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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

Drais, Gregory

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:Moe WindMont Vista Capital LLCFish, Wildlife

3

Fish and Wildlife Administrator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The incumbent in this position will serve as a Fish and Wildlife Administrator for BPAs Fish and Wildlife Division. The Fish and Wildlife Administrator is responsible for overseeing projects, and...

4

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

5

EA-1932: Bass Lake Native Fish Restoration, Eureka, Lincoln County, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA was initiated to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to help restore native fish populations to the Tobacco River and Lake Koocanusa. The project has been cancelled.

6

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Interior FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Box 50088 Honolulu, Hawaii 96850 In Reply Refer To: 20 lO-F...

7

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

9

Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

∑ Walleye ∑ Smallmouth bass ∑ Northern pike ∑ Others 5 Native and Non-native Fish Predators #12;∑ At dams#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program Summary of Predation Event Center #12;Council's 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Piscivorous Predator Control ∑ Implement

10

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

11

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,...

12

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown,...

13

Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University Fisheries and Wildlife United States Geological Survey United States Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife of this report in any way is withheld pending specific authorization from the Leader, Maine Cooperative Fish

Thomas, Andrew

14

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994 Appendix C ASSURING AN ADEQUATE Council characterizes the fish and wildlife provisions of the Northwest Power Act as "[a Basin Fish And Wildlife program must consist of measures to "protect, mitigate, and enhance fish

15

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

16

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

17

Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest-2013 data is based on the proposed IPR spending levels as of May 13, 2010. Total $ 155 4 20 34 4 445 116 778 Program Proposed Expense Budget F&W Program Expense Budget IPR FY 2012 FY 2013 Base * 239,634,000 243

18

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, smallmouth bass; crappie; bluegill, redear sunfish; channel cat:fish #12;State Name ARKANSAS - Cont. Lonoke'-'I' 'J UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Washington 25, D. C. Leaflet FL-41 Revised May 1959 LIST OF STATE FISH HATCHERIES

19

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

20

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

22

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

23

FY2010 2018 Fish and Wildlife Program Project Solicitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Idaho Wildlife Mitigation-Middle Snake #12;2 A. Abstract The Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation project (SIWM) of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) proposes implementation of wildlife mitigation and/or scientific background In both the Mid and Upper Snake Provinces, human development

24

RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995 Section 10 RESIDENT FISH Resident fish are freshwater fish that live and migrate within the rivers, streams and lakes of the Columbia River Basin, but do not travel to the ocean. Resident fish exist throughout the basin

25

FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995 1 Section 162 3 Findings on the Recommendations for Amendments to the4 Resident Fish and Wildlife Portions of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program5 and Response to Comments6 September 13, 19957 8 9 In late 1994 the Council requested that fish and wildlife

26

Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram Lawswith Wildlife

27

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

29

NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron Fish and Wildlife Service -760/431-9440 ext. 205  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron ­ Fish and Wildlife Service - 760/431-9440 ext. 205 Jan Bedrosian ­ Bureau of Land Management ­ 916/978-4614 Timothy J. DiCintio ­ National Fish and Wildlife. The REAT is comprised of representatives of the Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management

30

DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Will Clements in fish, wildlife and conservation biology. The course format will include lectures, group discussion Assignments and Homework......................................... 15% #12;FW 370- DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

31

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service- Shepherdstown, West Virginia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective.

32

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory: A Strategy for the 21st Century #12;Estuarine emergent wetlands account for only five percent of the wetland area in the lower 48 States. Those like this estuarine wetland in South Carolina provide essential rearing habitat for important

Gray, Matthew

33

SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 2 SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK September 13, 1995 2-4 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM · determine and rebuilding of weak native fish stocks and those stocks that are resident fish substitutions under

34

US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Kate of ocean conditions on fish and wildlife populations." #12;Relationship between CRB and Ocean Ecosystems Columbia R Basin Ecosystem Ocean Ecosystem Anadromous fish Viability Abundance, productivity, spatial

36

Division of Fish and Wildlife Programs, 1984-1985 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes the organization and functions of the Division of Fish and Wildlife, and lists the projects conducted during FY 1985. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Dioxin hazards to fish, wildlife, and invertebrates: a synoptic review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs) are present as trace impurities in various manufactured chemicals and in combustion products. The chemical and environmental stability of PCDDs and their tendency to accumulate in fatty tissues have resulted in their widespread detection throughout the global ecosystem. The most toxic and extensively studied PCDD isomer is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Accidental contamination of the environment by 2,3,7,8-TCDD has resulted in deaths in many species of birds, wildlife, and domestic animals, and in the closing of rivers to fishing due to high residues in fish, i.e., >50 parts per trillion (ppt) wet weight. Laboratory studies with birds, mammals, aquatic organisms, and other species have conclusively demonstrated that exposure to 2,3,7,8-TCDD can be associated with acute and delayed mortality, carcinogenic, teratogenic, reproductive, mutagenic, histopathologic, and immunotoxic effects.

Eisler, R.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Dept. of Fish for compensatory predation by smallmouth bass and walleye. 4 Evaluate effect of program on salmonid4. Evaluate 4 Decreased amount of older/larger fish4. Decreased amount of older/larger fish. 5. Reduced

40

Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 60 (2013) LAKEWATCH Continues to be a Large Part of Florida Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a largemouth bass during a sampling event for the long-term fish monitoring program Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) Long-Term Fish Monitoring Program in their water bodies. Focusing more on fish and wildlife (biological integrity

Jawitz, James W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

Stovall, Stacey H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

Watson, Craig A.

43

Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we meeting biological and programmatic performance objectives established within the Columbia Basin Fish implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

44

Division of Fish and Wildlife Program Summary, 1985-1986 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the organization of the Division of Fish and Wildlife programs of Bonneville Power Administration, its budget, and research programs funded by it during FY 1986. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

DOE/EIS-0312; Bonneville Power Administration, Fish and Wildlife...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Limited NZ20027j April 03, 2001 Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area Anadromous Fish Extinct Listed Anadromous Fish Species Listed Resident Fish - Bull Trout Listed...

46

Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY for minor= 26 - 28 Aquatic and Fishery Electives for Fishery Biology Minor (Additional course work may 301/307, MATH 141/155/160) BZ 332 Phycology (F) FW 402 Fish Culture (S; FW 300) BZ 471 Stream Biology

48

WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 Seotember 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas increases. Programs to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should

49

PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 APPENDIX L Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife Plans and Programs This inventory was conducted in the spring of 2003 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife under contract to WRI. The following pages are printed from the spreadsheet used in the inventory

50

Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fishes. S..::aleless warm- water fish are particularly susceptible. High water temperature decreases fish resistance to this disease. RANGE Best known in America. Excessively hot summer temperatures are favorable and Wildlife INTRODUCTION Columnaris disease attacks many species of fresh -water fishes. Also known as "Cotton

52

WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 December 14, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should consider the net

53

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................. 16 SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS The Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system is a limited resource and reliable energy supply. This is so even though the hydroelectric operations specified for fish and wildlife peaking needs. On average, hydroelectric generation is reduced by about 1,200 average megawatts, relative

54

FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 Section 12 FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT Much of this program has focused on mitigating damage done for additional federal hydroelectric projects and to plan for new development in the basin. The Federal Energy

55

ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix D STAFF ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS During the course. This report provides the results of the biological analysis of the adopted actions. The package was termed

56

SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

57

Subbasin Assessment Template for the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL 1 Subbasin Assessment Template for the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife progress. Subbasin assessments provide technical information upon which subbasin plans and other planning but are separate and distinct technical exercises. Assessments help to estimate the resource potential of each

58

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biochemical indices of quality. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Engineering studies on freezing and cold storage systems . · · . . . . . . . · . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Storage of fish in refrigerated sea water . . . 5 Time-temperature tolerance of frozen seafoods 5 to meet the needs of industry. Funda- ment al research has been continued in the field of fish - mus cle

59

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

Casey, Daniel

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stagnant or muddy pools where their breathing movements attract attention on warm af,ternoons. The swimming, is known to pass readily to and from fresh and saltwater. \\ .JJ In general, information is from Fishes

62

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

63

Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 1: Field evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of arsenic and metals in soils surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana were correlated with vegetative community structure and composition and wildlife habitat quality. Soils in the uplands surrounding the smelter were highly enriched with arsenic and metals. Concentrations of these analytes decreased with distance from the smelter and with soil depth, suggesting that the smelter is the source of the enrichment. In enriched areas, marked modifications to the native vegetation community structure and composition were observed. These included replacement of evergreen forest with bare unvegetated ground; species impoverishment and increased dominance by weed species in grasslands; and reductions in the vertical complexity of the habitat. Significant negative correlations existed between soil arsenic and metals concentrations and the extent of vegetative cover and the vertical diversity of plant communities. Loss of vegetative cover in the affected areas has been accompanied by reductions in their capacity to support indigenous wildlife populations.

Galbraith, H.; LeJeune, K.; Lipton, J. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH AND AQUATIC INSECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

391 392 EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH AND AQUATIC INSECTS IN GALLATIN RIVER DRAINAGE IN MONTANA EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON STREAM BOTTOM ORGANISMS IN TWO MOUNTAIN STREAMS IN GEORGIA SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC, Commissioner Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, Daniel H. Janzen, Director EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH

65

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Concerns and Recommendations Our specific comments on the Council's draft recommendations address several issues, broadly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power needs of the people of the Pacific Northwest. In our perspective it is one of your most Balancing the Fish and Wildlife Program under the Northwest Power Act.Instead of reanalyzing the projects for the Fish and Wildlife Program was established by the Bonneville Power Administration in their electricity

67

FW370 -Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects -Spring 2012 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 10-11:40, Wagar 107 (Lecture & Discussion) or NR 232, CLL West (Lab)  

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FW370 - Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects - Spring 2012 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 10 of this course is to introduce you to the principles of conducting sound scientific research in fish, wildlife of the scientific method in fish, wildlife, and conservation biology research (from asking good questions

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FW370 Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects Spring 2011 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 1011:40, Wagar 107 (Lecture & Discussion) or NR 232, CLL West (Lab)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FW370 Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects Spring 2011 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 1011 is to introduce you to the principles of conducting sound scientific research in fish, wildlife, and conservation of the scientific method in fish & wildlife research (from asking good questions to designing experiments

69

Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service A National Streamflow Network Gap Analysis  

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Analysis U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2013 13039500, Henrys Fork near Lake, Idaho; photograph by Nathan Jacobson, USGS. USGS streamgage 10336660, Emily B. Osborne, and Ken Eng Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Scientific

Fleskes, Joe

70

Improving Avian Conservation in Northern Vietnam PhD Dissertation, Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Conservation Biology Vietnam is a tropical country rich in biodiversity. However, biodiversity in Vietnam has forests. Improving the conservation of biodiversity in Vietnam is a contemporary issue of concern. MyImproving Avian Conservation in Northern Vietnam PhD Dissertation, Department of Fish, Wildlife

71

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The runoff volumes in 2003 were below average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (79%) and The Dalles Dam (82%). The year 2003 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that met the spring seasonal Biological Opinion flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam, McNary Dam and Priest Rapids Dam. However, summer seasonal flows at Lower Granite Dam and McNary Dam were considerably below the Biological Opinion objectives of 50.7 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam and 2000 Kcfs at McNary Dam. Actual summer seasonal flows were just 32.3 Kcfs and 135.5 Kcfs, respectively. In most instances spill was provided as described by the Biological Opinion program for fish passage, within the constraints of the State waivers for total dissolved gas supersaturation levels. Spill was altered during spill testing and most notably during the month of August at Ice Harbor dam. At this project spill was modified from a 24-hour program to a 12-hour nightly spill period pending the evaluation of studies being conducted in-season. Spill was not returned to full implementation of the Biological Opinion levels even after data showed that spillway passage had the highest associated fish survival. This experience demonstrated the difficulty of managing the hydrosystem for fish passage based on preliminary data and data collected in-season. Increased hatchery releases and higher wild fish production resulted in a population of yearling chinook at Lower Granite Dam being one of the highest observed in recent years. However, the increased hatchery production may have been offset to some extent by decreased survival from release to Lower Granite Dam as suggested by the lower than average survival observed for the PIT tagged trap released fish to Lower Monumental Dam. Travel times were also longer for hatchery spring chinook compared to recent past years. The short duration of high flows that occurred in the Lower Snake River was too late for yearling chinook, but likely was a benefit for steelhead. Survivals for spring fish in the Lower Granite to McNary Dam and the McNary to Bonneville Dam reach were similar to recent years. Returning numbers of adult spring and summer chinook, coho and steelhead were less than observed in 2002, but far exceeded the ten-year average return numbers. Sockeye numbers were less than both the 2002 returning adults and the ten-year average number. However, fall chinook numbers surpassed all previous counts at Bonneville Dam since 1938. In 2003, about 81 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This was slightly less than the number released last year, but about average for the past several years.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 The definitions in this list have no legal significance and are provided only for clarification of terms used  

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GLOSSARY FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 GLOSSARY The definitions in this list have fish in the water of a particular stream before their release into that stream. Act -- See Northwest of different elements of the system are better understood. adult equivalent population The number of fish

77

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin  

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the U.S. Department of Energy that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal hydropower dams and one and wildlife mitigation. Also, direct-funding payments to the other federal agencies for theERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Background The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist March 2009 #12;OverviewOverview Location Importance to Fish system Anadromous fish remain Abundant wildlife remain Others working to improve habitat Connectivity & anadromous fish Local support MBCC support #12;HabitatHabitat TypesTypes Seasonal, forested, & scrub shrub

82

Fabricate and Install Yakima Basin Phase II Fish Screens; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to restore ESA listed and resident fish stocks within the Yakima Basin by preventing mortality and/or injury to all life stages of anadromous and resident fish at irrigation diversions. This goal is being accomplished through an on-going effort by the Yakima Basin Phase II Technical Work Group (TWG), which is comprised of local, state, federal, tribal and private groups who prioritize and assign screening projects.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Staff, (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

FW 300 Ichthyology Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University  

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, taxonomy, evolution, physiology, ecology, behavior, zoogeography, and conservation biology of fishes and urogenital system Bond 26 Feb 9 Midterm I Feb 14 7. Nervous system, sensory perception DOF 6 Feb 16 8

84

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

85

Montana Environmental Policy Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Montana Environmental Policy Act aims to provide for the consideration of environmental impacts by the legislature when enacting laws, and for public transparency regarding the possible...

86

Malheur River Subbasin Assessment and Management Plan For Fish and Wildlife Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.H. Stute. 2001. Evaluation of Idaho Power hatchery mitigation program. In: Technical appendices for Hells Canyon Complex Hydroelectric project. Idaho Power, Boise, ID. Technical Report E.3.1-4. Agee, J. K. 1981. Armour, C. 1990. Options for reintroducing salmon and steelhead above mid-Snake River dams. U.S. Fish

87

UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR u.s. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

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method on quality · Effective fish handling ········· Culling ········ Washing the catch········ Dressing ·· Steam generator········ iv ·.. .. .... .. 19 20 20 20 20 21 21 21 21 21 22 22 22 22 23 23 23 26 26 26 27 of higher qual- ity. This report can provide the fishery industry with a measuring stick necessary for self

88

Mining (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section provides general rules and regulations pertaining to mining practices in the state of Montana. It addresses mining locations and claims, procedures for rights-of-way and eminent domain...

89

Montana Water Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and abundance of fishes in Silver Bow Creek". Molly Smith of University of Montana received a $1,000 award his work on " Evaluation of the spatial and temporal availability of coldwater thermal refugia

90

Fish Biologist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a fish biologist within the Fish and Wildlife Policy and Planning organization. Your primarily focus will be on assessing the impacts...

91

Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 2: Laboratory phytotoxicity studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation communities on metal- and arsenic-contaminated uplands surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana have been eliminated or highly modified. Laboratory toxicity tests were performed using site soils from the impacted areas to determine whether the soils limit the ability of plants to establish and grow. The germination and growth of alfalfa, lettuce, and wheat in impacted area soils was compared to germination and growth of the three species in reference soils. The degree of phytotoxicity was quantified using a species-endpoint toxicity score calculated on the magnitude of difference between germination and growth of plants in impacted and reference soils. The impacted soils exhibited substantial toxicity to plants: 5% of the sites were severely phytotoxic, 55% were highly phytotoxic, 10% were moderately phytotoxic, 20% were mildly phytotoxic, and 10% were nontoxic. Root growth was consistently the most affected endpoint (18 of 20 impacted soils) and reduction in root length and mass was observed. Correlation and partial correlation analysis was used to evaluate the causes of phytotoxicity. Concentrations of As, Cu, and Zn and, to a lesser extent, Pb and Cd were found to be positively correlated with phytotoxicity.

Kapustka, L.A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Lipton, J.; Galbraith, H.; Cacela, D.; LeJeune, K. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Montana 2013 Biennium Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana 2013 Biennium Budget Abstract: Montanaís legislatureyears and constructs a two- year budget. The legislature waspromising for Montana and budget shortfalls are expected.

Greene, Jeffrey D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

United States Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pickle relish, paprika, onion, tabasco sauce, and pepper. Place fish on a pteheated, greased broiler pan

95

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

Schille, Patrick C. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1980 a s outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994.Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOEEA-1023)...

97

United States Department of the Interior, Douglas McKay, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, John L. Farley, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(or fat) content. Many species of fish store oil when feeding as a reserve to draw upon later their stored oil reserve. This causes a seasonal variation in oil content as shown in Table 1. The oil content from such average values. Doubtlessly the component of fish varying to the greatest degree is the oil

98

tat-es Department of the Interior, j. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert ~!r. Day, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and deter~ination *F.L. 206 Fish Processing Machinen', F.1. 207 Q,uick Freezing and Cold storage of Fish, F. Reay, Dep3.rtnent of SCier:tific and Industrial Research, and Lt. H. ~. M. Farrer, Herring Industry

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - atoll national wildlife Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Changed Pupping and Hauling Summary: . Atoll Research Bulletin 103. 3 pp. US.Fish and Wildlife Service. 1986. Hawaiian IslandsNational Wildlife... Islands National...

100

Wildlife Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildlife Services, part of Texas Cooperative Extension, is an agency created to assist the public in managing the problems sometimes caused by wildlife. Its objectives are to protect wildlife, crops, livestock, property and human health...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, J. A. KRUG, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, ALBERT :M. DAY, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

___ ______________ ___ ___ __ ____ _____ ____ __ _ ___ 207 Structures examined ~ 207 Area of fish from which scale samples were taken Preparation and method of examining scale samples. . ∑______ 209 Examination of scale materiaL ∑______ 209_____________________________________ 208 Collection of scale data__ ____ _____ __ ____ __________ _____ ________ _________________ 208

102

Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water.

Leitzinger, Eric J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Composition of Cooked Fish Dishes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composition of Cooked Fish Dishes CIRCULAR 29 Fish and Wildlife Service John L. Farley, Director United States Department of the Interior Douglas McKay, Secretary #12;#12;Composition of Cooked Fish Dishes CIRCULAR 29 Fish and Wildlife Service John L. Farley, Director United States Department

105

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part C; Lake Roosevelt Pelagic Fish Study: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pelagic fishes, such as kokanee and rainbow trout, provide an important fishery in Lake Roosevelt; however, spawner returns and creel results have been below management goals in recent years. Our objective was to identify factors that potentially limit pelagic fish production in Lake Roosevelt including entrainment, food limitation, piscivory, and other abiotic factors. We estimated the ratio of total fish entrained through Grand Coulee Dam to the pelagic fish abundance for September and October, 1998. If the majority of these fish were pelagic species, then entrainment averaged 10-13% of pelagic fish abundance each month. This rate of entrainment could impose considerable losses to pelagic fish populations on an annual basis. Therefore, estimates of species composition of entrained fish will be important in upcoming years to estimate the proportion of stocked pelagic fish lost through the dam. Food was not limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout populations since growth rates were high and large zooplankton were present in the reservoir. Estimates of survival for kokanee were low (< 0.01 annual) and unknown for rainbow trout. We estimated that the 1997 standing stock biomass of large (>1.1 mm) Daphnia could have supported 0.08 annual survival by kokanee and rainbow trout before fish consumption would have exceeded available biomass during late winter and early spring. Therefore, if recruitment goals are met in the future there may be a bottleneck in food supply for pelagic planktivores. Walleye and northern pikeminnow were the primary piscivores of salmonids in 1996 and 1997. Predation on salmonid prey was rare for rainbow trout and not detected for burbot or smallmouth bass. Northern pikeminnow had the greatest individual potential as a salmonid predator due to their high consumptive demand; however, their overall impact was limited because of their low relative abundance. We modeled the predation impact of 273,524 walleye in 1996, and 39,075 northern pikeminnow in 1997 because diet data revealed predation on salmonids during these years. We could not determine the absolute impact of piscivores on each salmonid species because identification of fish prey was limited to families. Our estimate of salmonid consumption by walleye in 1996 and northern pikeminnow in 1997 shows that losses of stocked kokanee and rainbow trout could be substantial (up to 73% of kokanee) if piscivores were concentrating on one salmonid species, but were most likely lower, assuming predation was spread among kokanee, rainbow trout, and whitefish. Dissolved oxygen was never limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout, but temperatures were up to 6 EC above the growth optimum for kokanee from July to September in the upper 33 meters of water. Critical data needed for a more complete analysis in the future include species composition of entrainment estimates, entrainment estimates expanded to include unmonitored turbines, seasonal growth of planktivorous salmonids, species composition of salmonid prey, piscivore diet during hatchery releases of salmonids, and collection of temperature and dissolved oxygen data throughout all depths of the reservoir during warm summer months.

Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt; Bonar, Scott

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Montana Major Facility Siting Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Montana Major Facility Siting Act aims to protect the environment from unreasonable degradation caused by irresponsible siting of electric transmission, pipeline, and geothermal facilities. The...

107

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, OSCAR L. CHAPMAN, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, ALBERT M. DAY, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

skipjack, Ka,tsuwonus pelamis. These young fish, measlUwg 35 mm. and 48 mm. in total length,2 were captmed. Yee,3 caught three additional specimens of juveuile K. pelamis. Total lengths of these Bsh were 20 mm of Kats1twon'us pelamis as shown by Kishinouye (1923), Frade and de Buen (1932), and Godsil and Byers

108

United states Departffient of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. l)iy, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPANIES #12;JAPAN'S BIG FISHIID CQ¥PANIES TABLE OF CCNnNTS Page S\\mllD8.ry was conducted by four large fishing companies or their subsidiary companies. The operations of these companies were often heavily subsidized by the J apanese Government. 5. The four big companies were: a

109

United State$ Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

risheries, but little attention has been given the use of kites in expanding the vertical fishing range with Danleno. As may oe seen in Figure 2, the method by which toe net is connected to the otter boards or ground cable (sweep) are used in this method of attachment of the otter boards to the net. This setup

110

united States Department of the Interior, J . A. Krug, Secre ary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Da y , Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· · · · · · · 2 Glas s j ars · · · · · · · · · · ·Cold storage looker faoilities. · 2 Appli oation of sharp freez, and if the fish are not held beyond a reasonable period prior to packaging and freezing. COLD STORAGE LOCKER

111

United States Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the yolume and value of the catch, productio n of manufactured fishery products, freezings and cold storage , manufacturer s of fishery byproducts, and cold- storage operators freezing or stqring fish and shellfish By C. E. Peterson · To operate efficiently, an industry must have readily available accurate current

112

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The YKFP has adopted the definition of supplementation described by Regional Assessment of Supplementation Program (1992), which is ''the use of artificial propagation in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population, and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on nontarget populations within specified biological limits''. Recent scientific reviews of hatchery supplementation continue to highlight the experimental nature and risk of supplementation (Independent Scientific Group 1996; National Research Council 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team 2000; Independent Scientific Advisory Board 2003; Hatchery Scientific Review Group 2003). In addition, many of these reviews included recommendations about the best ways to operate a supplementation program. Most of these recommendations were already being done or have been incorporated into the YKFP. The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), and Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve at the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2002 and July 31, 2003. The Yakama Nation's portion of the YKFP is presented in another report. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal. Pearsons and Easterbrooks (2003) described last year's activities.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Easterbrooks, John A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Forestry Policies (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Montana has over 20 million acres of public and private forested lands, about a quarter of the state's land area. Montana's Forests are managed by the Department of Natural Resources and...

114

Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project probability/coordination study resident fish and wildlife impacts, Phase III. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased white sturgeon habitat for most life stages. Rainbow trout adult and spawning habitat increased while juvenile and fry habitat generally decreased. Whether or not these short term increases in habitat result in long term benefits to the fish populations has yet to be determined.

Leitzinger, E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impact Phase III, 1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased white sturgeon habitat for most life stages. Rainbow trout adult and spawning habitat increased while juvenile and fry habitat generally decreased. Whether or not these short term increases in habitat result in long term benefits to the fish populations has yet to be determined.

Leitzinger, Eric J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase 3 began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transinontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased habitat for adult and juvenile white sturgeon and adult rainbow trout. But, the flows have failed to meet mean monthly flow recommendations for the past three years despite the addition of the flow augmentation releases. It is unlikely that the flow augmentation releases have had any significant long-term benefit for sturgeon and rainbow trout in the Snake River. Flow augmentation releases from the Boise and Payette rivers have in some years helped to meet or exceed minimum flow recommendations in these tributaries. The minimum flows would not have been reached without the flow augmentation releases. But, in some instances, the timing of the releases need to be adjusted in order to maximize benefits to resident fishes in the Boise and Payette rivers.

Leitzinger, Eric J. [Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Clean Air Act of Montana (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Clean Air Act of Montana is to achieve and maintain levels of air quality to "protect human health and safety and, to the greatest degree practicable, prevent injury to plant and...

118

Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 provides for the designation and establishment of a system of natural areas in order to preserve the natural ecosystems of these areas. Designated natural...

119

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Montana Joint Application for Proposed Work in Montana's Streams...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Montana Joint Application for Proposed Work in Montana's Streams (DNRC Form 270) Abstract Application must be completed for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nuclear Regulation (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes a regulatory program for sources of ionizing radiation, to be administered by the Montana Department of Health and Human Services. These regulations address permitting and...

122

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Montana Forest and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana Forest and Conservation Experiment Station 2009/2010 #12;Director's Message Page 2 The Montana Forest and Conservation Experiment Station (MFCES) continues its proud history of serving forest types. Faculty researchers of MFCES and the College of Forestry and Conservation have revealed new

Vonessen, Nikolaus

124

Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

345 Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON 1 Institute, 411 Route 1, Suite 1, Falmouth, ME 04105 USA 4 Arizona Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research address: Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Vermont 328 Aiken Center

125

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME |Supplement5869Google EarthUSE 4.1

127

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME |Supplement5869Google EarthUSE 4.1of

128

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

N /A

2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

129

Microsoft Word - CX_PerryCreek_4.29.11.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks for purchase of the Perry Creek Property. Fish and Wildlife Project...

130

Microsoft Word - DiamondB_Easement_CX.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to purchase the Diamond B conservation easement. Fish and Wildlife...

131

Fish  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified|North AmericacollaborativeFish Sign

132

Model Development to Establish Integrated Operational Rule Curves for Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs - Montana, 1996 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hungry Horse and Libby dams have profoundly affected the aquatic ecosystems in two major tributaries of the Columbia River by altering habitat and water quality, and by imposing barriers to fish migration. In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, designed in part to balance hydropower development with other natural resources in the Columbia System. The Act formed the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) who developed a program to protect, mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Pursuant to the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program for the Columbia River System (1987), we constructed computer models to simulate the trophic dynamics of the reservoir biota as related to dam operation. Results were used to develop strategies to minimize impacts and enhance the reservoir and riverine fisheries, following program measures 903(a)(1-4) and 903(b)(1-5). Two FORTRAN simulation models were developed for Hungry Horse and Libby reservoirs located in northwestern Montana. The models were designed to generate accurate, short-term predictions specific to two reservoirs and are not directly applicable to other waters. The modeling strategy, however, is portable to other reservoir systems where sufficient data are available. Reservoir operation guidelines were developed to balance fisheries concerns in the headwaters with anadromous species recovery actions in the lower Columbia (Biological Rule Curves). These BRCs were then integrated with power production and flood control to reduce the economic impact of basin-wide fisheries recovery actions. These Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) were developed simultaneously in the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR), the Council`s phase IV amendment process and recovery actions associated with endangered Columbia Basin fish species.

Marotz, Brian; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Geophysical Exploration (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An exploration permit is required for any entity conducting geophysical exploration within the state of Montana. Such entities are also required to follow rules adopted by the Board of Oil and Gas...

134

Water Resources (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state policy of Montana requires that water resources of the state be put to optimum beneficial use and not wasted. The state must promote the conservation, development, and beneficial use of...

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual fish austrolebias Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: annual fish austrolebias Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CV-C.G. Montana Carmen G. Montana Summary:...

136

Montana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drinking water supplies, a Prairie County sugar beet grower contemplating the possible impacts of coal-bed, drying streams and falling reservoir levels were the norm throughout Montana in FY 2003. But drought methane brines on soil and water, or a Madison County fishing guide coping with the effects of whirling

137

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Fact...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Swan Valley, Lake County, Mont. acres: 4,477 acres Partners: Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation; The...

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration wildlife mitigation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IntroductionI. Introduction The Northwest Power Act of Summary: , mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat, on the Columbia... to...

140

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

142

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETAIL PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna. (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All BrandsCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU PRICES APRIL 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch of Market Development FISHERY

143

Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture Graduate Programs Available Agricultural Education Program (http:// catalog.montana.edu/graduate/agriculture/agricultural- education) · M.S. in Agricultural Education (http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/ agriculture/agricultural-education) Department

Lawrence, Rick L.

144

Harvesting Rainwater for Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landowners can attract wildlife to their properties by installing rainwater catchment devices. This publication explains wildlife water sources, management considerations, rainfall catchment areas and wildlife tax valuation. It also illustrates...

Cathey, James; Persyn, Russell A.; Porter, Dana; Dozier, Monty; Mecke, Michael; Kniffen, Billy

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

United states Department of t he Interior, J. A. Kr ug, Secr et ary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day , Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.L O.S. i n London. *F. L. 206 Fish Proc essi~ r achi nery, F . L. 207 Q,uick Freezing and Cold storage of Fisheri es, Dr. G. A. Reay, Department of Scientific and Industrial Resear ch, and Lt . H. :w.. L . Farrer, Herring Industry Board, for the British Inte lligenc e Objectives Sub- Committee , 32 Bryanstone Square

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska linking wildlife Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Sciences Summary: of the state and federal agencies in Alaska (e.g. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Department of Fish... in FY08, close to 75 percent are...

147

Montana Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Montana Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program Kathi Montgomery MT Dept Environmental Quality kmontgomery@mt.gov 406-841-5243 Montana Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program...

148

Wildlife Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISP SignInWho do IWhyWhy:Wildlife

149

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fish Oil Industry in South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish Oil Industry in South America UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Fish Oil Industry in South America By -J. R. SANCHEZ TORRES Chief, "Fish Oils, " M. E. Stansby, editor, Avi Publishing Company, Westport, Connecticut, 1967. Circular 282

151

Pre-Screen Loss and Fish Facility Efficiency for Delta Smelt at the South Delta's State Water Project, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loss.cfm. Trefethen PS. 1968. Fish passage research. Reviewof progress, 1961-66. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service BureauCalifornia Department of Fish and Game Fish Bulletin 136:

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

<Montana>  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered¬ČPNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICSHe ő≤- DecayBe GeneralHeatingMontana - 2015

153

Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program: Wildlife Biology http://www.bw.uaf.edu/ University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Wildlife://www.forestry.auburn.edu/graduate/ProspectiveStudents/degrees.htm Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Programs: Wildlife Fisheries Biology http

154

Montana State University 1 Academic Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.montana.edu/undergraduate/agriculture/agricultural-education/ agricultural-education-relations-option) · Agroecology - BS option in Sustainable Food and Bioenergy Systems (http://catalog.montana.edu/undergraduate/agriculture/sustainable- food.montana.edu/undergraduate/letters-science/psychology) · Architecture - Graduate - M.Arch (http://catalog.montana.edu/graduate/ arts-architecture/architecture/master-architecture

Maxwell, Bruce D.

155

Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial #12;Table of Contents: Page Project personnel ..........................................................................................................10-17 #12;2 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial, 2013 Project Leader: Brooke Bohannon Canola Variety Evaluation. #12;4 Montana State University, College of Agriculture, Montana Agricultural

Dyer, Bill

156

Acquisition protects fish habitat in Yakima County Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

facilities. The property would be owned and managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. September 2008 Land to get management plan Once this property has been...

157

u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish hrough Navigation Locks and Use OF THE INTERIOR u.s. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES Circular 352 #12;Cover Photograph.- Brailing fish from haul seine into live car. #12;UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Walter J. Hickel

158

Montana Beginning Farm/Ranch Loan Program (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Loans subsidized by tax-exempt bonds issued by the Montana Agricultural Loan Authority may be used for the production of energy using an alternative renewable energy source. The program is run...

159

Montana Oil and Natural Gas Production Tax Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State of Montana imposes a quarterly tax on the gross taxable value of oil and natural gas production. This tax replaces several previous taxes, simplifying fees and rates as well as compliance...

160

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Montana Electric Cooperatives- Net Metering  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Montana Electric Cooperatives' Association (MECA) adopted model interconnection guidelines in 2001 and a revised net-metering policy in September 2008. Net metering is available in whole or...

162

INTERNSHIP HANDBOOK Montana State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNSHIP HANDBOOK Montana State University Counseling Program 2014-2015 #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS..........................................................................................................................................4 INTERNSHIP ASSIGNMENT TO YOUR PLACEMENT SITES........................................................................................5 APPLICATION TO INTERNSHIP SITES INTERNSHIP AT PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Dyer, Bill

163

EIS-0393: Montanore Project, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS, prepared by the U. S. Department of Agriculture (Kootenai National Forest) and the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to build a copper and silver underground mine in a location about 18 miles south of Libby, Montana. DOEís Bonneville Power Administration, a cooperating agency, has jurisdiction over the construction of a transmission line and two substations needed for powering the mine facilities if the proposed action is implemented.

164

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely restricted in these areas. Some of these species are also...

165

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

166

MONTANA PALLADIUM RESEARCH INITIATIVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Objective: The overarching objective of the Montana Palladium Research Initiative is to perform scientific research on the properties and uses of palladium in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy'√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The purpose of the research will be to explore possible palladium as an alternative to platinum in hydrogen-economy applications. To achieve this objective, the Initiatives activities will focus on several cutting-edge research approaches across a range of disciplines, including metallurgy, biomimetics, instrumentation development, and systems analysis. Background: Platinum-group elements (PGEs) play significant roles in processing hydrogen, an element that shows high potential to address this need in the U.S. and the world for inexpensive, reliable, clean energy. Platinum, however, is a very expensive component of current and planned systems, so less-expensive alternatives that have similar physical properties are being sought. To this end, several tasks have been defined under the rubric of the Montana Palladium Research Iniative. This broad swath of activities will allow progress on several fronts. The membrane-related activities of Task 1 employs state-of-the-art and leading-edge technologies to develop new, ceramic-substrate metallic membranes for the production of high-purity hydrogen, and develop techniques for the production of thin, defect-free platinum group element catalytic membranes for energy production and pollution control. The biomimetic work in Task 2 explores the use of substrate-attached hydrogen-producing enzymes and the encapsulation of palladium in virion-based protein coats to determine their utility for distributed hydrogen production. Task 3 work involves developing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a real-time, in situ diagnostic technique to characterize PGEs nanoparticles for process monitoring and control. The systems engineering work in task 4 will determine how fuel cells √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?taken as systems behave over periods of time that should show how their reformers and other subsystems deteriorate with time.

Peters, John; McCloskey, Jay; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Snyder, Stuart; Gurney, Brian

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish *preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:07 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section D. 7 Title: Resident Fish Mitigation (pg 22-23) Overview Generally, entities recommend that the existing language

168

Memorandum of Understanding The University of Montana and The Montana Law Enforcement Academy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academy Concerning Curriculum Changes in The University of Montana's Police Science Associate of Arts Degree Program WHEREAS The University of Montana and The Montana Law Enforcement Academy share of Arts Degree Program; and WHERAS employees of The Montana Law Enforcement Academy who develop and

Vonessen, Nikolaus

169

Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 2011 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Evaluation #12;1 Table of Contents: Page Project .................................................................................................................11-20 #12;2 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Evaluation, 2011 Project Leaders: Heather Mason Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Evaluation. SPONSOR VARIETY TYPE HERBICIDE RESISTANCE CONTACT

Dyer, Bill

170

Vulnerability of age-0 pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus to fish predation By W. E. French1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and smallmouth bass is low, especially in the presence of an alternative fish prey. Introduction SturgeonVulnerability of age-0 pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus to fish predation By W. E. French1 , B, Brookings, SD, USA; 2 USGS South Dakota Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Wildlife

171

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Montana State University 1 Geospatial &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Geospatial & Environmental Analysis Option Freshman Year (equiv to 270) GPHY 357 - GPS Fund/App in Mapping 3 GPHY 384 - Adv GIS and Spatial Analysis 3 University GIS & Spatial Analysis 3 Choose one of the following: 3 NRSM 430 - Natural Resource Law PSCI 362

Maxwell, Bruce D.

173

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume III, Fish and Habitat Inventory of Tributary Streams, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study of the fisheries of the Swan River drainage in relation to potential small hydro development. This information was collected in order to obtain a reliable basin-wide database which was used to evaluate the potential cumulative effects of a number of proposed small hydro developments on the fisheries of the drainage. For each named tributary stream there is a reach-by-reach narrative summary of general habitat characteristics, outstanding features of the stream, and fish populations and spawning use. An attempt was made to rank many of the measured parameters relative to other surveyed stream reaches in the drainage. 3 refs.

Leathe, Stephen A.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

175

Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greatly appreciate their input regarding this proposed project. We would like to take this chance of decreased internal nutrient loading, may take a number of years to realize. But a single season is enough is annually stocked into Twin Lakes and it is the pri

176

Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality enhancement and reduction in internal cycling of nutrients and toxic chemicals such as phosphorous

177

EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with the benefit of public comment and participation, BPA has developed and proposes a Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) that substantially...

178

Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf Jump to:Siting.pdf JumpFirelandsOpen Energy(RedirectedService

179

Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligence (SmartHome Kyoung's picture Submitted by

180

OpenEI Community - Fish and Wildlife  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahoma Jumpcommunity 2013InvitationFOA aimedTeam!

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Chemical mixtures and interactions with detoxification mechanisms and biomarker responses in fish.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Several classes of anthropogenic chemicals are present as mixtures in the aquatic environment. However, information of how wildlife species, including fish, are affected by exposuresÖ (more)

Gršns, Johanna

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - albeni falls wildlife Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Future 1. Population-specific goals Summary: -specific goals should be adopted for fish and wildlife affected by hydropower in the Columbia River Basin... in order to improve...

183

Fact Sheet - Acquisition of 0.5 acre wildlife habitat in the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Falls Dam. The 0.5-acre parcel will be owned and managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game for the purpose of wildlife mitigation. A fee in lieu of taxes will be paid to...

184

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Population and Habitat Assessment Branch, Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Veit R.R., T.P. White, M. Martin, and M.J. Steinkamp. 2010. At-Sea...

185

Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

186

Montana Economy at a Glance September 2012 Montana Department of Labor & Industry Research & Analysis Bureau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana Economy at a Glance September 2012 Montana Department of Labor & Industry Research to the economy over the last decade and helping to stabilize the Montana economy during the 2007-2010 recession The healthcare industry plays a positive and inte- gral role in the state's economy.Figure one shows the percent

Lawrence, Rick L.

187

Growth Through Agriculture (GTA) Program (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Agriculture Development Council is tasked with enhancing the future development of agriculture in Montana through establishing policies and priorities, and awarding loans or grants that have a...

188

Montana Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: Montana Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization, and Permit FeesPermitting...

189

State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes the state of Montana's support for the development and implementation of renewable energy technologies as well as environmentally-friendly modifications to existing...

190

,"Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

191

Oil and Gas General Provisions (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter describes general provisions for the exploration and development of oil and gas resources in Montana. The chapter addresses royalty interests, regulations for the lease of local...

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult fish passage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adult fish passage Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ADULT SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 6 FISH AND WILDLIFE...

193

Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Address Montana Economic Development...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Steven Chu to Address Montana Economic Development Summit Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Address Montana Economic Development Summit September 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington...

194

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Scope Change 1 PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie LTD More Documents & Publications Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd: Update...

195

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd More Documents & Publications Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana...

196

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-305 Montana...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Register Notice Vol 70 No 210. Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. 305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd More Documents & Publications PP-305 Montana Alberta Tie Ltd...

197

Energy Secretary Chu Announces Montana Schools Win National Student...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Secretary Chu Announces Montana Schools Win National Student Efficiency Competition Energy Secretary Chu Announces Montana Schools Win National Student Efficiency Competition May...

198

BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AUGUST 2009 A report prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council #12;#12;Bitterroot Subbasin Inventory for Fish (Inventory Volume), and Part III (Management Plan Volume), its appendices, and electronically linked

199

CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS [Marine Biological Laboratoryj WOODS HOLE, MASS. SPECIAL A, Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suoraela, Commissioner CORROSION RESISTANCE were tagged with nickel and Type 304 stainless steel pins to compare the corrosion resistance

200

FISH SPERMATOLOGY FISH SPERMATOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISH SPERMATOLOGY #12;FISH SPERMATOLOGY Alpha Science International Ltd. Oxford, U.K. = Editors Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, University of South Bohemia, Vodnany, Czech Republic of the publisher. ISBN 978-1-84265-369-2 Printed in India #12;Fish Spermatology is dedicated to Professor Roland

Villefranche sur mer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Montana Natural Gas Processed in Montana (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomic team: Kay6 KentuckyYearDecadeBarrels)Montana (Million

202

Effects of Climate Change on Inland Fishes of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Climate Change on Inland Fishes of California Rebecca M. Qui√Īones rmquinones@ucdavis.edu Peter B Moyle pbmoyle@ucdavis.edu Center for Watershed Sciences Department of Wildlife, Fish of climate change on aquatic habitats in California ¬∑ Climate change threats to native fishes ¬∑ What can we

California at Davis, University of

203

Annual Fish Population Surveys of Lewis and Clark Lake, 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nearly the same as 1998, but preferred-length fish were more abundant in the sample. Smallmouth bass/ " 202. -F SOUTH DAKOTA c ) Annual Fish Population Surveys of Lewis and Clark Lake, 1999 Department of Game, Fish and Parks Wildlife Division Joe Foss Building Pierre, South Dakota 57501-3182 o o

204

Wildlife Photography Market Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs to reach existing groups such as photography clubs. Joining tourism organizations is also likely to be helpful. Private Landowners? Responses The data gathered from the landowners? survey responses illustrates the limited nature of wildlife... wildlife photography, most have not yet reached the levels desired by operators. This is partly due to a lack of development as a tourism enterprise, which includes marketing and well-defined operational limits.It does seem that satisfaction is very...

Phillips, Miles

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

205

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Study Architecture at Montana State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(NAAB) 4year Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design + 3 semester Master of Architecture 10Study Architecture at Montana State University www.arch.montana.edu 4069944256 5 ¬Ĺ years to complete a Master of Architecture degree Fully accredited by National Architectural Accrediting Board

Maxwell, Bruce D.

207

Safety & Risk Management Montana State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

59717-0510 406-994-2711 406-994-7040 Fax www.montana.edu/wwwsrm Ergonomics Evaluation Form (Please keep 994-7040 or campus mail: Ergonomics Reimbursement c/o Safety & Risk Management The following Safety & Ergonomics Training Courses: www.montana.edu/wwwsrm/training.htm Ergonomics Program Contact

Dyer, Bill

208

Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2012 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial #12;1 Table of Contents: Page Project ..........................................................................................................12-29 #12;2 Montana Statewide Spring Canola Variety Trial, 2012 Project Leader: Brooke Bohannon@landolakes.com Bayer CropScience InVigor L120 H LL Mr. Jordan Varberg InVigor L130 H LL Hybrid Canola Marketing

Dyer, Bill

209

Montana Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Montana Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program Kathi Montgomery from the Montana Department of Environmental Quality at the August 26, 2009 TAP Webcast for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) Technical Assistance Project for state and local officials.

210

Recovery Act State Memos Montana  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment ofList?Department09 SectionGeorgiaMichiganMontana For

211

Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

County, Mont. acres: 147 Partners: Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Purpose: The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the...

212

ARM 12-14-150 - Commercial Use Permitting: Restricted Use Permitting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use permits for land use within the jurisdiction of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2009 Legal Citation ARM...

213

ARM 12-14-145 - Commercial Use Permitting: Restricted Use Permit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use permits for land use within the jurisdiction of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2007 Legal Citation ARM...

214

Industrial Use of Fish Oils UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial Use of Fish Oils UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES #12;Industrial Use of Fish Oils UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR 16 IIndustrial Use of Fish Oils INTRODUCTION The world's waters annually produce a tremendous harwst

215

Montana Healthcare Workforce Advisory Committee Prepared by the Montana Office of Rural Health/Area Health Education Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas, fast track or accelerated programs) 4. Healthcare workforce planning, projections and analysisMontana Healthcare Workforce Advisory Committee Prepared by the Montana Office of Rural Health/Area Health Education Center May8, 2007 1 HEALTHCARE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN MONTANA A Report by the Montana

Maxwell, Bruce D.

216

HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):284­290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage- grouse: Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat been extrapolated to estimate future oil and gas impacts in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (2010

217

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Montana  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 |J.

219

Coordinating and promoting effective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 I Coordinating and promoting effective protection and restoration of fish, wildlife Nation Idaho Department of Fish and Game Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks National Marine Fisheries Service Nez Perce Tribe Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Shoshone

220

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Montana State University 1 Mechanical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the mechanical engineering technologist provides the professional services needed in transforming the resultsMontana State University 1 Mechanical Engineering Technology The mission of the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) program is to prepare students for successful Mechanical Engineering

Maxwell, Bruce D.

222

Montana State University 1 Computer Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Computer Science A computer science degree is highly curriculum is designed with considerable flexibility, due to the numerous types of computer science jobs. Students may then select from exciting computer science electives such as artificial intelligence

Maxwell, Bruce D.

223

Montana State University 1 College of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Engineering · BS Electrical Engineering · Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (http:// catalog.montana.edu/undergraduate/engineering/mechanical-industrial- engineering) · BS Financial Engineering · BS Industrial Engineering · BS Mechanical Engineering · BS Mechanical Engineering Technology

Maxwell, Bruce D.

224

Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act reforms taxes paid by electricity generators to reduce tax rates and imposes replacement taxes in response to the 1997 restructuring of the Montana electric utility industry that allows...

225

Montana State University 1 Sustainable Food &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, bioenergy production, marketing, distribution, and local food systems. Sustainable Food Systems OptionMontana State University 1 Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems This program is a unique, processing, distribution, and utilization of food and bioenergy. The degree focuses on ecologically sound

Maxwell, Bruce D.

226

Uniform Transboundary Pollution Reciprocal Access Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act allows any entity in a Reciprocating Jurisdiction harmed by pollution originating in the state of Montana to bring an action or other proceeding against the source of that pollution in the...

227

Montana State University 1 Mechanical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanics, materials science, manufacturing processes, thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanicsMontana State University 1 Mechanical Engineering The specific mission of the undergraduate Mechanical Engineering (ME) program is to prepare students for successful mechanical engineering

Maxwell, Bruce D.

228

Montana Manufacturing Center www.mtmanufacturingcenter.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana Manufacturing Center www.mtmanufacturingcenter.com University Technical Assistance Program and wellness industry. Commenting on the strategy, Chief Opera- tions Officer and Six Sigma Green Belt Brad achieve that. NLI offers premier manufacturing and laboratories services (www

Dyer, Bill

229

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

230

Electrical Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Each person or other organization engaged in the generation, manufacture, or production of electricity and electrical energy in the state of Montana, either through waterpower or by any other means...

231

Montana State University 1 Environmental Horticulture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advanced studies in programs of landscape architecture. Undergraduate Programs · Environmental HorticultureMontana State University 1 Environmental Horticulture Note: MSU's programs and recommends this minor to students particularly interested in genetics. The curriculum in Environmental

Maxwell, Bruce D.

232

Montana State University 1 Financial Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring EIND 354 - Engineering Probability and Statistics I 3 Professional Electives 3 ECNS 313Montana State University 1 Financial Engineering The Bachelor of Science in financial statistics and probability theory ∑ Financial economics with a solid background in classical economic theory

Maxwell, Bruce D.

233

Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Game preserves and closed areas exist within the state of Montana for the protection of all the game animals and birds. Construction and development is limited in these areas. Currently, only three...

234

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife accident mitigation installations with the wildlife accident reporting system (WARS) in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTIVENESS OF WILDLIFE ACCIDENT MITIGATION INSTALLATIONSWITH THE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) INadministers the Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS), a

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Wigwam River Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program : 2000 Data Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wigwam River bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat monitoring program is a trans-boundary initiative implemented by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks (MOE), in cooperation with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream located in southeastern British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout (Figure 1.1). This river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning stream in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000, Cope 1998). In addition, the Wigwam River supports some of the largest Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) in the Kootenay Region. These fish are highly sought after by anglers (Westover 1999a, 1999b). Bull trout populations have declined in many areas of their range within Montana and throughout the northwest including British Columbia. Bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Center (Cannings 1993) and although there are many healthy populations of bull trout in the East Kootenays they remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the United States portion of the Columbia River were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The upper Kootenay River is within the Kootenai sub-basin of the Mountain Columbia Province, one of the eleven Eco-provinces that make up the Columbia River Basin. MOE applied for and received funding from BPA to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. This task is one of many that was undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00).

Cope, R.S.; Morris, K.J.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Montana's Water very person who lives in or visits Montana participates in water manage-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing Montana's Water E very person who lives in or visits Montana participates in water manage management involves people who allocate water sup- plies, issue permits, regulate the resource according to state and federal laws, and enforce laws when violations occur. Without water management, more human

Lawrence, Rick L.

238

After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conser- vation Service office about the Environmental Quality Incentive Program, which offers cost-share funding for cross-fencing, watering, controlling brush, managing grazing and prescribed burning. Carefully consider wild- life needs when managing... brush. Landowners who want to provide habitat for rare or declining species should check on cost-share funding for these practices. The Natural Resources Conservation Service?s Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

Cearley, Kenneth A.; Kowaleski, Chuck

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

239

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

EIS-0106: Great Falls-Conrad Transmission Line Project, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Western Area Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of a 230-kilovolt transmission line from Great Falls, Montana, to Conrad, Montana.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

Costello, Ronald J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Montana State University 1 College of Arts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for baccalaureate degree programs with majors in Architecture (Environmental Design), Art (Ceramics, JewelryMontana State University 1 College of Arts and Architecture Nancy Cornwell, Dean://catalog.montana.edu/undergraduate/ artsarchitecture/art) · B.A. in Environmental Design (http://catalog.montana.edu/ undergraduate/artsarchitecture/environmental

Maxwell, Bruce D.

244

Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity Harvesting Prepared for considerations for biodiversity and wildlife habitat values during their development of a discussion paper paper. #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION When evaluating the biodiversity and wildlife habitat implications

245

Montana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:Moe WindMont Vista CapitalMontanaMontana Wind

246

Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish Substitution/Blocked Area Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish Substitution/Blocked Area Mitigation *Preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:08:05 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section II.C. 1. Substitution for Anadromous Fish Losses Section II. D. 8

247

Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental Ponds1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENY-670 Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental fish, and supplying water for wildlife, the potential for new mosquito breeding sites is increasing. Small insectivorous fish are a valuable tool in controlling mosquitoes and midges ("blind mosquitoes

Watson, Craig A.

248

May 2005 O-1 The Interaction between Power Planning and Fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 2005 O-1 The Interaction between Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development to decide how to equitably allocate this resource. In particular, measures developed to aid fish, "optimizing1 " the operation of the system to enhance power production has detrimental effects on fish

249

The Montana University System Water Center, located at Montana State University-Bozeman, was established by a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Montana University System Water Center, located at Montana State University to resolve the state's water problems. It does this by sponsoring water-related research, providing training Development program, so that Montana water professionals can acquire specialized training within the state

Maxwell, Bruce D.

250

Montana State University 1 Geology Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Geology Option The Geology Option is a degree program designed and private sectors in fields such as petroleum geology, mining geology, seismology (including earthquake and volcanic risk assessment), hydrology (surface and ground water) natural-hazard geology, environmental clean

Maxwell, Bruce D.

251

Montana State University 1 Industrial Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Industrial Engineering The mission of the undergraduate program in Industrial Engineering (IE) is to produce graduates well grounded in both classical and current industrial engineering knowledge and skills consistent with the land-grant mission of MSU. Graduates

Maxwell, Bruce D.

252

Geophysical investigations of certain Montana geothermal areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selected hot springs areas of Montana have been investigated by a variety of geophysical techniques. Resistivity, gravity, seismic, and magnetic methods have been applied during investigations near the hot springs. Because the geology is extremely varied at the locations of the investigations, several geophysical techniques have usually been applied at each site.

Wideman, C.J. (Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Butte); Dye, L.; Halvorson, J.; McRae, M.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Montana State University 1 Finance Minor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Finance Minor The Finance minor is open to all students, with the exception of students pursuing a business degree with the Finance option. Program objectives include · To provide flexibility to design one's own program through choice of electives Students seeking the Finance

Maxwell, Bruce D.

254

Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana Fall 2010 T/Th 2:10 ­ 3:30 pm CHCB 227://www.physics.umt.edu/~nate/astr362/ Course Description Observational astronomy relies heavily on application of advanced technology astronomy is dominated by the CCD and related pixel array detectors: digital devices with unprecedented

Vonessen, Nikolaus

255

Montana State University 1 Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Environmental Sciences Note: MSU's programs in the biological. For additional options see Biological Sciences at MSU. Department of Land Resources & Environmental Sciences http and relationships in land and natural resources systems, combined with applications of environmental science

Maxwell, Bruce D.

256

Montana Manufacturing Center www.mtmanufacturingcenter.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on. A Six Sigma project guided by a Field Engi- neer from the Montana Manufacturing Extension Center with Worrest serving as project lead and Six Sigma Coach. Reid considers Worrest a business coach and has used is much better, the company is carrying less inventory, and it is benefiting in other ways. Six Sigma

Dyer, Bill

257

Montana State University 1 Undergraduate Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Options · College of Agriculture (p. ) · College of Arts and Architecture (p. ) · College of Business · Plant Systems Option · Microbial Systems Option · Bachelor of Science in Environmental Horticulture (http:// catalog.montana.edu/undergraduate/agriculture/environmental- horticulture) · Environmental

Maxwell, Bruce D.

258

Montana State University 1 Environmental Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Environmental Design School of Architecture The School of Architecture offers a four year Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design undergraduate program which, when combined with our three-semester graduate program, leads to a fully accredited Master of Architecture

Maxwell, Bruce D.

259

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Environmental factors influencing fish assemblage structure in a naturally saline river system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2000 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INFLUENCING FISH ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE IN A NATURALLY SALINE RIVER SYSTEM A Thesis by NIKKOAL JEAN DICTSON Submitted to Texas A&M University... Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ABSTRACT Environmental Factors Influencing Fish Assemblage Structure in a Naturally Saline River System. (May 2000) Nikkoal Jean Dictson, B. S. , New Mexico State University; Chair of Advisory Committee...

Dictson, Nikkoal Jean

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon September 30, 2010 MEMORANDUM TO: Fish and Wildlife Committee members on Project #2008-800-00, Montana Resident Fish Habitat Acquisition1 , Columbia Basin Fish Accord project. No action is requested of the Fish and Wildlife Committee regarding this Accord project. Currently

263

Macrurous Decapods from the Bearpaw Shale (Cretaceous: Campanian) of Northeastern Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macrurous Decapods from the Bearpaw Shale (Cretaceous: Campanian) of Northeastern Montana Rodney M THE BEARPAW SHALE (CRETACEOUS: CAMPANIAN) OF NORTHEASTERN MONTANA RODNEY M. FELDMANN, GALE A. BISHOP Shale of north- eastern Montana were studied to characterize the occurrence, preservation

Kammer, Thomas

264

1 | P a g e Summary of Fish-Barge Interaction Research and Fixed Dual Frequency Identification Sonar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 | P a g e Summary of Fish-Barge Interaction Research and Fixed Dual Frequency Identification of Engineers (USACE) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) have conducted laboratory and field in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) and the resulting impacts to fish behavior. The experiments

US Army Corps of Engineers

265

Montana-Dakota Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers a variety of rebates to commercial customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient lighting measures, air conditioning equipment, variable...

266

The Montana 2013 Biennium Budget: Updated May 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

another hope for the state is to develop its oil reserves.Eastern Montana has oil reserves similar to those currently

Greene, Jeffrey D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Montana - Instructions for Application for Utilities Across State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Application for Utilities Across State Trust Lands Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Montana - Instructions for Application for Utilities...

268

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

269

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The University of Montana-Missoula Summary of Strategic Goals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. At the same time, current economic conditions of the nation and the State of Montana offer challenges is a summary of the four overarching goals that are inherently critical to the University's success in all its success and the value of The University of Montana. Improve AcAdemIc QuAlIty And Student SucceSS In order

Vonessen, Nikolaus

271

Montana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coalbed methane development. Broad exploitation of this resource has been deferred in Montana pending will soon be made. When coalbed methane is extracted, large volumes of saline water will be released the water resource impacts of coalbed methane development in southeastern Montana. At the local level, urban

272

Montana State University 1 College of Arts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 College of Arts and Architecture School of Architecture (http:// catalog.montana.edu/graduate/arts- architecture/architecture) The School of Architecture offers a five and a half year professional program leading to a Master of Architecture degree, fully accredited by NAAB

Lawrence, Rick L.

273

Using Livestock to Manage Wildlife Habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock grazing can be an effective tool in managing wildlife habitat. This publication explains how grazing affects various wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and turkeys, and how to select the type of livestock needed...

Lyons, Robert K.; Wright, Byron D.

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Montana | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:JuneNovember 26, 20149DepartmentMichiganMontana Categorical

275

Broadview, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Area SolarConnecticut:659243¬į LoadingBroadMontana: Energy

276

Northern Lights, Inc (Montana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus AreaDataBusPFAN) |Agny Jump to: navigation, searchMontana)

277

Energy Incentive Programs, Montana | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusinessin Jamaica,Idaho EnergyMontana Energy Incentive Programs,

278

Montana/Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:Moe WindMont Vista CapitalMontana

279

Darby, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC JumpCrow Lake Wind107 CX at NorthDalyMontana: Energy Resources

280

Anaconda, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT Biomass Facility Jump to:Operations atAnaconda, Montana: Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Worden, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodson County,Worden, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to:

282

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuels inGo Map_thumbnailMississippi InformationMontana

283

Sandia National Laboratories: Montana State University  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLSMolten-Salt Storage System Areva Solar and SandiaMontana State

284

Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish DAILY SECTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish Home DAILY SECTIONS News Sports Opinion Arts America! Study Spanish & Volunteer ONE FISH, TWO FISH, DUMB FISH, DEAD FISH | Print | E- mail Written scientists say fish are capable of deducing how they stack up against the competition by simply watching

Fernald, Russell

285

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Status and Trends of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S., 2005. Acknowledgments Manyagencies,organizations, andindividualscontributedtheir time,energy,OR;Dr.N.ScottUrquhart ResearchScientist,Departmentof Statistics,ColoradoStateUniversity, Fort courtesy of FWS. #12; Funding for this study was provided by the following agencies: Environmental

286

Notes From the Chair 2 Fish and Wildlife Amendment 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comes the Sun: Innovations in Solar Technology As fuel costs rise and concerns about climate change- ral gas prices, many people are taking another look at solar energy's potential. In a recent interview Decisions 11 Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin Spring 2008

287

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of quicklime, the destructi,e effect of which is produced by direct cantact. Particles of the chemicaI pread usually follow in a short time. Once spread o,er the oyster beds. the lime retains its effectiveness- ne_ to oysters and many other commercial species all indicate that it is a practical weapon for use

288

United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-430. 1867~ }3ergstrom, Sune. The aetive group of heparin. Haturwi ssenschaften 23: 706. 1935, [ Carrageen

289

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Mississippi Flyway. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 DDT accumulation by waterfowl in an Ohio marsh Reproductive success in a DDT-contaminated population of herring gulls . . . . . 11 Kinetics of pesticide pOisoning in Dutch elm disease control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Bird mortality following DDT spray for Dutch elm

290

Acquisition of fish and wildlife habitat along Upper Yakima River  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

factsheet The Bonneville Power Admin- istration is working with the Yakama Nation to acquire and manage a 105 acre parcel in Kittitas County, Washington. BPA funds the acquisition...

291

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be kept in good condition can be greatly extended by freezing and holding in cold storage. Brining before.. . ................. 4 Keeping Quality.......... ___ _.... _. . _. ......... 5 Cold storage o[ frozen smoked product, are usually frozen and held in cold storage until needed, when they are withdrawn, smoked, and then 1 #12

292

United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. JUly 1945 WFA NET WEIGHTS AND CONVERSION FACTORS FOR FISHERY PRODUCTS SU1I'ilift.ARIZED The fishery cacmodities listed in Se~tions A and B of the War Food Administration's booklets on Conversion Factors tabulations ,--Sect ion A. Conversion Factors. is composed primarily of factors used to convert food supplies

293

United states Department of the Iaterior Fish and Wildlife Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, hung evenly on a hemp or manila head rope of 1/2-inch difu'TI.eter strung wi th ordinary 3-inch cork b

294

United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accessible sources of this and other hard fibers. Hemp grown in Italy and Hungary, where abundant supplies the production of the fine hemp grown there, Jute from India has been partially cut off by action in the Orient were early and wisely placed under the control of the War Production Board.~ More "Manila hemp, " which

295

DOE/EIS-0312; Bonneville Power Administration, Fish and Wildlife...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to either minimize delay of adults or minimize counting difficulties that reduce count accuracy (NMFS Biological Opinion Action Table Dec. 2000). The Corps shall develop and...

296

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Fish and Wildlife Dept.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by defining the problem, understanding ecological functions and processes, identifying restoration processes that were historically supported by nutrients supplied by the natural flood pulse of the Kootenai), and evaluation of new opportunities and incentives to create long-term, sustainable floodplain restoration

297

Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: EnergyOpenBarterVirginia.Land or Waterbody

298

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartmentFebruary 4, 2014 BioenergyDepartment ofPyrolysis

299

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq.NorthUniopolis,ParcelDefenseOpen Energythe

300

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizations in Central America 24 Organizations in South America 24 INTRODUCTION Following the practice^foundland, Mexico, the West Indies, Central America, and South America. Including chiefly the organizations in Central America 24 Organizations in South America 24 INTRODUCTION FolloAving the practice of the Bureau

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

California Department of Fish & Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis a city inCCSE Jump to: navigation,Resources | Open

302

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is a county in Florida. ItsOregon Department

303

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline RockCaldera2 2013CalhounControlWebpage | Open

304

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline RockCaldera2 2013CalhounControlWebpage |

305

Acquisition of fish and wildlife habitat along Upper Yakima River  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuide the

306

United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Serves 6 3 tablespoons minced celery 1/3 teaspoon salt 6 drops tabasco sauce Mix the last fiVG ingredi

307

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hydropower: A Regulatory Guide to Permitting and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, construction and operation of a hydropower project can result in many potential impacts. These potential impacts are of concern to a host of federal, state, and local authorities. Early consultation with land and water management, fish and wildlife resource protection, and health and human safety-oriented agencies should occur to determine specific concerns and study requirements for each proposed project. This Guide to Permitting and Licensing outlines the characteristic features of attractive hydropower sites; summarizes an array of developmental constraints; illustrates potential environmental impacts and concerns; and summarizes all federal, state, and local permitting and licensing requirements.

McCoy, Gilbert A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Lodgepole reef potential seen in Montana Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston basin Mississippian Lodgepole oil play has suffered a string of dry holes lately eroding the confidence of explorationists to find these prolific reefs, particularly in North Dakota. Detailed mapping of the Lodgepole trend suggests more Lodgepole reefs will be found in the Montana part of the trend than in North Dakota. Companies seeking impact plays should certainly give this area strong consideration. The paper discusses the delineation of a lower Lodgepole fairway extending into Montana with identification of reef facies in key wells (reef clusters), good source rocks, high quality seismic data, and impact reserve potential which makes Montana good hunting ground for significant new discoveries.

Brogdon, L. [H.A. Hedberg Trust, Fort Worth, TX (United States); Ball, S.M.; Ball, D.S. [Ball Exploration Inc., Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1996-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

Robot Fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast transcript: Usually you expect this kind of news from Japan but this time it's South Korea where scientists have just created a robotic fish. Yes, folks, this is an electronic fish that can live underwater. At depths of up to 100 meters...

Hacker, Randi

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE CAUTION! FISH LAKE SCAVANGER HUNT RED HEADED is another majestic bird of Fish Lake. These birds can be seen perched at Fish Lake. CLUB-TAIL DRAGONFLY INSECTS OF FISH LAKE There are A LOT

Minnesota, University of

312

Economics, Mathematics, Statistics MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY BOZEMAN MOUNTAINS & MINDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics, Mathematics, Statistics MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY BOZEMAN MOUNTAINS & MINDS Economics The Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics offers a broad education involving the domestic, and for graduate study in economics and in related fields including business administra- tion, finance, public

Dyer, Bill

313

Montana State University Administration and Finance University Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disposal Engineering & Utilities Engineering Services Utilities Acquisitions Heating Plant OperationMontana State University Administration and Finance University Services Associate Vice President Bob Lashaway Facilities Services Budget & IT Services Budgeting & Accounting IT Services

Maxwell, Bruce D.

314

Montana State University -Administration and Finance University Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disposal Engineering & Utilities Engineering Services Utilities Acquisitions Heating Plant OperationMontana State University - Administration and Finance University Services Associate Vice President Bob Lashaway Facilities Services Budget & IT Services Budgeting & Accounting IT Services

Lawrence, Rick L.

315

Montana - Application for Right of Way Easement for Utilities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Right of Way Easement for Utilities Through State Lands Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Montana - Application for Right of Way Easement...

316

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

317

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

318

Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

319

Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 Ph.D. Degree in Ecology and Environmental Sciences This cross of ecology and environmental sciences, within the unparalleled natural laboratory that is the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Particular program strengths include terrestrial and aquatic ecology, environmental

Lawrence, Rick L.

320

Montana Facilities Which Do Not Discharge Process Wastewater...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Which Do Not Discharge Process Wastewater (MDEQ Form 2E) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Montana Facilities Which Do Not Discharge Process...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Montana Joint Application for Proposed Work in Streams, Lakes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Joint Application for Proposed Work in Streams, Lakes and Wetlands Webpage Abstract Provides access to application forms...

322

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

N /A

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

EA-1940: Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for Montana Advanced Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Montana Advanced Biofuels (MAB) submitted an application to DOE for a Federal loan guarantee to support construction of a multi-feedstock biorefinery that would produce approximately 115 million gallons per year of ethanol in Great Falls, Montana. The biorefinery would utilize renewable biomass in the form of barley and wheat to produce ethanol and other by-products, including wheat gluten, barley bran, and barley meal. NOTE: The EA is cancelled because the applicant withdrew from the program.

324

Structural analysis of the Little Water syncline, Beaverhead County, Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE LITTLE WATER SYNCLINE, BEAVERHEAD COUNTY, MONTANA A Thesis by JAMES DANIEL PONTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Geology STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE LITTLE WATER SYNCLINE, BEAVERHEAD COUNTY, MONTANA A Thesis by JAMES DANIEL PONTON Approved as to style and content by: John H. Spa (Chairman of C mittee) Jo M. Logan (Member...

Ponton, James Daniel

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Structural geology of the Henneberry Ridge area, Beaverhead County, Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and Weed (1900), helped define the Paleozoic stratigraphy of the Montana-Wyoming area as well as establish tenative type sections, some of which are still in use today. The search for economic deposits of minerals and oil shales provided the impetus...STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY OF THE HENNEBERRY RIDGE AREA, BEAVERHEAD COUNTY, MONTANA A Thesis by JEFFREY JOHN CORYELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Coryell, Jeffrey John

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Wildlife Photography for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. *Extension Ecotourism Program Specialist, The Texas A&M University System WILDLIFE Photography Miles Phillips* for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds B-6187 3/06 Types of Blinds Surface blinds Most photographers...

Phillips, Miles

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

328

A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

Murphy, Michaela Rene

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

) United states Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and vlildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Cormnissioner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State State State State Arizona Illinois Montana Oregon California Indiana New Hampshire Rhode Island) United states Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and vlildlife Service use is furnished. The Bureau of Public Roads of the United States De- partment of Commerce has

330

The Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS) in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001, WARS 2000 Wildlife Accident Reporting System (2000related motor vehicle accident claim data and funding toTHE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) IN BRITISH

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) procurement of one access easement with a private landowner, (2) design, layout, and implementation of 3.36 miles of instream structure maintenance, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 15.1 miles of fence, (4) revegetation along 3.36 miles of stream, (5) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, (6) extensive interagency coordination, and (7) environmental education activities with local high school students.

Bailey, Timothy D.; Laws, Troy S. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation For students entering fall 2010 graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. 1 - Earth Science elective ­ GEO-SCI 100 (f more of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Schweik, Charles M.

333

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester interested in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

Schweik, Charles M.

334

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective options - BIOL of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

Schweik, Charles M.

335

IEAB Invasive Mussels Update September 2013 Invasive Mussels Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................... 16 8. Update on Mussel Control Agents Area MFWP Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks NASQAN National Stream Quality Accounting Network NGO Non, respectively, during 2012. A total of 109 mussel-infested boats were found during

336

Microsoft Word - West Swan_Acquisition_CX_10212010.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Funding the acquisition by the State of Montana of habitat in the West Swan Valley. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-800-00, Contract BPA-45235 Categorical Exclusion...

337

CX-005969: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-005969: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks for Purchase of the Perry Creek Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date:...

338

Hay Creek conservation easement protects trout habitat in Flathead...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

map). Once the proposed land is acquired, which is expected in spring 2009, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks would convey a conservation easement on the property to BPA to ensure...

339

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (2006(2006--006006--00)00)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP 101HEP 101 Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed byHabitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP

340

On glacier retreat and drought cycles in the Rocky Mountains of Montana and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North America Ė Glaciers of Canada Glaciers of the CanadianRocky Mountains of Montana and Canada W. H. Berger * ScrippsMontana and southwestern Canada. The presence of tidal lines

Berger, Wolfgang H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EIS-0399: Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-KV Transmission Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE, jointly with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), prepared an EIS that evaluated the potential environmental impacts of a proposed international transmission line that would cross the U.S.-Canada border in northwest Montana.

342

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595

US Army Corps of Engineers

343

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Chair Oregon Bruce A. Measure Montana James A. Yost Idaho W. Bill Booth Idaho Henry Lorenzen Oregon Tom Karier and Liaison Specialist Subject: Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB) Review of the Fish and Wildlife scientific merits in time to inform amendments to the Fish and Wildlife Program and before the Council

344

High-pressure gasification of Montana subbituminous coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A data base for the fluidized-bed gasification of different coals at elevated pressures has been developed at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) with different ranks of coal at pressures up to 450 psig and at temperatures dictated by the individual coals. Adequate data have been obtained to characterize the effect of pressure on the gasification of Montana Rosebud subbituminous coal and North Dakota lignite. The results obtained with Montana Rosebud subbituminous coal are presented here. This program was funded by the Gas Research Institute. 9 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Goyal, A.; Bryan, B.; Rehmat, A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

2014 Evaluation and Economic Impact of the Montana Manufacturing Extension Center 1BY Paul Polzin, Emeritus Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Evaluation and Economic Impact of the Montana Manufacturing Extension Center 1BY Paul Polzin, Emeritus Director 2013 Montana Manufacturing Extension Center 2014 Evaluation and Economic Impact Research University of Montana Missoula, Montana 59812 #12;2014 Evaluation and Economic Impact

Maxwell, Bruce D.

346

Montana State University 1 M.S. in Mathematics -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University 1 M.S. in Mathematics - Mathematics Education Option (MSMME) The MSMME program emphasizes the teaching and learning of high school mathematics. The program offers a blend of courses addressing key topics in mathematics content and pedagogy. The MSMME curriculum

Lawrence, Rick L.

347

An internship on the Beaverhead Ranch in Southwest Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Beaverhead Ranch is located in Southwest Montana and operates a 7,000 head cow-calf operation on 257,000 acres. This ranch has been in operation under the management of Koch Beef since 195 1, a subsidiary of Koch Industries in Wichita, KS. My...

Donnelly, George Arthur

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EIS-0124: Conrad-Shelby Transmission Line Project, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration developed this statement to assess the environmental impact of adding a 230 kV transmission line between Conrad and Shelby, Montana and a new substation near Shelby to update the stressed electrical transmission system.

349

Montana State of mind Small City, the Rockies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Montana State of mind Small City, Big Energy Museum of the Rockies Streamline offers fare free bus service throughout the Bozeman area. Bozeman offers plenty of outdoor and intellectual and cultural activity. Bozeman offers all the amenities of a bigger city, including many chain

Dyer, Bill

350

EIS-0090: Fort Peck-Havre Transmission Line Project, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energyís Western Area Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of its proposed action to construct and operate a 230kV transmission line from Fort Peck to Havre, Montana, with three intermediate interconnecting substations.

351

Physician Supply in Montana: The Future is Now  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of physician workforce planning ­ the national picture. · Present the current supply of physicians in Montana Workforce Studies and WWAMI Rural Health Research Center University of Washington School of Medicine Physician Workforce #12;Impact of Expanding Insurance Coverage · Increased insurance uptake under health

Maxwell, Bruce D.

352

NATURAL RESOURCE SURVEY AND INVENTORY B-BAR RANCH, MONTANA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the best management decisions for the property. The Land Resources and Environmental Sciences senior and Environmental Sciences Montana State University Fall 2005 #12;Table of Contents 1. Introduction on production into a focus on conservation and holistic practices. The goals of these ranches are shifting from

Maxwell, Bruce D.

353

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

SUMMER FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN CHANNELIZED AND UNCHANNELIZED REACHES OF THE SOUTH SULPHUR RIVER, TEXAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TWRI TR-257 SUMMER FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN CHANNELIZED AND UNCHANNELIZED REACHES OF THE SOUTH SULPHUR RIVER, TEXAS A Thesis by CHRISTINE CONNER BURGESS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2003 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) Technical Report 244 SUMMER FISH ASSEMBLAGES...

BURGESS, CHRISTINE CONNER

355

Fish Biology Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab 10: Fish Biology Introduction The effective management of fish populations requires knowledge of the growth rate of the fish. This requires determination of the age of fish to develop a relationship between the size and age of fish. For an inventory, this information provides insights to evaluate the potential

Jochem, Frank J.

356

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1996 annual report, were conducted during field season 1997. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and instream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. This season also began the first year of post-assessment monitoring and evaluation of measures implemented during 1996. The largemouth bass hatchery construction was completed in October and the first bass were introduced to the facility that same month. The first round of production is scheduled for 1998.

Donley, Christopher; Lockwoood, Jr., Neil

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

6 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(1)Columns The changing face of wildlife damage management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management methods has risen dramatically. Public scrutiny of these methods has also increased substantially, wildlife damage management professionals are also involved in activities to protect public health damage management. New problems and conflicts with wildlife require increasingly new and unique research

358

Fish Tales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical differences are not really the central issue, however. It is more to the point that both fishermen and scientists enjoy creating a good story, and we also enjoy a story well told. The correct mixture of truth, lie, fantasy and excitement is a witches brew.

McLerran, L.

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

359

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a substantial impact to the economy. During the past several years the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement project has been collecting data pertaining to fish entraining out of the lake through Grand Coulee Dam. During 1996 and 1997 the lake was deeply drawn down to accommodate the limited available water during a drought year and for the highly unusual draw-down of Lake Roosevelt during the critical Northwest power shortage. The goal of the project is to enhance the resident rainbow trout fishery in Lake Roosevelt lost as a result of the unusual operation of Grand Coulee dam during the drought/power shortage.

LeCaire, Richard

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Statewide Assessment of Mercury Dynamics in North Carolina Water Bodies and Fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on humans and wildlife. Although the factors affecting mercury deposition, its conversion to biologically and the environmental factors associated with methylmercury formation and transport through aquatic food webs. Using factors and tissue mercury concentrations in fish from North Carolina water bodies. Multivariate tests

362

Upper Missouri River Basin Aquatic GAP Fish Distribution Model Accuracy Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were in the middle of nowhere sampling fish. Additional thanks go to Vaughn Wassink and Dustin Hourigan and staff at South Dakota State University, the Graduate School, and the Department of Wildlife many questions. Thanks are also extended to Steve and Jessica Freeling, for their time apart while we

363

Fish Bulletin No. 96. California Fishing Ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. 96 California Fishing Ports By W. L. SCOFIELD FIGURE 1.of the more important fishing ports FOREWORD The purpose ofthough it may be, of the 270 ports where commercially caught

Scofield, W L

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Chair Montana Bruce A. Measure Montana James A. Yost Idaho W. Bill Booth Idaho Bill Bradbury Oregon Tom Karier-wide outcomes of the Fish and Wildlife Program, and a scientific foundation, which is a set of scientific principles that are intended to broadly summarize current scientific knowledge concerning ecosystem

366

EA-1978: Sand Creek Winds, McCone County, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Sand Creek Winds Project, a 75-MW wind farm between the towns of Circle and Wolf Point in McCone County, Montana. The proposed wind farm would interconnect to Westernís existing Wolf Point to Circle 115-kV transmission line approximately 18 miles north of Wolf Point.

367

Montana Board of Water Well Contractors Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram Laws &Montana

368

Montana Code 75-20-102 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram Lawswith0-102Montana

369

Phillips County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources2003) |Facility | OpenPhilipsColorado:Montana:

370

Powell County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River Energy CorporationCounty, Montana:

371

Jefferson County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen Energy2005)JamaicaJeff Davis CountyMontana: Energy

372

RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Montana | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado < RAPID‚Äé | Geothermal‚Äé | Well FieldMontana <

373

City of Troy, Montana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby,Sullivan, Missouri (Utility Company)TorontoTroy Place: Montana

374

Utilizing spatial technologies to understand and model wildlife species distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and slopes found on Gus Engeling Wildlife Management Area (GEWMA) and Richland Creek Wildlife Management Area (RCWMA). The resulting model output was displayed as a map, depicting the spatial distribution of habitat suitability for each of the 3 species...

Daugherty, Brad Ellis

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge Application Process: Student Conservation Association (SCA) Forestry and biological Wildlife Refuge. This forestry position will be mostly field work within the Lower

Mazzotti, Frank

376

Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

FISH PASSAGE CENTER OVERSIGHT BOARD Meeting Notes for October 15, 2007 Missoula, Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For example, if the FPC did 300 technical analyses in a year, could the Board do a Quality Assurance/Quality to become a full-fledged member of the Board, instead of an ex-officio member. Discussion of Operating Rules of operating rules to govern its activities. The group agreed that was a good idea and proceeded to review

378

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

RECIPIENT:Montana DEQ U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIINAIION PROJECT TITLE: Developing Railway Markets for Montana Biodiesel Page 1 02 STATE: MT Funding...

380

EXPLANATION FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fish. So, unlike organic contaminants (for example PCBs and dioxins) which concentrate in the skin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1991-1995 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), presents research findings and guidelines for development and evaluation of innovative culture techniques to increase postrelease survival of hatchery fish. The Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) described in this report is a collection of experimental approaches designed to produce hatchery-reared chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that exhibit wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology. The NATURES culture research for salmonids included multiple tests to develop techniques such as: raceways equipped with cover, structure, and natural substrates to promote development of proper body camouflage coloration; feed-delivery systems that condition fish to orient to the bottom rather than the surface of the rearing vessel; predator conditioning of fish to train them to avoid predators; and supplementing diets with natural live foods to improve foraging ability. The underlying assumptions are that NATURES will: (1) promote the development of natural cryptic coloration and antipredator behavior; (2) increase postrelease foraging efficiency; (3) improve fish health and condition by alleviating chronic, artificial rearing habitat-induced stress; and (4) reduce potential genetic selection pressures induced by the conventional salmon culture environment. A goal in using NATURES is to provide quality fish for rebuilding depleted natural runs.

Maynard, Desmond J.; Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnken, Conrad V.W.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Wildlife Exclusion Fencing Temporary Hourly Technicians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technical support, conduct applied research, and offer career development and learning opportunities and mammals that present a threat to aircraft operations. In order to prevent wildlife from burrowing under sponsorship for this position. Candidates must be physical able to conduct repetitive actions; eye, hand

385

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking: Design Tradeoffs and Early Experiences with ZebraNet Philo Juang Hidekazu Oki Yong Wang Margaret Martonosi Li-Shiuan Peh Dan Rubenstein Dept. of Electrical Princeton University ZebraNet Project VET TES EN NOV TAM TVM Current Tracking Technology Most common: VHF

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

386

Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution) The nitrogen-fixing legume kudzu (Pueraria montana) is a wide- spread invasive plant in the southeastern United the effects of kudzu invasions on soils and trace N gas emissions at three sites in Madison County, Georgia

Mickley, Loretta J.

387

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595 to, NEPA and Section 401 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1341). #12;

US Army Corps of Engineers

388

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in Idaho, Montana, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321-4347; hereinafter "NEPA") and Section 401 of the Federal Water Pollution

US Army Corps of Engineers

389

The Problem Montana ranks third in the nation for brain injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Problem Montana ranks third in the nation for brain injury fatalities, and is home to a large population of brain injury survivors suffering from the chronic effects of a these injuries. In addition, Montana has a high percentage of veterans, many returning home with TBIs. The most common causes for brain

Vonessen, Nikolaus

390

Montana State University School of Architecture Assessment Plan May 31, 2013 P a g e | 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University School of Architecture Assessment Plan May 31, 2013 P a g e | 1 Montana State University School of Architecture Assessment Plan May 31, 2013 The School of Architecture has of Architecture is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board which provides a series

Maxwell, Bruce D.

391

Developing nominal threshold levels for Phyllotreta cruciferae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) damage on canola in Montana, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on canola in Montana, USA Khanobporn Tangtrakulwanich 1 , Gadi V.P. Reddy* , Shaohui Wu 2 , John H. Miller) are serious pests infesting canola (Brassica napus L.; Brassicales: Brassicaceae) in the Northern Great Plains of the United States. In Montana, P. cruciferae is the only flea beetle species that attacks canola during

Reddy, Gadi VP

392

California: Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage California: Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage March 6, 2014 - 10:01am Addthis The Electric Power...

393

Nearshore fish assemblages associated with introduced predatory fishes in lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated the relationship between the presence of introduced largebodied predatory fishes (largemouth bass: impact; invasive species; native fishes; pike; largemouth bass; rock bass; smallmouth bass; walleyeNearshore fish assemblages associated with introduced predatory fishes in lakes JUSTIN TRUMPICKASa

Ricciardi, Anthony

394

Montana Integrated Carbon to Liquids (ICTL) Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated carbon?to?liquids technology (ICTL) incorporates three basic processes for the conversion of a wide range of feedstocks to distillate liquid fuels: (1) Direct Microcatalytic Coal Liquefaction (MCL) is coupled with biomass liquefaction via (2) Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation and Isomerization (CHI) of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or trigylceride fatty acids (TGFA) to produce liquid fuels, with process derived (3) CO{sub 2} Capture and Utilization (CCU) via algae production and use in BioFertilizer for added terrestrial sequestration of CO{sub 2}, or as a feedstock for MCL and/or CHI. This novel approach enables synthetic fuels production while simultaneously meeting EISA 2007 Section 526 targets, minimizing land use and water consumption, and providing cost competitive fuels at current day petroleum prices. ICTL was demonstrated with Montana Crow sub?bituminous coal in MCL pilot scale operations at the Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota (EERC), with related pilot scale CHI studies conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center (PARC). Coal?Biomass to Liquid (CBTL) Fuel samples were evaluated at the US Air Force Research Labs (AFRL) in Dayton and greenhouse tests of algae based BioFertilizer conducted at Montana State University (MSU). Econometric modeling studies were also conducted on the use of algae based BioFertilizer in a wheat?camelina crop rotation cycle. We find that the combined operation is not only able to help boost crop yields, but also to provide added crop yields and associated profits from TGFA (from crop production) for use an ICTL plant feedstock. This program demonstrated the overall viability of ICTL in pilot scale operations. Related work on the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a Montana project indicated that CCU could be employed very effectively to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the MCL/CHI process. Plans are currently being made to conduct larger?scale process demonstration studies of the CHI process in combination with CCU to generate synthetic jet and diesel fuels from algae and algae fertilized crops. Site assessment and project prefeasibility studies are planned with a major EPC firm to determine the overall viability of ICTL technology commercialization with Crow coal resources in south central Montana.

Fiato, Rocco; Sharma, Ramesh; Allen, Mark; Peyton, Brent; Macur, Richard; Cameron, Jemima

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Avian use of Norris Hill Wind Resource Area, Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents results of a study of avian use and mortality in and near a proposed wind resource area in southwestern Montana. Data collected in autumn 1995 through summer 1996 represented preconstruction condition; it was compiled, analyzed, and presented in a format such that comparison with post-construction data would be possible. The primary emphasis of the study was recording avian migration in and near the wind resource area using state-of-the-art marine surveillance radar. Avian use and mortality were investigated during the breeding season by employing traditional avian sampling methods, radiotelemetry, radar, and direct visual observation. 61 figs., 34 tabs.

Harmata, A.; Podruzny, K.; Zelenak, J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Biology Dept.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

EIS-0393: Montanore Project, Montana | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThis EIS evaluates The Department of Energy (DOE)EIS,

397

Big Sandy, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio JumpVentures JumpGermany:Big Sandy, Montana:

398

San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwardsSafeguards andSan Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY

399

Beaverhead County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine:Barbers PointEnergy Information HotUtah: Energy ResourcesMontana:

400

Broadwater County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Area SolarConnecticut:659243¬į LoadingBroadMontana:Broadwater

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Montana Department of Environmental Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:Moe WindMont Vista Capital LLC Place:Montana

402

Montana-Dakota Utilities Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:Moe WindMont Vista CapitalMontana References:

403

Montana Natural Gas Processed in North Dakota (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomic team: Kay6 KentuckyYearDecadeBarrels)Montana

404

Montana Natural Gas Processed in Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomic team: Kay6 KentuckyYearDecadeBarrels)MontanaWyoming

405

Meagher County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellisMcDonald is a boroughMcPhersonMeagher County, Montana:

406

Montana - Seds - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World liquidsnuclear ContractMontana - Seds - U.S. Energy Information

407

Teton County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to: navigation, search Name:Texas:TersusIncMontana:

408

Montana Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticut RegionsScience (SC)Missouri RegionsMontana Regions

409

Montana Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticut RegionsScience (SC)Missouri RegionsMontana

410

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All Brands ExceptCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE ll959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDUFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch

411

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands" Managed by The Nez Perce Tribe Angela C. Sondenaa, Ph Oct 1996 Helm 10,306 $2,660,674.00 Sept 1998 Graham Tree farm 158 $402,453.00 Aug 1999 Beach Ranch 1 of shrub sub-canopy Project Goals: 40-70% tree canopy cover 35-65% shrub canopy cover > 3.5 snags 6-10" dbh

412

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

The wildlife orientation of selected student populations in Victoria, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE WILDLIFE ORIENTATIONS OF SELECTED STUDENT POPULATIONS IN VICTORIA, TEXAS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ANN BRADLEY KIRKPATRICK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE WILDLIFE ORIENTATIONS OF SELECTED STUDENT POPULATIONS IN VICTORIA, TEXAS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ANN BRADLEY KIRKPATRICK Approved as to style and content by...

Kirkpatrick, Phyllis Ann Bradley

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

415

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Microsoft Word - Fish Impact Assessment 070512.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K Fish Habitat and Fish Population Impacts ASSESSMENT OF RELATIVE FISH HABITAT AND FISH POPULATION IMPACTS OF I-5 CORRIDOR REINFORCEMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES AND OPTIONS Report to:...

417

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

Not Available

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

September 19, 2005 Dear Fish Sellers and Fish Buyers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 September 19, 2005 Dear Fish Sellers and Fish Buyers: Our records indicate you are obligated. (1) WHEN DOES THE FEE BEGIN? The fee begins on: October 17, 2005 (2) WHAT HAPPENS THEN? All fish sellers must pay the fee and all fish buyers must collect the fee for all fee fish landed on October 17

420

iFISH -Conceptually What is iFISH?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iFISH - Conceptually What is iFISH? iFISH is an underlying technology that can form the basis and effective manner. It provides users with a unique exploration experience. iFISH offers a playful environment that encourages a further quick and deeper investigation. iFISH provides all of the above. It employs sliders

Pearce, Jon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fish elevator and method of elevating fish  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A means and method for transporting fish from a lower body of water to a higher body of water. The means comprises a tubular lock with a gated entrance below the level of the lower body of water through which fish may enter the lock and a discharge passage above the level of the upper body of water. The fish raising means in the lock is a crowder pulled upward by a surface float as water from the upper body of water gravitationally flows into the closed lock filling it to the level of the upper body. Water is then pumped into the lock to raise the level to the discharge passage. The crowder is then caused to float upward the remaining distance through the water to the level of the discharge passage by the introduction of air into a pocket on the underside of the crowder. The fish are then automatically discharged from the lock into the discharge passage by the out of water position of the crowder. The movement of the fish into the discharge passage is aided by the continuous overflow of water still being pumped into the lock. A pipe may be connected to the discharge passage to deliver the fish to a selected location in the upper body of water.

Truebe, Jonathan (Mirror Lake, NH); Drooker, Michael S. (Sanbornville, NH)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 40(3), 2004, pp. 493500 Wildlife Disease Association 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pepper,1 Thomas R. Rainwater,1 Steven G. Platt,2 Jennifer A. Dever,3 Todd A. Anderson,1 and Scott T. Mc and cost associated with CAM collection and the specific life history traits of the wildlife species. Key often involves killing animals for collection and analysis of various biologic samples (e.g., internal

Dever, Jennifer A.

423

Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 41(2), 2005, pp. 291297 Wildlife Disease Association 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of northern California and southern Oregon (USA), the Texas Panhandle, and the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska Department, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521, USA 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Biological Current address: U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, 204 Russell Lab

Mladenoff, David

424

Trains, Grains, and Grizzly Bears: Reducing Wildlife Mortality on Railway Tracks in Banff National Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the causes and solutions to train-wildlife collisions. Whilepopulations, relatively few trains strike wildlife on thegrizzlies were struck by CPR trains, and none of the five

Pissot, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

N /A

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Montana.

Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas)- Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers rebates on energy efficient natural gas furnaces to its eligible commercial customers. New furnaces are eligible for a rebate incentive between $150 and $300,...

428

A.R.M. 36.2.521 - Administrative Procedures for Montana Environmental...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36.2.521 - Administrative Procedures for Montana Environmental Policy Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation:...

429

A diminutive pelecinid wasp from the Eocene Kishenehn Formation of northwestern Montana (Hymenoptera: Pelecinidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new genus and species of pelecinid wasp (Proctotrupoidea: Pelecinidae) is described and figured from a single male preserved in oil shale from the middle Eocene Kishenehn Formation of northwestern Montana. Phasmatopelecinus leonae Greenwalt...

Greenwalt, Dale; Engel, Michael S.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Weatherization is a Natural Choice for Montana: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Montana demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

D& R International

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

431

SECTION 595 WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECTION 595 ­ WRDA 1999, AS AMENDED IDAHO, MONTANA, RURAL NEVADA, NEW MEXICO, RURAL UTAH, rural Nevada, New Mexico, rural Utah, and Wyoming pursuant to Section 595 of the Water Resources

US Army Corps of Engineers

432

World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal AreaarticleWoodWildlife Fund Jump to:

433

EA-1551: Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-KV Transmission Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE started to prepare, jointly with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), an EA that would also serve as a state EIS. The document would evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposed international transmission line that would cross the U.S.-Canada border in northwest Montana. Based on comments received on the DOE Draft EA/MDEQ Draft EIS, DOE cancelled preparation of the EA and announced preparation of DOE/EIS-0399 (of the same title).

434

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a system of economic incentives and develop cost effective solutions to agricultural and wildlife issues#12;ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the Potential for Use of Economic and Associated Floodplains prepared by Richard M. Porter for Socio-Economic Section Sustainability Division

436

Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions · References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? · The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

Gray, Matthew

437

Fish, fishing, diving and the management of coral reefs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

things? What is the largest fish you ever caught in a trap?Year? What is the largest fish you ever caught with line?Kg? Year? What is the largest fish you ever caught with

Johnson, Ayana Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video Andrew Rova Simon template object recognition method for classifying fish species in un- derwater video. This method can be a component of a system that automatically identifies fish by species, im- proving upon previous works which

Mori, Greg

439

Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

New Hampshire, University of

440

One Fish, Two Fish, Small Fish, Huge Fish: Utilizing Zebrafish as a Model for Studying Mitochondrial Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

353-367 Laelle, H. (1977) J Fish Biol 10, 121-174 Koerber,arrow). (I) The heart rates of MitoBloCK-6 treated fish andmorpholino-injected fish were markedly reduced compared with

Johnson, Meghan Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

FISH U REGISTRATION Name: ___________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

registration and deposit (Make checks payable to SIUC) to: FISH U (Attn: Candie Glover) Fisheries & Illinois. Carbondale, IL 62901 Fish U Fisheries & Illinois Aquaculture Attn: Candie Glover Life Science II, Rm 173. Contact Candie Glover if you are interested in coordinating efforts for carpooling and/or lodging. #12;

442

A LANDOWNER'S GUIDE TO INVENTORYING AND MONITORING WILDLIFE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bridges, NH Fish & Game Dept. Meade Cadot, Harris Center for Conservation Education Christine Costello

New Hampshire, University of

443

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human≠Wildlife Conflicts 2(1):136≠138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews Urban Wildlife Management by Clark-reviewed and popular articles to support the subject mat- ter. Enter wildlife professors Clark Adams, Sara Ash, and Kieran Lindsey. Together, they have brought to us the first comprehensive book on urban wildlife

446

HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):250259, Fall 2013 Winter habitat use by juvenile greater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 1105 S. W. Williston Road, Gainesville, FL 32601, USA The historic range

447

The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) is a multi-purpose engineering test facility located in Butte, Montana, and is managed by MSE, Inc. WETO seeks to contribute to environmental research by emphasizing projects to develop heavy metals removal and recovery processes, thermal vitrification systems, and waste minimization/pollution prevention technologies. WETO`s environmental technology research and testing activities focus on the recovery of usable resources from waste. In one of WETO`s areas of focus, groundwater contamination, water from the Berkeley Pit, located near the WETO site, is being used in demonstrations directed toward the recovery of potable water and metal from the heavy metal-bearing water. The Berkeley Pit is part of an inactive copper mine near Butte that was once part of the nation`s largest open-pit mining operation. The Pit contains approximately 25 billion gallons of Berkeley Pit groundwater and surface water containing many dissolved minerals. As part of DOE/OST`s Resource Recovery Project (RRP), technologies are being demonstrated to not only clean the contaminated water but to recover metal values such as copper, zinc, and iron with an estimated gross value of more than $100 million. When recovered, the Berkeley Pit waters could benefit the entire Butte valley with new water resources for fisheries, irrigation, municipal, and industrial use. At WETO, the emphasis is on environmental technology development and commercialization activities, which will focus on mine cleanup, waste treatment, resource recovery, and water resource management.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fish, fishing, diving and the management of coral reefs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stocks, smoothing management transitions, and for promotingmanagement Fishing on CuraÁao and Bonaire should transition

Johnson, Ayana Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology Organizations Hiring Students in Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Health Public Lab Minnesota Dept of Ag Missouri Department of Conservation Missouri Solar Applications Service Utah Fish and Widlife Dept. Vail Resorts Veterans United Home Loans Walt Disney World Weyerhaeuser

450

Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainablyís...

451

Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

453

EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

454

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

455

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife] [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

457

A national assessment of wildlife information transfer to the public  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT A National Assessment of Wildlife Information Transfer to the Public. (August 2003) Kieran Jane Lindsey, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clark E. Adams A self-administered questionnaire was developed using... A NATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF WILDLIFE INFORMATION TRANSFER TO THE PUBLIC A Thesis by KIERAN JANE LINDSEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Lindsey, Kieran Jane

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION Sixth Avenue and Grant Street PO Box 172760 Bozeman, Montana 59717-2760  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Montana 59717-2760 Phone: (406) 994-5413 · Fax: (406) 994-5665 Acknowledgement of Subcontractors FORM 102 Page 1 of 1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF SUBCONTRACTORS Project Title: PPA NO. Location: Date: Contractor) Acknowledged by: Montana State University Facilities Planning, Design, & Construction (Signature) (Date) #12;

Dyer, Bill

459

DISCLAIMERS SECTION 14 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 14-1 December 14. 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; · authorize the appropriation of water by any federal, state or local agency, Indian tribe or any other entity States, states, Indian tribes or any person with respect to any water or water-related right; · affect or individual; · affect the rights or jurisdictions of the United States, the states, Indian tribes or other

460

Texas Drought 2012: Are we Impacts to Texas Fish, Wildlife and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cindy Loeffler Water Resources Branch #12;TPWD Mission To manage and conserve the natural and cultural tools to better monitor, manage and conserve groundwater and surface water resources. Data and tools and Water Management Plan ­ tools used to manage Lakes Travis and Buchanan to meet firm water needs

Yang, Zong-Liang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR q^^ FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2 steel traps, preferably the coil-spring type. Sets should be made along suspected routes of travel

462

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis). Skipjack tuna are the basis of by far the largest fishery in Hawaii

463

UNITED STATES DEPARrMENT OF THE mTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the capacity of the market to absorb increased production is ques- tionable. Similarly, outlets for eggs probably would have a depressing effect upon markets, although limited increases might be absorbed-cultural project should first give careful study to potential markets and know beforehand where ~e can sell his

464

United Stat es Department of t he Int erior Fish and Wildlife Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

---------~--- --·----·-· -_ .._--._--- _...- ashington 25, D. C. Oct ober 1945i - - --------- - -- - -i PRELIMINARY RWORT ON THE USE OF DDT AS A first large s ca le apnlicP.ttions of DDT fo r civilia n use r ec ent l y was carried out in the fishery doub t r ega r di ng the eff ectivenpss of DDT in r educing the hous e- fly ·oonulat ions in fi sh

465

US Fish and Wildlife Service biomonitoring operations manual, Appendices A--K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains Appendices and Summary Sheets for the following areas: A-Legislative Background and Key to Relevant Legislation, B- Biomonitoring Operations Workbook, C-Air Monitoring, D-Introduction to the Flora and Fauna for Biomonitoring, E-Decontamination Guidance Reference Field Methods, F-Documentation Guidance, Sample Handling, and Quality Assurance/Quality Control Standard Operating Procedures, G-Field Instrument Measurements Reference Field Methods, H-Ground Water Sampling Reference Field Methods, I-Sediment Sampling Reference Field Methods, J-Soil Sampling Reference Field Methods, K-Surface Water Reference Field Methods. Appendix B explains how to set up strategy to enter information on the ``disk workbook``. Appendix B is enhanced by DE97006389, an on-line workbook for users to be able to make revisions to their own biomonitoring data.

Gianotto, D.F.; Rope, R.C.; Mondecar, M.; Breckenridge, R.P.; Wiersma, G.B.; Staley, C.S.; Moser, R.S.; Sherwood, R.; Brown, K.W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Bonneville and other federal agencies to clarify funding responsibilities. The Council intends to make cost. Stated another way, these estimates predict that typical Northwest monthly electricity bills by state and federal entities and others. All levels of government must bear responsibility for adequately

467

Notes From the Chair 2 Revised Fish and Wildlife Program 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Plan. Wind Generation: Making It Work in the Pacific Northwest Wind energy has definitely arrived is attractive for several reasons. It is the least-expensive renew- (See Wind Generation on page 3) CQ #12;2 It--like much of the world--is grappling with how to lower greenhouse gas emissions, and because of this, wind

468

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.s. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leven . Still later, in 1828, on a Ross - shire fan~ , a considerable por- tion of the r,round was caverN

469

MINORITY OPINION APPENDIX E FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM E-1 December 15, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as accelerated diversion screening, hatchery reforms, harvest restrictions and surface collectors are entirely

470

Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, hydrosystem reform, artificial production, and harvest management. · The Bonneville Power Administration

471

RECOMMENDATIONS APPENDIX A FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM A-1 December 15, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eliminated until bank stability is greater than 90 percent. Water Quality · Where the water quality objective) reducing roads as necessary to meet sediment and other water quality objectives, 2) using watershed Harvest · The Council recommends not harvesting timber in areas prone to landslides or erosion which could

472

Aquatic plants growing in ponds and lakes are beneficial for fish and wildlife. They provide food,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cover, preventing predation, and leading to stunted (small-sized) sportfish populations. Water Weed in your pond. Constructing ponds with steep slopes that drop quickly into deep water can prevent weeds such as contour plowing, no-till farming, strip cropping, protecting shelter belts, and excluding livestock from

Liskiewicz, Maciej

473

Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations ISAB Review of the 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facing the altered Columbia River Basin ecosystem. The concept of sustainability in ecology describes how biological systems remain diverse, robust, and productive over time. Sustainability can be enhanced by building ecosystem resilience and adaptability. Natural systems do not fluctuate within a fixed range

474

UNITED STATES DEPARIJl.1ENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH .AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gordon Lindsay, Box 814 John A. Derobertis, Rte. 1, Box 98 Joseph J. Smith, Rte. 2, Box 17 w. G. Stricker

475

UNITED STATES DEPAR'lMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thompson, 2200 Avenue E. West Hampton Bros., General Delivery T.J.Bramlette, Box 1 W. G. Stricker, P.O. Box

476

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Protected Areas Designations, Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of capacity from this study that falls into the protected areas designations, the Northwest Hydroelectric run-of-the-river hydroelectric projects may not be able to be developed within a protected areas

477

United .States Dep artme nt of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Se rvice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are found on the COJ:1n1a.nde r I slanc.ls , off t he Si ber i an Coa·t , be longing t o Russi a, 9 77 , 377. nde r the se cond. l ease , h o\\"ever, ther" was only one ye a r , 1896 , in which he

478

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR u.s. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, north-south temperature gradient occurs in the western Gulf between Sabine Bank and the Gulf of Campeche

479

AMENDMENT PROCESS SECTION 13 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 13-1 December 14, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydroelectric power, generator outages, demand for electricity by aluminum smelters, CO2 taxes, and incentives

480

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mexico estuarine inventory project .................................... 5 Plankton ecology project.... ...................... ........ ................. 15 Isolation of toxin in a crude form ······ ,,, ·················· ,,...................... 15 of biological productivity in the coastal zone of the eastern Gulf of Mexico, to measure the effect of changes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "montana fish wildlife" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mexico, they are the cause of little concern. The areas now most heavily infested with wolves)een persistently hunted and trapped with crude methods. The steel trap, in sizes 3 and 4 for coyotes and sizes 4K

482

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Act of 1973 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq.NorthUniopolis,ParcelDefenseOpen Energy

483

Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Lower Snake River tributaries Prepared by: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is inadequate. This plan will therefore, serve as an interim set of guidelines that will assure a systematic of known quality (accuracy and precision) #12;- Validate EDT model as a reliable measure of habitat

484

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. of Energy, Office of CivilEnergy U.S.of Energy

485

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. of Energy, Office of CivilEnergy U.S.of

486

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment1, 2011 (BETO) Projectdried to about

487

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012 Greenbuy325, 2014

488

Mathematically Modeling a Fresh Fish Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"One fish, Two fish, Red fish, Blue fish" Mathematically Modeling a Fresh Fish Detector Ibrahim using a device designed to determine the freshness of fish. Through an electric current applied fresh fish from those which are not. Key words. Mathematical modelling, differential equations, noise re

Macdonald, Colin B.

489

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

494

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

ECOS Inquiries Series -University of Montana Composting 101-It's the Microbes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ECOS Inquiries Series - University of Montana Composting 101- It's the Microbes Target Grade: COMPOSTING 101: IT'S THE MICROBES 3. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: a. Inquiry Questions: What is composting and what Teachers and students): Everybody knows compost is good for the garden, but not everybody knows why

Brewer, Carol

497

Last Form Revision: May 8, 2014 Page 1 of 16 MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to and in conjunction with the Montana State AE Division Minimum Design Standards and the High-Performance Building for energy sources/conservation and general space requirements. For electrical design, consideration solutions for energy sources/conservation, service distribution, and general space requirements; 1

Dyer, Bill

498

FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................PS-18 Coal-Bed Methane ResourceChapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U

499

Montana State University EMEC320 Thermodynamics I1 EMEC 320: THERMODYNAMICS I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University EMEC320 Thermodynamics I1 EMEC 320: THERMODYNAMICS I (UPDATED AUG 27, 2011 thermodynamic concepts, first and second laws, open and closed systems, properties of ideal and real substances.E. and Borgnakke, C. ISBN 0-471-15232-3 "Fundamentals of Thermodynamics" COORDINATING INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Sarah Codd

Dyer, Bill

500

Montana State University EIND 101 Introduction to Industrial Engineering EIND 101: INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montana State University EIND 101 Introduction to Industrial Engineering EIND ­ 101: INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (Revised 11/4/11) CATALOG DATA: PREREQUISITE: Must be taken the first year enrolled in IE program. Overview of the industrial engineering profession. Lectures will concentrate on tools

Dyer, Bill