, Connecticut, 1967. Circular 282

168

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River and Coeur d'Alene Lake. Effluents from tailings and mining waste have contributed vast quantities of trace heavy metals to the system. Poor agricultural and forest practices have also contributed to the degradation of water quality and habitat suitability for resident salmonids. Increased sediment loads from agricultural runoff and recent and recovering clearcuts, and increases in water temperature due to riparian canopy removal may be two of the most important problems currently affecting westslope cutthroat trout. Increases in water temperature have reduced the range of resident salmonids to a fraction of its historic extent. Within this new range, sediment has reduced the quality of both spawning and rearing habitats. Historically, municipal waste contributed large quantities of phosphates and nitrogen that accelerated the eutrophication process in Coeur d'Alene Lake. However, over the last 25 years work has been completed to reduce the annual load of these materials. Wastewater treatment facilities have been established near all major municipalities in and around the basin. Species interactions with introduced exotics as well as native species are also acting to limit cutthroat trout populations. Two mechanisms are at work: interspecific competition, and species replacement. Competition occurs when two species utilize common resources, the supply of which is short; or if the resources are not in short supply, they harm each other in the process of seeking these resources. Replacement occurs when some environmental or anthropogenic change (e.g., habitat degradation, fishing pressure, etc.) causes the decline or elimination of one species and another species, either native or introduced, fills the void left by the other. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery. These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fis

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Recovery Act State Memos Montana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Montana For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

170

Conservation Districts (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation Districts (Montana) Conservation Districts (Montana) Conservation Districts (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation Local Conservation Districts in the state of Montana may be formed by

171

Opencut Mining Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opencut Mining Act (Montana) Opencut Mining Act (Montana) Opencut Mining Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act imposes permitting and operating restrictions on opencut mining activities. The Act contains permitting, siting, and procedural requirements; more specific regulations can be found in the Administrative Rules of Montana

172

Geophysical Exploration (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geophysical Exploration (Montana) Geophysical Exploration (Montana) Geophysical Exploration (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation An exploration permit is required for any entity conducting geophysical exploration within the state of Montana. Such entities are also required to follow rules adopted by the Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, including those pertaining to: (a) Adequate identification of seismic exploration crews operating in this

173

Water Resources (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources (Montana) Resources (Montana) Water Resources (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The state policy of Montana requires that water resources of the state be put to optimum beneficial use and not wasted. The state must promote the

174

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effects of Mine Waste Contamination on Fish and Wildlife Habitat at Multiple Levels of Biological Organization in the Methow River, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-year multidisciplinary study was conducted on the relationship between mine waste contamination and the effects on aquatic and terrestrial habitats in the Methow River below abandoned mines near Twisp in Okanogan County, Washington (U.S.A.). Ore deposits in the area were mined for gold, silver, copper and zinc until the early 1950's. An above-and-below-mine approach was used to study potentially impacted sites. Although the dissolved metal content of water in the Methow River was below the limits of detection, eleven chemicals of potential environmental concern were identified in the tailings, mine effluents, groundwater, streamwater and sediments (Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn). The potential for ecosystem level impacts was reflected in the risk of contamination in the mine waste to communities and populations that are valued for their functional properties related to energy storage and nutrient cycling. Dissolved and sediment metal contamination changed the benthic insect community structure in a tributary of the Methow River below Alder Mine, and at the population level, caddisfly larval development in the Methow River was delayed. Arsenic accumulation in bear hair and Cd in fish liver suggest top predators are effected. In situ exposure of juvenile triploid trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to conditions at the downstream site resulted in reduced growth and increased mortality among exposed individuals. Histopathological studies of their tissues revealed extensive glycogen inclusions suggesting food is being converted into glycogen and stored in the liver but the glycogen is not being converted back normally into glucose for distribution to other tissues in the body. Subcellular observations revealed mitochondrial changes including a decrease in the number and increase in the size of electron-dense metrical granules, the presence of glycogen bodies in the cytoplasm, and glycogen nuclei in exposed trout hepatocytes, which are signs that Type IV Glycogen Storage disease is occurring. GSD IV is caused by either a deficiency or inactivation of the glycogen branching enzyme that results in the synthesis of an abnormal glycogen molecule that is insoluble and has decreased branch points and increased chain length. These results show that the effects of mine waste contaminants can be expressed at all levels of organization from molecular to ecosystem-level responses.

Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

MONTANA PALLADIUM RESEARCH INITIATIVE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project Objective: The overarching objective of the Montana Palladium Research Initiative is to perform scientific research on the properties and uses of palladium in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy'????????????????s Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The purpose of the research will be to explore possible palladium as an alternative to platinum in hydrogen-economy applications. To achieve this objective, the Initiatives activities will focus on several cutting-edge research approaches across a range of disciplines, including metallurgy, biomimetics, instrumentation development, and systems analysis. Background: Platinum-group elements (PGEs) play significant roles in processing hydrogen, an element that shows high potential to address this need in the U.S. and the world for inexpensive, reliable, clean energy. Platinum, however, is a very expensive component of current and planned systems, so less-expensive alternatives that have similar physical properties are being sought. To this end, several tasks have been defined under the rubric of the Montana Palladium Research Iniative. This broad swath of activities will allow progress on several fronts. The membrane-related activities of Task 1 employs state-of-the-art and leading-edge technologies to develop new, ceramic-substrate metallic membranes for the production of high-purity hydrogen, and develop techniques for the production of thin, defect-free platinum group element catalytic membranes for energy production and pollution control. The biomimetic work in Task 2 explores the use of substrate-attached hydrogen-producing enzymes and the encapsulation of palladium in virion-based protein coats to determine their utility for distributed hydrogen production. Task 3 work involves developing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a real-time, in situ diagnostic technique to characterize PGEs nanoparticles for process monitoring and control. The systems engineering work in task 4 will determine how fuel cells ????????????????taken as systems behave over periods of time that should show how their reformers and other subsystems deteriorate with time.

Peters, John

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

Montana State Land Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Board Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana State Land Board Place Helena, Montana Website http:dnrc.mt.govLandBoardS References Webpage1 This article is a stub. You...

178

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Wildlife at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife at Brookhaven Wildlife Protection The Laboratory has precautions in place to protect on-site habitats and natural resources. Activities to eliminate or minimize negative...

180

Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildlifeResources&oldid612286" Category: NEPA Resources What links here...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2001 September 13, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17) Joe HeHerrera - KEWU Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Eagle Lakes Ranch Acquisition and Restoration Project No: 2000-025-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques - 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition Location: Franklin County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Columbia National Wildlife Refuge Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres

182

Climate Action Plan (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Action Plan (Montana) Climate Action Plan (Montana) Climate Action Plan (Montana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Montana Program Type Climate Policies Provider Department of Environmental Quality Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Montana, the Climate Change Advisory Committee (CCAC) was established with

183

Streamside Management Zones (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Streamside Management Zones (Montana) Streamside Management Zones (Montana) Streamside Management Zones (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This chapter sets streamside management zones as encompassing a strip at

184

Pipeline Carriers (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carriers (Montana) Carriers (Montana) Pipeline Carriers (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider State of Montana Public Service Commission Pipeline carriers transporting crude petroleum, coal, the products of crude petroleum or coal, or carbon dioxide produced in the combustion or gasification of fossil fuels are required to abide by these regulations. The regulations address construction permits and the use of eminent domain by pipeline carriers, records and reporting, connection and interchange facilities, and the prohibition of discrimination in rates and service

185

Uniform Transboundary Pollution Reciprocal Access Act (Montana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uniform Transboundary Pollution Reciprocal Access Act (Montana) Uniform Transboundary Pollution Reciprocal Access Act (Montana) Uniform Transboundary Pollution Reciprocal Access Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Transportation Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations This Act allows any entity in a Reciprocating Jurisdiction harmed by pollution originating in the state of Montana to bring an action or other proceeding against the source of that pollution in the state of Montana. Such an entity has the same rights in the state of Montana as they would if

186

Montana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana/Geothermal Montana/Geothermal < Montana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Montana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Montana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Montana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Montana Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Boulder Hot Springs Geothermal Area 5.21 MW5,210.319 kW 5,210,318.609 W 5,210,318,609 mW 0.00521 GW 5.210319e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Broadwater Hot Spring Geothermal Area 5.256 MW5,255.823 kW 5,255,823.43 W 5,255,823,430 mW 0.00526 GW 5.255823e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region

187

Stacker speeds coal recovery. [Montana  

SciTech Connect

NERCO's new mine in Montana features the only stacker/reclaimer in the US to stockpile and reclaim coal produced by a dragline/truck-shovel operation. Land reclamation at the mine has also been carefully planned. Other NERCO interests are mentioned.

Jackson, D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evaluation of a wildlife underpass on Vermont State Highway 289 in Essex, Vermont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scharf, technicians for the Vermont Department of Fish andEVALUATION OF A WILDLIFE UNDERPASS ON VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY289 IN ESSEX, VERMONT John M. Austin and Larry Garland,

Austin, John M.; Garland, Larry

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Implementation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Trademark Office, Washington, DC 20231, Term-expires September 30, 2001 Jin F. Ng, Director, Patent Examining Group, Patent and Trademark Office, Washington, DC 20231,...

190

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

habitat quality that will support native aquatic species, achieved mainly through natural regenerative processes (Draft All-H paper Dec. 1999). Establish riparian reserves to...

191

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

192

Wildlife's Winter Diet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife's Winter Diet Wildlife's Winter Diet Nature Bulletin No. 659 December 9, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE'S WINTER DIET Anyone who regularly feeds wild birds, and counts up the amount of food that they eat in the course of a winter, often wonders how they could get along without his help. In one day of freezing weather two or three dozen small birds commonly clean up a half pound of food -- suet, sunflower seed, cracked corn or small grain. This does not take into account raids by squirrels and rabbits. Winter in this region is a time of food crisis for all warm-blooded wildlife. Most of our summer song birds, especially the insect eaters, avoid cold by migrating to warm climates until spring. Likewise, most waterfowl and shorebirds go south during the months when our waters are locked in ice.

193

Park County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana. Its FIPS County Code is 067. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Park County, Montana Clyde Park, Montana Cooke...

194

Montana Watershed Coordination Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watershed Coordination Council Watershed Coordination Council Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Watershed Coordination Council Name Montana Watershed Coordination Council Place Helena, Montana Zip 59604-6873 Website http://mtwatersheds.org/index. References MWCC Website[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Montana Watershed Coordination Council is an organization based in Helena, Montana. MWCC has been cultivating broad-based support for community driven approaches to managing complex land and water issues for over eighteen years as the statewide organization representing each of more than 60 watershed groups. The MWCC mission is to enhance, conserve, and protect natural resources and sustain the high quality of life in Montana for present and future

195

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Montana Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Montana Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 11, 2013 CX-011006: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scalable, Automated, Semi Permanent Seismic Method for Detecting Carbon Dioxide Plume Extent During Geological... CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 26, 2013 CX-010583: Categorical Exclusion Determination Upper Jocko River Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 24, 2013 CX-010481: Categorical Exclusion Determination Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide

196

Forestry Policies (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forestry Policies (Montana) Forestry Policies (Montana) Forestry Policies (Montana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources and Conservation Montana has over 20 million acres of public and private forested lands, about a quarter of the state's land area. Montana's Forests are managed by the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation's Forestry Division. The DNRC's 2010 Statewide Forest Resource Strategy document specifies the promotion and facilitation of forest biomass for energy generation as a key strategic goal: http://dnrc.mt.gov/Forestry/Assistance/Documents/SAResponseStrategy2010.pdf The DNRC also offers financial assistance under its Woody Biomass Utilization program, with a mission to promote the beneficial use of forest

197

Demand for Wildlife Hunting in the Southeastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concern of decline in hunting license sales (Anderson et al 1985; Sun et al. 2005) 20% decline in number 15500 16000 16500 1980 1990 2000 2001 2002 2005 Year Licenses('000) Fig: Certified hunting license sales in USA (US Fish & Wildlife Services) #12;2 Benefits from Hunting Revenue License sales Species management

Gray, Matthew

198

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Energy Secretary Chu Announces Montana Schools Win National Student...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu Announces Montana Schools Win National Student Efficiency Competition Energy Secretary Chu Announces Montana Schools Win National Student Efficiency Competition...

200

Changes related to "Coal Severance Tax (Montana)" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Severance Tax (Montana)" Coal Severance Tax (Montana) Jump to: navigation, search...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pages that link to "Coal Severance Tax (Montana)" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Severance Tax (Montana)" Coal Severance Tax (Montana) Jump to: navigation, search...

202

Changes related to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)" Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)...

203

Pages that link to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)" Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana)...

204

Montana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million...

205

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Montana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Montana) Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction MunicipalPublic Utility Rural Electric...

206

Oil and Gas Conservation (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation (Montana) Oil and Gas Conservation (Montana) Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction MunicipalPublic Utility Installer...

207

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

208

NorthWestern Energy - Custom Business Efficiency Program (Montana...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Program (Montana) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Other Program Information Montana Program Type Utility...

209

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scope Change 1 Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd: Scope Change 1 Application from Montana Alberta Tie Ltd to construct, operate,...

210

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd: Update Application from Montana Alberta Tie Ltd to construct, operate, and maintain...

211

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ltd Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd Application from Montana Alberta Tie Ltd to construct, operate, and maintain electric...

212

Renewable Resource Grant and Loan Program (Montana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Grant and Loan Program (Montana) Renewable Resource Grant and Loan Program (Montana) Eligibility StateProvincial Govt Local Government Tribal Government Savings For...

213

Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

214

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The Comprehensive Environmental Cleanup and Responsibility Act contains general provisions (sections 705-729), along with the Voluntary Cleanup and Redevelopment Act (sections 730-738) and the Controlled Allocation of

215

Oil and Gas General Provisions (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter describes general provisions for the exploration and development of oil and gas resources in Montana. The chapter addresses royalty interests, regulations for the lease of local...

216

Microbusiness Loan Program (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Program Provider Montana Department of Commerce Businesses producing energy using an alternative renewable energy source are eligible for microbusiness loans, which are capped...

217

,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1212...

218

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Montana...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Energy West Information for Businesses Bonneville Power Administration Information for...

219

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Montana as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

220

Retail Unbundling - Montana - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information ... adopted several rules to implement the legislation and guide the transition to a ... Approval of Energy West Montana's interim rates, gas cost ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

,"Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Underground Natural Gas...

222

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume III, Fish and Habitat Inventory of Tributary Streams, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study of the fisheries of the Swan River drainage in relation to potential small hydro development. This information was collected in order to obtain a reliable basin-wide database which was used to evaluate the potential cumulative effects of a number of proposed small hydro developments on the fisheries of the drainage. For each named tributary stream there is a reach-by-reach narrative summary of general habitat characteristics, outstanding features of the stream, and fish populations and spawning use. An attempt was made to rank many of the measured parameters relative to other surveyed stream reaches in the drainage. 3 refs.

Leathe, Stephen A.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246-SA-24) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife MitigationProgram EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-24) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Herbert Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Benton County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 221 acres of the Herbert parcel in Benton County, Oregon for the protection of wetland, riparian, and riverine habitats. The Herbert parcel is located within the Willamette

224

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 10, 2003 October 10, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36) Joe DeHerrera- KEWN-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Project-Implemetation of Wildlife Mitigation Plan Project No: 200000900 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.0 Species Manangement

225

Energy Incentive Programs, Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Montana Energy Incentive Programs, Montana October 29, 2013 - 11:29am Addthis Updated December 2012 What public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs are available in my state? Montana's electricity restructuring law mandated the creation of a universal system benefit (USB) charge for the funding of energy efficiency, renewables and low-income energy assistance programs. The USB was set to expire at the end of 2009 but H.B. 27 removed the expiration date and extended the program indefinitely. In 2011, programs administered by Montana utilities budgeted over $10 million to promote increased energy efficiency in the state. NorthWestern Energy offers a variety of energy efficiency programs and services relevant to federal customers. Current incentive levels are valid

226

Water Use Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Water Use Act (Montana) Water Use Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation Any use of water in the state of Montana is established as a public use, and the waters within the state are established as property of the people

227

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 5, 2010 February 5, 2010 CX-001080: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montana State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Award CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 02/05/2010 Location(s): Montana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office February 5, 2010 CX-001988: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montana State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Award CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 02/05/2010 Location(s): Montana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office January 13, 2010 CX-000599: Categorical Exclusion Determination Flathead Substation Bay Addition - L0307 CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/13/2010 Location(s): Flathead County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

228

Montana/Transmission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Montana/Transmission < Montana Jump to: navigation, search MontanaTransmissionHeader.png Roadmap Agency Links Local Regulations State Regulations Summary General Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database The electrical grid in Montana is part of both the Eastern and Western Interconnection power grids and is part of two NERC regions - the Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO) and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). MRO's service territory extends from the state of Nebraska north to

229

Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Childs, Allen B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Points of Contact  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Montana Points of Montana Points of Contact to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Points of Contact on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Points of Contact on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Points of Contact on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Points of Contact on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Points of Contact on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Points of Contact on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Points of Contact The following people or agencies can help you find more information about Montana's clean transportation laws, incentives, and funding opportunities.

231

Montana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Montana are supporting abroad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and geothermal. Through these investments, Montana's businesses, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Montana to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Montana Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

232

Montana Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana Recovery Act State Memo Montana has substantial natural resources, including coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Montana are supporting abroad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to wind and geothermal. Through these investments, Montana's businesses, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Montana to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Montana Recovery Act State Memo More Documents & Publications

233

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Montana Laws and Montana Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Montana. For more information, contact your

234

VERMONT AGENCY OF TRANSPORTATION WILDLIFE CROSSING TEAM; BUILDING AN INTER-AGENCY PLANNING TOOL TO ADDRESS ECOLOGICAL CONNECTIVITY IN VERMONT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

He serves as chair of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibianis coordinator of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas.biologist with the Vermont Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. John

Slesar, Chris; Morse, Susan C.; Austin, John M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana: Energy Resources Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.8796822,"lon":-110.3625658,"alt":0,"address":"Montana","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

The Fish and Wildlife Agencies and Tribes of The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

migrants that breed in the subbasin and winter in Mexico or Central America. Flammulated owls are the most sparrows winter in the southern United States, south into Central America (Vickery 1996). The olive-sided flycatcher is migratory and winters in Central and South America (Csuti et al. 1997). Environmental toxins

237

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 26, 2010 July 26, 2010 CX-003263: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montana-Tribe-Blackfeet Tribe CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Montana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 13, 2010 CX-003037: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mercury Removal from Clean Coal Processing Air Stream CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Butte, Montana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 13, 2010 CX-003034: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B4.4, B5.1 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Helena, Montana Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 12, 2010 CX-002969: Categorical Exclusion Determination

239

Avista Corp (Montana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana) Montana) Jump to: navigation, search Name Avista Corp Place Montana Utility Id 20169 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0526/kWh Commercial: $0.0661/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Avista Corp (Montana). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 0.715 14.92 8 3.342 52.867 12 4.057 67.787 20

240

Montana Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 12 13 7 2010's 13...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coal Severance Tax (Montana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal Severance Tax (Montana) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being...

242

Montana Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 12 12 13...

243

,"Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas...

244

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35) Joe Deherrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Malheur Wildlife Mitigation Project- Denny Jones Ranch Project No: 200002700 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.2 Control of Predators and

245

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 5/15/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2002 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Canby Ferry Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Clackamas County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 16 acres of the Canby Ferry parcel in Clackamas County, Oregon for the protection

246

NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (11) Apply Africa filter Asia (12) Apply Asia filter Australia and Oceania (10) Apply Australia and Oceania filter Europe (219) Apply Europe filter Global (7) Apply Global filter North America (217) Apply North America filter Technology Land-Based Wind (280) Apply Land-Based Wind filter Marine Energy (58) Apply Marine Energy filter Offshore Wind (161) Apply Offshore Wind filter Power Lines (66) Apply Power Lines filter Towers (23) Apply Towers filter Animal Birds (334) Apply Birds filter Fish (71) Apply Fish filter Invertebrates (44) Apply Invertebrates filter Mammals (185) Apply Mammals filter Reptiles (10) Apply Reptiles filter Publication Year 2013 (92) Apply 2013 filter

247

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

Soults, Scott [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Mitigation Project Management Plan for the "Dilling Addition".  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) for management of the Pend Oreille Wetland Wildlife Mitigation project II (Dilling Addition) for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on Kalispel Ceded Lands. Albeni Falls Dam is located on the Pend Oreille River near the Washington-Idaho border, about 25 miles upstream of the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The dam controls the water level on Lake Pend Oreille. The lake was formerly the center of subsistence use by the Kalispel Tribe. Flooding of wetlands, and water fluctuations both on the lake and downstream on the river, has had adverse impacts to wildlife and wildlife habitat. An extensive process was followed to formulate and prioritize wildlife resource goals. The Kalispel Natural Resource Department provided guidance in terms of opportunities onsite. To prioritize specific goals, the Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Caucus were consulted. From this process, the top priority goal for the Kalispel Tribe is: Protect and develop riparian forest and shrub, and freshwater wetlands, to mitigate losses resulting from reservoir inundation and river level fluctuations due to Albeni Falls Dam. Indicator species used to determine the initial construction/inundation loses and mitigation project gains include Bald Eagle (breeding and wintering), Black-capped Chickadee, Canada Goose, Mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer, and Yellow Warbler.

Entz, Ray D.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

The Wildlife of Ireland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an island surrounded by salt water, no great variety of land animals nor freshwater fishes have colonized it since it was uncovered by the melting of the glaciers. For example,...

251

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Observations on a Montana water quality proposal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2005, a group of petitioners led by the Northern Plains Resource Council (NPRC) submitted a petition to revise water quality requirements to the Montana Board of Environmental Review (BER). Under Montana law, the BER had to consider the petition and either reject it or propose it as a new regulation. In September 2005, the BER announced proposed changes to the Montana water quality regulations. The proposal, which included almost the exact language found in the petition, was directed toward discharges of water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production. The key elements of the proposal included: (1) No discharges of CBNG water are allowed to Montana surface waters unless operators can demonstrate that injection to aquifers with the potential for later recovery of the water is not feasible. (2) When operators can demonstrate the injection is not feasible, the CBNG water to be discharged must meet very strict technology-based limits for multiple parameters. (3) The Montana water quality standards for the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and electrical conductivity (EC) would be evaluated using the 7Q10 flow (lowest 7-consecutive-day flow in a 10-year period) rather than a monthly flow that is currently used. (4) SAR and EC would be reclassified as ''harmful parameters'', thereby greatly restricting the ability for CBNG discharges to be allowed under Montana's nondegradation regulations. The proposed regulations, if adopted in their current form, are likely to substantially reduce the amount of CBNG production in Montana. The impact also extends to Wyoming CBNG production through much greater restrictions on water quality that must be met at the interstate border.

Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc (Montana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana) Jump to: navigation, search Name Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc Place Montana Utility Id 6169 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

254

Big Horn Rural Electric Co (Montana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co (Montana) Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Horn Rural Electric Co Place Montana Utility Id 1675 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

255

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Other  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Other to someone by E-mail Other to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Other on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Other on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Other on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Other on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Other on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Other on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Other The list below contains summaries of all Montana laws and incentives

256

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel The list below contains summaries of all Montana laws and incentives

257

Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

258

,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3:31:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMTMMCF" "Date","Montana Natural...

259

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives Listed below are the summaries of all current Montana laws, incentives, regulations, funding opportunities, and other initiatives related to

260

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Montana laws and incentives

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Wildlife in Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

650 October 7, 1961 650 October 7, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILDLIFE IN CHICAGO Few people realize that there is enough native wildlife worth mentioning in roaring, jam-packed Chicago, nor that very much of it is left in its fringe of adjoining suburbs. Surprisingly, this is not the case. Just as rural people become accustomed to urban life, some wild birds and mammals have adjusted to city life and are holding their own. A few kinds seem to be more numerous in parts of metropolitan Chicago than they were in those same areas a hundred years ago. The white-tailed deer, long extinct in this part of Illinois, is on the increase in the Chicago region. In recent winters two of them, perhaps chased by dogs, were rescued from the ice on the lake front -- one at Jackson Park and the other in the Calumet region.

263

Montana's Legal Environment: Are We Open For Business?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

William Jeffrey Bureau of Business and Economic Research 2006 Economic Outlook Seminar "Montana's Legal Environment: Are We Open For ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

Montana - State Energy Profile Data - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas: Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri: Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New ...

265

Great Falls lineament, Idaho and Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The name Great Falls lineament is given to a northeast-trending zone of diverse geologic features that can be traced northeastward from the Idaho batholith in the cordilleran miogeocline of the United States, across thrust belt structures and basement rocks of west-central and southwestern Montana, through the cratonic rocks of central Montana, and into southwesternmost Saskatchewan, Canada. The zone is well represented in east-central Idaho and west-central Montana where geologic mapping has outlined northeast-trending, high-angle faults and shear zones that: (1) extend more than 150 km (93 mi) from near Salmon, Idaho, northeastward toward Anaconda, Montana; (2) define a nearly continuous zone of faulting that shows recurrent movement from middle Proterozoic to Holocene time; (3) controlled the intrusion and orientation of some Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary batholithic rocks and early Tertiary dike swarms; and (4) controlled the uplift and orientation of the Anaconda-Pintlar Range. The boundary is also characterized by: high-angle faults, shear zones, and topographic lineaments; pronounced linear gravity and magnetic anomalies; igneous intrusions; and fault controlled depositional patterns and mineralization. That the Great Falls lineament is controlled by a similar Precambrian boundary between the Archean Wyoming province of southwestern Montana and early Proterozoic terrane to the north is speculative; however, the geologic features found along the Great Falls lineament share many common characteristics with features present along the Archean-Proterozoic boundary in Canada.

O'Neil, J.M.; Lopez, D.A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

267

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

268

A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

Costello, Ronald J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Anaconda, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaconda, Montana: Energy Resources Anaconda, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Anaconda, Montana Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 5637146 Coordinates 46.1285369°, -112.9422641° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.1285369,"lon":-112.9422641,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

270

Montana Sustainable Building Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Sustainable Building Systems Name Montana Sustainable Building Systems Address 201 Second St E Place Whitefish, Montana Zip 59937 Sector Buildings Product Cross-laminated timber panel building systems Year founded 2009 Phone number 406-862-9222 Website http://www.smartwoods.com Coordinates 48.410317°, -114.340704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.410317,"lon":-114.340704,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

271

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 25, 2012 June 25, 2012 CX-008443: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subtask 4.24 - Field Evaluation of a Novel Approach for Obtaining Metal Emission Data CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory June 12, 2012 CX-008696: Categorical Exclusion Determination Power Circuit Breaker Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 06/12/2012 Location(s): Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration May 1, 2012 CX-008152: Categorical Exclusion Determination Whitefish In-line Hydroelectric Project CX(s) Applied: B4.1 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration April 18, 2012 CX-008225: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from

272

Montana Department of Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Department of Transportation Name Montana Department of Transportation Address 2701 Prospect Avenue P.O. Box 201001 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620 Website http://www.mdt.mt.gov/ Coordinates 46.589151°, -111.992175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.589151,"lon":-111.992175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

273

Montana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Montana/Wind Resources < Montana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Montana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

274

Wildlife in Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

386-A September 12, 1970 386-A September 12, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE IN CHICAGO In August of 1803, when a detachment of soldiers came here from Detroit to build Fort Dearborn, they found only four crude cabins, situated on the north bank of the Chicago River. Three were occupied by French fur traders -- LeMaie, Ouilmette and Pettle -- and one was vacant. In 1833, when Chicago was incorporated as a village, there were only 200 people here. Wolves were still a problem, especially in winter. On October 6, 1834, a black bear -- the last wild one seen in Chicago was killed near the intersection of LaSalle and Adams Streets. Game was so plentiful that the region was a hunter's paradise .

275

Wildlife Trade: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

real-life situations. The real-life situations. The teacher asks students to spend a few minutes thinking about and jotting down responses in their journals to the question, "When you have gone somewhere on vacation, what kinds of things have you brought back?" She then asks the students to turn to a partner and discuss their responses. Each pair summarizes and shares their comments with the entire group. Several answers were given: pictures, postcards, souvenirs, etc. The project on wildlife trade is expected to be a multiweek inquiry. The goal is to investigate the problem, as defined by the students, using a variety of tools. Students are assigned to base groups or teams, which are frequently reorganized based on interest, but all students return to their base group to share information and help each other fill in the information

276

Wildlife Trade: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

real life situations. The real life situations. The teacher asks students to spend a few minutes thinking about and jotting down responses in their journals to the question, "When you have gone somewhere on vacation, what kinds of things have you brought back?" She then asks the students to turn to a partner and discuss their responses. Each pair summarizes and shares their comments with the entire group. Several answers were given: pictures, postcards, souvenirs, etc. The project on wildlife trade is expected to be a multiweek inquiry. The goal is to investigate the problem, as defined by the students, using a variety of tools. Students are assigned to base groups or teams, which are frequently reorganized based on interest, but all students return to their base group to share information and help each other fill in the information

277

State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Montana Legislature, Legislative Services Division

278

Flood Plain and Floodway Management Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flood Plain and Floodway Management Act (Montana) Flood Plain and Floodway Management Act (Montana) Flood Plain and Floodway Management Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation

279

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road construction and

280

Local Water Quality Districts (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Water Quality Districts (Montana) Local Water Quality Districts (Montana) Local Water Quality Districts (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This statute provides for the creation of local water quality districts to prevent and mitigate ground and surface water contamination. Each local

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Small Power Production Facilities (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities (Montana) Facilities (Montana) Small Power Production Facilities (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Interconnection Provider Montana Public Service Commission For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that: : (a) produces electricity by the use, as a primary energy source, of biomass, waste, water, wind, or other renewable resource, or any combination of those sources; or : (b) produces electricity and useful forms of thermal energy, such as heat

282

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Programmable Thermostat: 1 per address Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $150 - $300 Programmable Thermostat: $20 Natural Gas Water Heater: $50 - $100 Provider Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers several residential rebates on energy efficient measures and natural gas equipment. New furnaces, water heaters and programmable thermostats are eligible for a rebate incentive if the

283

Montana's At-large congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana's At-large congressional district: Energy Resources Montana's At-large congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Montana. Registered Research Institutions in Montana's At-large congressional district Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Registered Policy Organizations in Montana's At-large congressional district National Center for Appropriate Technology Registered Energy Companies in Montana's At-large congressional district Bioroot Energy Business Excellence Consulting Confluence Communications Grasslands Renewable Energy LLC Montana Sustainable Building Systems REC Silicon formerly ASiMI Rivertop Renewables Saddlehorn Sage Resources Semitool Inc SolarMission Technologies Inc

284

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tax Incentives to someone by E-mail Tax Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives

285

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Propane  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane (LPG) to someone by E-mail Propane (LPG) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG)

286

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

287

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parks and Wildlife Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Name Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Address 4200 Smith School Rd Place...

288

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Flying fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying fish Name: Prairie View Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How does the flying fish get speed to fly? Replies: The "flying fish", like most fishes, gets its...

291

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 3/7/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 7, 2002 March 7, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch Dam Phase II Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Camas and Elmore Counties, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 1,370 acres of

292

Wildlife -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New Wildlife Some of the links on this page lead to documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) and can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT HUNTING ON THE OAK RIDGE RESERVATION OTHER WILDLIFE INFORMATION WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT Top of Page ORR Wildlife Management Update (Presentation - February 5, 2010) Goose Control. (Video - December 2009) Giffen, Neil R., James W. Evans, and Patricia D. Parr. 2007. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. ORNL/TM-2006/155. August. Giffen, Neil R. 2007. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL/TM-2006/154. March. Wildlife Management Plan for the ORR (Presentation - November 2006) Wildlife Management Activities on the ORR (Presentation - September 2006)

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fleet  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fleet Purchaser/Manager to someone by E-mail Fleet Purchaser/Manager to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

295

Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Address Montana Economic Development Summit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Address Montana Economic Development Address Montana Economic Development Summit Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Address Montana Economic Development Summit September 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. -Tuesday, September 14, 2010, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will speak at the 2010 Montana Economic Development Summit. This year's summit will discuss the mechanics of a healthy recovery and how to get workers back into good-paying jobs. At the invitation of Senator Max Baucus, Secretary Chu will discuss how Montana can seize the clean energy opportunity and highlight the investments the administration has made in the state's clean energy sector. The summit will be webcast live. What: U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu to give keynote address at Montana Economic Development Summit

296

Workforce Training Grant (WTG) Program (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Grant (WTG) Program (Montana) Training Grant (WTG) Program (Montana) Workforce Training Grant (WTG) Program (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Montana Program Type Workforce development Training/Technical Assistance Provider Montana Department of Commerce The Workforce Training Grant (WTG) Program reimburses $5,000 per full time employee meeting wage requirements (lower of county or state average weekly wage) for new and existing employee training costs. The term of the program is 24 months. Business must demonstrate 50% sales from outside Montana and meet other eligibility criteria. Additionally, a $1 of match for every $3 WTG Funds is required of participating businesses

297

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Purchaser to someone by E-mail Purchaser to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Purchaser on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Purchaser on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Purchaser on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Purchaser on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Purchaser on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Purchaser on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

298

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Producer to someone by E-mail Producer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Producer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

299

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Registration  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Registration / Licensing to someone by E-mail Registration / Licensing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Registration / Licensing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Registration / Licensing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Registration / Licensing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Registration / Licensing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Registration / Licensing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Registration / Licensing on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

300

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Owner/Driver to someone by E-mail Vehicle Owner/Driver to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Secretary Chu Highlights Clean Energy Opportunities in Montana | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Opportunities in Montana Clean Energy Opportunities in Montana Secretary Chu Highlights Clean Energy Opportunities in Montana September 16, 2010 - 11:04am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Montana received $26.5 million going toward their weatherization assistance program. The state energy program received $25.9 million. Montana also received an additional $15.2 million for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program. On Tuesday, Secretary Chu took the stage at the Montana Economic Development summit to highlight how the Recovery Act has boosted energy projects across the state and why the state is in prime position to benefit from the shift towards a clean energy economy. The Secretary noted that the Recovery Act has made an historic investment

302

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Fuel Cells to someone by E-mail Hydrogen Fuel Cells to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

303

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fueling /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner to someone by E-mail Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on

304

Electrical Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) Energy Producer&#039;s License Tax (Montana) Electrical Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Fees Provider Montana Department of Revenue Each person or other organization engaged in the generation, manufacture, or production of electricity and electrical energy in the state of Montana,

305

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dealer to someone by E-mail Dealer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

306

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Acquisition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Acquisition / Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Acquisition / Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

307

Ballantine, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ballantine, Montana: Energy Resources Ballantine, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.9488511°, -108.1451196° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.9488511,"lon":-108.1451196,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

308

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Louisiana New Mexico Oklahoma Texas Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Florida Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Maryland Michigan Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New York North Dakota Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Utah Virginia West Virginia Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Gross Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

309

Worden, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worden, Montana: Energy Resources Worden, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.959962°, -108.1609536° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.959962,"lon":-108.1609536,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

310

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

311

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 374,201 374,201 376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 1988-2012

312

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

313

Montana Environmental Quality Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quality Council Quality Council Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana Environmental Quality Council Address Legislative Environmental Policy Office PO Box 201704 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-1704 Phone number 406-444-3742 Website http://leg.mt.gov/css/Services Coordinates 46.53°, -112.16° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.53,"lon":-112.16,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

314

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

315

Custer, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Custer, Montana: Energy Resources Custer, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.1291529°, -107.5550754° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.1291529,"lon":-107.5550754,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Huntley, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana: Energy Resources Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.899401°, -108.3015173° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.899401,"lon":-108.3015173,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

Lockwood, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lockwood, Montana: Energy Resources Lockwood, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.8191203°, -108.414855° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.8191203,"lon":-108.414855,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

319

Absarokee, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absarokee, Montana: Energy Resources Absarokee, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.5204982°, -109.4429444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5204982,"lon":-109.4429444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

Missoula, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missoula, Montana: Energy Resources Missoula, Montana: Energy Resources (Redirected from Missoula, MT) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.872146°, -113.9939982° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.872146,"lon":-113.9939982,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Belgrade, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belgrade, Montana: Energy Resources Belgrade, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.7760403°, -111.1768973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.7760403,"lon":-111.1768973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

322

Helena, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helena, Montana: Energy Resources Helena, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.6002123°, -112.0147188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.6002123,"lon":-112.0147188,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

323

Loma, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loma, Montana: Energy Resources Loma, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.9369164°, -110.5035455° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.9369164,"lon":-110.5035455,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

Boneau, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boneau, Montana: Energy Resources Boneau, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 48.2905436°, -109.8613151° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.2905436,"lon":-109.8613151,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

325

Billings, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Billings, Montana: Energy Resources Billings, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.7832856°, -108.5006904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.7832856,"lon":-108.5006904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

326

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Delaware Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Connecticut Delaware Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes

327

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 207,626 210,385 214,435 219,447 224,995 224,335 1990-2013

328

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

329

Carter, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carter, Montana: Energy Resources Carter, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.7810776°, -110.9563375° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.7810776,"lon":-110.9563375,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Geraldine, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geraldine, Montana: Energy Resources Geraldine, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.602291°, -110.267601° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.602291,"lon":-110.267601,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 205,601 207,626 210,385 214,435 219,447 224,995 1990-2013

332

Shepherd, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shepherd, Montana: Energy Resources Shepherd, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.943568°, -108.3423516° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.943568,"lon":-108.3423516,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

333

Whitefish, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Whitefish, Montana: Energy Resources Whitefish, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 48.4110757°, -114.3376334° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.4110757,"lon":-114.3376334,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

Smoke Wars: Anaconda Copper, Montana Air Pollution, and the Courts, 1890-1920  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Smoke Wars: Anaconda Copper, Montana Air Pollution,Donald MacMillan. Smoke Wars: Anaconda Copper, Montana AirWashoe Copper Company and Anaconda Copper Mining Company).

Stirling, Dale A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Lakeshore Management by Local Governments (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lakeshore Management by Local Governments (Montana) Lakeshore Management by Local Governments (Montana) Lakeshore Management by Local Governments (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Local Governments This statute grants primary authority to local governments to establish laws and regulations to conserve and protect lakes in their jurisdiction,

336

,"Montana Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2011,"6302007"...

337

,"Montana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

338

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Other Heating...

339

Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

company data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Montana Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves...

340

Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Montana Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Montana Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

342

,"Montana Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana...

343

Montana Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Montana Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

344

,"Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

345

Big Timber, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigTimber,Montana&oldid227781" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

346

Big Arm, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Relationship Tables Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigArm,Montana&oldid227741" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

347

,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

348

Montana - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Continental Divide forms much of Montana's western border with Idaho, where the Bitterroot Range captures warm moist air from the Pacific.

349

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement and Conduct Scoping Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd: Notice to Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and...

350

,"Montana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

351

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_Montana State U.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

th Annual SECA Workshop Poster Session ABSTRACT Surface Charge Redistribution in SOFC Materials Y. U. Idzerda , M. Finsterbusch, and A. Lussier Physics Department, Montana State...

352

Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

353

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

354

Montana-Dakota Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Programmable Thermostat: 1 per address Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Gas''' Furnace: 150 Energy Star Programmable Thermostat: 20 '''Electric''' Air Conditioner Replacement: 175/ton Provider Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers several residential rebates on energy efficient equipment for natural gas and electric customers. Natural gas customers are eligible for rebates on furnaces and programmable thermostats

355

Montana Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Montana Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

356

Wolf Point Substation, Roosevelt County, Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western), an agency of the United States Department of Energy, is proposing to construct the 115-kV Wolf Point Substation near Wolf Point in Roosevelt County, Montana (Figure 1). As part of the construction project, Western's existing Wolf Point Substation would be taken out of service. The existing 115-kV Wolf Point Substation is located approximately 3 miles west of Wolf Point, Montana (Figure 2). The substation was constructed in 1949. The existing Wolf Point Substation serves as a Switching Station'' for the 115-kV transmission in the region. The need for substation improvements is based on operational and reliability issues. For this environmental assessment (EA), the environmental review of the proposed project took into account the removal of the old Wolf Point Substation, rerouting of the five Western lines and four lines from the Cooperatives and Montana-Dakota Utilities Company, and the new road into the proposed substation. Reference to the new proposed Wolf Point Substation in the EA includes these facilities as well as the old substation site. The environmental review looked at the impacts to all resource areas in the Wolf Point area. 7 refs., 6 figs.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Spring Break March 1-9, 2014 Understand Ecology and Conservation. Explain Concepts and Terms. Compare and Contrast Wildlife Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation & Life Sciences Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Courses are taught by UF faculty WIS4905

Watson, Craig A.

358

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Kaniksu Unit Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge is proposing to acquire a 706-acre property located in Stevens County, Washington. The new acquisition would be called the Kaniksu Unit. A habitat evaluation was conducted on the property using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1980). Evaluation species were black-capped chickadee, mallard, ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were food and reproduction for black-capped chickadee, food, cover, and reproduction for mallard, available winter browse for white-tailed deer and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse.

US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fish breathing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish breathing Name: Bob W Whitbeck Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What factors make it harder for fish to breathe? Replies: Fish "breathe" with gills and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Glowing fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glowing fish Name: Nicholas L Walker Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do certain fish glow??? Replies: Some fish are able to produce light by a chemical...

362

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely

363

University of Montana College of Forestry and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.lawlibrary.state.mt.us/ Montana State Legislative Site: http://leg.state.mt.us/css/default.asp Montana Code Annotated: http://data regularly change. Bring this schedule to each class session for regular updates and additional or subtracted (2006): 233-311. 4. Environmental Planning Bradley C. Karkkainen, "Toward a Smarter NEPA: Monitoring

Nie, Martin

364

Montana Slab Edge Insulation Analysis for IECC 2006 Adoption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a letter report summarizing the energy analysis of slab insulation requirements which are no longer in IECC 2006 for Montana climate zone. Based on energy analysis using Equest, we calculated energy consumption and annual energy cost for various insulation configurations. This information will be used by the Montana Energy office during the upcoming code hearings.

Gowri, Krishnan

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info Start Date 2005 State Montana Program Type Grant Program Provider Montana Department of Commerce The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal government on behalf of any business may apply. The funding limit of the program is $5,000 per new qualifying job created or $7,500 per qualifying job created in a high poverty county. A dollar for dollar match (or 50% match in a high poverty

367

EIS-0393: Montanore Project, Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Montanore Project, Montana 93: Montanore Project, Montana EIS-0393: Montanore Project, Montana Summary This EIS, prepared by the U. S. Department of Agriculture (Kootenai National Forest) and the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to build a copper and silver underground mine in a location about 18 miles south of Libby, Montana. DOE's Bonneville Power Administration, a cooperating agency, has jurisdiction over the construction of a transmission line and two substations needed for powering the mine facilities if the proposed action is implemented. Kootenai National Forest's Montanore Project website: http://www.fs.fed.us/nepa/fs-usda-pop.php/?project=11743 Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

368

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The Coal Bed Methane Protection Act establishes a long-term coal bed methane protection account and a coal bed methane protection program for the purpose of compensating private landowners and water right holders for damage to land and to water quality and availability that is attributable to the development of coal bed methane wells. The Act aims to provide for

369

Montana Electric Cooperatives - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Cooperatives - Net Metering Electric Cooperatives - Net Metering Montana Electric Cooperatives - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Net Metering Provider Montana Electric Cooperatives' Association The Montana Electric Cooperatives' Association (MECA) adopted model interconnection guidelines in 2001 and a revised net-metering policy in September 2008. Net metering is available in whole or part by most of the 26 electric cooperatives in Montana. A map of the service areas of each of member cooperative is available on the MECA web site. To determine if a specific cooperative offers net metering, view the MECA

370

Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana) Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana) Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info Start Date 1975 State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Association of Conservation Districts (MACD) The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 aims to prevent the

371

EA-1940: Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for Montana Advanced Biofuels |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for Montana Advanced 0: Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for Montana Advanced Biofuels EA-1940: Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for Montana Advanced Biofuels SUMMARY Montana Advanced Biofuels (MAB) submitted an application to DOE for a Federal loan guarantee to support construction of a multi-feedstock biorefinery that would produce approximately 115 million gallons per year of ethanol in Great Falls, Montana. The biorefinery would utilize renewable biomass in the form of barley and wheat to produce ethanol and other by-products, including wheat gluten, barley bran, and barley meal. NOTE: The EA is cancelled because the applicant withdrew from the program. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOADS No downloads found for this office.

372

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) The Strip and Underground Mine Reclamation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality The policy of the state is to provide adequate remedies to protect the environmental life support system from degradation and to prevent unreasonable depletion and degradation of natural resources from strip and underground mining. This Act imposes permitting and operating restrictions on strip and underground mining activities for coal and uranium, and authorizes the Department of Environmental Quality to administer a

373

Empowerment Zone Tax Credit (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empowerment Zone Tax Credit (Montana) Empowerment Zone Tax Credit (Montana) Empowerment Zone Tax Credit (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Montana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Montana Department of Revenue The Empowerment Zone Tax Credit allows for eligible businesses located in such zones a $500 credit against income tax liability for each qualifying employee the first year, $1,000 for the second year and $1,500 for the third year of employment. If the credit exceeds the taxpayers' income tax liability, the credit may be carried forward 7 years and carried back 3 years. In addition to the income tax credits, the employer is also entitled

374

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential New Construction Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential New Construction Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential New Construction Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Residential New Construction Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Eligible Furnace: $300 Natural Gas Water Heater: $50 - $100 Provider Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers rebates to customers who install energy efficient natural gas equipment in new construction. New furnaces and water heaters are eligible for incentives through this offering. All new eligible homes with qualifying furnaces will receive a $300 rebate and

375

Montana State Historic Preservation Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana State Historic Preservation Office Montana State Historic Preservation Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana State Historic Preservation Office Name Montana State Historic Preservation Office Address 1410 Eighth Avenue Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620 Phone number 406-444-7715 Website http://mhs.mt.gov/shpo/ Coordinates 46.588015°, -112.015825° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.588015,"lon":-112.015825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

376

Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Fees Provider Montana Department of Revenue This Act reforms taxes paid by electricity generators to reduce tax rates and imposes replacement taxes in response to the 1997 restructuring of the

377

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Charlie Craig - KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Blue Creek Winter Range - Spokane Reservation (Acquisition of Smith and Parsons Properties) Project No: 1991-062-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.1 Fee Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Spokane Tribe of Indians Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the purchase of three parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 870 acres.

378

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (07/3/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Windy Bay Property Acquisition Project No: 1990-044-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Kootenai County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 150 acres of land located at the mouth of Lake Creek on Lake Coeur d'Alene on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation in Kootenai County, Idaho. Title to the land will be held by the Coeur d'Alene

379

DOE/EIS-0246-SA-16: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (8/9/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2001 9, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-16) Brad Miller, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Johnson Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: Benewah Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase three parcels totaling 411 acres of private property on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation as partial mitigation for

380

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 12/12/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 12, 2001 December 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) David Sill, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Bader Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: St. Joe Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 650 acres of private property that border the St. Joe River near Goose Heaven Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 7/24/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 24, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Lower Naches River Land Acquisition, Yakima River Side Channels Project Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources Location: Yakima County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase four parcels of private land that total approximately 125 acres located in south-central Washington along the Naches River in Yakima County. Following acquisition, title to the land will be held by The Yakama Nation. The goal of this project

382

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) 5/20/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 20, 2003 May 20, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) Joe DeHerrera, KECU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Zumwalt Prairie Preserve Conservation Easement Project No: 2001-043-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques-1.2 Easement Acquisition. Location: Wallowa County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Nature Conservancy Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The

383

Modeling highway impacts related to grizzly bear core, living, and connectivity habitat in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming using a two-scale approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mountains in Montana and Idaho. Endangered Species Technicalbear habitat of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Our approachanalysis encompassed all of Idaho, western Montana, and

Craighead, Lance; Olenicki, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

Cassirer, E. Frances

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents i TEXAS WILDLIFE DAMAGE MANAGMENT.............................................................................................................................. 2 #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page 1 TEXAS WILDLIFE-651-2880 karen.s.dulaney@usda.gov #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page

Wilkins, Neal

386

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-30)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0) 0) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Horkley Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 120 acres of sagebrush steppe and agricultural lands in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies on the west slope of the Menan Butte Area of Critical

387

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-31)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) 1) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Allen Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 81 acres of forested wetlands and scrub shrub wetlands along the south bank of the South Fork of the Snake River in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies within

388

Professor of Wildlife Biology March 2012 Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.87 Demographics Females (22%) 13 Males 47 Asians 8 Blacks or African Americans 2 Native Americans 3 Multiracials 5/Latinos 6 Multiracials 9 Native Americans 1 Whites 145 Internationals 5 Georgia Residents 74 Out, Inc.), Future of Breast Care, Mammographic Screening; · Greg Cefus, Ben Cross, and Jeff Jay (Savannah

Wilson, Kenneth R.

389

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in south central Washington. The basin encompasses approximately 136 square miles and enters the Columbia in a series of volumes that together comprise a Recovery and Subbasin Plan for Washington lower Columbia River Washington lower Columbia River subbasins consistent with the Regional Plan. These volumes describe

390

Introduction The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) or remain relatively productive (e.g., Hanford Reach fall chinook). Accordingly, this plan emphasizes, and migrating salmon and steelhead in the mainstem. This includes, among other things, protecting the Hanford included in these amendments to be "interim" while the Council works with the region to determine the most

391

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown Bat Pied-billed Grebe Turkey Vulture Blue Grouse Black Bear Red-necked Grebe Gadwall Bobcat Black Brewer's Sparrow Black-billed Magpie Clark's Grebe Blue-winged Teal Brown-headed Cowbird Black-capped Chickadee Double-crested Cormorant Green-winged Teal #12;Shrubsteppe Riparian Wetlands Herbaceous Wetlands

392

THE NORTHERN FUR SEAL FISH A>jm WILDLIFE SERVICE-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are conserved for the future, and that renewable resources make their full contribution to the progress, pros taken to the Canton market to trade for tea, silks, and other products of China. The huge populations

393

Fish and Wildlife Response Letter for Clipper Windpower Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

includes one 262-foot tall wind turbine and associatedfacilities including a 240-foot tall meteorological tower (lattice- guyed type), 400 square foot building, and underground...

394

Notes From the Chair 2 Fish and Wildlife Amendment 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, some companies are betting on thin film or nano solar tech- nology to advance photovoltaic cells hot weather--an office build- ing, for example, that would just get too hot. So the decision cell phone? Is the internet going to be the communication medium for pricing, is pricing going to go

395

FY2010 2018 Fish and Wildlife Program Project Solicitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Kate Marks (NASEO), Michael McAteer (National Grid), Bridget McLaughlin (Xcel Energy), Vivek Mohta

396

FY2010 2018 Fish and Wildlife Program Project Solicitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Huang ­ IREQ Doug McLaughlin ­ Southern Co. Sharma Kolluri ­ Entergy Dede Subakti ­ CAISO #12;ii Project

397

2000 Columbia river Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Hydroelectric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission FINAL COMMISSION REPORT RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD 2007 COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Robert B. Weisenmiller Chairman ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Renewables Portfolio Standard 2007 Procurement Verification Final Commission Report

398

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unit Coalc1ale Rearing Unit ) Crystal River Ree.ring Unit Denver He.tchery Dolores Rearing Unit Durango~1 River Hatchery Moccasin Cl"eek Hatchery Moja:ve River Hatchery MoorehQ~se Springs Hatchery M~ington Hatchery Voluntown Rearing Station Windsor Locks Hatchery FLORIDA Blackwater River Hatchery Wewahitchka

399

Montana Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 60,500 59,058 57,793 1970's 59,193 57,105 61,757 56,960 146,907 156,203 0 0 0 1980's 11,825 13,169 15,093 16,349 19,793 16,212 14,177 15,230 15,475 1990's 14,629 14,864 12,697 11,010 10,418 9,413 10,141 8,859 8,715 5,211 2000's 5,495 5,691 6,030 6,263 6,720 10,057 12,685 13,646 13,137 12,415 2010's 12,391 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Montana Natural Gas Plant Processing

400

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Wildlife Risks of Wind and Solar Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the potential wildlife impacts resulting from wind and solar power development. The report defines the potential wildlife impacts, the business reasoning for assessing these impacts, details regarding site selection to minimize impacts, strategies to assess impacts, and management strategies to mitigate or minimize impacts. The report will assist utility generation planners and electric power company environmental staff in identifying and evaluating the wildlife impacts of wind and s...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

Wildlife Management Plan for the ORR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at maintaining public safety (e.g., reduction in deervehicle collisions, reduction in Canada goosehuman interactions), while also maximizing wildlife health and diversity. *...

403

Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hydropower : A Regulatory Guide to Permitting and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, construction and operation of a hydropower project can result in many potential impacts. These potential impacts are of concern to a host of federal, state, and local authorities. Early consultation with land and water management, fish and wildlife resource protection, and health and human safety-oriented agencies should occur to determine specific concerns and study requirements for each proposed project. This Guide to Permitting and Licensing outlines the characteristic features of attractive hydropower sites; summarizes an array of developmental constraints; illustrates potential environmental impacts and concerns; and summarizes all federal, state, and local permitting and licensing requirements.

McCoy, Gilbert A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hydropower: A Regulatory Guide to Permitting and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, construction and operation of a hydropower project can result in many potential impacts. These potential impacts are of concern to a host of federal, state, and local authorities. Early consultation with land and water management, fish and wildlife resource protection, and health and human safety-oriented agencies should occur to determine specific concerns and study requirements for each proposed project. This Guide to Permitting and Licensing outlines the characteristic features of attractive hydropower sites; summarizes an array of developmental constraints; illustrates potential environmental impacts and concerns; and summarizes all federal, state, and local permitting and licensing requirements.

McCoy, Gilbert A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cooperative fish-rearing programs in Hanford Site excess facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In, 1993, two successful fish-rearing pilot projects were conducted in Hanford Site 100 K Area water treatment pools (K Pools) that are excess to the US Department of Energy needs. Beginning this spring, two larger cooperative fish programs will be undertaken in the K Pools. One program will involve the Yakama Indian Nation, which will rear, acclimate, and release 500,000 fall chinook salmon. The other program involves the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, which will rear warm-water specie (walleye and channel catfish) for planting in state lakes. Renewed economic vitality is the goal expected from these and follow-on fish programs.

Herborn, D.I.; Anderson, B.N.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

1994 COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM TABLE OF CONTENTS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM TOC-1 December 14, 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Chair Oregon Frank L. Cassidy Jr. "Larry" Washington Jim Kempton Idaho Judi Danielson Idaho Melinda S. Eden on the then-current lifecycle costs (including forecast changes in fuel prices and the cost of compliance has estimated that 1290 MW of potential geothermal capacity could be developed in Idaho, Oregon

408

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Appendix 2). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Attachment A). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this...

412

Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Montana Construction Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the DC Energy Conservation Code The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Montana homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Montana Construction Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Montana homeowners will save $4,105 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

413

Jumping fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jumping fish Name: Roy Bates Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do fish jump more in the summer than in the fall? Replies: One reason may be the number of...

414

Spawning fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spawning fish Name: Jeffrey M Ulmer Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What signals some fish to travel up a waterfall? Replies: Good question, Jeff Much is...

415

Gulping fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulping fish Name: Jason S Kay Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Dear Mr. or Ms. Scientist, why do fish come to the surface and gulp like they're...

416

Fish breathing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish breathing Name: lennartz Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: How do fish get their oxygen under water? Replies: Not so differently from the way we get it from air....

417

Fish Scales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Scales Name: Kaylee Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Do all fish have scales? Replies: No, some like catfish and bullheads, have smooth skins. J. Elliott No,...

418

Little Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Nature Bulletin No. 258-A February 25, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B, Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LITTLE FISH It is...

419

Fish eating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish eating Name: Rex P Frost Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: From the students in my grade 7 science class who are doing a an assignment on marine fish: What stops...

420

Internet Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I have invented "Internet Fish," a novel class of resource-discovery tools designed to help users extract useful information from the Internet. Internet Fish (IFish) are semi-autonomous, persistent information brokers; ...

LaMacchia, Brian A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Geothermal Resources on State Lands (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Resources on State Lands (Montana) Geothermal Resources on State Lands (Montana) Geothermal Resources on State Lands (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Montana Program Type Leasing Program This chapter authorizes the leasing of state-owned lands for the development of geothermal resources, and provides regulations pertaining to the nature of the resources, compensation, and water rights, as well as for

422

Montana-Dakota Utilities Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana-Dakota Utilities Co Place Montana Utility Id 12199 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large General Service - Rate 30 Commercial Large General Service Time of Use - Rate 31 Commercial Optional Time of Day Residential - Rate 16 Residential RS Rate 10 Residential Small General Service - Rate 20 Commercial Small General Service Time of Use - Rate 26 Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0797/kWh Commercial: $0.0654/kWh Industrial: $0.0462/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (Montana).

423

Energy Secretary Chu Announces Montana Schools Win National Student  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Schools Win National Student Montana Schools Win National Student Efficiency Competition Energy Secretary Chu Announces Montana Schools Win National Student Efficiency Competition May 2, 2012 - 3:05pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced the winners of the America's Home Energy Education Challenge, a national student competition designed to encourage students and their families to take action to start saving money by saving energy. A team of students from five schools in rural Carter County, Montana - Alzeda Elementary School, Carter County High School, Ekalaka Elementary School (K-8th grade), Hammond School (K-8th grade) and Hawks Home School - was declared the national winner for successfully reducing their home energy use by 3.4 percent, working with local utility companies and the community,

424

Montana-Dakota Utilities Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana-Dakota Utilities Co Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (Redirected from MDU Resources Group Inc) Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana-Dakota Utilities Co Place Montana Utility Id 12199 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large General Service - Rate 30 Commercial Large General Service Time of Use - Rate 31 Commercial Optional Time of Day Residential - Rate 16 Residential RS Rate 10 Residential Small General Service - Rate 20 Commercial Small General Service Time of Use - Rate 26 Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0797/kWh Commercial: $0.0654/kWh Industrial: $0.0462/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for

425

Montana Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Montana Regions Montana Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Montana Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Montana Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

426

Local Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) Local Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Bond Program Provider Any interested county or municipality. Limited obligation local government bonds ("special revenue bonds") may be issued for qualified electric energy generation facilities, including those powered by renewables. These bonds generally are secured by the project itself. The taxing power or general credit of the government may not be used to secure the bonds. Local governments may not operate any project

427

Montana Department of Environmental Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Department of Environmental Quality Name Montana Department of Environmental Quality Address 1520 E. 6th Ave, PO Box 200901 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-0901 Phone number 406-444-2544 Website http://www.deq.mt.gov/default. Coordinates 46.58741°, -112.013743° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.58741,"lon":-112.013743,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

Montana Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Montana Regions Montana Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Montana Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Montana Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

429

Montana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

+ Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Montana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

430

Montana Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Montana Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0...

431

Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Montana Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

432

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) This is the approved revision of this page, as...

433

Montana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

434

Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

435

Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

436

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

437

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70, No. 210 - Nov. 1, 2005 Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd: Federal Register Notice Volume 70, No. 210 - Nov. 1, 2005...

438

Montana Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Montana Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 78: 84: 84: 83: 85: 86: 84: 85: 84: 88 ...

439

Montana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

440

Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

,"Montana U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana...

442

Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

443

Montana-Dakota Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana-Dakota Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Montana-Dakota Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Program Montana-Dakota Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Lighting: Total incentive cannot exceed 50% of project cost Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Lighting Incentive: $0.20/watt 4 ft Lighting Fixtures or Less: $1 - $14 8 ft Lighting Fixtures: $3 - $9 13W-42W Lighting Replacements: $9 - $22 LED Exit Sign: $6 CFL Exit: $3 Central AC: $100 - $200/ton Split System AC: $100/ton Packaged/Rooftop AC: $100/ton New Premium Motor: $4/HP Premium Replacement Motor: $15/HP

444

Montana-Dakota Utilities Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MDU) MDU) Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana-Dakota Utilities Co Place Montana Utility Id 12199 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large General Service - Rate 30 Commercial Large General Service Time of Use - Rate 31 Commercial Optional Time of Day Residential - Rate 16 Residential RS Rate 10 Residential Small General Service - Rate 20 Commercial Small General Service Time of Use - Rate 26 Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0797/kWh Commercial: $0.0654/kWh Industrial: $0.0462/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (Montana).

445

US hydropower resource assessment for Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Montana.

Francfort, J.E.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Marysville, Montana Geothermal Project. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the exploration of an anomalous site near Marysville, Montana, where the geothermal heat flow is about 10 times the regional average. The site arouses scientific interest because there are no surface manifestations such as young volcanics, hot springs, geysers, etc., within 20 miles of it. Also, there is significant economic interest in exploring the source of heat as a potential for the generation of electricity. Included herein are independent sections prepared by each contractor. Consequently, there is some overlapping information, generally presented from different viewpoints. The project consists of geophysical surveys in 1973 and 1974, the drilling of the deep well in the summer of 1974 to a depth of 6790 feet, the coring and logging of the well, the supporting scientific studies, and the data analysis. Since so much data are available on the Marysville system, it can serve as a testing and research area to help locate and understand similar systems. (GRA)

Not Available

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

2012 WILDLIFE CAPTURE, IMMOBILIZATION, AND HANDLING COURSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blow pipes Darts Dart guns 5. The Drugging Event: putting it all together (i.e. drugs and equipment. Drugging, reversal (i.v. and i.m.), and antibiotics: syringes, pole syringes, blow-pipes, darts, dart.M. Arnemo. 2007. Handbook of Wildlife Immobilization: International Edition. Wildlife Pharmaceutical, Inc

Weiblen, George D

448

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring; Volume II of II, Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Participating agencies included: Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This is the final data report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project. Data collected and sampling results for 1990 and 1991 are presented within this report. An evaluation of this project can be found in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Volume 1, Completion Report.'' May, 1991. Pathogen detection methods remained the same from methods described in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Annual Report 1989,'' May, 1990. From January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 fish health monitoring sampling was conducted. In 1990 21 returning adult stocks were sampled. Juvenile pre-release exams were completed on 20 yearling releases, and 13 sub-yearling releases in 1990. In 1991 17 yearling releases and 11 sub-yearling releases were examined. Midterm sampling was completed on 19 stocks in 1990. Organosomatic analysis was performed at release on index station stocks; Cowlitz spring and fall chinook, Lewis river early coho and Lyons Ferry fall chinook.

Michak, Patty

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Montana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana Montana September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN MONTANA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN MONTANA Montana Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Montana. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas The list below contains summaries of all Montana laws and incentives

451

A Method for Predicting Chinook Winds East of the Montana Rockies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damaging foehn winds, locally known as chinook winds, are loosely defined and generally described for the east slopes of the Montana Rockies. Three upper-level patterns associated with chinook episodes in Montana are described and illustrated. ...

Michael J. Oard

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fuel Taxes  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Taxes to someone by E-mail Fuel Taxes to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fuel Taxes on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fuel Taxes on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fuel Taxes on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fuel Taxes on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fuel Taxes on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Fuel Taxes on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Fuel Taxes The list below contains summaries of all Montana laws and incentives

453

Primitive Fishes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fishes Fishes Nature Bulletin No. 322-A November 23, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRIMITIVE FISHES The history of fish covers such a vast stretch of time that the mind simply cannot grasp its immensity. The beginnings of fish -- or at least the earliest known forms -- and of the fish-like animals that existed before them, are found as fossils in rocks that geologists say were formed 400 million years ago. Sea scorpions, worms, mollusks and all of the other main types of lower animals had already lived in the sea for ages before that. It is a question which of them, if any, gave rise to fish. These older animals had a digestive tube and beneath it, on the side next to the ground, was the brain and nerve cord. The forerunners of fish, however, had the brain and nerve cord above the digestive tube, with a slender rod of gristle in between -- something that no other animal ever had had before. The theory is that this rod later developed into the backbone that is found in all of their modern descendants: fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

454

Selected data from thermal-spring areas, southwestern Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1975 to 1977 the Montana district of the US Geological Survey collected and assembled data describing the flow, temperature, and chemical characteristics of thermal and related waters. The work was part of an assessment of the geothermal resources of southwestern Montana, excluding Yellowstone Park. Representative data are presented here from 24 thermal springs and 3 deep wells where water temperatures exceed 38/sup 0/C (100/sup 0/F). Initially, the data base included references reported by Waring (1965). The data base also included unpublished chemical analyses of water samples and related data collected during 1959 to 1973 by the Montana State Board of Health (now Montana Department of Health and Environmental Sciences), the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, and by graduate students for theses. Results of analyses and engineering reports were collected from landowners, and additional published and unpublished data were collected by Geological Survey investigators during 1967 to 1975. Tabulation of the data revealed wide discrepancies in reported parameters for some sites. Inadequate description of the sampling sites limited the value of much of the previously reported data, because most of the thermal springs were characterized by multiple outlets. Field measurements of rate, specific conductance, pH, and temperature of flow at the various outlets, particularly those having the highest temperatures, were compared with previously reported determinations.

Leonard, R.B.; Brosten, T.M.; Midtlyng, N.A.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nevada Department of Wildlife Name Nevada Department of Wildlife Address 1100 Valley Rd. Place Reno, Nevada Zip 89512 Website http://www.ndow.org/ Coordinates 39.5394967°, -119.807584° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5394967,"lon":-119.807584,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Fund Wildlife Fund Jump to: navigation, search Logo: World Wildlife Fund Name World Wildlife Fund Address 1250 Twenty-Fourth Street, N.W. Place Washington, DC Zip 20090-7180 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Website http://www.worldwildlife.org Coordinates 38.92°, -76.99° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.92,"lon":-76.99,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

Colorado Division of Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name Colorado Parks and Wildlife Address 1313 Sherman Street, Suite 618 Place Denver, Colorado Zip 80203 Phone number (303) 866-3437 Website http://wildlife.state.co.us/Pa Coordinates 39.7370973°, -104.9851154° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7370973,"lon":-104.9851154,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) Flood damage assessment of project leases after the May 1995 and November 1995 floods, (2) reconstruction of 0.75 miles of riparian fence, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 14.8 miles of fence, (4) collection of approximately 55,000 native willow and cottonwood cuttings and installation of approximately 21,600 of these material, (5) implementation of two bioengineering projects and initiation of a third project, (6) installation of approximately 30 tree/rootwads for fish habitat enhancement, (7) removal of an abandoned flood irrigation dam/fish barrier, (8) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, and (9) extensive interagency coordination.

Laws, Troy S. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Helena, Montana B Helena, Montana Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-6b_mt_helena.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-6b_usa_mt_helena.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-6b_usa_mt_helena.zip More Documents & Publications

460

Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Conservation Oil and Gas Conservation Jump to: navigation, search State Montana Name Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation Address 2535 St. Johns Avenue City, State Billings, Montana Zip 59102 Website http://bogc.dnrc.mt.gov/defaul Coordinates 45.772091°, -108.580921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.772091,"lon":-108.580921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}