Sample records for monoxide mixing ratio

  1. Influence of Co/Mo Ratio on Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from Carbon Monoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Influence of Co/Mo Ratio on Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from Carbon Monoxide, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 Co and Mo are often used as catalysts for the catalytic chemical vapor in synthesizing random, vertical and parallel aligned SWNTs on Co and Mo dip-coated quartz substrates from carbon

  2. Carbon Monoxide Environmental Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Workgroup on Carbon Monoxide Surveillance Formed in April 2005 Membership: EPHT grantees Academic

  3. Characterizing the Aging of Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol by Use of Mixing Ratios: A Meta-analysis of Four Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    Characterizing the Aging of Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol by Use of Mixing Ratios: A Meta: Characteristic organic aerosol (OA) emission ratios (ERs) and normalized excess mixing ratios (NEMRs) for biomass and combustion conditions in determining OA loadings from biomass burning. 1. INTRODUCTION Biomass burning

  4. Widespread elevated atmospheric SF6 mixing ratios in the Northeastern United States: Implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    Widespread elevated atmospheric SF6 mixing ratios in the Northeastern United States: Implications; Unsaturated zone; Northeastern USA; SF6 Summary SF6 is a promising transient tracer for groundwater dating, but elevated levels of atmospheric SF6 may limit application of this dating method in urban areas. To deter

  5. Catalyst for the methanation of carbon monoxide in sour gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kustes, William A. (Louisville, KY); Hausberger, Arthur L. (Louisville, KY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention involves the synergistic effect of the specific catalytic constituents on a specific series of carriers for the methanation of carbon monoxide in the presence of sulfur at relatively high temperatures and at low steam to gas ratios in the range of 0.2:1 or less. This effect was obtained with catalysts comprising the mixed sulfides and oxides of nickel and chromium supported on carriers comprising magnesium aluminate and magnesium silicate. Conversion of carbon monoxide to methane was in the range of from 40 to 80%. Tests of this combination of metal oxides and sulfides on other carriers and tests of other metal oxides and sulfides on the same carrier produced a much lower level of conversion.

  6. Device for staged carbon monoxide oxidation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Nguyen, Trung V. (College Station, TX); Guante, Jr., Joseph (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for selectively oxidizing carbon monoxide in a hydrogen rich feed stream. The method comprises mixing a feed stream consisting essentially of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water and carbon monoxide with a first predetermined quantity of oxygen (air). The temperature of the mixed feed/oxygen stream is adjusted in a first the heat exchanger assembly (20) to a first temperature. The mixed feed/oxygen stream is sent to reaction chambers (30,32) having an oxidation catalyst contained therein. The carbon monoxide of the feed stream preferentially absorbs on the catalyst at the first temperature to react with the oxygen in the chambers (30,32) with minimal simultaneous reaction of the hydrogen to form an intermediate hydrogen rich process stream having a lower carbon monoxide content than the feed stream. The elevated outlet temperature of the process stream is carefully controlled in a second heat exchanger assembly (42) to a second temperature above the first temperature. The process stream is then mixed with a second predetermined quantity of oxygen (air). The carbon monoxide of the process stream preferentially reacts with the second quantity of oxygen in a second stage reaction chamber (56) with minimal simultaneous reaction of the hydrogen in the process stream. The reaction produces a hydrogen rich product stream having a lower carbon monoxide content than the process stream. The product stream is then cooled in a third heat exchanger assembly (72) to a third predetermined temperature. Three or more stages may be desirable, each with metered oxygen injection.

  7. Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

  8. ATOC/CHEM 5151 Problem 5 Converting Volume Mixing Ratio to Mass Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    , 2014 In 2012, the dry mixing ratio volume of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in the atmosphere was about 7.5 parts per trillion by volume ("pptv" or "ppt"). Convert this value into the mass density of SF6 in units of micrograms of SF6 per cubic meter of air ("g m-3" ). Source of information: MW(SF6)= 146 g mol-1 Methodology

  9. The Ratio of Helium- to Hydrogen-Atmosphere White Dwarfs: Direct Evidence for Convective Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. -E. Tremblay; P. Bergeron

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the ratio of helium- to hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf stars as a function of effective temperature from a model atmosphere analysis of the infrared photometric data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey combined with available visual magnitudes. Our study surpasses any previous analysis of this kind both in terms of the accuracy of the Teff determinations as well as the size of the sample. We observe that the ratio of helium- to hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs increases gradually from a constant value of ~0.25 between Teff = 15,000 K and 10,000 K to a value twice as large in the range 10,000 > Teff > 8000 K, suggesting that convective mixing, which occurs when the bottom of the hydrogen convection zone reaches the underlying convective helium envelope, is responsible for this gradual transition. The comparison of our results with an approximate model used to describe the outcome of this convective mixing process implies hydrogen mass layers in the range log M_H/M_tot = -10 to -8 for about 15% of the DA stars that survived the DA to DB transition near Teff ~ 30,000 K, the remainder having presumably more massive layers above log M_H/M_tot ~ -6.

  10. Measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratios in Houston using a compact high-power CW DFB-QCL-based QEPAS sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and water heaters, stoves and other gasoline pow- ered equipment used in households. Typically, CO levels of 0.5­5 ppm are expected in homes in the absence of high-efficiency heaters and stoves. In spaces where gas stoves/heaters are operated, the CO concentration can increase up to 30 ppm [6]. In this work

  11. (Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  12. Circumstellar {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratios from millimeter observations of CN and CO: Mixing in carbon- and oxygen-rich stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milam, S. N.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)], E-mail: Stefanie.N.Milam@nasa.gov, E-mail: nwoolf@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: lziurys@as.arizona.edu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio toward circumstellar envelopes has been conducted at millimeter wavelengths using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The ratios were obtained for a sample of local C- and O-rich asymptotic giant branch and supergiant stars from observations of the {sup 12}C and {sup 13}C isotopologues of CO and CN, respectively. The J = 1 {yields} 0 transitions of both molecules were observed at {lambda} = 3 mm using the ARO 12 m telescope, while the J = 2 {yields} 1 lines of the two species were measured using the ARO Sub-Millimeter Telescope (SMT) at {lambda} = 1 mm. The {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios were determined from the CO data by modeling both transitions simultaneously with a circumstellar radiative transfer code, which can account for the high opacities present in the emission from this species. In the case of CN, the hyperfine structure was used to evaluate opacity effects. Ratios obtained independently from CO and CN are in good agreement. For the C-rich envelopes, the ratios fall in the range {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C {approx} 25-90, while the O-rich shells have values of 10-35. Ratios of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C {approx} 3-14 are found for the supergiant stars, with the exception of VY CMa, where the values lie in the range 25-46. All ratios obtained in this study are {<=} 89, the solar value, suggesting that substantial carbon-13 enrichment may be currently occurring in the local interstellar medium. A qualitative model was constructed based on first and third dredge-up convective mixing that can reproduce the observed ratios. Substantial mixing of H-burning products must occur to explain the ratios in the O-rich objects, while a wide range of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C values can be generated by only a few percent mixing of He-burning ashes in the C-rich case. The {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios obtained in this study should help improve stellar yield models and contribute to the understanding of Galactic chemical evolution.

  13. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Wei (Cambridge, MA); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and composition for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdnum, copper, cobalt, maganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  14. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and composition are disclosed for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, copper, cobalt, manganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  15. Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster presented at the 16th Directions...

  16. [Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  17. Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In. - Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Vol. 3A,Monoxide." Applied Industrial Hygiene, 4,119-125. Jabara, J.Monoxide Detection. Industrial Hygiene Journal Match-April,

  18. Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monoxide in Seatde Ice Skating Rinks." American Journal ofHockey Players in Ice Skating Rinks." Veterinary and Human

  19. atmospheric carbon monoxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    monoxide from fossil-fuel and biofuel combustion-fuel and- biofuel combustion sources in North America, Europe, Asia (including Indonesia and the Middle Palmer, Paul 14...

  20. Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on Alumina. Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium...

  1. Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster Location P-19 Gregory K. Lilik, Andr L. Boehman Department of Energy & Mineral Engineering EMS Energy...

  2. Measurement of D0-D0bar Mixing using the Ratio of Lifetimes for the Decays D0->K-pi+ and K+K-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the rate of D0-D0bar mixing with the observable yCP=(tauKpi/tauKK)-1, where tauKK and tauKpi are respectively the mean lifetimes of CP-even D0->K+K- and CP-mixed D0->K-pi+ decays, using a data sample of 384/fb collected by the Babar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. From a sample of D0 and D0bar decays where the inital flavor of the decaying meson is not determined, we obtain yCP = [1.12 +/- 0.26 (stat) +/- 0.22 (sys)]%, which excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at 3.3 sigma, including both statistical and systematic uncertainties. This result is in good agreement with a previous Babar measurement of yCP obtained from a sample of D*+->D0pi+ events, where the D0 decays to K-pi+, K+K-, and pi+pi-, which is disjoint with the untagged D0 events used here. Combining the two results taking into account statistical and systematic uncertainties, where the systematic uncertainties are assumed to be 100% correlated, we find yCP = [1.16 +/- 0.22 (stat) +/- 0.18 (sys)]%, which excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at 4.1 sigma.

  3. accelerates carbon monoxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon monoxide First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Carbon Monoxide Environmental Public...

  4. acute carbon monoxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acute carbon monoxide First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Carbon Monoxide Environmental...

  5. accidental carbon monoxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accidental carbon monoxide First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Carbon Monoxide...

  6. Adsorption of Nitrogen Monoxide and Carbon Monoxide on Copper-Exchanged ZSM-5: A Cluster and Embedded Cluster Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    Adsorption of Nitrogen Monoxide and Carbon Monoxide on Copper-Exchanged ZSM-5: A Cluster study on the adsorption of NO and CO in Cu-ZSM-5, using an ab initio embedded cluster methodology are small for adsorption energies of CO and NO. For adsorption of CO, the calculated binding energy of 32

  7. Carbon monoxide sensor for PEM fuel cell systems Christopher T. Holta,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    reforming) or with air and water (autothermal reforming). In the second step, carbon monoxide is reduced

  8. Carbon monoxide sensor and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDaniel; Anthony H. (Livermore, CA), Medlin; J. Will (Boulder, CO), Bastasz; Robert J. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon monoxide sensors suitable for use in hydrogen feed streams and methods of use thereof are disclosed. The sensors are palladium metal/insulator/semiconductor (Pd-MIS) sensors which may possess a gate metal layer having uniform, Type 1, or non-uniform, Type 2, film morphology. Type 1 sensors display an increased sensor response in the presence of carbon monoxide while Type 2 sensors display a decreased response to carbon monoxide. The methods and sensors disclosed herein are particularly suitable for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs).

  9. Extremely stable Nafion based carbon monoxide sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Wal; P.D. de Rooij, N.F.; Koudelka-Hep, M. [Univ. of Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At present carbon monoxide sensing devices are readily available for many industrial applications. The sensors used in these devices include electrochemical sensors, semiconductor sensors, calorimetric detectors and infra red detectors. From these devices the electrochemical sensors are of specific interest because of their high selectivity and low power consumption. This makes them suitable for use in battery operated devices, e.g. for domestic safety. However, their relatively high price and frequent need for recalibration seriously hamper their utilisation on a large scale. The relatively high price of electrochemical CO sensors is caused by the complexity of fabrication. They are composed of a cylindrical housing, with one end the counter and reference electrodes, and on the other the working electrode. The electrodes are made out of Teflon bonded platinum black on a Teflon substrate and the electrolyte is a sulfuric acid solution. The aim of this work was to develop electrochemical CO sensors, that are small and cheaper than the existing products. The approach concentrated on three main aspects: (a) simplification of the device assembly by investigating the of using a planar sensor design, (b) use of mass production compatible fabrication, and (c) replacement of the sulfuric acid.

  10. Synthesis gas conversion in a mixed slurry reactor with iron-manganese catalysts. [Four catalysts with iron-manganese ratios of 57/43, 44/56, 22/78, and 10/90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W.; Zarochak, M.F.; Tischer, R.E.; Schehl, R.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas was reacted over different compositions of iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalysts in a slurry reactor. The reactor operates in a back-mixed mode with a continuous flow of feed gas through the catalyst suspended in the liquid medium. Four catalysts with iron-manganese ratios of 57/43, 44/56, 22/78, and 10/90 were investigated at identical process conditions after a standard activation procedure. With time on stream for each catalyst system, hydrogenation of olefins occurred, along with olefin isomerization reactions. Activity, selectivity, and stability are discussed in general. Analyses of used catalyst samples are also reported. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Studies of carbon monoxide diffusion in an urban area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, John Charles

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J 7 j 3 , '. ', 73 . J ('. J &", , i j 100 200 300 400 500 60il TPMI'FIC/15 Mi(( Fig. 13. Carbon monoxide concenrration vs Lraf6ic for gamp j er 2 from 6:15 A(1 - 11:15 AM CDT on July 20, 1969 (r = -0. 23) . !! a)9 6:00 H p o 4 O Q... (r = -0. 57) 28 Carbon monoxide concentration vs traffic for Sampler 3 from 7;30 AM ? 11:30 AM CDT on July 18, 1969 (r = +0. 87) 29 Figure Page 16. Carbon monoxide concentration vs traffic for Sampler 3 from 12:30 PN - 9:30 PN CDT on July 18...

  12. Terpolymerization of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a high molecular weight terpolymer of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide stable to 280.degree. C. and containing as little as 36 mol % ethylene and about 41-51 mol % sulfur dioxide; and to the method of producing said terpolymer by irradiation of a liquid and gaseous mixture of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide by means of Co-60 gamma rays or an electron beam, at a temperature of about 10.degree.-50.degree. C., and at a pressure of about 140 to 680 atmospheres, to initiate polymerization.

  13. Quantitative analysis of SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide total column measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laat, Jos de

    , SCIAMACHY CO total column retrievals are of sufficient quality to provide useful new information]. Ground-based FTIR measurements provide high quality total column measurements but have very limitedQuantitative analysis of SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide total column measurements A. T. J. de Laat,1,2 A

  14. Detection of iodine monoxide in the tropical free troposphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    19, 2012) Atmospheric iodine monoxide (IO) is a radical that catalytically destroys heat trapping in the remote tropical marine boundary layer (MBL) (2­4). IO further affects the oxidative capacity iodine species over the remote ocean remain poorly understood (11, 14) but are currently thought

  15. Carbon Monoxide bands in M dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakiv V. Pavlenko; Hugh R. A. Jones

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the observational and theoretical spectra of the $\\Delta v$ = 2 CO bands in a range of M dwarfs. We investigate the dependence of theoretical spectra on effective temperatures as well as carbon abundance. In general we find that the synthetic CO bands fit the observed data extremely well and are excellent diagnostics. In particular the synthetic spectra reasonably match observations and the best fit temperatures are similar to those found by empirical methods. We also examine the \\CDC isotopic ratio. We find that fundamental $^{13}$CO bands around 2.345 and 2.375 $\\mu$m are good discriminators for the \\CDC ratio in M dwarfs. The 2.375 $\\mu$m is more useful because it doesn't suffer such serious contamination by water vapour transitions. Our current dataset does not quite have the wavelength coverage to perform a reliable determination of the \\CDC ratio in M dwarfs. For this we recommend observing the region 2.31--2.40 $\\mu$m at a resolution of better than 1000. Alternatively the observational problems of contamination by water vapour at 2.345 $\\mu$m maybe solved by observing at resolutions of around 50000. We also investigated the possibility of using the $\\Delta v$ = 1 CO bands around 4.5 $\\mu$m. We find that the contamination due to water vapour is even more of a problem at these wavelengths.

  16. Simultaneous Detection of Water, Methane and Carbon Monoxide in the Atmosphere of Exoplanet HR8799b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barman, Travis S; Macintosh, Bruce; Marois, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption lines from water, methane and carbon monoxide are detected in the atmosphere of exoplanet HR8799b. A medium-resolution spectrum presented here shows well-resolved and easily identified spectral features from all three molecules across the K band. The majority of the lines are produced by CO and H2O, but several lines clearly belong to CH4. Comparisons between these data and atmosphere models covering a range of temperatures and gravities yield log mole fractions of H2O between -3.09 and -3.91, CO between -3.30 and -3.72 and CH4 between -5.06 and -5.85. More precise mole fractions are obtained for each temperature and gravity studied. A reanalysis of H-band data, previously obtained at similar spectral resolution, results in a nearly identical water abundance as determined from the K-band spectrum. The methane abundance is shown to be sensitive to vertical mixing and indicates an eddy diffusion coefficient in the range of 10^6 to 10^8 cm^2 s^-1, comparable to mixing in the deep troposphere of Jupite...

  17. Transient PrOx carbon monoxide measurement, control, and optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inbody, M. A. (Michael A.); Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.); Tafoya, J. (Jose I.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel processing systems for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems require control of the carbon monoxide concentration to less than 100 ppm to 10 ppm in the anode feed. Conventional hydrocarbon fuel processors use a water-gas shift (WGS) reactor to react CO with water to form H2 and reduce the CO concentration. The CO conversion is limited by equilibrium at the outlet temperature of the WGS reactor. The WGS outlet CO concentration can range from over 1% to 2000 ppm depending on the system and its operating parameters. At these concentrations, CO poisons low temperature PEM fuel cells and the concentrations needs to be reduced further.

  18. Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b , Y.F. Zheng a , C.S. Lee a , N of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China b Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada N6A 5B7 Received 17 February 2001 Abstract Carbon monoxide

  19. An experimental investigation of the ignition properties of hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    for syngas turbine applications S.M. Walton *, X. He, B.T. Zigler, M.S. Wooldridge Department of Mechanical of simulated syngas mixtures of hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and carbon. Keywords: Carbon monoxide; Hydrogen; Syngas; Ignition; Rapid compression facility 1. Introduction Syngas

  20. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Combustion characteristics of hydrogen - carbon monoxide-based gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.J.; Kubasco, A.J.; Lecren, R.T.; Notardonato, J.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental rig program has been conducted with the objective of evaluating the combustion performance of a family of fuel gases based on a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These gases, in addition to being members of a family, were also representative of those secondary fuels that could be produced from coal by various gasification schemes. In particular, simulated Winkler, Lurgi, and Blue-water low and medium energy content gases were used as fuels in the experimental combustor rig. The combustor used was originally designed as a low NOx rich-lean system for burning liquid fuels with high bound nitrogen levels. When used with the above gaseous fuels this combustor was operated in a lean-lean mode with ultra long residence times. The Bluewater gas was also operated in a rich-lean mode. The results of these tests indicate the possibility of the existence of an ''optimum'' gas turbine hydrogen - carbon monoxide based secondary fuel. Such a fuel would exhibit low NOx and high efficiency over the entire engine operating range. It would also have sufficient stability range to allow normal light-off and engine acceleration. Solar Turbines Incorporated would like to emphasize that the results presented here have been obtained with experimental rig combustors. The technologies generated could, however, be utilized in future commercial gas turbines.

  2. Size Effect of Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Catalytic Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Jeong Y.; Renzas, J. Russell; Butcher, Derek R.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon monoxide oxidation over ruthenium catalysts has shown an unusual catalytic behavior. Here we report a particle size effect on CO oxidation over Ru nanoparticle (NP) catalysts. Uniform Ru NPs with a tunable particle size from 2 to 6 nm were synthesized by a polyol reduction of Ru(acac){sub 3} precursor in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) stabilizer. The measurement of catalytic activity of CO oxidation over two-dimensional Ru NPs arrays under oxidizing reaction conditions (40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2}) showed an activity dependence on the Ru NP size. The CO oxidation activity increases with NP size, and the 6 nm Ru NP catalyst shows 8-fold higher activity than the 2 nm catalysts. The results gained from this study will provide the scientific basis for future design of Ru-based oxidation catalysts.

  3. Solar Carbon Monoxide, Thermal Profiling, and the Abundances of C, O, and their Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Ayres; Claude Plymate; Christoph U. Keller

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar photospheric "thermal profiling" analysis is presented, exploiting the infrared rovibrational bands of carbon monoxide (CO) as observed with the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Kitt Peak, and from above the Earth's atmosphere by the Shuttle-borne ATMOS experiment. Visible continuum intensities and center-limb behavior constrained the temperature profile of the deep photosphere, while CO center-limb behavior defined the thermal structure at higher altitudes. The oxygen abundance was self consistently determined from weak CO absorptions. Our analysis was meant to complement recent studies based on 3-D convection models which, among other things, have revised the historical solar oxygen (and carbon) abundance downward by a factor of nearly two; although in fact our conclusions do not support such a revision. Based on various considerations, an oxygen abundance of 700+/-100 ppm (parts per million relative to hydrogen) is recommended; the large uncertainty reflects the model sensitivity of CO. New solar isotopic ratios also are reported for 13C, 17O, and 18O.

  4. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA); Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas, which method comprises: (a) contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate of the formula: ##STR1## wherein the water-soluble organic compound is selected from compounds of the formula: ##STR2## wherein: R is selected from hydrogen or an organic moiety having at least one polar functional group; Z is selected from oxygen, sulfur, or --N--A wherein N is nitrogen and A is hydrogen or lower alkyl having from one to four carbon atoms; and M is selected from hydrogen, sodium or potassium; and n is 1 or 2, in a contacting zone for a time and at a temperature effective to reduce the nitrogen monoxide. These mixtures are useful to provide an unexpensive method of removing NO from gases, thus reducing atmospheric pollution from flue gases.

  5. Correction to ``Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography carbon monoxide total columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laat, Jos de

    Correction to ``Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography carbon to ``Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography carbon monoxide total columns, doi:10.1029/2007JD009378. [1] In the paper ``Scanning Imaging Absorption Spec- trometer

  6. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Timothy Christopher (Allentown, PA); Farris, Thomas Stephen (Bethlehem, PA)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  7. Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

    2012-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

  8. Reductive coupling of carbon monoxide to C sub 2 products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, J.L.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress since the initiation of this two year award on May 1, 1988, has been divided into two areas for reporting purposes. We have been working on ideas described in the proposal submitted two years ago, and simultaneously we initiated chemistry in a distinct area in order to provide a springboard for the current proposal. Efforts directed toward reductive coupling of carbon monoxide have continued to focus on carbyne species as the central figure in coupling reactions. At the same time we have attempted to prepare intermediate oxidation state metal imido complexes with an eye to synthetic applications of nitrene transfer reagents. The results of carbyne chemistry, electrophilic addition reactions of anionic carbonyl and isonitrile complexes, and carbyne-carbonyl coupling reactions will be presented in this progress report, while the work with nitrene complexes will be included as preliminary results in the text of the accompanying proposal. The description of published work will be brief in this report; greater detail will be provided for unpublished material.

  9. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  10. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Fritzsch

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  11. Carbon monoxide inhalation increases microparticles causing vascular and CNS dysfunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jiajun; Yang, Ming [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kosterin, Paul [Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Salzberg, Brian M. [Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M. [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Thom, Stephen R., E-mail: sthom@smail.umaryland.edu [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We hypothesized that circulating microparticles (MPs) play a role in pro-inflammatory effects associated with carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation. Mice exposed for 1 h to 100 ppm CO or more exhibit increases in circulating MPs derived from a variety of vascular cells as well as neutrophil activation. Tissue injury was quantified as 2000 kDa dextran leakage from vessels and as neutrophil sequestration in the brain and skeletal muscle; and central nervous system nerve dysfunction was documented as broadening of the neurohypophysial action potential (AP). Indices of injury occurred following exposures to 1000 ppm for 1 h or to 1000 ppm for 40 min followed by 3000 ppm for 20 min. MPs were implicated in causing injuries because infusing the surfactant MP lytic agent, polyethylene glycol telomere B (PEGtB) abrogated elevations in MPs, vascular leak, neutrophil sequestration and AP prolongation. These manifestations of tissue injury also did not occur in mice lacking myeloperoxidase. Vascular leakage and AP prolongation were produced in nave mice infused with MPs that had been obtained from CO poisoned mice, but this did not occur with MPs obtained from control mice. We conclude that CO poisoning triggers elevations of MPs that activate neutrophils which subsequently cause tissue injuries. - Highlights: Circulating microparticles (MPs) increase in mice exposed to 100 ppm CO or more. MPs are lysed by infusing the surfactant polyethylene glycol telomere B. CO-induced MPs cause neutrophil activation, vascular leak and CNS dysfunction. Similar tissue injuries do not arise with MPs obtained from air-exposed, control mice.

  12. A population-based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a carbon monoxide passive sampler and occupational dosimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, M.G.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two devices, an occupational carbon monoxide (CO) dosimeter (LOCD), and an indoor air quality (IAQ) passive sampler were developed for use in population-based CO exposure assessment studies. CO exposure is a serious public health problem in the U.S., causing both morbidity and mortality (lifetime mortality risk approximately 10{sup -4}). Sparse data from population-based CO exposure assessments indicate that approximately 10% of the U.S. population is exposed to CO above the national ambient air quality standard. No CO exposure measurement technology is presently available for affordable population-based CO exposure assessment studies. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested in the laboratory and field. The palladium-molybdenum based CO sensor was designed into a compact diffusion tube sampler that can be worn. Time-weighted-average (TWA) CO exposure of the device is quantified by a simple spectrophotometric measurement. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested over an exposure range of 40 to 700 ppm-hours and 200 to 4200 ppm-hours, respectively. Both devices were capable of measuring precisely (relative standard deviation <20%), with low bias (<10%). The LOCD was screened for interferences by temperature, humidity, and organic and inorganic gases. Temperature effects were small in the range of 10{degrees}C to 30{degrees}C. Humidity effects were low between 20% and 90% RH. Ethylene (200 ppm) caused a positive interference and nitric oxide (50 ppm) caused a negative response without the presence of CO but not with CO.

  13. Substantially isotactic, linear, alternating copolymers of carbon monoxide and an olefin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sen, A.; Jiang, Z.

    1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The compound, [Pd(Me-DUPHOS)(MeCN){sub 2}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, [Me-DUPHOS: 1,2-bis(2,5-dimethylphospholano)benzene] is an effective catalyst for the highly enantioselective, alternating copolymerization of olefins, such as aliphatic {alpha}-olefins, with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic polymers which can serve as excellent starting materials for the synthesis of other classes of chiral polymers. For example, the complete reduction of a propylene-carbon monoxide copolymer resulted in the formation of a novel, optically active poly(1,4-alcohol). Also, the previously described catalyst is a catalyst for the novel alternating isomerization cooligomerization of 2-butene with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic poly(1,5-ketone).

  14. Substantially isotactic, linear, alternating copolymers of carbon monoxide and an olefin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sen, Ayusman (State College, PA); Jiang, Zhaozhong (State College, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compound, [Pd(Me-DUPHOS)(MeCN).sub.2 ](BF.sub.4).sub.2, [Me-DUPHOS: 1,2-bis(2,5-dimethylphospholano)benzene] is an effective catalyst for the highly enantioselective, alternating copolymerization of olefins, such as aliphatic .alpha.-olefins, with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic polymers which can serve as excellent starting materials for the synthesis of other classes of chiral polymers. For example, the complete reduction of a propylene-carbon monoxide copolymer resulted in the formation of a novel, optically active poly(1,4-alcohol). Also, the previously described catalyst is a catalyst for the novel alternating isomerization cooligomerization of 2-butene with carbon monoxide to form optically active, isotactic poly(1,5-ketone)

  15. Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti; Marco Laveder

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review we present the main features of the current status of neutrino physics. After a review of the theory of neutrino mixing and oscillations, we discuss the current status of solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that the current data can be nicely accommodated in the framework of three-neutrino mixing. We discuss also the problem of the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale through Tritium beta-decay experiments and astrophysical observations, and the exploration of the Majorana nature of massive neutrinos through neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Finally, future prospects are briefly discussed.

  16. Cyclic process for producing methane from carbon monoxide with heat removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY); Yang, Chang-lee (Spring Valley, NY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  17. Mixed potential sensors for CO monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, R. (Rangachary); Brosha, E. L. (Eric L.); Garzon, F. H. (Fernando H.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon monoxide sensor based on the phenomenon of 'mixed-potential' has been developed. The sensor consists of platinum and gold wire-electrodes embedded in a Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} electrolyte. The sensor response to 500 ppm of CO in room air is {approx} 100 mV at 400 C. The response time to 90% of level is < 5 sec and the response is stable over a period of several months. Moreover, the sensor to sensor reproducibility of these controlled-interface sensors is excellent. The sensor in combination with an activated carbon filter shows great promise for application as a room air CO monitor.

  18. Effects of exogenous carbon monoxide on radiation-induced bystander effect in zebrafish embryos in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    -no-threshed (LNT) model widely accepted for radiation protection saying that biological effects caused by ionizingEffects of exogenous carbon monoxide on radiation-induced bystander effect in zebrafish embryos) on the radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in vivo between embryos of the zebrafish was studied. RIBE

  19. Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

  20. Submitted to the Annals of Applied Statistics INTERPOLATING FIELDS OF CARBON MONOXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nychka, Douglas

    from forest clearing and biofuels. Thus CO is a global pollutant with a variety of sources. CO has and transport. CO AMS 2000 subject classifications: Carbon monoxide; satellite data; Bayesian hierarchi- cal and the transport of surface emissions but also in determining budgets for other chemical constituents. 1

  1. SWNT Synthesis by Carbon Monoxide Catalytic Thermal CVD (COCCVD) Method Toshiaki NISHII1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    plants. Furthermore, carbon dioxide gas is exhausted from most industrial plants as one of Greenhouse. (2) R. Saito, G. Dresselhaus, M. S. Dresselhaus, Physical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes, (1988 CVD SWNT Synthesis by Carbon Monoxide Catalytic Thermal CVD (COCCVD) Method * Toshiaki

  2. Elevated levels of carbon monoxide in the patient compartment of ambulances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iglewicz, R.; Rosenman, K.D.; Iglewicz, B.; O'Leary, K.; Hockemeier, R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six hundred and ninety New Jersey ambulances were monitored for carbon monoxide (CO); 27 per cent had CO levels of 10 ppm or more greater than ambient air in the breathing zone of the patient. Twenty-nine of these ambulances had levels of at least 35 ppm greater than ambient air. Results indicate that a CO exposure problem exists in ambulances.

  3. Efficiency of Mixing Forced by Unsteady Shear Flow RYUICHIRO INOUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, William David

    Efficiency of Mixing Forced by Unsteady Shear Flow RYUICHIRO INOUE Department of Physics form 18 December 2008) ABSTRACT The dependence of mixing efficiency on time-varying forcing is studied frame and allowing the tilt angle to vary in time. Mixing efficiency Gc is defined as the ratio

  4. Rotational state microwave mixing for laser cooling of complex diatomic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeo, Mark; Collopy, Alejandra L; Yan, Bo; Hemmerling, Boerge; Chae, Eunmi; Doyle, John M; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the mixing of rotational states in the ground electronic state using microwave radiation to enhance optical cycling in the molecule yttrium (II) monoxide (YO). This mixing technique is used in conjunction with a frequency modulated and chirped continuous wave laser to slow longitudinally a cryogenic buffer gas beam of YO. We generate a measurable flux of YO below 10~m/s, directly loadable into a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap. This technique opens the door for laser cooling of molecules with more complex structure.

  5. A Study of Vibrational Relaxation of B-State Carbon Monoxide in the Heme Pocket of Photolyzed Carboxymyoglobin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straub, John E.

    , Massachusetts 02215 ABSTRACT The vibrational energy relaxation of dissociated carbon monoxide in the heme pocket for the two CO substate frequencies, T1(B1) 335 115 ps and T1(B2) 330 145 ps. These simulation results

  6. Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

  7. Palladium(II)-acetamide complex as a solid monitoring reagent for carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, J.L.; Liaw, Yun-Long; Paukstelis, J.V. (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan (USA)); Chiang, Y.C. (Kansas Wesleyan Univ. Salina (USA))

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of solid salts containing cationic complexes of palladium(II) with neutral, weakly complexing ligands resulted in the discovery of the palladium(II)-acetamide-tetrafluoroborate reagent, in which acetamide is present in 20-fold molar excess. It was found that a successful reagent of this type must have a ligand that complexes palladium(II) weakly, but more strongly than does water, with water available for subsequent reaction. Carbon monoxide appears to coordinate with the palladium(II)-acetamide complex, which then reacts with water to form, simultaneously, palladium(O) metal that is black, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen ion. The reagent is described as a visual warning device for the present of carbon monoxide. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Correlating benzene, total hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions from wood-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, A.J.; Grande, D.E.; Berens, J.R. [Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison, WI (United States); Piotrowski, J. [Tenneco Packaging, Inc., Tomahawk, WI (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous air pollutants, including benzene, are generated by the incomplete combustion of fuels. Organic compound emissions, which are generally products of incomplete combustion, are reduced by promoting high quality combustion, for example by controlling furnace exit temperatures and establishing minimum residence times. Monitoring carbon monoxide (CO) emissions is important since the amount of carbon monoxide emitted represents the quality of combustion which in turn represents the amount of hazardous air pollutants being generated. Total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions are also related to the quality of combustion. Recently the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) measured the benzene and total hydrocarbon emissions from two large industrial wood fired boilers. These boilers are located at Tenneco Packaging, a container board manufacturing facility in northern Wisconsin. Temperature, oxygen and carbon monoxide concentrations were sampled continuously by Tenneco Packaging`s emission monitoring system. The Department`s team used an organic vapor analyzer to continuously measure concentrations of total hydrocarbons (THC). The Department`s team also used a modified USEPA Method 18 sampling train to capture organic vapors for subsequent analysis by gas chromatography. The data show correlations between benzene and carbon monoxide, and between benzene and THC concentrations. The emissions sampling occurred both upstream of the particulate emissions control system as well as at the stack. The CO variations during actual boiler operation appeared to be well correlated with changes in boiler steam load. That is, increases in CO generally accompanied a change, either up or down, in boiler load. Lower concentrations of CO were associated with stable combustion, as indicated by periods of constant or nearly constant boiler load.

  9. The decommodified security ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    are currently experiencing: changing patterns of work, the phenom- enon she calls the "breakdown in the wage furthered by the work of the International Labour Office. In particular, the programme of researchThe decommodified security ratio: A tool for assessing European social protection systems Georges

  10. Multi-ratio transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, J.C.

    1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A preselected multi-ratio power transmission is described comprising: input means for transmitting drive forces; output means; first, second and third friction clutch means each selectively engageable with the input means for accepting drive forces. First input gear means drivingly connects with the first friction clutch means; second input gear means drivingly connects with the second friction clutch means; third input gear means drivingly connects with the third clutch means; first output gear means drivingly connects with the first input gear means; second output gear means drivingly connects with the first and second input gear means; third output means drivingly connects between the third input gear means and the output means; and one double-acting synchronizer clutch for selectively engaging the first output gear means with the output means and alternately the second output gear means with the output means. The first friction clutch means and the one double-acting synchronizer clutch cooperates during engagement to establish two forward drive ratios between the input and output means. The second friction clutch means and the one double-acting synchronizer clutch cooperates during engagement to establish two other forward drive ratios between the input and output means. The third friction clutch means is engageable to provide another forward drive ratio between the input means and the output means; and the one double-acting synchronizer clutch is relieved of transmitting drive forces during the engagement of the third friction clutch means and being manipulable for alternate connection with either the first output gear or the second output gear while the third friction clutch means is engaged.

  11. ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particleSizegovMeasurementsIsotope ratio

  12. Carbon monoxide tolerant electrocatalyst with low platinum loading and a process for its preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav; Brankovic, Stanko; Wang, Jia

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrocatalyst is provided for use in a fuel cell that has low platinum loading and a high tolerance to carbon monoxide poisoning. The fuel cell anode includes an electrocatalyst that has a conductive support material, ruthenium nanoparticles reduced in H.sub.2 and a Group VIII noble metal in an amount of between about 0.1 and 25 wt % of the ruthenium nanoparticles, preferably between about 0.5 and 15 wt %. The preferred Group VIII noble metal is platinum. In one embodiment, the anode can also have a perfluorinated polymer membrane on its surface.

  13. Nonadiabatic calculations of ultraviolet absorption cross section of sulfur monoxide: Isotopic effects on the photodissociation reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielache, Sebastian O.; Tomoya, Suzuki; Nanbu, Shinkoh [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Chiyoda Ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)] [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Chiyoda Ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Kondorsky, Alexey [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of Russian Academy of Science, Leninsky pr., 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation) [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of Russian Academy of Science, Leninsky pr., 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Institutsky per., 9, Dolgoprudny Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Tokue, Ikuo [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, Ikarashi, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, Ikarashi, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of the main and substituted sulfur monoxide (SO) isotopologues were calculated using R-Matrix expansion technique. Energies, transition dipole moments, and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements were calculated at MRCI/AV6Z level. The calculated absorption cross section of {sup 32}S{sup 16}O was compared with experimental spectrum; the spectral feature and the absolute value of photoabsorption cross sections are in good agreement. Our calculation predicts a long lived photoexcited SO* species which causes large non-mass dependent isotopic effects depending on the excitation energy in the ultraviolet region.

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 106, NO. D22, PAGES28,481-28,495, NOVEMBER 27, 2001 Source analysis of carbon monoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laat, Jos de

    at the InterTropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The marked tracer study suggests that biofuel use the globe where biofuel use and biomass burning contribute so much to the CO mixing ratios. In general, most is the dominant CO source at middle and high northern latitudes, whereas biofuel use and biomass burning are major

  15. Testing solar lepton mixing sum rules in neutrino oscillation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballett, Peter; Luhn, Christoph; Pascoli, Silvia; Schmidt, Michael A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small discrete family symmetries such as S4, A4 or A5 may lead to simple leading-order predictions for the neutrino mixing matrix such as the bimaximal, tribimaximal or golden ratio mixing patterns, which may be brought into agreement with experimental data with the help of corrections from the charged-lepton sector. Such scenarios generally lead to relations among the parameters of the physical leptonic mixing matrix known as solar lepton mixing sum rules. In this article, we present a simple derivation of such solar sum rules, valid for arbitrary neutrino and charged lepton mixing angles and phases, assuming only {\\theta}13^{\

  16. Thermal device and method for production of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by thermal dissociation of hydrocarbon gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon monoxide is produced in a fast quench reactor. The production of carbon monoxide includes injecting carbon dioxide and some air into a reactor chamber having a high temperature at its inlet and a rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Carbon dioxide and other reactants such as methane and other low molecular weight hydrocarbons are injected into the reactor chamber. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  17. Inhalation toxicology. 11. The effect of elevated temperature on carbon monoxide toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, D.C.; Endecott, B.R.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory rats were exposed (a) to experimental concentrations of carbon monoxide in air at ambient temperature, (b) to elevated temperature atmospheres from 40 deg C to 60 deg C, and (c) to selected carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations at the elevated temperatures in (b). The incapacitating potency of each of the environments was evaluated by measurements of time-to-incapacitation (t sub i) as a function of CO concentration and/or temperature; incapacitation was defined operationally as loss of ability to walk inside a motor-driven, rotating cage enclosed in an exposure chamber. Comparison of data from the combined (CO + elevated temperature) exposures and exposures to CO and elevated temperatures alone indicated than incapacitation occurred earlier when CO inhalation was combined with a whole-body, elevated temperature environment than was observed for the same exposure parameters applied individually. No evidence for a synergistic effect was noted. An empirical equation was derived that allows the calculation of a predicted t sub i for combinations of CO and temperature within the rangers utilized in the experimental exposures.

  18. mixed-bean-chili

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... J. Infante) MIXED BEAN CHILI So, I added 1 cup of tvp to 2 cups of water, ... was about 6 cups of water to mix everything together) Cook for about 5 hours at...

  19. Design and Development of a Mid-Infrared Carbon Monoxide Sensor for a High-Pressure Combustor Rig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camou, Alejandro

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    -strengths compared to the overtone bands near 2.3 ?m and 1.55 ?m. The mid-IR sensor was applied to a high-pressure combustor to determine the time-history of carbon monoxide and compare it to other measured combustor parameters to fully characterize the combustors...

  20. Process for producing hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide from hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide using a heteropolyanionic metal complex catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuch, Ph. L.

    1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide are produced by a process comprising contracting gaseous hydrogen sulfide with gaseous carbon monoxide in the presence of a heteropolymolybdate or tungstate complex. Use of these catalysts reduce the amount of by-product carbon dioxide and methane formation and thus enhance the make of hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide.

  1. Combined Crossed Molecular Beam and ab Initio Investigation of the Multichannel Reaction of Boron Monoxide (BO; X2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    in conventional carbon based jet fuel systems. The combustion of hydrocarbon based fuels can reach temperatures monoxide (11 BO; X2 + ) radical with unsaturated hydrocarbons are of importance in understanding the formation of small boron-oxygen bearing hydrocarbons in boron combustion processes. Over recent decades

  2. Prediction of Carbon Monoxide and Hydrocarbon Emissions in Isooctane HCCI Engine Combustion Using Multi-Zone Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Dibble, R

    2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignitions (HCCI) engines show promise as an alternative to Diesel engines, yet research remains: development of practical HCCI engines will be aided greatly by accurate modeling tools. A novel detailed chemical kinetic model that incorporates information from a computational fluid mechanics code has been developed to simulate HCCI combustion. This model very accurately predicts many aspects of the HCCI combustion process. High-resolution computational grids can be used for the fluid mechanics portion of the simulation, but the chemical kinetics portion of the simulation can be reduced to a handful of computational zones (for all previous work 10 zones have been used). While overall this model has demonstrated a very good predictive capability for HCCI combustion, previous simulations using this model have tended to underpredict carbon monoxide emissions by an order of magnitude. A factor in the underprediction of carbon monoxide may be that all previous simulations have been conducted with 10 chemical kinetic zones. The chemistry that results in carbon monoxide emissions is very sensitive to small changes in temperature within the engine. The resolution in temperature is determined directly by the number of zones. This paper investigates how the number of zones (i.e. temperature resolution) affects the model's prediction of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions in an HCCI engine. Simulations with 10, 20, and 40 chemical kinetic zones have been conducted using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism (859 species, 3606 reactions) to simulate an isooctane fueled HCCI engine. The results show that 10-zones are adequate to resolve the hydrocarbon emissions, but a greater numbers of zones are required to resolve carbon monoxide emissions. Results are also presented that explore spatial sources of the exhaust emissions within the HCCI engine combustion chamber.

  3. Oxygen isotopic ratios in intermediate-mass red giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebzelter, Thomas; Hinkle, Kenneth; Nowotny, Walter; Aringer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. The abundances of the three main isotopes of oxygen are altered in the course of the CNO-cycle. When the first dredge-up mixes the burning products to the surface, the nucleosynthesis processes can be probed by measuring oxygen isotopic ratios. Aims. By measuring 16O/17O and 16O/18O in red giants of known mass we compare the isotope ratios with predictions from stellar and galactic evolution modelling. Methods. Oxygen isotopic ratios were derived from the K-band spectra of six red giants. The sample red giants are open cluster members with known masses of between 1.8 and 4.5 Msun . The abundance determination employs synthetic spectra calculated with the COMARCS code. The effect of uncertainties in the nuclear reaction rates, the mixing length, and of a change in the initial abundance of the oxygen isotopes was determined by a set of nucleosynthesis and mixing models using the FUNS code. Results. The observed 16O/17O ratios are in good agreement with the model results, even if the measured values do ...

  4. NUCLEAR MIXING METERS FOR CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Keegan J.; Iliadis, Christian; Downen, Lori; Champagne, Art [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Jos, Jordi [Departament de Fsica i Enginyeria Nuclear, EUETIB, Universitat Politcnica de Catalunya, E-08036 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical novae are caused by mass transfer episodes from a main-sequence star onto a white dwarf via Roche lobe overflow. This material possesses angular momentum and forms an accretion disk around the white dwarf. Ultimately, a fraction of this material spirals in and piles up on the white dwarf surface under electron-degenerate conditions. The subsequently occurring thermonuclear runaway reaches hundreds of megakelvin and explosively ejects matter into the interstellar medium. The exact peak temperature strongly depends on the underlying white dwarf mass, the accreted mass and metallicity, and the initial white dwarf luminosity. Observations of elemental abundance enrichments in these classical nova events imply that the ejected matter consists not only of processed solar material from the main-sequence partner but also of material from the outer layers of the underlying white dwarf. This indicates that white dwarf and accreted matter mix prior to the thermonuclear runaway. The processes by which this mixing occurs require further investigation to be understood. In this work, we analyze elemental abundances ejected from hydrodynamic nova models in search of elemental abundance ratios that are useful indicators of the total amount of mixing. We identify the abundance ratios ?CNO/H, Ne/H, Mg/H, Al/H, and Si/H as useful mixing meters in ONe novae. The impact of thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties on the mixing meters is investigated using Monte Carlo post-processing network calculations with temperature-density evolutions of all mass zones computed by the hydrodynamic models. We find that the current uncertainties in the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S rate influence the Si/H abundance ratio, but overall the mixing meters found here are robust against nuclear physics uncertainties. A comparison of our results with observations of ONe novae provides strong constraints for classical nova models.

  5. Abundance ratios in hierarchical galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thomas

    1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical enrichment and stellar abundance ratios of galaxies which form in a hierarchical clustering scheme are calculated. For this purpose I adopt the star formation histories (SFH) as they are delivered by semi-analytic models in Kauffmann (1996}. It turns out that the average SFH of cluster ellipticals does not yield globally alpha-enhanced stellar populations. The star burst that occurs when the elliptical forms in the major merger plays therefore a crucial role in producing alpha-enhancement. Only under the assumption that the IMF is significantly flattened with respect to the Salpeter value during the burst, a Mg/Fe overabundant population can be obtained. In particular for the interpretation of radial gradients in metallicity and alpha-enhancement, the mixing of global and burst populations are of great importance. The model predicts bright field galaxies to be less alpha-enhanced than their counterparts in clusters.

  6. Mixed-mode cooling.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ASHRAEs permission. Mixed-Mode Cooling Photo Credit: Paulnatural ventilation for cooling. Buildings typically had1950s of large-scale mechanical cooling, along with other

  7. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Magno, Scott (Dublin, CA); Wang, Ruiping (Fremont, CA); Derouane, Eric (Liverpool, GB)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  8. Using the HP-41CV calculator as a data acquisition system for personal carbon monoxide exposure monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitz-Simons, T.; Sauls, H.B.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of small, personal monitors as instruments for air pollution data acquisition, storage, and retrieval presents a new set of monitoring considerations. Portability, ruggedness, power supplies, and data capture are functions to be addressed in designing personal monitoring systems. The emphasis herein is on the data capture function. This paper describes experiences using the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV system as a data management system interfaced with personal carbon monoxide monitors (General Electric Carbon Monoxide Detector, Model 15EC53CO3). In general, the HP-41CV proved to be reliable, adaptable, and easy to use. Problems with the monitor power source (battery failure) were more frequent than with the HP-41CV itself. Using the HP-41CV for the specific data collection requirements of the Washington Microenvironment Study is a focal point of this presentation.

  9. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  10. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  11. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  12. Liquid mixing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, R. P.

    1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixing device for mixing at least two liquids to produce a homogenous mixture. The device includes an elongated chamber in which a vertically oriented elongated mixing cavity is located. The cavity is sealed at its lower end and it is open at its upper end and in communication with the interior of the chamber. An elongated conduit extends the length of the cavity and is adapted to receive liquids to be mixed. The conduit includes a plurality of ports located at longitudinally spaced positions therealong and which ports are directed in different directions. The ports create plural streams of liquid which interact and mix with one another within the cavity. The mixed liquids overflow the cavity and out its top end into the chamber 24. The chamber 24 includes an outlet from which the mixed liquids are withdrawn. In accordance with the preferred embodiment gas eductor means are provided in the inlet to the conduit to introduce gas bubbles within the cavity. Gas vent means are also provided in the device to vent any introduced gases from the device so that only the mixed liquids flow out the outlet.

  13. Estimation of the carbon monoxide emissions due to Sandia National Laboratories commuter and on-base traffic for conformity determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClellan, Y. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Royer, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the analysis and conclusion of an investigation of the carbon monoxide emissions resulting from Sandia National Laboratories and Department of Energy (DOE) commuter and on-base traffic for the Clean Air Act (CAA) Conformity Determination. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County was classified as a nonattainment area by the Environmental Protection Agency. Nonattainment area is an area which is shown by monitored data or which is calculated by air quality modeling to exceed any National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for the pollutant. Albuquerque/Bernalillo County exceeds the NAAQS for carbon monoxide and ozone. The Conformity Determination was needed to complete the CAA Title V Permitting process for SNL and the DOE. The analysis used the EPA approved MOBILE5a Carbon Monoxide (CO) emissions modeling program. This analysis will provide a baseline for mobile sources to allow Sandia to estimate any future activity and how that activity will impact CO emissions. The General Conformity Rule (AQCR 43) requires that operations which will increase CO emissions in nonattaimnent or maintenance areas such as Bernalillo County undergo conformity analyses to determine whether or not they will impact ambient air quality in the area.

  14. Spectroscopic detection of Carbon Monoxide in the Young Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rho, Jeonghee; Cami, Jan; Reach, William

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of carbon monoxide (CO) emission from the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) at wavelengths corresponding to the fundamental vibrational mode at 4.65 micron. We obtained AKARI Infrared Camera spectra towards 4 positions which unambiguously reveal the broad characteristic CO ro-vibrational band profile. The observed positions include unshocked ejecta at the center, indicating that CO molecules form in the ejecta at an early phase. We extracted a dozen spectra across Cas A along the long 1 arcmin slits, and compared these to simple CO emission models in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium to obtain first-order estimates of the excitation temperatures and CO masses involved. Our observations suggest that significant amounts of carbon may have been locked up in CO since the explosion 330 years ago. Surprisingly, CO has not been efficiently destroyed by reactions with ionized He or the energetic electrons created by the decay of the radiative nuclei. Our CO detection thus implies that...

  15. Relationship of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide yield of cigarettes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Sherrill, D.L.; Paoletti, P.; Lebowitz, M.D. (National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw (Poland))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The data from consecutive surveys of the Tucson Epidemiologic Study (1981-1988) were used to evaluate the relationship in cigarette smokers of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide (CO) yields of the cigarette. There were 690 subjects who reported smoking regularly in at least one survey, over age 15. After adjustment for intensity and duration of smoking and for depth of inhalation, the risk of chronic phlegm, cough, and dyspnea were not related to the tar and nicotine yields. In 414 subjects with pulmonary function tested in at least one of the three surveys the spirometric indices used were significantly related to the daily dose of tar, nicotine, and CO (product of the cigarette yield and daily number of cigarettes smoked). The effects were more pronounced for past than for current doses. However, the differentiation of pulmonary function due to various yields of cigarettes was small in comparison to the difference in pulmonary function between smokers and nonsmokers.

  16. Search for the electric dipole moment of the electron with thorium monoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amar C. Vutha; Wesley C. Campbell; Yulia V. Gurevich; Nicholas R. Hutzler; Maxwell Parsons; David Patterson; Elizabeth Petrik; Benjamin Spaun; John M. Doyle; Gerald Gabrielse; David DeMille

    2010-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric dipole moment of the electron (eEDM) is a signature of CP-violating physics beyond the Standard Model. We describe an ongoing experiment to measure or set improved limits to the eEDM, using a cold beam of thorium monoxide (ThO) molecules. The metastable $H {}^3\\Delta_1$ state in ThO has important advantages for such an experiment. We argue that the statistical uncertainty of an eEDM measurement could be improved by as much as 3 orders of magnitude compared to the current experimental limit, in a first-generation apparatus using a cold ThO beam. We describe our measurements of the $H$ state lifetime and the production of ThO molecules in a beam, which provide crucial data for the eEDM sensitivity estimate. ThO also has ideal properties for the rejection of a number of known systematic errors; these properties and their implications are described.

  17. The role of surface structure in carbon-monoxide hydrogenation on cobalt catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B.G.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of surface structure on the CO hydrogenation reaction were investigated by comparing the activity and selectivity of submonolayer cobalt deposited on W(110) and W(100) with that of carbonyl-derived Co/alumina catalysts of varying dispersion. The structure, stability, surface electronic properties, and chemisorptive properties of vapor deposited cobalt overlayers (0-4 ML) on W(110) and W(100) were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy, low electron diffraction, work function changes, and temperature programmed desorption of cobalt, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide. The chemisorptive properties of the cobalt overlayers are quite different from those of bulk cobalt surfaces. The Co/W surface have highly strained and different geometries but have similar CO hydrogenation activity. The activity nearly matches that of the highly active, highly reduced Co/alumina catalysts, showing that the activity of cobalt surfaces is independent of surface structure. The specific activity of carbonyl-derived catalysts appears to be more closely related to the extent of reduction and the support dehydroxylation temperatures than to the dispersion. Thus, the chemical nature of the support surface is the controlling factor in determining the specific activity of supported cobalt catalysts. CO hydrogenation on cobalt is neither primary nor secondary structure sensitive.

  18. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  19. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Dimenna, R.; Tamburello, D.

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. One of the main objectives in the waste processing is to provide feed of a uniform slurry composition at a certain weight percentage (e.g. typically {approx}13 wt% at SRS) over an extended period of time. In preparation of the sludge for slurrying, several important questions have been raised with regard to sludge suspension and mixing of the solid suspension in the bulk of the tank: (1) How much time is required to prepare a slurry with a uniform solid composition? (2) How long will it take to suspend and mix the sludge for uniform composition in any particular waste tank? (3) What are good mixing indicators to answer the questions concerning sludge mixing stated above in a general fashion applicable to any waste tank/slurry pump geometry and fluid/sludge combination?

  20. Fuel Mix Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hawaii requires the states retail electric suppliers to disclose details regarding the fuel mix of their electric generation to retail customers. Such information must be provided on customers...

  1. Fuel Mix Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washingtons retail electric suppliers must disclose details regarding the fuel mix of their electric generation to customers. Electric suppliers must provide such information in a standard format...

  2. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. Paul Chin; Dr. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts; Professor James J. Spivey; Mr. Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Dr. James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Dr. Richard W. Rice

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several different catalytic reactions must be carried out in order to convert hydrocarbons (or alcohols) into hydrogen for use as a fuel for polyelectrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Each reaction in the fuel-processing sequence has a different set of characteristics, which influences the type of catalyst support that should be used for that particular reaction. A wide range of supports are being evaluated for the various reactions in the fuel-processing scheme, including porous and non-porous particles, ceramic and metal straight-channel monoliths, and ceramic and metal monolithic foams. These different types of support have distinctly different transport characteristics. The best choice of support for a given reaction will depend on the design constraints for the system, e.g., allowable pressure drop, and on the characteristics of the reaction for which the catalyst is being designed. Three of the most important reaction characteristics are the intrinsic reaction rate, the exothermicity/endothermicity of the reaction, and the nature of the reaction network, e.g., whether more than one reaction takes place and, in the case of multiple reactions, the configuration of the network. Isotopic transient kinetic analysis was used to study the surface intermediates. The preferential oxidation of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen (PROX) is an important final step in most fuel processor designs. Data on the behavior of straight-channel monoliths and foam monolith supports will be presented to illustrate some of the factors involved in choosing a support for this reaction.

  3. 13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS Updated October 2011 by K compelling evidences for oscillations of neutrinos caused by nonzero neutrino masses and neutrino mixing. The data imply the existence of 3-neutrino mixing in vacuum. We review the theory of neutrino oscillations

  4. 13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS Written May 2010 by K. Nakamura for oscillations of neutrinos caused by nonzero neutrino masses and neutrino mixing. The data imply the existence of 3-neutrino mixing in vacuum. We review the theory of neutrino oscillations, the phenomenology

  5. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and schedule savings. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria associated with the waste processing at SRS and to quantify the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed briefly, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. One of the main objectives in the waste processing is to provide the DWPF a uniform slurry composition at a certain weight percentage (typically {approx}13 wt%) over an extended period of time. In preparation of the sludge for slurrying to DWPF, several important questions have been raised with regard to sludge suspension and mixing of the solid suspension in the bulk of the tank: (1) How much time is required to prepare a slurry with a uniform solid composition for DWPF? (2) How long will it take to suspend and mix the sludge for uniform composition in any particular waste tank? (3) What are good mixing indicators to answer the questions concerning sludge mixing stated above in a general fashion applicable to any waste tank/slurry pump geometry and fluid/sludge combination? Grenville and Tilton (1996) investigated the mixing process by giving a pulse of tracer (electrolyte) through the submersible jet nozzle and by monitoring the conductivity at three locations within the cylindrical tank. They proposed that the mixing process was controlled by the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in the region far away from the jet entrance. They took the energy dissipation rates in the regions remote from the nozzle to be proportional to jet velocity and jet diameter at that location. The reduction in the jet velocity was taken to be proportional to the nozzle velocity and distance from the nozzle. Based on their analysis, a correlation was proposed. The proposed correlation was shown to be valid over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (50,000 to 300,000) with a relative standard deviation of {+-} 11.83%. An improved correlat

  6. Kinetics of the Reduction of Wstite by Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide for the Chemical Looping Production of Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wen; Lim, Jin Yang; Saucedo, Marco A.; Hayhurst, Allan N.; Scott, Stuart A.; Dennis, J. S.

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    produced could be stored, e.g. by geological sequestration, making the overall process carbon-neutral, or carbon-negative when biomass is used as fuel. In addition, the hydrogen produced during the oxidation of FexO and metallic Fe in steam can be kept... Kinetics of the reduction of wstite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide for the chemical looping production of hydrogen Wen Liu a,n, Jin Yang Lim b, Marco A. Saucedo a, Allan N. Hayhurst b, Stuart A. Scott a, J.S. Dennis b a Department of Engineering...

  7. Growth direction of oblique angle electron beam deposited silicon monoxide thin films identified by optical second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vejling Andersen, Sren; Lund Trolle, Mads; Pedersen, Kjeld [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Skjernvej 4A, DK-9220 Aalborg st (Denmark)] [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Skjernvej 4A, DK-9220 Aalborg st (Denmark)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Oblique angle deposited (OAD) silicon monoxide (SiO) thin films forming tilted columnar structures have been characterized by second-harmonic generation. It was found that OAD SiO leads to a rotationally anisotropic second-harmonic response, depending on the optical angle of incidence. A model for the observed dependence of the second-harmonic signal on optical angle of incidence allows extraction of the growth direction of OAD films. The optically determined growth directions show convincing agreement with cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy images. In addition to a powerful characterization tool, these results demonstrate the possibilities for designing nonlinear optical devices through SiO OAD.

  8. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  9. Mixing by Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P; Pesci, Adriana I; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this fluid dynamics video, we demonstrate the microscale mixing enhancement of passive tracer particles in suspensions of swimming microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These biflagellated, single-celled eukaryotes (10 micron diameter) swim with a "breaststroke" pulling motion of their flagella at speeds of about 100 microns/s and exhibit heterogeneous trajectory shapes. Fluorescent tracer particles (2 micron diameter) allowed us to quantify the enhanced mixing caused by the swimmers, which is relevant to suspension feeding and biogenic mixing. Without swimmers present, tracer particles diffuse slowly due solely to Brownian motion. As the swimmer concentration is increased, the probability density functions (PDFs) of tracer displacements develop strong exponential tails, and the Gaussian core broadens. High-speed imaging (500 Hz) of tracer-swimmer interactions demonstrates the importance of flagellar beating in creating oscillatory flows that exceed Brownian motion out to about 5 cell radii from the swimm...

  10. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  11. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low the compression ratio can be raised (to as much as 18:1) providing high engine efficiency. It is important to recognize that for a well designed VCR engine cylinder pressure does not need to be higher than found in current production turbocharged engines. As such, there is no need for a stronger crankcase, bearings and other load bearing parts within the VCR engine. The Envera VCR mechanism uses an eccentric carrier approach to adjust engine compression ratio. The crankshaft main bearings are mounted in this eccentric carrier or 'crankshaft cradle' and pivoting the eccentric carrier 30 degrees adjusts compression ratio from 9:1 to 18:1. The eccentric carrier is made up of a casting that provides rigid support for the main bearings, and removable upper bearing caps. Oil feed to the main bearings transits through the bearing cap fastener sockets. The eccentric carrier design was chosen for its low cost and rigid support of the main bearings. A control shaft and connecting links are used to pivot the eccentric carrier. The control shaft mechanism features compression ratio lock-up at minimum and maximum compression ratio settings. The control shaft method of pivoting the eccentric carrier was selected due to its lock-up capability. The control shaft can be rotated by a hydraulic actuator or an electric motor. The engine shown in Figures 3 and 4 has a hydraulic actuator that was developed under the current program. In-line 4-cylinder engines are significantly less expensive than V engines because an entire cylinder head can be eliminated. The cost savings from eliminating cylinders and an entire cylinder head will notably offset the added cost of the VCR and supercharging. Replacing V6 and V8 engines with in-line VCR 4-cylinder engines will provide high fuel economy at low cost. Numerous enabling technologies exist which have the potential to increase engine efficiency. The greatest efficiency gains are realized when the right combination of advanced and new technologies are packaged together to provide the greatest gains at the least cost. Aggressive engine downsiz

  12. Nonlinear oscillations and waves in an arbitrary mass ratio cold plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Prabal Singh [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that nonlinear standing oscillations in an arbitrary mass ratio cold plasma always phase mix away. However, there exist nonlinear electron-ion traveling wave solutions, which do not exhibit phase mixing because they have zero ponderomotive force. The existence of these waves has been demonstrated using a perturbation method. Moreover, it is shown that cold plasma BGK waves [Albritton et al., Nucl. Fusion 15, 1199 (1975)] phase mix away if ions are allowed to move and the scaling of phase mixing is found to be different from earlier work [Sengupta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1867 (1999)]. Phase mixing of these waves has been further verified in 1-D particle in cell simulation.

  13. Unitarity constraints on trimaximal mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sanjeev [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi -110005 (India)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the neutrino mass eigenstate {nu}{sub 2} is trimaximally mixed, the mixing matrix is called trimaximal. The middle column of the trimaximal mixing matrix is identical to tribimaximal mixing and the other two columns are subject to unitarity constraints. This corresponds to a mixing matrix with four independent parameters in the most general case. Apart from the two Majorana phases, the mixing matrix has only one free parameter in the CP conserving limit. Trimaximality results in interesting interplay between mixing angles and CP violation. A notion of maximal CP violation naturally emerges here: CP violation is maximal for maximal 2-3 mixing. Similarly, there is a natural constraint on the deviation from maximal 2-3 mixing which takes its maximal value in the CP conserving limit.

  14. Role of shocks and mix caused by capsule defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Schmitt, M. J.; Obrey, K. D.; Batha, S. H.; Magelssen, G. R.; Fincke, J. R.; Hsu, S. C.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Wysocki, F. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glebov, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An Eulerian code with a turbulent mix model is used to model a set of plastic (CH) ablator capsules with and without equatorial grooves. The 'perfect' capsule results were used to calibrate simulations of capsules with equatorial grooves of different depths that provided information on increasingly perturbed implosions. Simulations with a turbulence model were able to calculate the same yield over mix (YOM) ratio (experiment/mix simulation) of 0.2 to 0.3 for thin (8-{mu}m thick) and thick shell (15-{mu}m thick) capsules with no grooves and thin capsules with shallow grooves. When the capsules have deep grooves, the YOM ratio increases to greater than unity, probably because the deformed shocks focus too strongly on the symmetry axis in our two-dimensional simulations. This is supported by a comparison of simulated and experimental x-ray images.

  15. Beta-decay branching ratios of 62Ga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bey; B. Blank; G. Canchel; C. Dossat; J. Giovinazzo; I. Matea; V. Elomaa; T. Eronen; U. Hager; M. Hakala; A. Jokinen; A. Kankainen; I. Moore; H. Penttila; S. Rinta-Antila; A. Saastamoinen; T. Sonoda; J. Aysto; N. Adimi; G. De France; J. C. Thomas; G. Voltolini; T. Chaventr

    2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-decay branching ratios of 62Ga have been measured at the IGISOL facility of the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaskyla. 62Ga is one of the heavier Tz = 0, 0+ -> 0+ beta-emitting nuclides used to determine the vector coupling constant of the weak interaction and the Vud quark-mixing matrix element. For part of the experimental studies presented here, the JYFLTRAP facility has been employed to prepare isotopically pure beams of 62Ga. The branching ratio obtained, BR= 99.893(24)%, for the super-allowed branch is in agreement with previous measurements and allows to determine the ft value and the universal Ft value for the super-allowed beta decay of 62Ga.

  16. Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Button, Joseph Wade

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prepared mixtures, field mixtures obtained at the plant and pavement cores. Laboratory tests included Hveem and Marshall stability, resilient modulus and indirect tension. Mixture conditioning to evaluate resistance to moisture damage included vacuum... Mixed and Compacted Specimens Tensile Strength Ratio for Laboratory Mixed and Compacted Specimens 14 Marshall Stability Before and After 7-days Soaking in Water for Lab Mixed and Compacted Specimens 36 FIGURE Page 15 16 Hveem Stability Before...

  17. SHEAR LAYER INSTABILITY AND MIXING IN MICRO HEAT SPREADERS C. Sert and A. Beskok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beskok, Ali

    SHEAR LAYER INSTABILITY AND MIXING IN MICRO HEAT SPREADERS C. Sert and A. Beskok Texas A the chip surface temperature by oscillatory flow forced convection and mixing. Numerical simulations are performed for an MHS device with channel to reservoir expansion ratio H/h 25. The boundary conditions

  18. CYCLIC PLASTICITY OF A CRACKED STRUCTURE SUBJECTED TO MIXED MODE LOADING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CYCLIC PLASTICITY OF A CRACKED STRUCTURE SUBJECTED TO MIXED MODE LOADING Sylvie Pommier1, a 1 LMT, mixed mode crack propagation, plasticity, crack deflection. Abstract. Cyclic plasticity in the crack tip stresses in the overload's plastic zone. Moreover, if the overload's ratio is large enough, the crack may

  19. 13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13. Neutrino mixing 1 13. NEUTRINO MASS, MIXING, AND OSCILLATIONS Updated May 2012 by K. Nakamura have provided compelling evidences for oscillations of neutrinos caused by nonzero neutrino masses of neutrino oscillations, the phenomenology of neutrino mixing, the problem of the nature - Dirac or Majorana

  20. Scientists ignite aluminum water mix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists ignite aluminum water mix Scientists ignite aluminum water mix Don't worry, that beer can you're holding is not going to spontaneously burst into flames. June 30, 2014...

  1. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  2. Nozzle mixing apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mensink, D.L.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a nozzle device for causing two fluids to mix together. In particular, a spray nozzle comprise two hollow, concentric housings, an inner housing and an outer housing. The inner housing has a channel formed therethrough for a first fluid. Its outer surface cooperates with the interior surface of the outer housing to define the second channel for a second fluid. The outer surface of the inner housing and the inner surface of the outer housing each carry a plurality of vanes that interleave but do not touch, each vane of one housing being between two vanes of the other housing. The vanes are curved and the inner surface of the outer housing and the outer surface of the inner housing converge to narrow the second channel. The shape of second channel results in a swirling, accelerating second fluid that will impact the first fluid just past the end of the nozzle where mixing will take place.

  3. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Das; Jorge Gamboa; Miguel Pino

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  4. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  5. Pattern of neutrino mixing in grand unified theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, K.; Tanaka, K.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It was found previously in SO(10) grand unified theories that if the neutrinos have a Dirac mass and a right-handed Majorana mass (approx. 10/sup 15/GeV) but no left-handed Majorana mass, there is small ..nu../sub e/ mixing but ..nu../sub ..mu../ - ..nu../sub tau/ mixing can be substantial. This problem is reexamined on the basis of a formalism that assumes that the up, down, lepton, and neutrino mass matrices arise from a single complex 10 and a single 126 Higgs boson. This formalism determines the Majorana mass matrix in terms of quark mass matrices. Adopting three different sets of quark mass matrices that produce acceptable fermion mass ratios and Cabbibo mixing produces results consistent with the above; however, in the optimum case, ..nu../sub e/ - ..nu../sub ..mu../ mixing can be of the order of the Cabbibo angle.

  6. Potentiometric CO titrations of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and CO-inhibition of the NI-removing reaction with 1,10--phenanthroline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, William Kent

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum catalyzes two reactions involving redox chemistry (the reversible oxidation Of CO to C02, and the synthesis of acetyl-CoA) using three types of Ni and Fe-S structures called the A-, B...

  7. Cooking with Dry Egg Mix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    package has been opened, place the unused egg mix in a resealable bag or in an airtight container and store it in the refrigerator. How to prepare it To make liquid eggs, stir 1 part mix with 2 parts warm water. Use a fork to blend the egg mix...

  8. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  9. Citation: J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), PR D86, 010001 (2012) (URL: http://pdg.lbl.gov) Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accelerator experiments. Some neutrino oscillation experiments compare the flux in two or more detectors://pdg.lbl.gov) Neutrino Mixing A REVIEW GOES HERE Check our WWW List of Reviews (A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios(A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios(A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios(A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios

  10. Earth Planets Space, 54, 265273, 2002 Iodine isotope ratios and halide concentrations in fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehn, Udo

    is best preserved in the high-temperature fumaroles collected in 1998 and has a 129 I/I ratio of 756 ± 47 recent meteoric water from the fumarolic system after 1993. The acid hot springs on the flanks by mixing with old meteoric water and seawater. Fumarolic gases and hot spring waters were also analyzed

  11. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Goldberg, R.I.

    1985-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of converting low H/sub 2//CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200 to 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinum, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n + 1) greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  12. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Goldberg, Robert I. (Selden, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of converting low H.sub.2 /CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200.degree. to 350.degree. C. in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinium, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n+1).gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n.gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  13. A Micro-Computer-Based Fuel Optimization System Utilizing In-Situ Measurement of Carbon Monoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVivo, D. G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency, safety and cost-effectiveness. With this control approach, the existing analog boiler controls remain intact and continue to function. No costly retrofit of computer compatible controllers and actuators is required and full analog backup.... The control output to the boiler control interface, such as a pUlse-to pneumatic converter linked to an air bias station that adjusts the air:fuel ratio, is calculated based on the time domain response of the boiler. The control algorithm recognizes...

  14. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-128 Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Value-Added

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-15022252 G-Band48

  15. Atomic mix in directly driven inertial confinement implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D. C.; Ebey, P. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sangster, T. C.; Shmayda, W. T.; Yu. Glebov, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Lerche, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Directly driven implosions on the Omega laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have measured the presence of atomic mix using D+T neutron yield rates from plastic capsules with and without deuterated layers, and a nearly pure tritium fuel containing 0.7% deuterium. In 15, 19, and 24 {mu}m thick plastic shells, D+T neutron yields increased by factors of 86, 112, and 24 when the 1.2 {mu}m thick inner layer was deuterated. Based on adjusting a fully atomic mix modvfel to fit yield degradation in the un-deuterated capsule and applying it to the capsule with the deuterated layer, atomic mixing accounts for 40-75% of the yield degradation due to mix. For the first time, the time dependence of mixed mass was measured by the ratio of the yield rates from both types of capsules. As expected, the amount of mix grows throughout the D+T burn.

  16. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  17. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  18. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclos...

  19. Optimal broadcasting of mixed states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang Guifang; Fan Heng [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The N to M (M{>=}N) universal quantum broadcasting of mixed states {rho}{sup xN} is proposed for a qubit system. The broadcasting of mixed states is universal and optimal in the sense that the shrinking factor is independent of the input state and achieves the upper bound. The quantum broadcasting of mixed qubits is a generalization of the universal quantum cloning machine for identical pure input states. A pure state decomposition of the identical mixed qubits {rho}{sup xN} is obtained.

  20. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marylands 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires all electric companies and electricity suppliers to provide customers with details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of...

  1. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions to customers. Electric utilities and...

  2. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginias 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation....

  3. Application of an all-solid-state diode-laser-based sensor for carbon monoxide detection by optical absorption in the 4.4 ? 4.8 m spectral region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodolfo, Barron Jimenez

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for mid-infrared absorption measurements of the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. The single-mode, tunable output of an external-cavity ...

  4. Overview of Neutrino Mixing Models and Their Mixing Angle Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, Carl H.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of neutrino-mixing models is presented with emphasis on the types of horizontal flavor and vertical family symmetries that have been invoked. Distributions for the mixing angles of many models are displayed. Ways to differentiate among the models and to narrow the list of viable models are discussed.

  5. Measurements of moisture suction in hot mix asphalt mixes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassem, Emad Abdel-Rahman

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of moisture in hot mix asphalt (HMA) causes loss of strength and durability of the mix, which is referred to as moisture damage. This study deals with the development of experimental methods for measuring total suction in HMA, which can...

  6. Mixing and segregation rates in sheared granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura A. Golick; Karen E. Daniels

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The size-segregation of granular materials, a process colloquially known as the Brazil Nut Effect, has generally been thought to proceed faster the greater the size difference of the particles. We experimentally investigate sheared bidisperse granular materials as a function of the size ratio of the two species, and find that the mixing rate at low confining pressure behaves as expected from percolation-based arguments. However, we also observe an anomalous effect for the re-segregation rates, wherein particles of both dissimilar and similar sizes segregate more slowly than intermediate particle size ratios. Combined with the fact that increasing the confining pressure significantly suppresses both mixing and segregation rates of particles of dissimilar size, we propose that the anomalous behavior may be attributed to a species-dependent distribution of forces within the system.

  7. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Keith Edward (Kobe, JP); Moser, William Elliott (Peoria, IL); Roozenboom, Stephan Donald (Washington, IL); Knox, Kevin Jay (Peoria, IL)

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  8. Abundance Ratios in Early-Type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynier Peletier

    1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Although evidence is accumulating that abundance ratios in galaxies are often non-solar, they are far from understood. I resume the current evidence for non-solar abundance ratios, supplementing the recent review by Worthey (1998) with some new results. It appears that the Mg/Fe abundance ratio only depends on the mass of the galaxy, not on the formation time-scale. For massive galaxies [Mg/Fe] > 0, while small galaxies show solar abundance ratios. Information about abundances of other element is scarce, but new evidence is given that [Ca/Fe] is solar, or slightly lower than solar, contrary to what is expected for an alpha-element.

  9. Environmental factors affecting the permitting of a gas turbine cogeneration system located in an area designated non-attainment for ozone and carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Memarzadeh, F. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Office of Research

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will describe air permitting regulations that apply to a new cogeneration facility or the modification of any existing facility. The permitting depends on several factors including the attainment status of the emitted criteria pollutants within the project area, with the facility classified as either a ``major new source`` or a ``major modification``. Depending on the attainment status of a given pollutant, either the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) or the Non-attainment area (NAA) regulations (Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990) will apply for that pollutant. Since the greatest percentage of emissions generated by a gas turbine are nitrogen oxides (ozone precursors) and carbon monoxide this paper presents an overview of clean air regulations pertinent to those areas of the country that are designated as attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and lead (Pb), and as areas of nonattainment for ozone (O{sub 3}) and carbon monoxide (CO). A hypothetical case is presented and all the environmental issues such as applicability of PSD and NAA regulations, available pollution offsets, and air quality compliance requirements for a modification to an existing facility located in a serious ozone and moderate carbon monoxide non-attainment area will be illustrated.

  10. Mixed semiconductor nanocrystal compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maskaly, Garry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Schaller, Richard D. (Santa Fe, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors, wherein energy is transferred from the energy donor to the energy acceptor and wherein: the energy acceptor is a colloidal nanocrystal having a lower band gap energy than the energy donor; the energy donor and the energy acceptor are separated by a distance of 40 nm or less; wherein the average peak absorption energy of the acceptor is at least 20 meV greater than the average peak emission energy of the energy donor; and wherein the ratio of the number of energy donors to the number of energy acceptors is from about 2:1 to about 1000:1.

  11. Effect of quantity and route of administration of manganese monoxide on feed intake and serum manganese in ruminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, J.R.; Ammerman, C.B.; Henry, P.R.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experiment investigated effects of high quantities of manganese and route of administration (diet versus capsule-dosed) on feed intake and blood characteristics in sheep. Twenty-four Florida native or Florida native by St. Croix crossbred wethers, 47 kg initially, were assigned randomly to eight treatments including basal diet supplemented with 0, 3000, 6000, or 9000 ppm manganese as a reagent grade manganese monoxide or basal diet plus gelatin capsules containing the equivalent of 0, 3000, 6000, or 9000 ppm manganese based on intake of the previous day. Three sheep per treatment were provided feed and tap water for ad libitum intake. Sheep were fed basal diet for 7 days followed by a 21-day experimental period, then placed back on the basal diet for 7 days. Average daily feed intake was reduced by increasing supplemental manganese, regardless of route. Animals dosed by capsule consumed less feed than those administered manganese in the diet. Serum manganese increased as manganese supplementation increased, but route of administration had no effect.

  12. Ratio model serves suprathreshold color luminance discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Kathy T.

    Ratio model serves suprathreshold color luminance discrimination Marcel J. Sankeralli and Kathy T quadrants of the red green/luminance and blueyellow/luminance planes of cardinal color space. We showed model of suprathreshold colorluminance dis- crimination, in which discrimination depends on a ratio

  13. High Transformer ratios in collinear wakefield accelerators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanreykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on our previous experiment that successfully demonstrated wakefield transformer ratio enhancement in a 13.625 GHz dielectric-loaded collinear wakefield accelerator using the ramped bunch train technique, we present here a redesigned experimental scheme for even higher enhancement of the efficiency of this accelerator. Design of a collinear wakefield device with a transformer ratio R2, is presented. Using a ramped bunch train (RBT) rather than a single drive bunch, the enhanced transformer ratio (ETR) technique is able to increase the transformer ratio R above the ordinary limit of 2. To match the wavelength of the fundamental mode of the wakefield with the bunch length (sigmaz=2 mm) of the new Argonne wakefield accelerator (AWA) drive gun (where the experiment will be performed), a 26.625 GHz dielectric based accelerating structure is required. This transformer ratio enhancement technique based on our dielectric-loaded waveguide design will result in a compact, high efficiency accelerating structures for future wakefield accelerators.

  14. The oxidation of soot and carbon monoxide in hydrocarbon diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puri, R.; Santoro, R.J. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Smyth, K.C. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Building and Fire Research Lab.)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative hydroxyl radical concentrations and primary soot particle sizes have been determined in the soot oxidation regions of axisymmetric diffusion flames burning methane, methane/butane, and methane/1-butene in air at atmospheric pressure. The total carbon flow rate was held constant in these flames while the maximum amount of soot varied by a factor of seven along the centerline. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of OH were placed on an absolute basis by calibration against earlier absorption results. The primary size measurements of the soot particles were made using thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscopy. OH concentrations are greatly reduced in the presence of soot particles. Whereas large super-equilibrium ratios are observed in the high-temperature reaction zones in the absence of soot, the OH concentrations approach equilibrium values when the soot loading is high. The diminished OH concentrations are found to arise from reactions with the soot particles and only to a minor degree from lower temperatures due to soot radiation losses. Analysis of the soot oxidation rates computed from the primary particle size profiles as a function of time along the flame centerlines shows that OH is the dominant oxidizer of soot, with O[sub 2] making only a small contribution. Higher collision efficiencies of OH reactions with soot particles are found for the flames containing larger soot concentrations at lower temperatures. A comparison of the soot and CO oxidation rates shows that although CO is inherently more reactive than soot, the soot successfully competes with CO for OH and hence suppresses CO oxidation for large soot concentrations.

  15. Neutrino Mixing and Discrete Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Bo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model independent study of neutrino mixing based on a new method to derive mixing patterns is presented. An interesting result we find is that, in the case where unbroken residual symmetries of the Majorana neutrino and left-handed charged-lepton mass matrices obey some general assumptions, the complete set of possible mixing patterns can be determined by the solutions to the constraint equation with the help of algebraic number theory. This method can also be applied to more general cases beyond the minimal scenario. Several applications and phenomenological implications are discussed.

  16. Stratification, segregation and mixing of granular materials in quasi-2D bounded heaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Fan; Youcef Boukerkour; Thibault Blanc; Paul B. Umbanhowar; Julio M. Ottino; Richard M. Lueptow

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Segregation and mixing of granular mixtures during heap formation have important consequences in industry and agriculture. This research investigates three different final particle configurations of bi-disperse granular mixtures -- stratified, segregated and mixed -- during filling of quasi-two dimensional silos. We consider a larger number and relatively wider range of control parameters than previous studies, including particle size ratio, flow rate, system size and heap rise velocity. The boundary between stratified and unstratified states is primarily controlled by the two-dimensional flow rate, with the critical flow rate for the transition depending weakly on particle size ratio and flowing layer length. In contrast, the transition from segregated to mixed states is controlled by the rise velocity of the heap, a control parameter not previously considered. The critical rise velocity for the transition depends strongly on the particle size ratio.

  17. Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type Wayne D. Shepperd Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer disturbances to meet the desired objective #12;Aspen in Mixed Conifer ForestsAspen in Mixed Conifer Forests

  18. The assessment of mixing/solid suspension in a slab tank due to vibratory agitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Christopher Joseph

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -4-1. The shape is the result of nuclear safety considerations; the high ratio of length to width prevents a critical build-up of the radioactive crystals. A slab tank is noncylindrical. Traditionally, though, mixing processes occur in cylindrical tanks.... The design is an application of the technology of mixing and solid suspension in cylindrical tanks. The optimization of agitation in such a "nonstandard" geometry would only be possible through extensive experimental work. The optimum might not even lie...

  19. Fluid Mixing from Viscous Fingering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jha, Birendra

    Mixing efficiency at low Reynolds numbers can be enhanced by exploiting hydrodynamic instabilities that induce heterogeneity and disorder in the flow. The unstable displacement of fluids with different viscosities, or ...

  20. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

  1. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  2. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  3. Is the tribimaximal mixing accidental?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Mohammed [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Sciences, Abbassiyah 11566, Cairo (Egypt); Center for Theoretical Physics (CTP), British University in Egypt, BUE, El-Sherouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); Smirnov, A. Yu. [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tribimaximal (TBM) mixing is not accidental if structures of the corresponding leptonic mass matrices follow immediately from certain (residual or broken) flavor symmetry. We develop a simple formalism which allows one to analyze effects of deviations of the lepton mixing from TBM on the structure of the neutrino mass matrix and on the underlying flavor symmetry. We show that possible deviations from the TBM mixing can lead to strong modifications of the mass matrix and strong violation of the TBM-mass relations. As a result, the mass matrix may have an 'anarchical' structure with random values of elements or it may have some symmetry that differs from the TBM symmetry. Interesting examples include matrices with texture zeros, matrices with certain 'flavor alignment' as well as hierarchical matrices with a two-component structure, where the dominant and subdominant contributions have different symmetries. This opens up new approaches to understanding the lepton mixing.

  4. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2001, Nevada enacted legislation requiring the states electric utilities to provide details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation to their customers. Utilities must...

  5. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan's Customer Choice and Electric Reliability Act of 2000 (P.A. 141) requires electric suppliers to disclose to customers details related to the fuel mix and emissions, in pounds per megawatt...

  6. Mixed-Mode Ventilation and Building Retrofits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Ackerly, Katie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 15 Mixed-Mode Ventilation and Building RetrofitsEngineers. 2000. Mixed-mode ventilation. CIBSE ApplicationsMichael. 2000. Hybrid Ventilation Systems: An Arup Approach

  7. Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings, Summary Report, CenterCBE). 2006. Website: Mixed-Mode Building Case Studies.Department of Environmental Building Research Establishment

  8. Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Quality in Green Buildings. Indoor Air; 14 (Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings, Summary Report, CenterCBE). 2006. Website: Mixed-Mode Building Case Studies.

  9. Quantum computing with mixed states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Siomau; Stephan Fritzsche

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a model for quantum computing with initially mixed states. Although such a computer is known to be less powerful than a quantum computer operating with pure (entangled) states, it may efficiently solve some problems for which no efficient classical algorithms are known. We suggest a new implementation of quantum computation with initially mixed states in which an algorithm realization is achieved by means of optimal basis independent transformations of qubits.

  10. Quantum computing with mixed states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siomau, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a model for quantum computing with initially mixed states. Although such a computer is known to be less powerful than a quantum computer operating with pure (entangled) states, it may efficiently solve some problems for which no efficient classical algorithms are known. We suggest a new implementation of quantum computation with initially mixed states in which an algorithm realization is achieved by means of optimal basis independent transformations of qubits.

  11. Carbon monoxide alleviates ethanol-induced oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yanyan; Gao, Chao; Shi, Yanru; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Liang; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ministry of Education Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Xing, Mingyou [Department of Infectious Diseases, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Liu, Liegang [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ministry of Education Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Yao, Ping, E-mail: yaoping@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ministry of Education Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stress-inducible protein heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) is well-appreciative to counteract oxidative damage and inflammatory stress involving the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). The potential role and signaling pathways of HO-1 metabolite carbon monoxide (CO), however, still remained unclear. To explore the precise mechanisms, ethanol-dosed adult male Balb/c mice (5.0 g/kg.bw.) or ethanol-incubated primary rat hepatocytes (100 mmol/L) were pretreated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimmer (CORM-2, 8 mg/kg for mice or 20 ?mol/L for hepatocytes), as well as other pharmacological reagents. Our data showed that CO released from HO-1 induction by quercetin prevented ethanol-derived oxidative injury, which was abolished by CO scavenger hemoglobin. The protection was mimicked by CORM-2 with the attenuation of GSH depletion, SOD inactivation, MDA overproduction, and the leakage of AST, ALT or LDH in serum and culture medium induced by ethanol. Moreover, CORM-2 injection or incubation stimulated p38 phosphorylation and suppressed abnormal Tnfa and IL-6, accompanying the alleviation of redox imbalance induced by ethanol and aggravated by inflammatory factors. The protective role of CORM-2 was abolished by SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) but not by PD98059 (ERK inhibitor) or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor). Thus, HO-1 released CO prevented ethanol-elicited hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of gaseous signal molecule on ALD induced by naturally occurring phytochemicals. - Highlights: CO alleviated ethanol-derived liver oxidative and inflammatory stress in mice. CO eased ethanol and inflammatory factor-induced oxidative damage in hepatocytes. The p38 MAPK is a key signaling mechanism for the protective function of CO in ALD.

  12. The Use of Fuel Chemistry and Property Variations to Evaluate the Robustness of Variable Compression Ratio as a Control Method for Gasoline HCCI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On a gasoline engine platform, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) holds the promise of improved fuel economy and greatly reduced engine-out NOx emissions, without an increase in particulate matter emissions. In this investigation, a variable compression ratio (CR) engine equipped with a throttle and intake air heating was used to test the robustness of these control parameters to accommodate a series of fuels blended from reference gasoline, straight run refinery naptha, and ethanol. Higher compression ratios allowed for operation with higher octane fuels, but operation could not be achieved with the reference gasoline, even at the highest compression ratio. Compression ratio and intake heat could be used separately or together to modulate combustion. A lambda of 2 provided optimum fuel efficiency, even though some throttling was necessary to achieve this condition. Ethanol did not appear to assist combustion, although only two ethanol-containing fuels were evaluated. The increased pumping work from throttling was minimal compared to the efficiency increases that were the result of lower unburned hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Low temperature heat release was present for all the fuels, but could be suppressed with a higher intake air temperature. Results will be used to design future fuels and combustion studies with this research platform.

  13. The effect of mix on capsule yields as a function of shell thickness and gas fill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, P. A., E-mail: pbradley@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of direct drive capsules with different shell thicknesses and gas fills was conducted to examine the amount of shock induced (Richtmyer-Meshkov) mix versus Rayleigh-Taylor mix from deceleration of the implosion. The RAGE (Eulerian) code with a turbulent mix model was used to model these capsules for neutron yields along with time-dependent mix amounts. The amount of Richtmyer-Meshkov induced mix from the shock breaking out of the shell is about 0.1??g (0.15??m of shell material), while the Rayleigh-Taylor mix is of order 1??g and determines the mixed simulation yield. The simulations were able to calculate a yield over mix (YOM) ratio (experiment/mix simulation) between 0.5 and 1.0 for capsules with shell thicknesses ranging from 7.5 to 20??m and with gas fills between 3.8 and 20?atm of D{sub 2} or DT. The simulated burn averaged T{sub ion} values typically lie with 0.5?keV of the data, which is within the measurement error. For capsules with shell thicknesses >25??m, the YOM values drop to 0.10??0.05, suggesting that some unmodeled effect needs to be accounted for in the thickest capsules.

  14. WHEC 16 / 13-16 June 2006 Lyon France Materials, geometry, and net energy ratio of tubular photobioreactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .lovegrove@anu.edu.au Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200, AUSTRALIA ABSTRACT: We estimate the energy content for tubular solar collectors. Small diameter reactors have a low NER as the mixing energy becomes largeWHEC 16 / 13-16 June 2006 ­ Lyon France 1/12 Materials, geometry, and net energy ratio of tubular

  15. Process for the production of hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide from hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide using a multi-metal oxide/sulfide catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jevnikar, M. G.; Kuch, Ph. L.

    1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide are produced by a process comprising contacting gaseous hydrogen sulfide with gaseous carbon monoxide in the presence of a catalytic composition containing an oxide and/or sulfide of at least one of molybdenum, tungsten, iron, chromium and vanadium in combination with at least one promoter metal, e.g. a catalyst of the formula Cs Cu /SUB 0.2/ Zn /SUB 0.5/ Mn /SUB 0.5/ Sn /SUB 2.4/ Mo O /SUB x/ S /SUB y/ .

  16. Collectibility for Mixed Quantum States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?ukasz Rudnicki; Zbigniew Pucha?a; Pawe? Horodecki; Karol ?yczkowski

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Bounds analogous to entropic uncertainty relations allow one to design practical tests to detect quantum entanglement by a collective measurement performed on several copies of the state analyzed. This approach, initially worked out for pure states only [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 150502 (2011)], is extended here for mixed quantum states. We define collectibility for any mixed states of a multipartite system. Deriving bounds for collectibility for positive partially transposed states of given purity provides a new insight into the structure of entangled quantum states. In case of two qubits the application of complementary measurements and coincidence based detections leads to a new test of entanglement of pseudopure states.

  17. Mixed ternary heterojunction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA); Stewart, John M. (Seattle, WA)

    1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film heterojunction solar cell and a method of making it has a p-type layer of mixed ternary I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor material in contact with an n-type layer of mixed binary II-VI semiconductor material. The p-type semiconductor material includes a low resistivity copper-rich region adjacent the back metal contact of the cell and a composition gradient providing a minority carrier mirror that improves the photovoltaic performance of the cell. The p-type semiconductor material preferably is CuInGaSe.sub.2 or CuIn(SSe).sub.2.

  18. Bs Mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of B{sub s} mesons. B{sub s} Mixing is the most important analysis within the B Physics program of both experiments. In this paper they summarize the most recent results on this topic from both D0 and CDF experiments. There were very important updates in both experiments after his last talk, hence the organizers warmly recommended me to include the latest available results on B{sub s} mixing, instead of what he presents there.

  19. Radioactive anomaly discrimination from spectral ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for discriminating a radioactive anomaly from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive anomaly is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.

  20. Light Quarkonium - Glueball Mixing from a Holographic QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mixing structure of isospin-singlet scalars, the light quarkonium $(\\bar{q}q)$ and glueball $(gg)$ in two-flavor QCD, based on a holographic model of bottom-up hard-wall type. In the model the pure quarkonium and glueball states are unambiguously defined in terms of the different $U(1)_A$ charges in the restoration limit of the chiral $U(2)_L \\times U(2)_R$ symmetry, in which the quarkonium gets massless as the chiral partner of the pion. Hence the $\\bar{q}q$-$gg$ mixing arises in the presence of the nonzero chiral condensate or pion decay constant. At the realistic point where the pion decay constant and other hadron masses reach the observed amount, we predict the tiny mixing between the lightest quarkonia and glueball: The smallness of the mixing is understood by the slightly small ratio of the chiral and gluon condensate scales. The low-lying two scalar masses are calculated to be $\\simeq 1.25$ GeV and $\\simeq 1.77$ GeV, which are compared with masses of $f_0(1370)$ and $f_0(1710)$. Our resul...

  1. Fission Product Ratios as Treaty Monitoring Discriminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Arthur, Richard J.

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is currently under construction. The IMS is intended for monitoring of nuclear explosions. The radionuclide branch of the IMS monitors the atmosphere for short-lived radioisotopes indicative of a nuclear weapon test, and includes field collection and measurement stations, as well as laboratories to provide reanalysis of the most important samples and a quality control function. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington hosts the United States IMS laboratory, with the designation RL16. Since acute reactor containment failures and chronic reactor leakage may also produce similar isotopes, it is tempting to compute ratios of detected isotopes to determine the relevance of an event to the treaty or agreement in question. In this paper we will note several shortcomings of simple isotopic ratios: (1) fractionation of different chemical species, (2) difficulty in comparing isotopes within a single element, (3) the effect of unknown decay times. While these shortcomings will be shown in the light of an aerosol sample, several of the problems extend to xenon isotopic ratios. The result of the difficulties listed above is that considerable human expertise will be required to convert a simple mathematical ratio into a criterion which will reliably categorize an event as reactor or weapon.

  2. Viscosity to entropy ratio at extremality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayan K. Chakrabarti; Sachin Jain; Sudipta Mukherji

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming gauge theory realization at the boundary, we show that the viscosity to entropy ratio is 1/(4 pi) where the bulk is represented by a large class of extremal black holes in anti-de Sitter space. In particular, this class includes multiple R-charged black holes in various dimensions.

  3. Ratio method of measuring $w$ boson mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Feng; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes an alternative method of measuring the W boson mass in D0 experiment. Instead of extracting M{sub W} from the fitting of W {yields} e{nu} fast Monte Carlo simulations to W {yields} e{nu} data as in the standard method, we make the direct fit of transverse mass between W {yields} e{nu} data and Z {yields} ee data. One of the two electrons from Z boson is treated as a neutrino in the calculation of transverse mass. In ratio method, the best fitted scale factor corresponds to the ratio of W and Z boson mass (M{sub W}/M{sub Z}). Given the precisely measured Z boson mass, W mass is directly fitted from W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee data. This dissertation demonstrates that ratio method is a plausible method of measuring the W boson mass. With the 1 fb{sup -1} D0 Run IIa dataset, ratio method gives M{sub W} = 80435 {+-} 43(stat) {+-} 26(sys) MeV.

  4. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  5. Dark energy and particle mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

    2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the vacuum condensate due to particle mixing is responsible of a dynamically evolving dark energy. In particular, we show that values of the adiabatic index close to -1 for vacuum condensates of neutrinos and quarks imply, at the present epoch, contributions to the vacuum energy compatible with the estimated upper bound on the dark energy.

  6. Mixed RL-Huffman Encoding for Power Reduction and Data Compression in Scan Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranipoor, Mohammad

    Mixed RL-Huffman Encoding for Power Reduction and Data Compression in Scan Test M. H. Tehranipour1 techniques to reduce test data volume, test pattern delivery time and power dissipation in scan test. This combination is especially effective when the ratio of don't cares in a test set is high which is a common case

  7. Z .Chemical Geology 158 1999 173188 Grain size separation and sediment mixing in Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    ' FBE . At the land­ocean transition the reduction of the particle velocity causes a deposition ages from the FBE reflect the age of the Siberian flood Z .basalt of about 220 Ma and the initial ratio samples from the western Laptev Sea Z . 143 144 west of 1208E fall between LME and FBE. Mixing

  8. Mixed uranium dicarbide and uranium dioxide microspheres and process of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuel microspheres are made by sintering microspheres containing uranium dioxide and uncombined carbon in a 1 mole percent carbon monoxide/99 mole percent argon atmosphere at 1550.degree. C. and then sintering the microspheres in a 3 mole percent carbon monoxide/97 mole percent argon atmosphere at the same temperature.

  9. Do Mixed States save Effective Field Theory from BICEP?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Hael; Vardanyan, Tereza

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The BICEP2 collaboration has for the first time observed the B-mode polarization associated with inflationary gravitational waves. Their result has some discomfiting implications for the validity of an effective theory approach to single-field inflation since it would require an inflaton field excursion larger than the Planck scale. We argue that if the quantum state of the gravitons is a mixed state based on the Bunch-Davies vacuum, then the tensor to scalar ratio r measured by BICEP is different than the quantity that enters the Lyth bound. When this is taken into account, the tension between effective field theory and the BICEP result is alleviated.

  10. Do Mixed States save Effective Field Theory from BICEP?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hael Collins; R. Holman; Tereza Vardanyan

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The BICEP2 collaboration has for the first time observed the B-mode polarization associated with inflationary gravitational waves. Their result has some discomfiting implications for the validity of an effective theory approach to single-field inflation since it would require an inflaton field excursion larger than the Planck scale. We argue that if the quantum state of the gravitons is a mixed state based on the Bunch-Davies vacuum, then the tensor to scalar ratio r measured by BICEP is different than the quantity that enters the Lyth bound. When this is taken into account, the tension between effective field theory and the BICEP result is alleviated.

  11. Long-Term Testing of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis 2013 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research since 2005 to develop a catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) into mixed alcohols for use in liquid transportation fuels. Initially, research involved screening possible catalysts based on a review of the literature, because at that time, there were no commercial catalysts available. The screening effort resulted in a decision to focus on catalysts containing rhodium and manganese. Subsequent research identified iridium as a key promoter for this catalyst system. Since then, research has continued to improve rhodium/manganese/iridium-based catalysts, optimizing the relative and total concentrations of the three metals, examining baseline catalysts on alternative supports, and examining effects of additional promoters. Testing was continued in FY 2013 to evaluate the performance and long-term stability of the best catalysts tested to date. Three tests were conducted. A long-term test of over 2300 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was conducted with the best carbon-supported catalyst. A second test of about 650 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed for comparison using the same catalyst formulation on an alternative carbon support. A third test of about 680 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed using the best silica-supported catalyst tested to date.

  12. Implementation of deep soil mixing at the Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, F.G.; Korte, N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Strong-Gunderson, J.; Siegrist, R.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Baker, J. [AlliedSignal, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP), AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted field-scale tests of in situ soil mixing and treatment technologies within the Northeast Area (NEA) of the KCP at the Former Ponds site. This demonstration, testing, and evaluation effort was conducted as part of the implementation of a deep soil mixing (DSM) innovative remedial technology demonstration project designed to test DSM in the low-permeability clay soils at the KCP. The clay soils and groundwater beneath this area are contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE). The demonstration project was originally designed to evaluate TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency using soil mixing coupled with vapor stripping. Treatability study results, however, indicated that mixed region vapor stripping (MRVS) coupled with calcium oxide (dry lime powder) injection would improve TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency in saturated soils. The scope of the KCP DSM demonstration evolved to implement DSM with the following in situ treatment methodologies for contaminant source reduction in soil and groundwater: DSM/MRVS coupled with calcium oxide injection; DSM/bioaugmentation; and DSM/chemical oxidation using potassium permanganate. Laboratory treatability studies were started in 1995 following collection of undisturbed soil cores from the KCP. These studies were conducted at ORNL, and the results provided information on optimum reagent concentrations and mixing ratios for the three in situ treatment agents to be implemented in the field demonstration.

  13. Blowing Ratio Effects on Film Cooling Effectiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kuo-Chun

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling Rib turbulators Shaped internal cooling passage Trailing edge ejection Cooling air 3 Among the variety of film cooling hole designs, compound angle and shaped holes are generally considered in modern high pressure and high temperature gas turbine... ratio of 1.85. As compared to cylindrical hole, both shaped holes showed significant improved thermal protection of the surface downstream of the ejection location. Yu et al. [7] studied film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer distributions on a...

  14. aspect ratio wings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  15. aspect ratios numerical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  16. aspect ratio microstructuring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  17. aspect ratio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  18. average aspect ratios: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  19. aspect ratio tori: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  20. aspect ratio ion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  1. aspect ratio su-8: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  2. aspect ratio micro: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  3. aspect ratio domains: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  4. aspect ratio electrodes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  5. aspect ratio plasmas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency versus a function of mobility ratio and aspect ratio for staggered line-drive waterflood pattern Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ratios on five-spot and...

  6. Neutrino mixing, flavor states and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Blasone; A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We shortly summarize the quantum field theory formalism for the neutrino mixing and report on recent results showing that the vacuum condensate induced by neutrino mixing can be interpreted as a dark energy component of the Universe.

  7. Estimating a mixed strategy employing maximum entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golan, Amos; Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MIXED STRATEGY EMPLOYING MAXIMUM ENTROPY by Amos Golan LarryMixed Strategy Employing Maximum Entropy Amos Golan Larry S.Abstract Generalized maximum entropy may be used to estimate

  8. Rotational Mixing and Lithium Depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinsonneault, M H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I review basic observational features in Population I stars which strongly implicate rotation as a mixing agent; these include dispersion at fixed temperature in coeval populations and main sequence lithium depletion for a range of masses at a rate which decays with time. New developments related to the possible suppression of mixing at late ages, close binary mergers and their lithium signature, and an alternate origin for dispersion in young cool stars tied to radius anomalies observed in active young stars are discussed. I highlight uncertainties in models of Population II lithium depletion and dispersion related to the treatment of angular momentum loss. Finally, the origins of rotation are tied to conditions in the pre-main sequence, and there is thus some evidence that enviroment and planet formation could impact stellar rotational properties. This may be related to recent observational evidence for cluster to cluster variations in lithium depletion and a connection between the presence of planets and s...

  9. HETEROGENEOUS REBURNING BY MIXED FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Yin Chen; Benson B. Gathitu

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies of heterogeneous reburning, i.e., reburning involving a coal-derived char, have elucidated its variables, kinetics and mechanisms that are valuable to the development of a highly efficient reburning process. Young lignite chars contain catalysts that not only reduce NO, but they also reduce HCN that is an important intermediate that recycles to NO in the burnout zone. Gaseous CO scavenges the surface oxides that are formed during NO reduction, regenerating the active sites on the char surface. Based on this mechanistic information, cost-effective mixed fuels containing these multiple features has been designed and tested in a simulated reburning apparatus. Remarkably high reduction of NO and HCN has been observed and it is anticipated that mixed fuel will remove 85% of NO in a three-stage reburning process.

  10. Heterogeneous Reburning By Mixed Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson Hall

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies of heterogeneous reburning, i.e., reburning involving a coal-derived char, have elucidated its variables, kinetics and mechanisms that are valuable to the development of a highly efficient reburning process. Young lignite chars contain catalysts that not only reduce NO, but they also reduce HCN that is an important intermediate that recycles to NO in the burnout zone. Gaseous CO scavenges the surface oxides that are formed during NO reduction, regenerating the active sites on the char surface. Based on this mechanistic information, cost-effective mixed fuels containing these multiple features has been designed and tested in a simulated reburning apparatus. Remarkably high reduction of NO and HCN has been observed and it is anticipated that mixed fuel will remove 85% of NO in a three-stage reburning process.

  11. Phase-mixing of Langmuir oscillations in cold electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maity, Chandan [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Space-time evolution of Langmuir oscillations in a cold homogeneous electron-positron-ion plasma has been analyzed by employing a straightforward perturbation expansion method, showing phase-mixing and, thus, wave-breaking of excited oscillations at arbitrary amplitudes. Within an assumption of infinitely massive ions, an approximate phase-mixing time is found to scale as ?{sub pe}t{sub mix}?[(6/?{sup 2})((2??){sup 5/2}/(1??))]{sup 1/3}, where ? and ? (= n{sub 0i}/n{sub 0e}) are the amplitude of perturbation and the ratio of equilibrium ion density to equilibrium electron density, respectively, and ?{sub pe}??(4?n{sub 0e}e{sup 2}/m) is the electron plasma frequency. The results presented on phase-mixing of Langmuir modes in multispecies plasmas are expected to be relevant to laboratory and astrophysical environments.

  12. Mixing in thermally stratified nonlinear spin-up with uniform boundary fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baghdasarian, Meline; Pacheco-Vega, Arturo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State University, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90032 (United States); Pacheco, J. Rafael, E-mail: rpacheco@asu.edu [SAP Americas Inc., Scottsdale, Arizona 85251 (United States); School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Environmental Fluid Dynamics Laboratories, Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, The University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana 46556 (United States); Verzicco, Roberto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133, Roma (Italy); PoF, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of stratified spin-up experiments in enclosed cylinders have reported the presence of small pockets of well-mixed fluids but quantitative measurements of the mixedness of the fluid has been lacking. Previous numerical simulations have not addressed these measurements. Here we present numerical simulations that explain how the combined effect of spin-up and thermal boundary conditions enhances or hinders mixing of a fluid in a cylinder. The energy of the system is characterized by splitting the potential energy into diabatic and adiabatic components, and measurements of efficiency of mixing are based on both, the ratio of dissipation of available potential energy to forcing and variance of temperature. The numerical simulations of the NavierStokes equations for the problem with different sets of thermal boundary conditions at the horizontal walls helped shed some light on the physical mechanisms of mixing, for which a clear explanation was absent.

  13. Mixing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pyrocamera t 0 5 ps 10 ps Pyrocamera Diffractive grating wavenumber 1.3 cm -1 Fourier transform Measured Simulated :) Single-shot :) Simple reliable :) Indiv. pulse...

  14. Optimization Online - Analysis of mixed integer programming ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiago Henrique Nogueira

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 15, 2014 ... Analysis of mixed integer programming formulations for single machine scheduling problems with sequence dependent setup times and...

  15. Dark energy induced by neutrino mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Capolupo; Salvatore Capozziello; Giuseppe Vitiello

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy content of the vacuum condensate induced by the neutrino mixing is interpreted as dynamically evolving dark energy.

  16. Higgs-portal assisted Higgs inflation with a large tensor-to-scalar ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ko; Wan-Il Park

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the Higgs portal interactions involving extra dark Higgs field $\\phi$ can save generically the original Higgs inflation of the standard model (SM) in light of the constrained low energy parameters and a large tensor-to-scalar ratio ($r$) hinted by the recent result of BICEP2. Specifically, we show that such interactions disconnect the top quark pole mass from inflationary observables, and allow multi-dimensional parameter space to save the Higgs inflation, thanks to the additional parameters (the dark Higgs boson mass $m_\\phi$, the mixing angle $\\alpha$ between $H$ and $\\phi$, and the mixed quartic coupling) affecting RG-running of the Higgs quartic coupling. One can easily accommodate $r \\sim O(0.1)$ in wide ranges of $\\alpha$ and $m_\\phi$, some region of which can be probed at future colliders.

  17. air-fuel ratio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was performed to investigate the effects of air-fuel ratio, inlet boost pressure, hydrogen rich fuel reformate, and compression ratio on engine knock behavior. For each...

  18. Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayland, B.B.

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory directions for this program include expending new strategies for anti-Markovnikov addition of water, alcohols, and amines with olefins, developing catalytic reactions of CO to give formamides and formic esters, and evaluating the potential for coupling reactions of CO to produce organic building blocks.

  19. United Quark and Neutrino Mixing Matrices with Universal Pair of CP-Violating Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. M. Lipmanov

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model quark and neutrino mixing matrices are of independent empirical origin, but they do suggest unification. In this paper I obtained two united one-parameter quark and neutrino mixing matrices inferred from two semi-empirical deviation-from-mass-degeneracy (DMD) flavor rules (quadratic DMD-hierarchy rule and Dirac-Majorana DMD-duality rule) without use of the common exact-flavor-symmetry suggestions for that particular unification problem. One small empirical parameter quantitatively defines the pattern of particle flavor physics. The main predictions are: 1) hierarchical connections between the 2 large solar and atmospheric neutrino mixing angels, and the 2 small quark mixing angels, 2) universal sequence of 14 equality relations to that one-empirical-parameter of the quark and neutrino mixing-matrix parameters, CP-phases and lepton mass ratios, which are free dimensionless constants in the Standard Model, 3) complementarity connections between doubled large neutrino and small quark mixing angles, 4) tentative solution of the CP-violation problem in framework of Standard Model mixing matrix phenomenology by suggesting a universal set of two nonzero values ~58.8 and ~31.2 degrees for Dirac and Majorana CP-violating phases.

  20. Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (burners) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (breeders) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is attractive for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

  1. High aspect ratio, remote controlled pumping assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steve B. (Livermore, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature dual syringe-type pump assembly which has a high aspect ratio and which is remotely controlled, for use such as in a small diameter penetrometer cone or well packer used in water contamination applications. The pump assembly may be used to supply and remove a reagent to a water contamination sensor, for example, and includes a motor, gearhead and motor encoder assembly for turning a drive screw for an actuator which provides pushing on one syringe and pulling on the other syringe for injecting new reagent and withdrawing used reagent from an associated sensor.

  2. Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station (EBBR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-minute estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity (RH). Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  3. Meteorological Effects on Air/Fuel Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferri, J. L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) where subscript 1 indicates at condition 1 and subsc 1pt 2 Indicates at condition 2. Solving for E gives 2 100. (E . 13) Example 1 A furnace with a pressure type ratio control sys~em is calibrated at 10% excess air with 30 of air. If the air... of ... 30 of ... 460? 590 oR Substituting in Equation 13 and solving for E gives 2 E = (100 ... 10) (:;~)II, - 100 = 3.3% excess ir. 2 If the furnace had been calibrated to 10% excess air with iOO of air, the % excess air with 30 of air would bJI 590 II...

  4. High aspect ratio, remote controlled pumping assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, S.B.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature dual syringe-type pump assembly is described which has a high aspect ratio and which is remotely controlled, for use such as in a small diameter penetrometer cone or well packer used in water contamination applications. The pump assembly may be used to supply and remove a reagent to a water contamination sensor, for example, and includes a motor, gearhead and motor encoder assembly for turning a drive screw for an actuator which provides pushing on one syringe and pulling on the other syringe for injecting new reagent and withdrawing used reagent from an associated sensor. 4 figs.

  5. B0-B0bar mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Schneider

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of particle-antiparticle mixing in the neutral B meson systems is reviewed. The formalism of B0-B0bar mixing is recalled and basic Standard Model predictions are given, before experimental issues are discussed and the latest combinations of experimental results on mixing parameters are presented, including those on mixing-induced CP violation, mass differences, and decay-width differences. Finally, time-integrated mixing results are used to improve our knowledge on the fractions of the various b-hadron species produced in Z decays and at high-energy colliders.

  6. B0-B0bar mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Schneider

    2006-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of particle-antiparticle mixing in the neutral B meson systems is reviewed. The formalism of B0-B0bar mixing is recalled and basic Standard Model predictions are given, before experimental issues are discussed and the latest combinations of experimental results on mixing parameters are presented, including those on mixing-induced CP violation, mass differences, and decay-width differences. Finally, time-integrated mixing results are used to improve our knowledge on the fractions of the various b-hadron species produced in Z decays and at high-energy colliders.

  7. Tailored mixing inside a translating droplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodolphe Chabreyrie; Dmitri Vainchtein; Cristel Chandre; Pushpendra Singh; Nadine Aubry

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailored mixing inside individual droplets could be useful to ensure that reactions within microscopic discrete fluid volumes, which are used as microreactors in ``digital microfluidic'' applications, take place in a controlled fashion. In this article we consider a translating spherical liquid drop to which we impose a time periodic rigid-body rotation. Such a rotation not only induces mixing via chaotic advection, which operates through the stretching and folding of material lines, but also offers the possibility of tuning the mixing by controlling the location and size of the mixing region. Tuned mixing is achieved by judiciously adjusting the amplitude and frequency of the rotation, which are determined by using a resonance condition and following the evolution of adiabatic invariants. As the size of the mixing region is increased, complete mixing within the drop is obtained.

  8. Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Arthur L. (Kenyon, MN); Krawza, Kenneth I. (Lakeville, MN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a hydraulically powered pump for excavating and transporting slurries in hich it is immersed, the improvement of a gravel and cobble eductor including an expandable mixing section, comprising: a primary flow conduit that terminates in a nozzle that creates a water jet internal to a tubular mixing section of the pump when water pressure is applied from a primary supply flow; a tubular mixing section having a center line in alignment with the nozzle that creates a water jet; a mixing section/exit diffuser column that envelopes the flexible liner; and a secondary inlet conduit that forms an opening at a bas portion of the column and adjacent to the nozzle and water jet to receive water saturated gravel as a secondary flow that mixes with the primary flow inside of the mixing section to form a combined total flow that exits the mixing section and decelerates in the exit diffuser.

  9. Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Gronau; Jonathan L. Rosner

    2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for $D_s$ semileptonic decay is known to be $(17.0 \\pm 5.3)%$ lower than those for $D^0$ or $D^+$, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing $b$ quarks, this method implies that the $B_s$ semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for $B$ semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For $\\Lambda_b$ semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio $\\Gamma(\\Lambda_b)/ \\bar \\Gamma(B) = 1.13 \\pm 0.03$ of total decay rates.

  10. Hydraulic system for a ratio change transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalns, Ilmars (Northville, MI)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

  11. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  12. Orifice mixing of immiscible liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonough, Joseph Aloysius

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solution (7). The present study of orif1ce mixing is a continuation of previous research on this project which yielded a relationship explaining the effect of operating conditions upon the format1on of 1nterfacial area for the system water-kerosene.... The experimental technique evolved by Helch (18), Vesselhoff (19), McNair (8), and Scott (IA) was changed only slightly. Their work on water-kerosene was repeated for the liquid pairs trichloroethylene-water, heptanol-water, 20 per oent aqueous sucrose-kerosene...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods and their Raman activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mlambo, Mbuso [Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, Advanced Materials Division, Mintek, Private Bag X3015, Randburg 2125 (South Africa); Mdluli, Phumlani S.; Shumbula, Poslet; Mpelane, Siyasanga [Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, Advanced Materials Division, Mintek, Private Bag X3015, Randburg 2125 (South Africa); Moloto, Nosipho, E-mail: Nosipho.Moloto@wits.ac.za [Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Skepu, Amanda; Tshikhudo, Robert [Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, Advanced Materials Division, Mintek, Private Bag X3015, Randburg 2125 (South Africa)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanorods surface functionalization. - Highlights: Mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin as a Raman active compound. - Abstract: The cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) gold nanorods (AuNRs) were prepared by seed-mediated route followed by the addition of a Raman active compound (HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin) on the gold nanorods surfaces. Different stoichiometric mixtures of HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin and HS-PEG-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}COOH were evaluated for their Raman activities. The lowest stoichiometric ratio HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin adsorbed on gold nanorods surface was detected and enhanced by Raman spectroscopy. The produced mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods were characterized by UV-vis spectrometer for optical properties, transmission electron microscope (TEM) for structural properties (shape and aspect ratio) and their zeta potentials (charges) were obtained from ZetaSizer to determine the stability of the produced mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods. The Raman results showed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement at the lowest stoichiometric ratio of 1% HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin compared to high ratio of 50% HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}-NHCO-coumarin on the surface of gold nanorods.

  14. Mixed waste characterization reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

  15. Tunable infrared source employing Raman mixing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L. (Stanford, CA); Herbst, Richard L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable source of infrared radiation is obtained by irradiating an assemblage of Raman active gaseous atoms or molecules with a high intensity pumping beam of coherent radiation at a pump frequency .omega..sub.p to stimulate the generation of Stokes wave energy at a Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s and to stimulate the Raman resonant mode at the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R within the irradiated assemblage where the pump frequency .omega..sub.p minus the Stokes frequency .omega..sub.s is equal to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R. The stimulated assemblage is irradiated with a tunable source of coherent radiation at a frequency .omega..sub.i to generate the output infrared radiation of the frequency .omega..sub.0 which is related to the Raman mode frequency .omega..sub.R and the input wave .omega..sub.i by the relation .omega..sub.0 =.omega..sub.i .+-..omega..sub.R. In one embodiment the interaction between the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i is collinear and the ratio of the phase velocity mismatch factor .DELTA.k to the electric field exponential gain coefficient T is within the range of 0.1 to 5. In another embodiment the pump wave energy .omega..sub.p and the tunable input wave energy .omega..sub.i have velocity vectors k.sub.p and k.sub.i which cross at an angle to each other to compensate for phase velocity mismatches in the medium. In another embodiment, the Stokes wave energy .omega..sub.s is generated by pump energy .omega..sub.p in a first Raman cell and .omega..sub.s, .omega..sub.i and .omega..sub.p are combined in a second Raman mixing cell to produce the output at .omega..sub.i.

  16. Synthesis and structure of nanocrystalline mixed CeYb silicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma?ecka, Ma?gorzata A., E-mail: M.Malecka@int.pan.wroc.pl; K?pi?ski, Leszek

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: New method of synthesis of nanocrystalline mixed lanthanide silicates is proposed. Formation of A-type (Ce{sub 1?y}Yb{sub y}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} in well dispersed Ce{sub 1?x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2?(x/2)}SiO{sub 2} system. Formation of Yb{sub y}Ce{sub 9.33?y}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} in agglomerated Ce{sub 1?x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2?(x/2)}SiO{sub 2} system. - Abstract: This work presents results of studies on synthesis and structure of mixed, nanocrystalline CeYb silicates. Using TEM, XRD and FTIR we showed that heat treatment of nanocrystalline Ce{sub 1?x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2?(x/2)} (x = 0.3, 0.5) mixed oxide supported on amorphous silica in reducing atmosphere, results in formation of CeYb mixed silicates. Dispersion of the oxide on the silica surface and thus a local lanthanide/Si atomic ratio determines the stoichiometry of the silicate. Oxide crystallites uniformly dispersed on the silica surface transformed into A-(Ce{sub 1?y}Yb{sub y}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} disilicate, while the agglomerated nanoparticles converted into Yb{sub y}Ce{sub 9.33?y}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} oxyapatite silicate as an intermediate phase.

  17. Texture Zero Mass Matrices and Flavor Mixing of Quarks and Leptons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss mass matrices with four texture zeros for the quarks and leptons. The three mixing angles for the quarks and leptons are functions of the fermion masses. The results agree with the experimental data. The ratio of the masses of the first two neutrinos is given by the solar mixing angle. The neutrino masses are calculated: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV , $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV , $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

  18. Optimal Control of Evolution Mixed Variational Inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alduncin, Gonzalo, E-mail: alduncin@geofisica.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, Departamento de Recursos Naturales, Instituto de Geofsica (Mexico)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimal control problems of primal and dual evolution mixed variational inclusions, in reflexive Banach spaces, are studied. The solvability analysis of the mixed state systems is established via duality principles. The optimality analysis is performed in terms of perturbation conjugate duality methods, and proximation penalty-duality algorithms to mixed optimality conditions are further presented. Applications to nonlinear diffusion constrained problems as well as quasistatic elastoviscoplastic bilateral contact problems exemplify the theory.

  19. p/pi Ratio in Di-Hadron Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misha Veldhoen; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle ratios are important observables used to constrain models of particle production in heavy-ion collisions. In this work we report on a measurement of the p/pi ratio in the transverse momentum range 2.0 p_{T,assoc} p_{T,trig} p/pi ratio in the bulk region is compatible with the p/pi ratio of an inclusive measurement, and is much larger than the p/pi ratio in the jet peak. The p/pi ratio in the jet peak is compatible with a PYTHIA reference, in which fragmentation in the vacuum is the dominant mechanism of particle production.

  20. California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S. [Indian Institute for Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. for Civil Engineering

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

  1. Seesaw enhancement of lepton mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, A.Y. (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States) International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 34100 Trieste (Italy) Institute for Nuclear Research, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation))

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation may enhance lepton mixing up to maximal even if the Dirac mass matrices of leptons have a structure similar to that in the quark sector. Two sets of conditions for such an enhancement are found. The first one includes the seesaw generation of heavy Majorana masses for right-handed neutrinos and a universality of Yukawa couplings which can follow from the unification of neutrinos with new superheavy neutral leptons. The second set is related to the lepton number symmetry of the Yukawa interactions in the Dirac basis of neutrinos. Models which realize these conditions have a strong hierarchy or strong degeneration of Majorana masses of the right-handed neutrinos.

  2. Hygroscopic Properties of Internally Mixed Particles Composed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    composed of sea salts and water soluble organic compounds of anthropogenic origin. Mixing of sea salt and organic components has profound effects on the evolving chemical...

  3. Optimization Online - Convex Quadratic Relaxations for Mixed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan L. Hijazi

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 30, 2013 ... Convex Quadratic Relaxations for Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programs in Power Systems. Hassan L. Hijazi (hassan.hijazi ***at*** nicta.com.au)

  4. Independent Oversight Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 2013 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project of the Idaho Site This report documents an independent review of...

  5. Optimization Online - Concrete Structure Design Using Mixed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres Guerra

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 26, 2009 ... Abstract: We present a mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) formulation to achieve minimum-cost designs for reinforced concrete...

  6. TANK MIXING STUDY WITH FLOW RECIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this work is to quantify the mixing time when two miscible fluids are mixed by one recirculation pump and to evaluate adequacy of 2.5 hours of pump recirculation to be considered well mixed in SRS tanks, JT-71/72. The work scope described here consists of two modeling analyses. They are the steady state flow pattern analysis during pump recirculation operation of the tank liquid and transient species transport calculations based on the initial steady state flow patterns. The modeling calculations for the mixing time are performed by using the 99% homogeneity criterion for the entire domain of the tank contents.

  7. Lanthanide doped strontium barium mixed halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundiah, Gautam; Bizarri, Gregory; Hanrahan, Stephen M; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a lanthanide-doped strontium barium mixed halide useful for detecting nuclear material.

  8. Optimization Online - Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Belotti

    2012-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 2, 2012 ... Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Optimization. Pietro Belotti(pbelott ***at*** clemson.edu) Sven Leyffer(leyffer ***at*** mcs.anl.gov) Christian...

  9. Inference of ICF implosion core mix using experimental data and theoretical mix modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherrill, Leslie Welser [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, Donald A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sherrill, Manolo E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mancini, Roberto C [UNR; Tommasini, Riccardo [LLNL; Golovkin, Igor E [PRISM COMP. SCIENCES; Haan, Steven W [LLNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (lCF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model predicted trends in the width of the mix layer as a function of initial shell thickness. These results contribute to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increasing confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  10. Detection of Far-Infrared Water Vapor, Hydroxyl, and Carbon Monoxide Emissions from the Supernova Remnant 3C 391

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William T. Reach; Jeonghee Rho

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of shock-excited far-infrared emission of H2O, OH, and CO from the supernova remnant 3C 391, using the ISO Long-Wavelength Spectrometer. This is the first detection of thermal H2O and OH emission from a supernova remnant. For two other remnants, W~28 and W~44, CO emission was detected but OH was only detected in absorption. The observed H2O and OH emission lines arise from levels within ~400 K of the ground state, consistent with collisional excitation in warm, dense gas created after the passage of the shock front through the dense clumps in the pre-shock cloud. The post-shock gas we observe has a density ~2x10^5 cm^{-3} and temperature 100-1000 K, and the relative abundances of CO:OH:H2O in the emitting region are 100:1:7 for a temperature of 200 K. The presence of a significant column of warm H2O suggests that the chemistry has been significantly changed by the shock. The existence of significant column densities of both OH and H2O, which is at odds with models for non-dissociative shocks into dense gas, could be due to photodissociation of H2O or a mix of fast and slow shocks through regions with different pre-shock density.

  11. Sex ratios in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reece, S E; Duncan, Alison B; West, Stuart A; Read, Andrew F

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sex ratios of malaria and related Apicomplexan parasites play a major role in transmission success. Here, we address 2 fundamental issues in the sex ratios of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. First we ...

  12. Ultra-short nacelles for low fan pressure ratio propulsors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Andreas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the uncharted inlet and nacelle design space for low pressure ratio fans for advanced aeroengines. A key feature in low fan pressure ratio (FPR) propulsors with short inlets and nacelles is the increased ...

  13. GLOBAL STABILITY STUDY OF THE ULTRALOW ASPECT RATIO TOKAMAK,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS GLOBAL STABILITY STUDY OF THE ULTRALOW ASPECT RATIO TOKAMAK, ULART M. YAMADA, N. POMPHREY of the TS-3device at Tokyo Univesity, ultralow aspect ratio tokamak (ULART) configurations have been of the tiltishift modes agree well with the TS-3 data. 1. INTRODUCTION In recent years, low aspect ratio tokamak

  14. Neutrino Mixing and Oscillations in Astrophysical Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

  15. Milestone M4900: Simulant Mixing Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses Milestone M4900, ''Simulant Mixing Sample Analysis Results,'' and contains the data generated during the ''Mixing of Process Heels, Process Solutions, and Recycle Streams: Small-Scale Simulant'' task. The Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for this task is BNF-003-98-0079A. A report with a narrative description and discussion of the data will be issued separately.

  16. Adaptive wavelet deconvolution for strongly mixing sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Adaptive wavelet deconvolution for strongly mixing sequences Christophe Chesneau Abstract square error over Besov balls, we explore the performances of two wavelet estimators: a standard linear, Strongly mixing, Adap- tivity, Wavelets, Hard thresholding. AMS 2000 Subject Classifications: 62G07, 62G20

  17. Neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balantekin, A. B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

  18. Predictions From High Scale Mixing Unification Hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Rahul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with 'High Scale Mixing Unification' hypothesis, we investigate the renormalization group evolution of mixing parameters and masses for both Dirac and Majorana type neutrinos. Following this hypothesis, the PMNS mixing parameters are taken to be identical to the CKM ones at a unifying high scale. Then, they are evolved to a low scale using MSSM renormalization-group equations. For both type of neutrinos, the renormalization group evolution 'naturally' results in a non-zero and small value of leptonic mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. One of the important predictions of this analysis is that, in both cases, the mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ turns out to be non-maximal for most of the parameter range. We also elaborate on the important differences between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos within our framework and how to experimentally distinguish between the two scenarios. Furthermore, for both cases, we also derive constraints on the allowed parameter range for the SUSY breaking and unification scales, for which th...

  19. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  20. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

  1. Unparticle-Higgs field mixing: Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonances, seesaw mechanism, and spinodal instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyanovsky, D. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Holman, R.; Hutasoit, Jimmy A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by slow-roll inflationary cosmology we study a scalar unparticle weakly coupled to a Higgs field in the broken symmetry phase. The mixing between the unparticle and the Higgs field results in a seesaw type matrix and the mixing angles feature a Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect as a consequence of the unparticle field being noncanonical. We find two (MSW) resonances for small and large spacelike momenta. The unparticlelike mode features a nearly flat potential with spinodal instabilities and a large expectation value. An effective potential for the unparticlelike field is generated from the Higgs potential, but with couplings suppressed by a large power of the small seesaw ratio. The dispersion relation for the Higgs-like mode features an imaginary part even at ''tree level'' as a consequence of the fact that the unparticle field describes a multiparticle continuum. Mixed unparticle-Higgs propagators reveal the possibility of oscillations, albeit with short coherence lengths. The results are generalized to the case in which the unparticle features a mass gap, in which case a low energy MSW resonance may occur for lightlike momenta depending on the scales. Unparticle-Higgs mixing leads to an effective unparticle potential of the new-inflation form. Slow-roll variables are suppressed by seesaw ratios and the anomalous dimensions and favor a red spectrum of scalar perturbations consistent with cosmic microwave background data.

  2. Thermal performance of direct contact heat exchangers for mixed hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, L. Jr.; Coswami, D.Y.; Demuth, O.J.; Mines, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a physical and a mathematical model for evaluating the tray efficiencies for a direct contact heat exchanger (DCHX). The model is then used to determine the efficiencies for tests conducted on a 60kW sieve tray DCHX as heat is transferred from a geofluid (brine) to a working fluid (mixed hydrocarbons). It is assumed that there are three distinct regions in the column based on the state of the working fluid, as follows: Region I - Preheating with no vaporization; Region II - Preheating with moderate vaporization; and Region III - Major vaporization. The boundaries of these regions can be determined from the experimental data. In the model, mass balance and energy balance is written for a tray ''N'' in each of these regions. Finally, the ''tray efficiency'' or ''heat transfer'' effectiveness of the tray is calculated based on the definition that it is the ratio of the actual heat transfer to the maximum possible, thermodynamically.

  3. Integrated Removal of NOx with Carbon Monoxide as Reductant, and Capture of Mercury in a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neville Pinto; Panagiotis Smirniotis; Stephen Thiel

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal will likely continue to be a dominant component of power generation in the foreseeable future. This project addresses the issue of environmental compliance for two important pollutants: NO{sub x} and mercury. Integration of emission control units is in principle possible through a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR) in which NO{sub x} removal is achieved in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The capture of mercury is integrated into the same process unit. Such an arrangement would reduce mercury removal costs significantly, and provide improved control for the ultimate disposal of mercury. The work completed in this project demonstrates that the use of CO as a reductant in LTSCR is technically feasible using supported manganese oxide catalysts, that the simultaneous warm-gas capture of elemental and oxidized mercury is technically feasible using both nanostructured chelating adsorbents and ceria-titania-based materials, and that integrated removal of mercury and NO{sub x} is technically feasible using ceria-titania-based materials.

  4. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) programs Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  5. Fast mix table construction for material discretization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S. R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective hybrid Monte Carlo-deterministic implementation typically requires the approximation of a continuous geometry description with a discretized piecewise-constant material field. The inherent geometry discretization error can be reduced somewhat by using material mixing, where multiple materials inside a discrete mesh voxel are homogenized. Material mixing requires the construction of a 'mix table,' which stores the volume fractions in every mixture so that multiple voxels with similar compositions can reference the same mixture. Mix table construction is a potentially expensive serial operation for large problems with many materials and voxels. We formulate an efficient algorithm to construct a sparse mix table in O(number of voxels x log number of mixtures) time. The new algorithm is implemented in ADVANTG and used to discretize continuous geometries onto a structured Cartesian grid. When applied to an end-of-life MCNP model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor with 270 distinct materials, the new method improves the material mixing time by a factor of 100 compared to a naive mix table implementation. (authors)

  6. $B_d-\\bar{B}_d$ mixing vs. $B_s-\\bar{B}_s$ mixing with the anomalous $Wtb$ couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong Phil Lee; Kang Young Lee

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the effects of the anomalous $tbW$ couplings on the $\\bd$ mixing and recently measured $\\bs$ mixing. The combined analysis of mixings via box diagrams with penguin decays provides strong constraints on the anomalous top quark couplings. We find the bound from the $\\bd$ mixing data is stronger than that from the $\\bs$ mixing.

  7. Unveiling neutrino mixing and leptonic CP violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, Olga; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the present understanding of neutrino masses and mixings, discussing what are the unknowns in the three family oscillation scenario. Despite the anticipated success coming from the planned long baseline neutrino experiments in unraveling the leptonic mixing sector, there are two important unknowns which may remain obscure: the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the CP-phase {delta}. The measurement of these two parameters has led us to consider the combination of superbeams and neutrino factories as the key to unveil the neutrino oscillation picture.

  8. Updated Constraints on General Squark Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arana-Catania, M; Herrero, M J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the phenomenological implications on non-minimal flavor violating (NMFV) processes from squark flavor mixing within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We work under the model-independent hypothesis of general flavor mixing in the squark sector, being parametrized by a complete set of dimensionless delta^AB_ij (A,B = L, R; i,j = u, c, t or d, s, b) parameters. The present upper bounds on the most relevant NMFV processes, together with the requirement of compatibility in the choice of the MSSM parameters with the recent LHC and g-2 data, lead to updated constraints on all squark flavor mixing parameters.

  9. Corrections to Scaling Neutrino Mixing: Non-zero $?_{13}, ?_{CP}$ and Baryon Asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupam Kalita; Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a very specific type of neutrino mass and mixing structure based on the idea of Strong Scaling Ansatz (SSA) where the ratios of neutrino mass matrix elements belonging to two different columns are equal. There are three such possibilities, all of which are disfavored by the latest neutrino oscillation data. We focus on the specific scenario which predicts vanishing reactor mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ and inverted hierarchy with vanishing lightest neutrino mass. Motivated by several recent attempts to explain non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ by incorporating corrections to a leading order neutrino mass or mixing matrix giving $\\theta_{13}=0$, here we study the origin of non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ as well as leptonic Dirac CP phase $\\delta_{CP}$ by incorporating two different corrections to scaling neutrino mass and mixing: one where type II seesaw acts as a correction to scaling neutrino mass matrix and the other with charged lepton correction to scaling neutrino mixing. Although scaling neutrino mass matrix originating from type I seesaw predicts inverted hierarchy, the total neutrino mass matrix after type II seesaw correction can give rise to either normal or inverted hierarchy. However, charged lepton corrections do not disturb the inverted hierarchy prediction of scaling neutrino mass matrix. We further discriminate between neutrino hierarchies, different choices of lightest neutrino mass and Dirac CP phase by calculating baryon asymmetry and comparing with the observations made by the Planck experiment.

  10. Mixing of. nu. /sub e/ and. nu. /sub. mu. / in SO(10) models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, K.; Nandi, S.; Tanaka, K.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We found previously in SO(10) grand unified theories that if the neutrinos have a Dirac mass and a right-handed Majorana mass (approx.10/sup 15/ GeV) but no left-handed Majorana mass, there is small ..nu../sub e/ mixing but ..nu../sub ..mu../-..nu../sub tau/ mixing can be substantial. We reexamine this problem on the basis of a formalism that assumes that the up, down, lepton, and neutrino mass matrices arise from a single complex 10 and a single 126 Higgs boson. This formalism determines the Majorana mass matrix in terms of quark mass matrices. Adopting three different sets of quark mass matrices that produce acceptable fermion mass ratios and Cabbibo mixing, we obtain results consistent with the above; however, in the optimum case, ..nu../sub e/-..nu../sub ..mu../ mixing can be of the order of the Cabbibo angle. In an extension of this model wherein the Witten mechanism generates the Majorana mass, we illustrate quantitatively how the parameter characterizing the Majorana sector must be tuned in order to achieve large ..nu../sub e/-..nu../sub ..mu../ mixing.

  11. Conservation Community Perspective on Mixed Conifer Management in SW Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public education important #12;Warm-Dry Mixed Conifer, Cool-Moist Mixed Conifer, Aspen with Conifer One.g., WUI treatment and mixed conifer restoration) where possible. Need to reconcile mc & aspen mngt

  12. Electroweak model of lepton mass and mixing hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. M. Lipmanov

    2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Flavor physics, like cosmology, is likely in need of new basic ideas; the puzzles of elementary particle mass hierarchies and in particular the e-mu-tau and neutrino ones still remain mysteries. In this paper a new idea of dynamical connection between low energy 3-flavor particle mass hierarchies and electroweak charges is studied with restriction to the simplest case of lepton flavor phenomenology. The main inference is that it can be only two types of lepton 3-flavor particle-copy groups: 1) with large and strongly hierarchical mass ratios and 2) with close to 1 mass ratios. From experimental data definitely follows that the three charged leptons belong to the first type whereas the three neutrinos belong to the second type and so are quasi-degenerate. The inferences of QD-neutrinos with realistic small masses and oscillation hierarchy parameter and quark-QD-neutrino mixing angle complementarity follow from the fact of small EW charges and their relation to the concept of benchmark flavor pattern.

  13. Observation of Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Collinear Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, Ohio 44139 (United States); Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois-60439 (United States)

    2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    One approach to future high energy particle accelerators is based on the wakefield principle: a leading high-charge drive bunch is used to excite fields in an accelerating structure or plasma that in turn accelerates a trailing low-charge witness bunch. The transformer ratio R is defined as the ratio of the maximum energy gain of the witness bunch to the maximum energy loss of the drive bunch. In general, R<2 for this configuration. A number of techniques have been proposed to overcome the transformer ratio limitation. We report here the first experimental study of the ramped bunch train (RBT) technique in a dielectric based accelerating structure. A single drive bunch was replaced by two bunches with charge ratio of 1 ratio 2.5 and a separation of 10.5 wavelengths of the fundamental mode. An average measured transformer ratio enhancement by a factor of 1.31 over the single drive bunch case was obtained.

  14. New Constraints on General Slepton Flavor Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arana-Catania, M; Herrero, M J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the phenomenological implications on charged lepton flavor violating (LFV) processes from slepton flavor mixing within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We work under the model-independent hypothesis of general flavor mixing in the slepton sector, being parametrized by a complete set of dimensionless delta^AB_ij (A,B = L,R; i,j = 1, 2, 3) parameters. The present upper bounds on the most relevant LFV processes, together with the requirement of compatibility in the choice of the MSSM parameters with the recent LHC and (g-2) data, lead to updated constraints on all slepton flavor mixing parameters. A comparative discussion of the most effective LFV processes to constrain the various generation mixings is included.

  15. Mixing in a liquid metal electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Douglas H.

    Fluid mixing has first-order importance for many engineering problems in mass transport, including design and optimization of liquid-phase energy storage devices. Liquid metal batteries are currently being commercialized ...

  16. Economizer Control Using Mixed Air Enthalpy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, J.; Liu, M.; Pang, W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    economizer is db-temperature based economizer. Table7. Economizer Operation Testing Period: April.3 rd ~Aug. 22 th ,2007 Temperature- based Economizer Mixed-air enthalpy economizer Operation hours 888 1251 Energy saving - 15.7% 6...

  17. Mixed micelles system: equilibrium and kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salonen, Anniina M

    Lipid-detergent systems are interesting to study, as the two amphiphiles have very different spontaneous curvature, however readily form mixed micelles in solution. These micelles can be shorter cylindrical micelles ...

  18. Particle mixing, flavor condensate and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Blasone; Antonio Capolupo; Giuseppe Vitiello

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixing of neutrinos and quarks generate a vacuum condensate that, at the present epoch, behaves as a cosmological constant. The value of the dark energy is constrained today by the very small breaking of the Lorentz invariance.

  19. Rating of Mixed Split Residential Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domanski, P. A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology is presented for rating the performance of mixed, split residential air conditioners. The method accounts for the impact on system performance of the indoor evaporator, expansion device and fan; three major components that are likely...

  20. Accretion of dust grains as a possible origin of metal-poor stars with low alpha/Fe ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshikazu Shigeyama; Takuji Tsujimoto

    2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of low alpha/Fe ratios in some metal-poor stars, so called low-alpha stars, is discussed. It is found that most of low-alpha stars in the Galaxy are on the main-sequence. This strongly suggests that these stars suffered from external pollution. It is also found that the abundance ratios Zn/Fe of low-alpha stars both in the Galaxy and in dwarf spheroidal galaxies are lower than the average value of Galactic halo stars whereas damped Ly alpha absorbers have higher ratios. This implies that some low-alpha stars accreted matter depleted from gas onto dust grains. To explain the features in these low-alpha stars, we have proposed that metal-poor stars harboring planetary systems are the origin of these low-alpha stars. Stars engulfing a small fraction of planetesimals enhance the surface content of Fe to exhibit low alpha/Fe ratios on their surfaces while they are on the main-sequence, because dwarfs have shallow surface convection zones where the engulfed matter is mixed. After the stars leave the main-sequence, the surface convection zones become deeper to reduce the enhancement of Fe. Eventually, when the stars ascend to the tip of the red giant branch, they engulf giant planets to become low-alpha stars again as observed in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We predict that low-alpha stars with low Mn/Fe ratios harbor planetary systems.

  1. Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion...

  2. Morphology of Mixed Primary and Secondary Organic Particles and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Mixed Primary and Secondary Organic Particles and the Adsorption of Spectator Organic Gases during Aerosol Morphology of Mixed Primary and Secondary Organic Particles and the...

  3. Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid solutions of methanol and ethanol at temperatures near the glass Mixing it up - Measuring diffusion in supercooled liquid...

  4. Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mixed Alcohols from Municipal Solid Waste via Gasification Design Case Summary: Production of Mixed Alcohols from Municipal Solid Waste via Gasification The Bioenergy Technologies...

  5. Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results 2003 DEER Conference...

  6. Elucidating the Higher Stability of Vanadium (V) Cations in Mixed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elucidating the Higher Stability of Vanadium (V) Cations in Mixed Acid Based Redox Flow Battery Electrolytes. Abstract: The Vanadium (V) cation structures in mixed acid based...

  7. Non carbon mixed conducting materials for PEFC electrocatalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non carbon mixed conducting materials for PEFC electrocatalysts and electrodes Non carbon mixed conducting materials for PEFC electrocatalysts and electrodes These slides were...

  8. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Achieves Impressive Safety and Production Marks June...

  9. Mixed oxide nanoparticles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Phelps, Tommy J. (Knoxville, TN); Zhang, Chuanlun (Columbia, MO); Roh, Yul (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for producing mixed oxide nanoparticulates are disclosed. Selected thermophilic bacteria cultured with suitable reducible metals in the presence of an electron donor may be cultured under conditions that reduce at least one metal to form a doped crystal or mixed oxide composition. The bacteria will form nanoparticles outside the cell, allowing easy recovery. Selection of metals depends on the redox potentials of the reducing agents added to the culture. Typically hydrogen or glucose are used as electron donors.

  10. Mass hierarchies and the seesaw neutrino mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, T. K. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Wu, Guo-Hong [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States)] [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Mansour, Sadek W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a general analysis of neutrino mixing in the seesaw mechanism with three flavors. Assuming that the Dirac and u-quark mass matrices are similar, we establish simple relations between the neutrino parameters and individual Majorana masses. They are shown to depend rather strongly on the physical neutrino mixing angles. We calculate explicitly the implied Majorana mass hierarchies for parameter sets corresponding to different solutions to the solar neutrino problem. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Dual equilibrium in a finite aspect ratio tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gourdain, P A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    achievable in conventional tokamaks. Previous research hasin a ?nite aspect ratio tokamak P. -A. Gourdain a , b ,? ,fusion reactor is the tokamak concept, a closed magnetic

  12. Neutrino Flavor Ratios Modified by Cosmic Ray Re-acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawanaka, Norita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Re-acceleration of $\\pi$'s and $\\mu$'s modifies the flavor ratio at Earth (at astrophysical sources) of neutrinos produced by $\\pi$ decay, $\

  13. aspect ratio spherical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability Modes of Low-Aspect-Ratio Wings Matt Shields Engineering Websites Summary: vehicles (MAVs) ranging from flexiblemorphing wing aircraft to nano- and pico-scale...

  14. aspect ratio toroidal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability Modes of Low-Aspect-Ratio Wings Matt Shields Engineering Websites Summary: vehicles (MAVs) ranging from flexiblemorphing wing aircraft to nano- and pico-scale...

  15. aerosol ratio program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contribute a major portion of atmospheric aerosol mass loading 5. The estimated global annual Liou, K. N. 2 Studying Clouds and Aerosols with Lidar Depolarization Ratio and...

  16. aspect ratio aluminium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    perturbations Reynolds numbers Re) by means of the minimal amplitude of an initial global perturbation triggering Meseguer, Alvaro 9 Effect of mineral dust aerosol aspect ratio...

  17. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Oxygen...

  18. High Compression Ratio Turbo Gasoline Engine Operation Using...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Compression Ratio Turbo Gasoline Engine Operation Using Alcohol Enhancement PI: John B. Heywood Sloan Automotive Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology June 19, 2014...

  19. Precise measurement of branching ratios in the beta decay of 38Ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, H I; Iacob, V E; Bencomo, M; Chen, L; Horvat, V; Nica, N; Roeder, B T; McCleskey, E; Tribble, R E; Towner, I S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the full description of a measurement of the branching ratios for the beta-decay of 38Ca. This decay includes five allowed 0+ --> 1+ branches and a superallowed 0+ --> 0+ one. With our new result for the latter, we determine its ft value to be 3062.3(68) s, a result whose precision (0.2%) is comparable to the precision of the thirteen well known 0+ --> 0+ transitions used up till now for the determination of Vud, the up-down quark-mixing element of the CKM matrix. The 38Ca superallowed transition thus becomes the first addition to this set of transitions in nearly a decade and the first for which a precise mirror comparison is possible, thus enabling an improved test of the isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections required for the extraction of Vud.

  20. Performance of Cladding on MOX Fuel with Low 240Pu/239Pu Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Kevin [Areva NP; Blanpain, Patrick [AREVA NP SAS; Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of its surplus plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. As part of fuel qualification, four lead assemblies were manufactured and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod average burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg heavy metal. This was the world s first commercial irradiation of MOX fuel with a 240Pu/239Pu ratio less than 0.10. Five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This paper discusses the results of those examinations with emphasis on cladding performance. Exams relevant to the cladding included visual and eddy current exams, profilometry, microscopy, hydrogen analysis, gallium analysis, and mechanical testing. There was no discernible effect of the type of MOX fuel on the performance of the cladding.

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures and photoluminescence properties of mixed europium-yttrium organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han Yinfeng [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Taishan University, Taian 271021 (China); Fu Lianshe [Department of Physics, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Mafra, Luis, E-mail: lmafra@ua.pt [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Shi, Fa-Nian, E-mail: fshi@ua.pt [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three mixed europium-yttrium organic frameworks: Eu{sub 2-x}Y{sub x}(Mel)(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} (Mel=mellitic acid or benzene-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexacarboxylic acid, x=0.38 1, 0.74 2, and 0.86 3) have been synthesized and characterized. All the compounds contain a 3-D net with (4, 8)-flu topology. The study indicates that the photoluminescence properties are effectively affected by the different ratios of europium and yttrium ions, the quantum efficiency is increased and the Eu{sup 3+} lifetime becomes longer in these MOFs than those of the Eu analog. - Graphical abstract: Three mixed europium and yttrium organic frameworks: Eu{sub 2-x}Y{sub x}(Mel)(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} (Mel=mellitic acid) have been synthesized and characterized. All the compounds contain a 3-D net with (4, 8)-flu topology. The study indicates that the photoluminescence properties are effectively affected by the different ratios of europium and yttrium ions, the quantum efficiency is increased and the Eu{sup 3+} lifetime becomes longer in these MOFs than those of the Eu analog. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three (4, 8)-flu topological mixed Eu and Y MOFs were synthesized under mild conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal ratios were refined by the single crystal data consistent with the EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mixed Eu and Y MOFs show longer lifetime and higher quantum efficiency than the Eu analog. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adding inert lanthanide into luminescent MOFs enlarges the field of luminescent MOFs.

  2. Citation: K. Nakamura et al. (Particle Data Group), JP G 37, 075021 (2010) and 2011 partial update for the 2012 edition (URL: http://pdg.lbl.gov) Neutrino Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accelerator experiments.Events (observed/expected) from accelerator experiments. Some neutrino oscillation for the 2012 edition (URL: http://pdg.lbl.gov) Neutrino Mixing A REVIEW GOES HERE Check our WWW List of Reviews (A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios(A) Neutrino fluxes and event ratios(A) Neutrino fluxes

  3. Study of B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup (')} decays and determination of {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jingwu [Department of Physics, Xu Zhou Normal University, XuZhou 221116 (China); Du Dongsheng [Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing 100049 (China)

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup (')} decays and suggest two methods to determine the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle. We calculate not only the factorizable contribution in the QCD factorization scheme but also the nonfactorizable hard spectator corrections in the pQCD approach. We get the branching ratio of B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}, which is consistent with recent experimental data, and predict the branching ratio of B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '} to be 7.59x10{sup -6}. Two methods for determining the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle are suggested in this paper. For the first method, we get the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle to be about -13.1 deg., which is consistent with others in the literature. The second method depends on fewer parameters and can thus be used to determine the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle with better accuracy but needs, as an input, the branching ratio for B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}, which should be measured in the near future.

  4. ITER physics design guidelines at high aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uckan, N.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics requirements for ITER design are formulated in a set of physics design guidelines. These guidelines, established by the ITER Physics Group during the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA, 1988--90), were based on credible extrapolations of the tokamak physics database as assessed during the CDA, and defined a class of tokamak designs (with plasma current I {approximately}20 MA and aspect ratio A {approximately}2.5--3.5) that meet the ITER objectives. Recent US studies have indicated that there may be significant benefits if the ITER-CDA design point is moved from the low aspect ratio, high current baseline (A = 2.79, I = 22 MA) to a high aspect ratio machine at A {approximately}4, I {approximately}15 MA, especially regarding steady-state, technology-testing performance. To adequately assess the physics and technology testing capability of higher aspect ratio design options, several changes are proposed to the original ITER guidelines to reflect the latest (although limited) developments in physics understanding at higher aspect ratios. The critical issues for higher aspect ratio design options are the uncertainty in scaling of confinement with aspect ratio, the variation of vertical stability with elongation and aspect ratio, plasma shaping requirements, ability to control and maintain plasma current and q-profiles for MHD stability (and volt-second consumption), access for current drive, restrictions on field ripple and divertor plate incident angles, etc. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  5. IEA Workshop 59 Shape and Aspect Ratio Optimization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEA Workshop 59 Shape and Aspect Ratio Optimization for High Beta, Steady-State Tokamak SCOPE and aspect ratio is particularly important for achieving high beta and also for the optimization of edge optimization of high beta steady state tokamak including DEMO concept, stability and CD assessment

  6. Net energy ratio of photobiohydrogen generation G. Burgessa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net energy ratio of photobiohydrogen generation G. Burgessa and J.G. Fernndez the energy content, the operational energy inputs, and the net energy ratio (NER) of an industrial tubular photobioreactor used for the photosynthetic production of H2 by microalgae. The calculated H2 output

  7. aspect ratio hydrogen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aspect ratio hydrogen First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Balanced Aspect Ratio Trees...

  8. LIQUID MIXING STUDIES WITH AN INTEGRATED MIXER/VALVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    181 LIQUID MIXING STUDIES WITH AN INTEGRATED MIXER/VALVE Joel Voldman* , Martha L. Gray, and testing of an integrated mixer/valve and a method for determining its mixing performance. The method of their mixing performance - the mixing time. We have designed and fabricated a microfabricated liquid mixer/valve

  9. Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ventilation dilutes or removes indoor contaminants to reduce occupant exposure. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining the exposure of occupants to given sources, but the zone- specific distribution of exhaust and supply air, and the mixing of ventilation air can have significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage through the building envelope, air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact that air mixing has on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. Evaluations of existing field measurements and simulations reported in the literature are combined with new analyses to provide an integrated overview of the topic. The results show that for extreme cases additional mixing can be a significant factor but for typical homes looking at average exposures mixing is not helpful and can even make exposures worse.

  10. Temperature-dependent ion beam mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehn, L.E.; Alexander, D.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work on enhanced interdiffusion rates during ion-beam mixing at elevated temperatures is reviewed. As discussed previously, expected increase in ion-beam mixing rates due to `radiation-enhanced diffusion` (RED), i.e. the free migration of isolated vacancy and interstitial defects, is well documented in single-crystal specimens in the range of 0.4 to 0.6 of absolute melting temperature. In contrast, the increase often observed at somewhat lower temperatures during ion-beam mixing of polycrystalline specimens is not well understood. However, sufficient evidence is available to show that this increase reflects intracascade enhancement of a thermally-activated process that also occurs without irradiation. Recent evidence is presented which suggests that this process is Diffusion-induced Grain-Boundary Migration (DIGM). An important complementary conclusion is that because ion-beam mixing in single-crystal specimens exhibits no significant temperature dependence below that of RED, models that invoke only irradiation-specific phenomena, e.g., cascade-overlap, thermal-spikes, or liquid-diffusion, and hence which predict no difference in mixing behavior between single- or poly-crystalline specimens, cannot account for the existing results.

  11. Improvements in Mixing Time and Mixing Uniformity in Devices Designed for Studies of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Shuhuai [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bakajin, Olgica [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a microfluidic laminar flow mixer designed for studies of protein folding kinetics, we demonstrate a mixing time of 1 +/- 1 micros with sample consumption on the order of femtomoles. We recognize two limitations of previously proposed designs: (1) size and shape of the mixing region, which limits mixing uniformity and (2) the formation of Dean vortices at high flow rates, which limits the mixing time. We address these limitations by using a narrow shape-optimized nozzle and by reducing the bend of the side channel streamlines. The final design, which combines both of these features, achieves the best performance. We quantified the mixing performance of the different designs by numerical simulation of coupled Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations and experiments using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-labeled DNA.

  12. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] to about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 9 figs.

  13. Mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Noll, L.A.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of an evaluation of mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several surfactant combinations have been studied. These include alkyl aryl sulfonates as primary surfactants and carboxymethylated ethoxylated (CME) surfactants and ethoxylated sulfonates (ES) as secondary surfactants. The ethoxylated surfactants increase the salinity tolerance of the primary surfactants and, in theory, allow tailoring of the surfactant system to match selected reservoir conditions. The experiments conducted included interfacial tension (IFT) measurements, phase behavior measurements, adsorption and/or chromatographic separation of mixed surfactant systems, measurements of solution properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant mixtures, and crude oil displacement experiments. The effects of temperature, surfactant concentration, salinity, presence of divalent ions, hydrocarbon type, and component proportions in the mixed surfactant combinations, and injection strategies on the performance potential of the targeted surfactant/hydrocarbon systems were studied. 40 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (pcm) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 10 figures.

  15. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 2 figures.

  16. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the p.c.m. must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less p.c.m. per combined weight of silica and p.c.m. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a p.c.m. material. The silica-p.c.m. mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  17. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  18. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garmets, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  19. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  20. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  1. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael K.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid. The tests were conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants, and the test data were used to develop models predicting two measures of mixing performance for full-scale WTP vessels. The models predict the cloud height (the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action) and the critical suspension velocity (the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids are suspended off the floor, though not fully mixed). From the cloud height, the concentration of solids at the pump inlet can be estimated. The predicted critical suspension velocity for lifting all solids is not precisely the same as the mixing requirement for 'disturbing' a sufficient volume of solids, but the values will be similar and closely related. These predictive models were successfully benchmarked against larger scale tests and compared well with results from computational fluid dynamics simulations. The application of the models to assess mixing in WTP vessels is illustrated in examples for 13 distinct designs and selected operational conditions. The values selected for these examples are not final; thus, the estimates of performance should not be interpreted as final conclusions of design adequacy or inadequacy. However, this work does reveal that several vessels may require adjustments to design, operating features, or waste feed properties to ensure confidence in operation. The models described in this report will prove to be valuable engineering tools to evaluate options as designs are finalized for the WTP. Revision 1 refines data sets used for model development and summarizes models developed since the completion of Revision 0.

  2. Evolution of the Blue Luminosity-to-Baryon Mass Ratio of Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Shimasaku

    2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the ratio of total blue luminosity to total baryon mass, LB/Mb, for massive (Mgas at the Abell radius is \\ge 1 \\times 10^{13} h^{-2.5} \\Msolar) clusters of galaxies up to z \\simeq 1 from the literature. Twenty-two clusters in our sample are at z > 0.1. Assuming that the relative mix of hot gas and galaxies in clusters does not change during cluster evolution, we use LB/Mb to probe the star formation history of the galaxy population as a whole in clusters. We find that LB/Mb of clusters increases with redshift from LB/Mb=0.024 (solar units) at z = 0 to \\simeq 0.06 at z=1, indicating a factor of 2-3 brightening (we assume H0=70 km/s/Mpc). This amount of brightening is almost identical to the brightening of the M/LB ratio of early-type galaxies in clusters at 0.02 \\le z \\le 0.83 reported by van Dokkum et al. (1998). We compare the observed brightening of LB/Mb with luminosity evolution models for the galaxy population as a whole, changing the e-folding time of star formation \\tau by 0.1 \\le \\tau \\le 5 Gyr and the formation redshift \\zF by 2 \\le \\zF < \\infty. We find that \\tau=0.1 Gyr 'single burst' models with \\zF \\ge 3 and \\tau=5 Gyr 'disk' models with arbitrary \\zF are consistent with the observed brightening, while models with \\tau=1-2 Gyr tend to predict too steep brightening. We also derive the ratio of blue luminosity density to baryon density for field galaxies, adopting \\Omega_b h^2 = 0.02, and find that blue luminosity per unit baryon is similar in clusters and in fields up to z \\simeq 1 within the observational uncertainties.

  3. Model Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New Abelian vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by {epsilon} {approx}< 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.

  4. B^0_s mixing at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piedra, Jonatan; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. One of the most important analyses within the B physics program of the CDF experiment is B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. Since the time this school was held, several improvements in the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing analysis have made possible the measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency, result that has been presented at the FPCP 2006 Conference.

  5. Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

  6. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  7. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figs.

  8. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figures.

  9. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  10. Accretion of dust grains as a possible origin of metal-poor stars with low alpha/Fe ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeyama, T; Shigeyama, Toshikazu; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of low alpha/Fe ratios in some metal-poor stars, so called low-alpha stars, is discussed. It is found that most of low-alpha stars in the Galaxy are on the main-sequence. This strongly suggests that these stars suffered from external pollution. It is also found that the abundance ratios Zn/Fe of low-alpha stars both in the Galaxy and in dwarf spheroidal galaxies are lower than the average value of Galactic halo stars whereas damped Ly alpha absorbers have higher ratios. This implies that some low-alpha stars accreted matter depleted from gas onto dust grains. To explain the features in these low-alpha stars, we have proposed that metal-poor stars harboring planetary systems are the origin of these low-alpha stars. Stars engulfing a small fraction of planetesimals enhance the surface content of Fe to exhibit low alpha/Fe ratios on their surfaces while they are on the main-sequence, because dwarfs have shallow surface convection zones where the engulfed matter is mixed. After the stars leave the main...

  11. BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall shearing was shown to reduce the rheological properties of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Samples taken at the static feed tank showed that gelling impacted the rheological properties of the grout before it was fed into the pump and transfer line. A comparison of the rheological properties of samples taken at the feed tank and transfer line discharge indicated shearing of the grout was occurring in the transfer line. Bench scale testing of different mixing methods with three different salt solutions showed that method of mixing influences the rheological properties of the grouts. The paddle blade mixing method of the salt solution used for the BMSR testing provided comparable rheological properties of the grout prepared in the BMSR after 14 minutes of processing, B3. The paddle blade mixing method can be used to represent BMSR results and mixing time can be adjusted to represent larger scale mixing.

  12. aspect ratio silicon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    silicon-nitride hard-mask for high aspect-ratio silicon fins V. Jovanovi, S, Zagreb, Croatia Abstract - A method for using hard-masks to achieve sub- 100 nm patterning of...

  13. Separated Response Function Ratios in Exclusive, Forward ?[superscript ] Electroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, G.?M.

    The study of exclusive ?[superscript ] electroproduction on the nucleon, including separation of the various structure functions, is of interest for a number of reasons. The ratio R[subscript L] = ?[?? over L]/?[?+ over ...

  14. Benefits and Drawbacks of Compression Ratio Reduction in PCCI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effect of compression ratio on performance of light duty diesel operating with PCCI calibration, near EURO6Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx limits. deer08beatrice.pdf More Documents &...

  15. Design studies of low aspect ratio quasi-omnigenous stellarators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín-Solís, José Ramón

    optimization principles for the design of a more attractive reactor. These are 3 and 4 field period low aspect] produced low aspect ratio stellarator configurations that had promising features for a reactor (stable

  16. aspect ratio effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contribute a major portion of atmospheric aerosol mass loading 5. The estimated global annual Liou, K. N. 2 Effects of aspect ratio of MWNT on the flammability properties of...

  17. Rapid Replication of High Aspect Ratio Molds for UV Embossing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Yehai

    This paper describes a promising fabrication technique for rapid replication of high aspect ratio microstructured molds for UV embossing. The process involves casting silicone rubber on a microstructured master, replicating ...

  18. Method and apparatus for the control of fluid dynamic mixing in pulse combustors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In a method and apparatus for controlling total ignition delay time in a pulse combustor, and thus controlling the mixing characteristics of the combustion reactants and the combustion products in the combustor, the total ignition delay time is controlled by adjusting the inlet geometry of the inlet to the combustion chamber. The inlet geometry may be fixed or variable for controlling the mixing characteristics. A feedback loop may be employed to sense actual combustion characteristics, and, in response to the sensed combustion characteristics, the inlet geometry may be varied to obtain the total ignition delay time necessary to achieve the desired combustion characteristics. Various embodiments relate to the varying of the mass flow rate of reactants while holding the radius/velocity ratio constant. 10 figs.

  19. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  20. TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS AS A FUNCTION OF ASPECT RATIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    GAA23168 TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS AS A FUNCTION OF ASPECT RATIO by C.P.C. WONG and R.D. STAMBAUGH or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;GAA23168 TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS JULY 1999 #12;C.P.C. WONG AND R.D. STAMBAUGH TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS AS A FUNCTION OF ASPECT RATIO

  1. Interpretation of the atmospheric muon charge ratio in MINOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Schreiner; Maury Goodman

    2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    MINOS is the first large magnetic detector deep underground and is the first to measure the muon charge ratio with high statistics in the region near 1 TeV.\\cite{bib:adamson} An approximate formula for the muon charge ratio can be expressed in terms of $\\epsilon_\\pi$ = 115 GeV, $\\epsilon_K$ = 850 GeV and $\\ec$. The implications for K production in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  2. Increasing the transformer ratio at the Argonne wakefield accelerator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Power, J.G.; Conde, M.; Liu, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A. (High Energy Physics); (Euclid Techlabs, LLC)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transformer ratio is defined as the ratio of the maximum energy gain of the witness bunch to the maximum energy loss experienced by the drive bunch (or a bunch within a multidrive bunch train). This plays an important role in the collinear wakefield acceleration scheme. A high transformer ratio is desirable since it leads to a higher overall efficiency under similar conditions (e.g. the same beam loading, the same structure, etc.). One technique to enhance the transformer ratio beyond the ordinary limit of 2 is to use a ramped bunch train. The first experimental demonstration observed a transformer ratio only marginally above 2 due to the mismatch between the drive microbunch length and the frequency of the accelerating structure [C. Jing, A. Kanareykin, J. Power, M. Conde, Z. Yusof, P. Schoessow, and W. Gai, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 144801 (2007)]. Recently, we revisited this experiment with an optimized microbunch length using a UV laser stacking technique at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and measured a transformer ratio of 3.4. Measurements and data analysis from these experiments are presented in detail.

  3. Geochemical Implications of Stirring and Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudge, John

    Geochemical Implications of Stirring and Mixing in the Earth's Mantle John Frederick Rudge Trinity Sciences and Applied Mathematics, mostly in the form of papers in my rucksack as I have cycled back constrain the melting, melt mi- gration, and solid state convection that occurs in the Earth's mantle

  4. SOME ASPECTS OF NEUTRINO MIXING AND OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    SOME ASPECTS OF NEUTRINO MIXING AND OSCILLATIONS THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF CALCUTTA into the fascinating world of neutrinos and for being an excellent teacher and a perfect guide. I convey my regards everything I know about neutrino phenomenology, I owe to him. I consider myself very fortunate to have him

  5. PCC Mix Designs Using Recycled Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    PCC Mix Designs Using Recycled Concrete Pavements Mary E. Vancura, Derek Tompkins, & Lev Khazanovich 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference #12;·! Reassessment of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) use in rigid pavements ·! History of RCA use ·! Characteristics of RCA concrete ·! RCA production

  6. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1989-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and radioactive mixed waste policies and requirements and to implement the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) within the framework of the environmental programs established under DOE O 5400.1. This directive does not cancel any directives.

  7. CP ROAD MAP Mix Design & Analysis Track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    payment is made, it is unusual for liability to be assessed later when the actual durability of the structure becomes known." #12;GREEN CONCRETE The Specifications 1. Specify required strength a coarse mix, 8520 psi core strength and 14.89% permeable pores still used in 2008! #12;#12;FIELD STUDIES

  8. Dark energy, cosmological constant and neutrino mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The today estimated value of dark energy can be achieved by the vacuum condensate induced by neutrino mixing phenomenon. Such a tiny value is recovered for a cut-off of the order of Planck scale and it is linked to the sub eV neutrino mass scale. Contributions to dark energy from auxiliary fields or mechanisms are not necessary in this approach.

  9. Symmetrical parametrizations of the lepton mixing matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advantages of the original symmetrical form of the parametrization of the lepton mixing matrix are discussed. It provides a conceptually more transparent description of neutrino oscillations and lepton number violating processes like neutrinoless double beta decay, clarifying the significance of Dirac and Majorana phases. It is also ideal for parametrizing scenarios with light sterile neutrinos.

  10. Inference for Clustered Mixed Outcomes from a Multivariate Generalized Linear Mixed Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hsiang-Chun

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) and E(?i2t?) with their marginal expectations over X, ??1 = EX {E(?i1t)} and ??2 = EX {E(?i2t)}, which are shown in the previous subsections. In other words, the overall total-CC is ?total = KtotalN,1,2 (??1, ??2) KtotalD,1,2 (??1, ??2) . 3.2.4....2 Multivariate Generalized Linear Mixed Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.3 Assessing Correlation in Generalized Linear Mixed Model . . . . . . . 8 2.4 Bayesian Method for the Generalized Linear Mixed Model . . . . . . 10 3. ASSESSING CORRELATION...

  11. Mixing fraction of inner solar system material in comet 81P/Wild2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, Andrew J.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of crystalline silicates in the comae of comets, inferred through infrared observations, has been a long-standing puzzle. Crystalline silicates are unexpectedif comets are composed of pristine interstellar material, since interstellar silicates are almost entirely amorphous. Heating to> 1100 K can anneal silicates to crystallinity,but no protoplanetary heating sources have been identified that were sufficiently strong to heat materials in the outer nebula to such high temperatures. This conundrum led to the suggestion that large-scalemixing was important in theprotoplanetary disk. Reports of refractory calcium - aluminum-rich inclusion-like objects and large concentrations of noble gases in Stardust samples underscore the need for such mixing. However, the evidence from the Stardust samples until now has been largely anecdotal, and it has not been possible to place quantitative constraints on the mixing fraction. Here we report synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe measurements of the relative concentrations of the chemical state of iron in material from a known comet, the Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild2. We find that the comet is rich in iron sulfides. The elemental S/Fe ratio based on the sulfide concentration, S/Fe> 0.31(2 sigma), is higher than in most chondritic meteorites. We also found that Fe-bearing silicates are at least 50percent crystalline. Based on these measurements, we estimate the fraction psi of inner nebular material in 81P/Wild2. With the lower bound on the crystalline Fe-bearing silicate fraction, we find that psi> 0.5. If the observed S depletion in the inner solar system predated or was contemporaneous with large-scale mixing, our lower bound on the S/Fe ratio gives an upper bound on psi of ~;; 0.65. This measurement may be used to test mixing models of the early solar system.

  12. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  13. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Bailey, Sharon A.; Bower, John C.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Eakin, David E.; Elmore, Monte R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Michael D.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Lawler, Bruce D.; Loveland, Jesse S.; Mullen, O Dennis; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Peters, Timothy J.; Robinson, Peter J.; Russcher, Michael S.; Sande, Susan; Santoso, Christian; Shoemaker, Steven V.; Silva, Steve M.; Smith, Devin E.; Su, Yin-Fong; Toth, James J.; Wiberg, John D.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zuljevic, Nino

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants. The test data were used to independently develop mixing models that can be used to predict full-scale WTP vessel performance and to rate current WTP mixing system designs against two specific performance requirements. One requirement is to ensure that all solids have been disturbed during the mixing action, which is important to release gas from the solids. The second requirement is to maintain a suspended solids concentration below 20 weight percent at the pump inlet. The models predict the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action, and the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids have been lifted from the floor. From the cloud height estimate we can calculate the concentration of solids at the pump inlet. The velocity needed to lift the solids is slightly more demanding than "disturbing" the solids, and is used as a surrogate for this metric. We applied the models to assess WTP mixing vessel performance with respect to the two performance requirements. Each mixing vessel was evaluated against these two criteria for two defined waste conditions. One of the wastes was defined by design limits and one was derived from Hanford waste characterization reports. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy the performance criteria used for any of the conditions evaluated. The remaining three vessel types provide varying assessments when the different particle characteristics are evaluated. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy the performance criteria used for any of the conditions evaluated. The remaining three vessel types provide varying assessments when the different particle characteristics are evaluated. The HLP-022 vessel was also evaluated using 12 m/s pulse jet velocity with 6-in. nozzles, and this design also did not satisfy the criteria for all of the conditions evaluated.

  14. Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology Analysis Group

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

  15. KEY FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PERFORMANCE PROPERTIES OF ARP/MCU SALTSTONE MIXES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF), decontaminated salt solution (DSS) is combined with premix (a cementitious mixture of portland cement (PC), blast furnace slag (BFS) and Class F fly ash (FA)) in a Readco mixer to produce fresh (uncured) Saltstone. After transfer to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) the hydration reactions initiated during the contact of the premix and salt solution continue during the curing period to produce the hardened waste form product. The amount of heat generated from hydration and the resultant temperature increase in the vaults depend on the composition of the decontaminated salt solution being dispositioned as well as the grout formulation (mix design). This report details the results from Task 3 of the Saltstone Variability Study for FY09 which was performed to identify, and quantify when possible, those factors that drive the performance properties of the projected ARP/MCU Batches. A baseline ARP/MCU mix (at 0.60 water to cementitious materials (w/cm) ratio) was established and consisted of the normal premix composition and a salt solution that was an average of the projected compositions of the last three ARP/MCU batches developed by T. A. Le. This task introduced significant variation in (1) wt % slag, w/cm ratio, and wt % portland cement about the baseline mix and (2) the temperature of curing in order to better assess the dependence of the performance properties on these factors. Two separate campaigns, designated Phase 10 and Phase 11, were carried out under Task 3. Experimental designs and statistical analyses were used to search for correlation among properties and to develop linear models to predict property values based on factors such as w/cm ratio, slag concentration, and portland cement concentration. It turns out that the projected salt compositions contained relatively high amounts of aluminate (0.22 M) even though no aluminate was introduced due to caustic aluminate removal from High Level Waste. Previous studies revealed that increased levels of aluminate in the feed cause a significant increase in the heat generation. For Phase 10, a mix with 0.05 M aluminate was used as a comparison point for the mixes at 0.22 M aluminate. The temperature of curing in Task 3 ranged from 22 C to 75 C. Recent results demonstrated that it is not only the temperature of curing which is important but also the time/temperature sequence of curing. Therefore, this report also focuses on the impact of the sequencing of time and curing temperature on Saltstone properties.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: carbon monoxide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper Presented at American Society of Mechanical Engineers' (ASME) 2012 Internal Combustion Engine Division (ICED) Conference On August 28, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Energy...

  17. Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marceau, Claude, E-mail: claude.marceau.2@ulaval.ca; Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser, Pavillon d'optique-photonique Qubec (Qubec), Universit Laval, Qubec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800?nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400?nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1??m to 18??m. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

  18. Synthesis gas conversion in a mixed slurry reactor with iron-manganese catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W.; Schehl, R.R.; Tischer, R.E.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas was reacted over different compositions of iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalysts in a slurry reactor. The reactor operates in a back-mixed mode with a continuous flow of feed gas through the catalyst suspended in the liquid medium. Four catalysts with iron-manganese ratios of 57/43, 44/56, 22/78, and 10/90 were investigated at identical process conditions after a standard activation procedure. With time on stream for each catalyst system, hydrogenation of olefins occurred, along with olefin isomerization reactions. Activity, selectivity, and stability are discussed in general. Analyses of used catalyst samples are also reported.

  19. Formation of Ti-B surface alloys by excimer laser mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jervis, T.R.; Nastasi, M.; Hirvonen, J.P.; Zocco, T.G.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have formed a surface Ti-B alloy by excimer laser mixing of a single B layer on a Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrate. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy indicates a uniform B:Ti ratio of approximately 0.7 in the surface layer. A Boron layer 60 nm thick resulted in an alloy layer approximately 200 nm thick. There is little indication, by either Auger electron spectroscopy or nuclear reaction analysis, of substantial oxygen incorporation in the surface alloy despite the fact that the processing was done in air. Transmission electron microscopy of the surface alloy shows a completely amorphous surface layer underlain by a martensitic structure.

  20. Mixing device for materials with large density differences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, David W. (Moraga, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An auger-tube pump mixing device for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided.

  1. Mixing device for materials with large density differences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, D.W.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An auger-tube pump mixing device is disclosed for mixing materials with large density differences while maintaining low stirring RPM and low power consumption. The mixing device minimizes the formation of vortexes and minimizes the incorporation of small bubbles in the liquid during mixing. By avoiding the creation of a vortex the device provides efficient stirring of full containers without spillage over the edge. Also, the device solves the problem of effective mixing in vessels where the liquid height is large compared to the diameter. Because of the gentle stirring or mixing by the device, it has application for biomedical uses where cell damage is to be avoided. 2 figs.

  2. Mixed-Salt Effects on the Ionic Conductivity of Lithium-Doped PEO-Containing Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Wen-Shiue; Albert, Julie N.L.; Schantz, A. Benjamin; Epps, III, Thomas H. (Delaware)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a simple, yet effective, mixed-salt method to increase the room temperature ionic conductivity of lithium-doped block copolymer electrolyte membranes by suppressing the crystalline phases in the conducting block. We examined a mixed-salt system of LiClO{sub 4} and LiN(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} (LiTFSI) doped into a lamellae-forming poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) diblock copolymer. The domain spacings, morphologies, thermal behavior, and crystalline phases of salt-doped PS-PEO samples were characterized, and the ionic conductivities of block copolymer electrolytes were obtained through ac impedance measurements. Comparing the ionic conductivity profiles of salt-doped PS-PEO samples at different mixed-salt ratios and total salt concentrations, we found that the ionic conductivity at room temperature can be improved by more than an order of magnitude when coinhibition of crystallite growth is promoted by the concerted behavior of the PEO:LiClO{sub 4} and PEO:LiTFSI phases. Additionally, we examined the influence of mixed-salt ratio and total salt concentration on copolymer energetics, and we found that the slope of the effective interaction parameter ({chi}{sub eff}) vs salt concentration in our lamellae-forming PS-PEO system was lower than that reported for a cylinder-forming PS-PEO system due to the balance between chain stretching and salt segregation in the PEO domains.

  3. Mixed-salt Effects on the Ionic Conductivity of Lithium-doped PEO-containing Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W Young; J Albert; A Schantz; T Epps

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a simple, yet effective, mixed-salt method to increase the room temperature ionic conductivity of lithium-doped block copolymer electrolyte membranes by suppressing the crystalline phases in the conducting block. We examined a mixed-salt system of LiClO{sub 4} and LiN(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} (LiTFSI) doped into a lamellae-forming poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) diblock copolymer. The domain spacings, morphologies, thermal behavior, and crystalline phases of salt-doped PS-PEO samples were characterized, and the ionic conductivities of block copolymer electrolytes were obtained through ac impedance measurements. Comparing the ionic conductivity profiles of salt-doped PS-PEO samples at different mixed-salt ratios and total salt concentrations, we found that the ionic conductivity at room temperature can be improved by more than an order of magnitude when coinhibition of crystallite growth is promoted by the concerted behavior of the PEO:LiClO{sub 4} and PEO:LiTFSI phases. Additionally, we examined the influence of mixed-salt ratio and total salt concentration on copolymer energetics, and we found that the slope of the effective interaction parameter (x{sub eff}) vs salt concentration in our lamellae-forming PS-PEO system was lower than that reported for a cylinder-forming PS-PEO system due to the balance between chain stretching and salt segregation in the PEO domains.

  4. Investigation of Mixed Oxide Catalysts for NO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szanyi, Janos; Karim, Ayman M.; Pederson, Larry R.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Tran, Diana N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Qi, Gongshin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The oxidation of engine-generated NO to NO2 is an important step in the reduction of NOx in lean engine exhaust because NO2 is required for the performance of the LNT technology [2], and it enhances the activities of ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts [1]. In particular, for SCR catalysts an NO:NO2 ratio of 1:1 is most effective for NOx reduction, whereas for LNT catalysts, NO must be oxidized to NO2 before adsorption on the storage components. However, NO2 typically constitutes less than 10% of NOx in lean exhaust, so catalytic oxidation of NO is essential. Platinum has been found to be especially active for NO oxidation, and is widely used in DOC and LNT catalysts. However, because of the high cost and poor thermal durability of Pt-based catalysts, there is substantial interest in the development of alternatives. The objective of this project, in collaboration with partner General Motors, is to develop mixed metal oxide catalysts for NO oxidation, enabling lower precious metal usage in emission control systems. [1] M. Koebel, G. Madia, and M. Elsener, Catalysis Today 73, 239 (2002). [2] C. H. Kim, G. S. Qi, K. Dahlberg, and W. Li, Science 327, 1624 (2010).

  5. Tribimaximal neutrino mixing and neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, M.; Morisi, S.; Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular-- C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a tribimaximal lepton mixing scheme where the neutrinoless double beta decay rate has a lower bound which correlates with the ratio {alpha}{identical_to}{delta}m{sub sol}{sup 2}/{delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2} well determined by current data, as well as with the unknown Majorana CP phase {phi}{sub 12} characterizing the solar neutrino subsystem. For the special value {phi}{sub 12}=({pi}/2) (opposite CP-sign neutrinos) the {beta}{beta}{sub 0{nu}} rate vanishes at tree level when {delta}m{sub sol}{sup 2}/{delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2}=3/80, only allowed at 3{sigma}. For all other cases the rate is nonzero, and lies within current and projected experimental sensitivities close to {phi}{sub 12}=0. We suggest two model realizations of this scheme in terms of A{sub 4}xZ{sub 2} and A{sub 4}xZ{sub 4} flavor symmetries.

  6. Observation of Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Collinear Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A. [Euclid Techlabs, LLC, Solon, OH-44139 (United States); Power, J.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL-60439 (United States)

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transformer ratio R is a parameter that characterizes the efficiency of the energy transferred from the drive beam to the trailing witness beam passing through a wakefield accelerating structure (all metal or dielectric based) or a plasma chamber. Using a ramped bunch train (RBT) rather than a single drive bunch, the enhanced transformer ratio (ETR) technique is able to increase the transformer ratio R above the ordinary limit of 2 for a single bunch in a collinear wakefield accelerator. The RBT is a train of electron bunches separated by half integer multiples wavelength of the wakefield. The charge of the leading bunch is lowest and subsequent bunch charges are increased in such a way as to maximize R. In this article, an experimental study of this scheme is presented in which an RBT of 2 bunches with charge ratio of 1:2.5 and bunch length {sigma}z = 2 mm were used to enhance the transformer ratio. Measurement results and data analysis show good agreement with theoretical predictions. The ETR technique demonstrated here can be used in any collinear wakefield accelerator configuration, either structure- or plasma-based.

  7. Observation of enhanced transformer ratio in collinear Wakefield acceleration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Power, J.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transformer ratio R is a parameter that characterizes the efficiency of the energy transferred from the drive beam to the trailing witness beam passing through a wakefield accelerating structure (all metal or dielectric based) or a plasma chamber. Using a ramped bunch train (RBT) rather than a single drive bunch, the enhanced transformer ratio (ETR) technique is able to increase the transformer ratio R above the ordinary limit of 2 for a single bunch in a collinear wakefield accelerator. The RBT is a train of electron bunches separated by half integer multiples wavelength of the wakefield. The charge of the leading bunch is lowest and subsequent bunch charges are increased in such a way as to maximize R. In this article, an experimental study of this scheme is presented in which an RBT of 2 bunches with charge ratio of 1:2.5 and bunch length {sigma}{sub z} = 2 mm were used to enhance the transformer ratio. Measurement results and data analysis show good agreement with theoretical predictions. The ETR technique demonstrated here can be used in any collinear wakefield accelerator configuration, either structure- or plasma-based.

  8. The S-D mixing and dielectron widths of higher charmonium 1{sup --} states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badalian, A. M., E-mail: badalian@itep.r [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Bakker, B. L. G. [Vrije Universiteit, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Netherlands); Danilkin, I. V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dielectron widths of {psi}(4040), {psi}(4160), and {psi}(4415), and their ratios are shown to be in good agreement with experiment, if in all cases the S-D mixing with a large mixing angle {theta} {approx_equal} 34 deg. is taken. Arguments are presented why continuum states give small contributions to the wave functions at the origin. We find that the Y (4360) resonance, considered as a pure 3 {sup 3}D{sub 1} state, would have very small dielectron width, {Gamma}{sub ee}(Y (4360)) = 0.060 keV. On the contrary, for large mixing between the 4 {sup 3}S{sub 1} and 3 {sup 3}D{sub 1} states with the mixing angle {theta} = 34.8 deg., {Gamma}{sub ee}({psi}(4415)) = 0.57 keV coincides with the experimental number, while a second physical resonance, probably Y (4360), has also a rather large {Gamma}{sub ee}(Y ({approx}4400)) = 0.61 keV. For the higher Y (4660) resonance, considered as a pure 5 {sup 3}S{sub 1} state, we predict the dielectron width {Gamma}{sub ee}(Y (4660)) = 0.70 keV, but it becomes significantly smaller, namely 0.31 keV, if the mixing angle between the 5 {sup 3}S{sub 1} and 4 {sup 3}D{sub 1} states has the characteristic value {theta} = 34 deg. The mass and dielectron width of the 6 {sup 3}S{sub 1} charmonium state are calculated.

  9. $D^0$-$\\bar{D}^0$ mixing and CP violation results from Belle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. K. Nisar

    2014-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results on $D^0$-$\\bar{D}^0$ mixing in the decays of $D^0\\to K^+\\pi^-$ and $D^0\\to K_S^0\\pi^+\\pi^-$, and CP violation in $D^0\\to\\pi^0\\pi^0$ using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of about 1~ab$^{-1}$ recorded with the Belle detector, at different center of mass energies. The mixing is observed in $D^0\\to K^+\\pi^-$ with the mixing parameters $x'^2=(0.09\\pm 0.22)\\times 10^{-3}$, $y'=(4.6\\pm 3.4)\\times 10^{-3}$ and the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favored decay rates $R_{D}=(3.53\\pm0.13)\\times 10^{-3}$, where the quoted uncertainties combine both statistical and systematic contributions. For the $D^0\\to K_S^0\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay, assuming CP conservation we measure mixing parameters $x=(0.56\\pm 0.19^{+0.03+0.06}_{-0.09-0.09})\\%$ and $y=(0.30\\pm 0.15^{+0.04+0.03}_{-0.05-0.06})\\%$, where the uncertainties are statistical, experimental systematics, and that due to amplitude model. We measure the mixing parameters allowing CP violation for this decay mode, and obtain $|q/p|=0.90^{+0.16+0.05+0.06}_{-0.15-0.04-0.05}$ and arg($q/p$)=$(-6\\pm 11 \\pm3^{+3}_{-4})^{\\circ}$ that are consistent with no CP violation. The time-integrated CP asymmetry in the decay $D^0\\to\\pi^0\\pi^0$ is measured to be, $[-0.03\\pm 0.64(stat) \\pm 0.10(syst)]\\%$, consistent with CP conservation. We also present an updated measurement of CP asymmetry in $D^0\\to K_S^0\\pi^0$.

  10. CP violation in neutrino oscillations and L/E flatness of the e-like event ratio at Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Ahluwalia; Y. Liu; I. Stancu

    2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that if the presently observed L/E-flatness of the electron-like event ratio in the Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data is confirmed then the indicated ratio must be {\\em unity}. Further, it is found that once CP is violated the exact L/E flatness implies: (a) The CP-violating phase, in the standard parameterization, is narrowed down to two possibilities pm pi/2, and (b) The mixing between the second and the third generations must be maximal. With these results at hand, we argue that a dedicated study of the L/E-flatness of the electron-like event ratio by Super-Kamiokande can serve as an initial investigatory probe of CP violation in the neutrino sector. The assumptions under which these results hold are explicitly stated.

  11. Ratio of Pion Kaon Production in Proton Carbon Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, Andrey V.; /Harvard U.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio of pion-kaon production by 120 GeV/c protons incident on carbon target is presented. The data was recorded with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Production ratios of K{sup +}/{pi}{sup +}, K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup -}/K{sup +}, and {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} are measured in 24 bins in longitudinal momentum from 20 to 90 GeV/c and transverse momentum up to 2 GeV/c. The measurement is compared to existing data sets, particle production Monte Carlo results from FLUKA-06, parametrization of proton-beryllium data at 400/450 GeV/c, and ratios measured by the MINOS experiment on the NuMI target.

  12. Recent Experiment on Wakefield Transformer Ratio Enhancement at AWA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A. [Euclid Techlabs, LLC, 5900 Harper Rd, Solon, OH 44139 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Liu, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    One technique to enhance the transformer ratio beyond the ordinary limit of 2 in a collinear wakefield acceleration scheme is to use a ramped bunched train (RBT). The first experimental demonstration has been reported in [1]. However, due to the mismatch between the beam bunch length and frequency of the accelerating structure, the observed transformer ratio was only marginally above 2 in the earlier experiment. We recently revisited this experiment with an optimized bunch length using the laser stacking technique at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. A transformer ratio of 3.4 has been measured using two drive bunches. Attempting to use four drive bunches met with major challenges. In this article, measurement results and data analysis from these experiments are presented in detail.

  13. Transformer ratio improvement for beam based plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Shea, Brendan; Rosenzweig, James; Barber, Samuel; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Williams, Oliver; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl [University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); University of Southern California, Department of Electrical Engineering, Los Angeles, CA 90089 U.S.A. and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the transformer ratio of wakefield accelerating systems improves the viability of present novel accelerating schemes. The use of asymmetric bunches to improve the transformer ratio of beam based plasma systems has been proposed for some time[1, 2] but suffered from lack appropriate beam creation systems. Recently these impediments have been overcome [3, 4] and the ability now exists to create bunches with current profiles shaped to overcome the symmetric beam limit of R {<=} 2. We present here work towards experiments designed to measure the transformer ratio of such beams, including theoretical models and simulations using VORPAL (a 3D capable PIC code) [5]. Specifically we discuss projects to be carried out in the quasi-nonlinear regime [6] at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory and the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab.

  14. Hall viscosity to entropy ratio in higher derivative theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibakar Roychowdhury

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper based on the basic principles of gauge/gravity duality we compute the hall viscosity to entropy ratio in the presence of various higher derivative corrections to the dual gravitational description embedded in an asymptotically $ AdS_{4} $ space time. As the first step of our analysis, considering the back reaction we impose higher derivative corrections to the abelian gauge sector of the theory where we notice that the ratio indeed gets corrected at the leading order in the coupling. Considering the probe limit as a special case we compute this leading order correction over the fixed background of the charged black brane solution. Finally we consider higher derivative ($ R^{2} $) correction to the gravity sector of the theory where we notice that the above ratio might get corrected at the sixth derivative level.

  15. Data base for fused-iron catalyst in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batchelder, R.F.; Pennline, H.W.; Schehl, R.R.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various tests were conducted with a promoted, fused-iron catalyst. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures of different ratios with or without light olefin additives were reacted in a gradientless, mixed reactor. Process and catalyst parameters investigated were temperature (250 to 325/sup 0/C), pressure (100 to 600 psig), H/sub 2/:CO synthesis gas ratio (1/1 to 4/1), and catalyst particle size. Results from these experiments have been presented graphically, and observations have been discussed.

  16. Synthesis and study of frustrated oxide and mixed anion materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Lucy

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed anion systems, such as oxynitrides and oxyfluorides, are an emerging class of interesting materials. The lower stability of mixed anion systems in comparison to oxide materials has had the consequence that this ...

  17. Synthesis and physical properties study on mixed metal oxynitrides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Minghui

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed metal oxynitrides have attracted attention due to their interesting chemical and physical properties in the past twenty years. In this thesis, four series of mixed metal oxynitrides have been investigated. The ...

  18. Trajectory Optimization using Mixed-Integer Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajectory Optimization using Mixed-Integer Linear Programming by Arthur George Richards Master Optimization using Mixed-Integer Linear Programming by Arthur George Richards Submitted to the Department subjected to avoidance and assignment requirements. The former include avoidance of collisions

  19. Water and Gold: A Promising Mix for Future Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water and Gold: A Promising Mix for Future Batteries Water and Gold: A Promising Mix for Future Batteries Berkeley Lab Study Reveals Molecular Structure of Water at Gold Electrodes...

  20. Controlled Dispensing and Mixing of Pico- to Nanoliter Volumes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dispensing and Mixing of Pico- to Nanoliter Volumes Using On-Demand Droplet-Based Microfluidics. Controlled Dispensing and Mixing of Pico- to Nanoliter Volumes Using On-Demand...

  1. Cost and Schedule of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    project review conducted by NNSA 1 Mixed oxide fuel is produced by mixing plutonium with depleted uranium. concluded that the MOX Facility had a very low probability of being...

  2. MIX and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molitoris, J D; Batteux, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Souers, P C; Forbes, J W

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced mix resulting from interface features in a divergent cylindrical geometry. In this research a cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave and accelerate the interface. The interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Pre-emplaced surface features added to the aluminum were used to modify this interface. Time sequence radiographic imaging quantified the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to over 60 {micro}s post-detonation. Thus allowing the study of the onset of mix and evolution to turbulence. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Radiographic image data are compared with numerical simulations of the experiments.

  3. DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

  4. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Carl H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begins with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretion on a spinning pair releases 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscosity and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, creating mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until a quark-gluon strong-force SF freeze-out. Gluon-viscosity anti-gravity ({\\Lambda}SF) exponentially inflates the fireball to preserve big bang turbulence information at scales larger than ct as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background CMB temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered (10^12 s) as plasma viscous forces permit gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales (10^13 s). Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths a...

  5. Particle acceleration in thick parallel shocks with high compression ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joni J. P. Virtanen; Rami Vainio

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report studies on first-order Fermi acceleration in parallel modified shock waves with a large scattering center compression ratio expected from turbulence transmission models. Using a Monte Carlo technique we have modeled particle acceleration in shocks with a velocity ranging from nonrelativistic to ultrarelativistic and a thickness extending from nearly steplike to very wide structures exceeding the particle diffusion length by orders of magnitude. The nonrelativistic diffusion approximation is found to be surprisingly accurate in predicting the spectral index of a thick shock with large compression ratio even in the cases involving relativistic shock speeds.

  6. High transformer ratio drive beams for wakefield accelerator studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, R. J.; Ng, C.-K.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Muggli, P.; Joshi, C.; An, W.; Andonian, G.; Mori, W.; Lu, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For wakefield based acceleration schemes, use of an asymmetric (or linearly ramped) drive bunch current profile has been predicted to enhance the transformer ratio and generate large accelerating wakes. We discuss plans and initial results for producing such bunches using the 20 to 23 GeV electron beam at the FACET facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and sending them through plasmas and dielectric tubes to generate transformer ratios greater than 2 (the limit for symmetric bunches). The scheme proposed utilizes the final FACET chicane compressor and transverse collimation to shape the longitudinal phase space of the beam.

  7. Prediction of heptanes-plus equilibrium ratios from empirical correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenna, Martin James

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6590 305 247 0. 862 low 600 3225 158 149 0. 787 8055 313 212 0. 841 low sOV 2375 127 108 0. 746 TABLE 3-PHYS ICAL AND CRITICAL PROPERTIES Component methane ethane propane i-butane n-butane i-pentane n-pentane hexane (1b... using only one property ? critical temperature- to correlate equilibrium ratios. Campbell stated that for a fixed temperature and pressure, the equilibrium ratios of a mixture in v the equation apor-liquid equilibrium can be represented by log K...

  8. Estimate of the triton asymptotic D to S ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederico, T.; Adhikari, S.K.; Hussein, M.S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of the deuteron asymptotic D to S normalization ratio eta/sup d/ in the calculation of triton observables is emphasized both within a simple model and in an exact numerical calculation. We suggest a new correlation among eta/sup t//eta/sup d/ and E/sub t/ in dynamical three nucleon calculations, where eta/sup t/ is the triton asymptotic D to S ratio and E/sub t/ is the triton binding energy. Studying this correlation we obtained eta/sup t//eta/sup d/ = 1.68 +- 0.04. .AE

  9. Perfusion measurement with Rubidium 81 to Krypton 81m ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beasley, Charles Ward

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WRITE & II!FV ~ 26) FQRM4T(' REPLACE OR AF'PING OAT* FILET (Rr(4&)'I 'rfrA1) READ( IDEV r 22 & IANS IF ( (IANS, AND. '377) . EQ, '122) ICNTR=O WRITE& IDEV r 145) FORMAT(' USE OLD SEITINGSr &N&; 'rf !A1) RE*D(IDEVr22) IANS IOLD=O IF? IANS. AND. '377... TO EQUI LI!3RIUM AND POINTS TAKEN FROM THE OBSERVED (4) RATIO DECLINE REAL TIME RB-81/KR-81M RATIO VERSUS PHANTOM FLOW 17 19 10 SYMBOLIC FORMAT QF RECTILINEAR PHANTOM SCANS, SHOWING THE RELATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF RB-81 AND KR-81M AT DIFFERENT FLOW...

  10. Effect of mixing on polymerization of styrene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treybig, Michael Norris

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was performed by co- feeding styrene monomer, batch prepared living polystyrllithium seed and benzene. Reaction conditions such as temperature, initial monomer and polymer concentrations, residence time and mixing speed were varied to achieve different... for the laboratory reactor. Micromixing was found to pro- duce a broad distribution with a high molecular weight tail, whereas total segregation would produce a more narrow polymer distribution with a low molecular weight tail. Before making the laboratory...

  11. Sideband Mixing in Intense Laser Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Lavelle; David McMullan

    2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron propagator in a laser background has been shown to be made up of a series of sideband poles. In this paper we study this decomposition by analysing the impact of the residual gauge freedom in the Volkov solution on the sidebands. We show that the gauge transformations do not alter the location of the poles. The identification of the propagator from the two-point function is maintained but we show that the sideband structures mix under residual gauge transformations.

  12. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

  13. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

  14. August 2000 ((Mixed) Integer Nonlinear Programming ) Sven Leyffer ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ((Mixed) Integer Linear Programming ) ... Facets of The Cardinality Constrained Circuit Polytope ..... Analysis of MILP Techniques for the Pooling Problem

  15. Eco blocks: Nontraditional use for mixed wastepaper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, A.M. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States); Rose, M. [EKA Nobel, Ashland, VA (United States); Ryu, R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, approximately 37%, by weight, of the materials going to landfills was paper. Landfill space in the US is becoming a critical problem in certain areas. This mixed paper fraction does not have a good use in traditional recycling applications. Wastepaper dealers have an excess of mixed wastepaper. This project explored the possibility of producing a value added product that would consume large amounts of mixed waste. The product selected was to produce 5 x 10 x 20 cm paper blocks. These blocks could find applications in building structures. The blocks were modeled using a heated platen press and an aluminum mold, fitted with porous brass plates on the top and bottom in order to ease water removal. The material produced was similar to synthetic wood. Unlike wood, it could be molded into different shapes if desired. The density and physical properties of tensile strength and modulus were determined and compared to wood. The water absorption properties were evaluated and found to be a potential problem. Various coatings were investigated in order to improve the water holdout properties. A manufacturing process was laid out and the cost of block production was estimated to be from $0.15 to $0.24 per block, which would make it competitive with other blocks.

  16. Solving the structure of disordered mixed salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenkel, A. (School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel)); Stern, E.A. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Voronel, A. (School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel)); Qian, M. (Princeton Materials Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)); Newville, M. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) investigation of two mixed alkali halides Rb[sub 0.76]K[sub 0.24]Br and RbBr[sub 0.62]Cl[sub 0.38] was performed. The concentrations of the mixtures had been chosen to produce a single homogeneous phase for each, and it was checked by XAFS that the salts were randomly mixed on the atomic level. Detailed analysis of the data including multiple-scattering contributions revealed an rms buckling angular deviation of both mixtures from the average NaCl collinear structure of 7--9[degree]. The angles are defined by three atomic positions determined through double- and triple-scattering paths. These angles are new parameters which should be added to characterize the buckled crystals. Adding to diffraction results the parameters determined from XAFS as input into a molecular-dynamics simulation the structures of the mixed salts with their fluctuations about the NaCL structure are solved and displayed.

  17. Homemade mixes can save time and money. You can make

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Meat Mixes Homemade mixes can save time and money. You can make meat mixes ahead of time and freeze seconds before and after handling food. Don't cross-contaminate. Keep raw meat, poultry, fish and their juices away from other food in your grocery cart and at home. Thaw meat safely. Be sure thawing meat

  18. RISK AVERSION AND TECHNOLOGY MIX IN AN ELECTRICITY Guy MEUNIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    RISK AVERSION AND TECHNOLOGY MIX IN AN ELECTRICITY MARKET Guy MEUNIER Cahier n 2013-23 ECOLE:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00906944,version1-20Nov2013 #12;Risk aversion and technology mix in an electricity market Guy-aversion on the long-term equilibrium technology mix in an electricity market. It develops a model where firms can

  19. Bifurcations of flame filaments in chaotically mixed combustion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottwald, Georg A.

    Bifurcations of flame filaments in chaotically mixed combustion reactions Shakti N. Menon and Georg ranging fields. Be- sides in the case of combustion, where mixing-induced bifurcations may lead mixing has a significant effect on combustion processes and in particular on flame filamental structures

  20. Characterization of turbulent jet mixing in cylindrical tanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte, Casey M

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , for the most part, confirms many of the findings of previous studies of jet mixing. First, mixing time in jet-mixed systems depends primarily upon the mass of the fluid in a tank and the amount of addition, to maximize the efficient transfer of momentum...

  1. aerosol ratio test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerosol ratio test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Effect of mineral dust aerosol...

  2. Generalized solar load ratio correlation for direct gain buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, W.O.; Best, E.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized solar load ratio correlation has been developed for direct gain buildings by generating relationships between the correlation parameters and two fundamental design parameters. The first design parameter is the steady state conductance of the solar aperture, U/sub c/. The second is the effective heat capacity of the solar zone, EHC.

  3. Improved Signal-to-Noise Ratio Estimation for Speech Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Improved Signal-to-Noise Ratio Estimation for Speech Enhancement Cyril Plapous, Member, IEEE speech enhancement in noisy environments. State-of- the-art short-time noise reduction techniques reduction techniques, includ- ing TSNR, introduce harmonic distortion in enhanced speech because

  4. NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorken, Marcel

    NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of Echium endemic to the Canary Islands Marcel E. Dorken Abstract: Species of Echium from the Canary Islands represent an adaptive radiation fertility of females and hermaphrodites were de- tected. Key words: Canary Islands, Echium, island radiation

  5. The Next Generation Isotope Ratio MS DELTA V Advantage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachniet, Matthew S.

    on front panel - All pumps inside - Low noise design #12;T The Next Generation Isotope Ratio MS More than with intrinsic alignment of all ion optical components - Integrated signal amplifiers and digitizers - All ion - Comprehensive set of automated diagnostics Compact and user-friendly design - Small footprint - Space for on

  6. RpA ratio: total shadowing due to running coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Iancu; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We predict that the RpA ratio at the most forward rapidities to be measured at LHC should be strongly suppressed, close to "total shadowing'' (RpA = A^(-1/3)), as a consequence of running coupling effects in the nonlinear QCD evolution.

  7. Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Xiaojun

    Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images Xiaojun Qi Computer Science present prediction-based image compression techniques take advantage of either intra- or inter function. The prediction-based compression technique has been applied on some magnetic resonance (MR) brain

  8. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  9. Negative Poisson's Ratio Behavior Induced by an Elastic Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Pedro Miguel

    's ratio, which is approximately 0.5 for rubber and 0.3 for glass and steel. Materials with a negative] prostheses,[3] piezocomposites with optimal performance[4] and foams with superior damping and acoustic foams with reentrant struc- tures,[1] hierarchical laminates,[12] polymeric and metallic foams,[13

  10. The Proton Form Factor Ratio Measurements at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punjabi, Vina A. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Perdrisat, Charles F. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio of the proton form factors, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp}, has been measured from Q{sup 2} of 0.5 GeV{sup 2} to 8.5 GeV{sup 2}, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The discovery that the proton form factor ratio measured in these experiments decreases approximately linearly with four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, for values above #25;~1 GeV{sup 2}, is one of the most significant results to come out of JLab. These results have had a large impact on progress in hadronic physics; and have required a significant rethinking of nucleon structure. The increasingly common use of the double-polarization technique to measure the nucleon form factors, in the last 15 years, has resulted in a dramatic improvement of the quality of all four nucleon electromagnetic form factors, G{sub Ep}, G{sub Mp}, G{sub En} and G{sub Mn}. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEP(V), to continue the ratio measurements to 12 GeV{sup 2}. A dedicated experimental setup, the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS), will be built for this purpose. It will be equipped with a focal plane polarimeter to measure the polarization of the recoil protons. The scattered electrons will be detected in an electromagnetic calorimeter. In this presentation, I will review the status of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors and discuss a number of theoretical approaches to describe nucleon form factors.

  11. MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN {omega} CENTAURI RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E.; Yong, David [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the high-resolution observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope with Ultra-High Resolution Facility (R {approx} 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R {approx} 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven {omega} Cen red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = -1.78 to -0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The {omega} Cen stars sample both the ''primordial'' (i.e., O-rich, Na- and Al-poor) and the ''extreme'' (O-depleted, Na- and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both {omega} Cen and M4 show ({sup 25}Mg, {sup 26}Mg)/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the {omega} Cen extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the {sup 26}Mg/{sup 24}Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < -1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values. Further, the relative abundance of {sup 26}Mg in the extreme population stars is notably higher than that of {sup 25}Mg, in contrast to model predictions. The {sup 25}Mg/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratio in fact does not show any obvious dependence on either [Fe/H] or [Al/Fe] nor, intriguingly, any obvious difference between the primordial and extreme population stars.

  12. OXYGEN ISOTOPIC RATIOS IN COOL R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Lambert, David L. [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin. 1 University Station, C1400. Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Rao, N. Kameswara [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Hinkle, Ken H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Eriksson, Kjell, E-mail: agarcia@iac.e, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.ed, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.i, E-mail: hinkle@noao.ed, E-mail: Kjell.Eriksson@astro.uu.s [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 515, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the relationship between R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars and hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars by measuring precise {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratios for five cool RCB stars. The {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratios are derived by spectrum synthesis from high-resolution (R {approx} 50, 000) K-band spectra. Lower limits to the {sup 16}O/{sup 17}O and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios as well as Na and S abundances (when possible) are also given. RCB stars in our sample generally display less {sup 18}O than HdC stars-the derived {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratios range from 3 to 20. The only exception is the RCB star WX CrA, which seems to be an HdC-like star with {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O = 0.3. Our result of a higher {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratio for the RCB stars must be accounted for by a theory of the formation and evolution of HdC and RCB stars. We speculate that a late dredge-up of products of He burning, principally {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O, may convert an {sup 18}O-rich HdC star into an {sup 18}O-poor RCB star as the H-deficient star begins its final evolution from a cool supergiant to the top of the white dwarf cooling track.

  13. Iron-phosphate ceramics for solidification of mixed low-level waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Kovarskaya, Elena N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Koltsova, Tatiana I. (St. Petersburg, RU); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID); Medvedev, Pavel G. (Ozersk, RU); Todd, Terry (Aberdeen, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of immobilizing mixed low-level waste is provided which uses low cost materials and has a relatively long hardening period. The method includes: forming a mixture of iron oxide powders having ratios, in mass %, of FeO:Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 equal to 25-40:40-10:35-50, or weighing a definite amount of magnetite powder. Metallurgical cinder can also be used as the source of iron oxides. A solution of the orthophosphoric acid, or a solution of the orthophosphoric acid and ferric oxide, is formed and a powder phase of low-level waste and the mixture of iron oxide powders or cinder (or magnetite powder) is also formed. The acid solution is mixed with the powder phase to form a slurry with the ratio of components (mass %) of waste:iron oxide powders or magnetite:acid solution=30-60:15-10:55-30. The slurry is blended to form a homogeneous mixture which is cured at room temperature to form the final product.

  14. Mixed heavy-quark-gluon condensate in the stochastic vacuum model and dual superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri Antonov

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The world-line formalism is used for the evaluation of the mixed heavy-quark-gluon condensate in two models of QCD - the stochastic vacuum model and the dual superconductor one. Calculations are performed for an arbitrary dimensionality of space-time $d\\ge 2$. While in the stochastic vacuum model, the condensate is UV finite up to $d=8$, in the dual superconductor model it is UV divergent at any $d\\ge 2$. A regularization of this divergence is proposed, which makes quantitative the condition of the type-II dual superconductor. The obtained results are generalized to the case of finite temperatures. Corrections to the both, mixed and standard, heavy-quark condensates, which appear due to the variation of the gauge field at the scale of the vacuum correlation length, are evaluated within the stochastic vacuum model. These corrections diminish the absolute values of the condensates, as well as the ratio of the mixed condensate to the standard one.

  15. Hydrodynamic instability growth and mix experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Barrios, M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Mintz, M.; Parham, T.; Peterson, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF Directorate, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF Directorate, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on implosion performance were studied at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Implosion performance and mix have been measured at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and containing embedded localized carbon-deuterium diagnostic layers in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the tritium-tritium fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits for yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role. In addition, spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure instability growth in the acceleration phase of the implosions. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses, and ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography for a shell convergence ratio of ?2. The measured growth was in good agreement with that predicted, thus validating simulations for the fastest growing modulations with mode numbers up to 90 in the acceleration phase. Future experiments will be focused on measurements at higher convergence, higher-mode number modulations, and growth occurring during the deceleration phase.

  16. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todreas, N.E.; Cheng, S.K.; Basehore, K.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project principally undertook the investigation of the thermal hydraulic performance of wire wrapped fuel bundles of LMFBR configuration. Results obtained included phenomenological models for friction factors, flow split and mixing characteristics; correlations for predicting these characteristics suitable for insertion in design codes; numerical codes for analyzing bundle behavior both of the lumped subchannel and distributed parameter categories and experimental techniques for pressure velocity, flow split, salt conductivity and temperature measurement in water cooled mockups of bundles and subchannels. Flow regimes investigated included laminar, transition and turbulent flow under forced convection and mixed convection conditions. Forced convections conditions were emphasized. Continuing efforts are underway at MIT to complete the investigation of the mixed convection regime initiated here. A number of investigations on outlet plenum behavior were also made. The reports of these investigations are identified.

  17. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Chunsong; Liu, Yangang; Niu, Shengjie; Endo, Satoshi

    2014-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasingmorescales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.less

  18. Scale dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms in cumulus clouds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Chunsong [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters; Chinese Acadamy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental and Climate Science Dept.; Liu, Yangang [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental and Climate Science Dept.; Niu, Shengjie [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters; Endo, Satoshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental and Climate Science Dept.

    2014-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This work empirically examines the dependence of entrainment-mixing mechanisms on the averaging scale in cumulus clouds using in situ aircraft observations during the Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. A new measure of homogeneous mixing degree is defined that can encompass all types of mixing mechanisms. Analysis of the dependence of the homogenous mixing degree on the averaging scale shows that, on average, the homogenous mixing degree decreases with increasing averaging scales, suggesting that apparent mixing mechanisms gradually approach from homogeneous mixing to extreme inhomogeneous mixing with increasing scales. The scale dependence can be well quantified by an exponential function, providing first attempt at developing a scale-dependent parameterization for the entrainment-mixing mechanism. The influences of three factors on the scale dependence are further examined: droplet-free filament properties (size and fraction), microphysical properties (mean volume radius and liquid water content of cloud droplet size distributions adjacent to droplet-free filaments), and relative humidity of entrained dry air. It is found that the decreasing rate of homogeneous mixing degree with increasing averaging scales becomes larger with larger droplet-free filament size and fraction, larger mean volume radius and liquid water content, or higher relative humidity. The results underscore the necessity and possibility of considering averaging scale in representation of entrainment-mixing processes in atmospheric models.

  19. Introduction and Case Studies The Ratio Plot Under Homogeneity and the Decontaminated Turing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehning, Dankmar

    Outline Introduction and Case Studies The Ratio Plot Under Homogeneity and the Decontaminated Introduction and Case Studies The Ratio Plot Under Homogeneity and the Decontaminated Turing The Ratio Plot The Ratio Plot Under Homogeneity and the Decontaminated Turing The Ratio Plot and Structured Heterogeneity

  20. Measurement of B s 0 ? D s ( * ) + D s ( * ) ? Branching Ratios

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decays B0s?D(*)+sD(*)?s are reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb? collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron pp collider. All decay modes are observed with a significance of more than 10?, and we measure the B?s production rate times B?s?D(*)+sD(*)?s branching ratios relative to the normalization mode B??D?sD?to be 0.1830.0210.017 for B?s?D?sD?s, 0.4240.0460.035 for B0s?D*sD?s, 0.6540.0720.065 for B0s?D*+sD*s-, and 1.2610.0950.112 for the inclusive decay B0s?D(*)+sD(*)-s , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. These results are the most precise single measurements to date and provide important constraints for indirect searches for nonstandard model physics in B0s mixing.

  1. Mixing zones in magnetized differentially rotating stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Urpin

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the secular instability of magnetized differentially rotating radiative zones taking account of viscosity and magnetic and thermal diffusivities. The considered instability generalizes the well-known Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability for the case of a sufficiently strong magnetic field. In magnetized stars, instability can lead to a formation of non-spherical unstable zones where weak turbulence mixes the material between the surface and interiors. Such unstable zones can manifest themselves by a non-spherical distribution of abundance anormalies on the stellar surface.

  2. B_s mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchesi, Donatella; /Padua U.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the B{sub s} mixing oscillation frequency, {Delta}m{sup s}, has been the main goal for both experiments CDF and D0 which are running at the Tevatron collider. With 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected during the last four years D0 set a lower and upper limit on this frequency, 17 < {Delta}m{sub s} < 21 ps{sup -1}. CDF measured {Delta}m{sub s} with a precision better than 2% and the probability that the data could randomly fluctuate to mimic such a signature is 0.2%.

  3. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Wheatridge, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  4. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

  5. B lifetimes and mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedeschi, Franco; /INFN, Pisa

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present recent results on b-hadron lifetimes and mixing obtained from the analysis of the data collected at the Tevatron Collider by the CDF and D0 Collaborations in the period 2002-2004. Many lifetime measurements have been updated since the Summer 2004 conferences, sometimes improving significantly the accuracy. Likewise the measurement of the B{sub d} oscillation frequency has been updated. New limits on the B{sub s} oscillation frequency have been determined using for the first time Run II data.

  6. CST/Water Slurry Mixing and Resuspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baich, M.A.

    2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) was selected as one of the alternatives to the In-Tank Precipitation Process (ITP) for removal of cesium from the salt waste at Savannah River Site. The proposed salt waste treatment process using CST would involve passing a filtered salt waste through a fixed bed of CST. The CST would remove the cesium from the salt waste by ion exchange and the decontaminated salt would be incorporated into the Saltstone Process. This report documents the results of investigations into the mixing and re-suspension characteristics of two 10 wt percent CST slurries.

  7. Mixing It Up | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 atthe DistrictIndependentDepartment4.docfromImpact |GuidanceMixing It Up

  8. Mixed Solvent Electrolyte Model | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,Official FileEnergyAERMOD-PRIME,Department ofMixed Solvent

  9. Ratios of Helicity Amplitudes for Exclusive rho-0 Electroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dueren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapikas, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Ruiz, A Lopez; Lorenzon, W; Lu, X -G; Lu, X -R; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Manfre, L; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schaefer, A; Schnell, G; Schueler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stinzing, F; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Yen, S; Yu, W; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exclusive rho^0-meson electroproduction is studied in the HERMES experiment, using a 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron/positron beam and unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets in the kinematic region 0.5 GeV^2 \\rho_T), T_{01} (\\gamma^*_T --> \\rho_L), T_{10} (\\gamma^*_L --> \\rho_T), and T_{1-1} (\\gamma^*_{-T} -->\\rho_T) to T_{00} (\\gamma^*_L --> \\rho_L) are extracted from the data. For the unnatural-parity-exchange amplitude U_{11}, the ratio |U_{11}/T_{00}| is obtained. The Q^2 and t' dependences of these ratios are presented and compared with perturbative QCD predictions.

  10. Ratios of Helicity Amplitudes for Exclusive rho-0 Electroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; N. Bianchi; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Dueren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; R. Fabbri; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; G. Hill; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; N. Kobayashi; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; R. Lamb; L. Lapikas; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; L. A. Linden-Levy; A. Lopez Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; X. -G. Lu; X. -R. Lu; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; L. Manfre; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; V. Muccifora; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; N. Pickert; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schaefer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schueler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; F. Stinzing; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; A. Vandenbroucke; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; S. Yen; W. Yu; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

    2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Exclusive rho^0-meson electroproduction is studied in the HERMES experiment, using a 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron/positron beam and unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets in the kinematic region 0.5 GeV^2 \\rho_T), T_{01} (\\gamma^*_T --> \\rho_L), T_{10} (\\gamma^*_L --> \\rho_T), and T_{1-1} (\\gamma^*_{-T} -->\\rho_T) to T_{00} (\\gamma^*_L --> \\rho_L) are extracted from the data. For the unnatural-parity-exchange amplitude U_{11}, the ratio |U_{11}/T_{00}| is obtained. The Q^2 and t' dependences of these ratios are presented and compared with perturbative QCD predictions.

  11. Backward running or absence of running from Creutz ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giedt, Joel; Weinberg, Evan [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12065 (United States)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract the running coupling based on Creutz ratios in SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation. Depending on how the extrapolation to zero fermion mass is performed, either backward running or an absence of running is observed at strong bare coupling. This behavior is consistent with other findings which indicate that this theory has an infrared fixed point.

  12. Radar antenna pointing for optimized signal to noise ratio.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Marquette, Brandeis [General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., San Diego, CA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of a radar echo signal will vary across a range swath, due to spherical wavefront spreading, atmospheric attenuation, and antenna beam illumination. The antenna beam illumination will depend on antenna pointing. Calculations of geometry are complicated by the curved earth, and atmospheric refraction. This report investigates optimizing antenna pointing to maximize the minimum SNR across the range swath.

  13. Dilepton to photon ratio, a viscometer of QGP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Israel-Stewart's 2nd order hydrodynamics, a viscous effect on dilepton emission from a QGP medium is investigated. Dileptons are strongly affected by QGP viscosity. Large invariant mass dileptons, due to their lower velocity, are less affected by viscosity than the low invariant mass dileptons. We also show that the ratio of photon to dilepton is sensitive to the viscosity and can serve as a viscometer for QGP.

  14. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in ?{sup 13}C between batches from ?29.7 to ?31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between ?31.3 to ?34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  15. Large Field Inflation from Axion Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiu, Gary; Ye, Fang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the general multi-axion systems, focusing on the possibility of large field inflation driven by axions. We find that through axion mixing from a non-diagonal metric on the moduli space and/or from St\\"uckelberg coupling to a U(1) gauge field, an effectively super-Planckian decay constant can be generated without the need of "alignment" in the axion decay constants. We also investigate the consistency conditions related to the gauge symmetries in the multi-axion systems, such as vanishing gauge anomalies and the potential presence of generalized Chern-Simons terms. Our scenario applies generally to field theory models whose axion periodicities are intrinsically sub-Planckian, but it is most naturally realized in string theory. The types of axion mixings invoked in our scenario appear quite commonly in D-brane models, and we present its implementation in type II superstring theory. Explicit stringy models exhibiting all the characteristics of our ideas are constructed within the frameworks of Type IIA ...

  16. Boosted di-boson from a mixed heavy stop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Diptimoy

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lighter mass eigenstate ($\\widetilde{t}_1$) of the two top squarks, the scalar superpartners of the top quark, is extremely difficult to discover if it is almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino ($\\widetilde{\\chi}_1^0$), the lightest and stable supersymmetric particle in the R-parity conserving supersymmetry. The current experimental bound on $\\widetilde{t}_1$ mass in this scenario stands only around 200 GeV. For such a light $\\widetilde{t}_1$, the heavier top squark ($\\widetilde{t}_2$) can also be around the TeV scale. Moreover, the high value of the higgs ($h$) mass prefers the left and right handed top squarks to be highly mixed allowing the possibility of a considerable branching ratio for $\\widetilde{t}_2 \\to \\widetilde{t}_1 h$ and $\\widetilde{t}_2 \\to \\widetilde{t}_1 Z$. In this paper, we explore the above possibility together with the pair production of $\\widetilde{t}_2$ $\\widetilde{t}_2^*$ giving rise to the spectacular di-boson + missing transverse energy final state. For an approximately 1 TeV $\\widetilde{t}_2$ and a few hundred GeV $\\widetilde{t}_1$ the final state particles can be moderately boosted which encourages us to propose a novel search strategy employing the jet substructure technique to tag the boosted $h$ and $Z$. The reconstruction of the $h$ and $Z$ momenta also allows us to construct the stransverse mass $M_{T2}$ providing an additional efficient handle to fight the backgrounds. We show that a 4--5$\\sigma$ signal can be observed at the 14 TeV LHC for $\\sim$ 1 TeV $\\widetilde{t}_2$ with 100 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity.

  17. Alkali injection system with controlled CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 ratios for combustion of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, Gregory F. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature combustion process for an organic fuel containing sulfur n which the nitrogen of air is replaced by carbon dioxide for combination with oxygen with the ratio of CO.sub.2 /O.sub.2 being controlled to generate combustion temperatures above 2000 K. for a gas-gas reaction with SO.sub.2 and an alkali metal compound to produce a sulfate and in which a portion of the carbon-dioxide rich gas is recycled for mixing with oxygen and/or for injection as a cooling gas upstream from heating exchangers to limit fouling of the exchangers, with the remaining carbon-dioxide rich gas being available as a source of CO.sub.2 for oil recovery and other purposes.

  18. Anodically electrodeposited Co+Ni mixed oxide electrode: preparation and electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in alkaline media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Gang [Innovative Catalysis Program, Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: wugang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Li Ning [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou Derui [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Mitsuo, Kurachi [Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8283 (Japan); Xu Boqing [Innovative Catalysis Program, Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co+Ni mixed oxides on Ni substrate were prepared through anodic electrodeposition from Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} aqueous solutions with five different Co{sup 2+}/Ni{sup 2+} ratios beside only Co{sup 2+}. By the electrochemical measurements, the optimum performance in electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline media was obtained on the Co+Ni mixed oxide deposited from the solution containing Co{sup 2+}/Ni{sup 2+} ratio of 1:1. The mixed oxide is corresponding to about 68at% Co contents with spinel-type NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase and porosity surface structure. The electrochemical kinetic parameters including exchange current density, Tafel slopes, reaction order with respect to [OH{sup -}] and standard electrochemical enthalpy of activation were analyzed also. A possible mechanism involving the formation of a physisorbed hydrogen peroxide intermediate in a slow electrochemical step was presented, which accounts for the values of the experimental results.

  19. air-fuel ratio control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was performed to investigate the effects of air-fuel ratio, inlet boost pressure, hydrogen rich fuel reformate, and compression ratio on engine knock behavior. For each...

  20. Isotope Ratio Analysis on Micron-Sized Particles in Complex Matrices by Laser Ablation Absorption Ratio Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushaw, Bruce A.; Anheier, Norman C.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser ablation has been combined with dual tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry to measure 152Gd:160Gd isotope ratios in micron-size particles. The diode lasers are tuned to specific isotopes in two different atomic transitions at 405.9 nm (152Gd) and 413.4 nm (160Gd) and directed collinearly through the laser ablation plume, separated on a diffraction grating, and detected with photodiodes to monitor transient absorption signals on a shot-by-shot basis. The method has been characterized first using Gd metal foil and then with particles of GdCl3?xH20 as binary and ternary mixtures with 152Gd:160Gd isotope ratios ranging from 0.01 to 0.43. These particulate mixtures have been diluted with Columbia River sediment powder (SRM 4350B) to simulate environmental samples and we show the method is capable of detecting a few highly enriched particles in the presence of > 100-fold excess of low-enrichment particles, even when the Gd-bearing particles are a minor component (0.08%) in the SRM powder and widely dispersed (1178 particles detected in 800 000 ablation laser shots). The implications for monitoring 235U:238U enrichment ratios, as related to the nuclear industry, are discussed

  1. Environment-induced mixing processes in quantum walks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauri Lehman

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixing process of discrete-time quantum walks on one-dimensional lattices is revisited in a setting where the walker is coupled to an environment, and the time evolution of the walker and the environment is unitary. The mixing process is found to be incomplete, in the sense that the walker does not approach the maximally mixed state indefinitely, but the distance to the maximally mixed state saturates to some finite value depending on the size of the environment. The quantum speedup of mixing time is investigated numerically as the size of the environment decreases from infinity to a finite value. The mixing process in this unitary setting can be explained by interpreting it as an equilibration process in a closed quantum system, where subsystems can exhibit equilibration even when the entropy of the total system remains zero.

  2. Method of chaotic mixing and improved stirred tank reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J. (Monroe, NJ); Lamberto, David J. (Edison, NJ)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for efficiently achieving a homogeneous mixture of fluid components by introducing said components having a Reynolds number of between about .ltoreq.1 to about 500 into a vessel and continuously perturbing the mixing flow by altering the flow speed and mixing time until homogeniety is reached. This method prevents the components from aggregating into non-homogeneous segregated regions within said vessel during mixing and substantially reduces the time the admixed components reach homogeneity.

  3. Optical vortex interaction and generation via nonlinear wave mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenzini, F. [INLN, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 1361 route des Lucioles, FR-06560 Valbonne (France); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, via Sansone 1, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U. [INLN, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, 1361 route des Lucioles, FR-06560 Valbonne (France); Arecchi, F. T. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, via Sansone 1, IT-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical vortex beams are made to interact via degenerate two-wave mixing in a Kerr-like nonlinear medium. Vortex mixing is shown to occur inside the medium, leading to exchange of topological charge and cascaded generation of vortex beams. A mean-field model is developed and is shown to account for the selection rules of the topological charges observed after the wave-mixing process. Fractional charges are demonstrated to follow the same rules as for integer charges.

  4. Method of chaotic mixing and improved stirred tank reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muzzio, F.J.; Lamberto, D.J.

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for efficiently achieving a homogeneous mixture of fluid components by introducing said components having a Reynolds number of between about [le]1 to about 500 into a vessel and continuously perturbing the mixing flow by altering the flow speed and mixing time until homogeneity is reached. This method prevents the components from aggregating into non-homogeneous segregated regions within said vessel during mixing and substantially reduces the time the admixed components reach homogeneity. 19 figs.

  5. Method for producing thin graphite flakes with large aspect ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunnell, L. Roy (Kennewick, WA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for making graphite flakes of high aspect ratio by the steps of providing a strong concentrated acid and heating the graphite in the presence of the acid for a time and at a temperature effective to intercalate the acid in the graphite; heating the intercalated graphite at a rate and to a temperature effective to exfoliate the graphite in discrete layers; subjecting the graphite layers to ultrasonic energy, mechanical shear forces, or freezing in an amount effective to separate the layes into discrete flakes.

  6. Stellar mixing length theory with entropy rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar mixing length theory is modified to include the effects of a nongradient term that originates from the motion of convective elements with entropy perturbations of either sign. It is argued that such a term, first studied by Deardorff in the meteorological context, represents the effects of thin intense downdrafts caused by the rapid cooling in the granulation layer at the top of the convection zone. They transport heat nonlocally, as originally anticipated by Spruit in the 1990s, who describes the convection in the strongly stratified simulations of Stein & Nordlund as entropy rain. Although our model has ill-determined free parameters, it demonstrates that solutions can be found that look similar to the original ones, except that the deeper layers are now Schwarzschild stable, so no giant cells are produced and the typical convective scale is that of granules even at larger depth. Consequences for modeling solar differential, the global dynamo, and sunspots are briefly discussed.

  7. Fourier-Motzkin elimination for mixed systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liepins, G.E.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple extension of Fourier-Motzkin elimination is made to mixed systems of equations, that is, systems consisting of equalities in conjunction with inequalities and strict inequalities. The principal observation is that inequalities combined with strict inequalities result in strict inequalities. Two applications are made to automatic data editing. First, a constructive method is provided to test for the existence of a linear objective function for the minimum weighted fields to impute (MWFI) problem with side constraints. If the linear objective function exists, it is determined; if it does not exist, the extension to a quadratic objective function is given. Next, for any fixed linear objective function, a solution algorithm based on extended Fourier-Motzkin elimination is given for the resultant MWFI and is illustrated with an example. It is believed that the applications are significant in their own right: they provide solution techniques to difficult problems in the field of automatic data editing.

  8. Flavour leptogenesis with tribimaximal mixings and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Zeen Devi; Amal Kr Sarma; N. Nimai Singh

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute and compare the baryon asymmetry of the universe in thermal leptogenesis scenario with and without flavour effects for different neutrino mass models namely degenerate, inverted hierarchical and normal hierarchical models, with tribimaximal mixings and beyond. Considering three possible diagonal forms of Dirac neutrino mass matrices $m_{LR}$, the right-handed Majorana mass matrices $M_{RR}$ are constructed from the light neutrino mass matrices $m_{LL}$ through the inverse seesaw formula. The normal hierarchical model is found to give the best predictions of the baryon asymmetry for both cases. This analysis serves as an additional information in the discrimination of the presently available neutrino mass models. Moreover, the flavour effects is found to give enhancement of the baryon asymmetry in thermal leptogenesis.

  9. Flavour leptogenesis with tribimaximal mixings and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devi, H Zeen; Singh, N Nimai

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute and compare the baryon asymmetry of the universe in thermal leptogenesis scenario with and without flavour effects for different neutrino mass models namely degenerate, inverted hierarchical and normal hierarchical models, with tribimaximal mixings and beyond. Considering three possible diagonal forms of Dirac neutrino mass matrices $m_{LR}$, the right-handed Majorana mass matrices $M_{RR}$ are constructed from the light neutrino mass matrices $m_{LL}$ through the inverse seesaw formula. The normal hierarchical model is found to give the best predictions of the baryon asymmetry for both cases. This analysis serves as an additional information in the discrimination of the presently available neutrino mass models. Moreover, the flavour effects is found to give enhancement of the baryon asymmetry in thermal leptogenesis.

  10. The Integer Approximation Error in Mixed-Integer Optimal Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend recent work on nonlinear optimal control problems with integer restrictions on some of the control functions (mixed-integer optimal control problems...

  11. Control problems with mixed constraints and application to an ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract We discuss two optimal control problems of parabolic equations, with mixed state and control constraints, for which the standard qualification condition

  12. Convex Quadratic Relaxations for Mixed-Integer Nonlinear ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Hijazi, C. Coffrin and P. Van Hentenryck

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    nonlinear and mixed-integer nonlinear programs arising in power systems. The ...... International Symposium on Computer Aided Control Systems Design, pp.

  13. Bounds for Multistage Stochastic Mixed-Integer Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel L. Zenarosa

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 16, 2014 ... Scenario-Tree Decomposition: Bounds for Multistage Stochastic Mixed-Integer Programs. Gabriel L. Zenarosa(glz5 ***at*** pitt.edu) Oleg A.

  14. approximation configuration mixing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recurrence satisfied by the Stirling numbers of the second kind. Abrams, Aaron; Hower, Valerie 2010-01-01 270 Markov Chain Monte Carlo and mixing rates Mathematics Websites...

  15. International Environmental Agreements with Mixed Strategies and Investment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Fuhai; Karp, Larry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Envi- ronmental Agreements (IEA), considering both mixed anddecision, whether to join or stay out of an IEA, and thenthe resulting IEA decides on the level of abatement. Early

  16. A Hierarchy of Bounds for Stochastic Mixed-Integer Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A Hierarchy of Bounds for Stochastic. Mixed-Integer Programs. 1. Burhaneddin Sand?k?. The University of Chicago Booth School of Business, Chicago,...

  17. A multifluid mix model with material strength effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scannapieco, A. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new multifluid mix model. Its features include material strength effects and pressure and temperature nonequilibrium between mixing materials. It is applicable to both interpenetration and demixing of immiscible fluids and diffusion of miscible fluids. The presented model exhibits the appropriate smooth transition in mathematical form as the mixture evolves from multiphase to molecular mixing, extending its applicability to the intermediate stages in which both types of mixing are present. Virtual mass force and momentum exchange have been generalized for heterogeneous multimaterial mixtures. The compression work has been extended so that the resulting species energy equations are consistent with the pressure force and material strength.

  18. Effects of Pore-Scale Heterogeneity and Transverse Mixing on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Transverse Mixing on Bacterial Growth in Porous Media. Abstract: Microbial degradation of contaminants in the subsurface requires the availability of nutrients; this is...

  19. A new mixed integer linear programming formulation for one ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    new mixed integer linear programming formulations for first and second prob- ... the best formulation was based on WF closest assignment constraints proposed.

  20. Classification of lepton mixing patterns from finite flavour symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renato M. Fonseca; Walter Grimus

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Flavour symmetries have been used to constrain both quark and lepton mixing parameters. In particular, they can be used to completely fix the mixing angles. For the lepton sector, assuming that neutrinos are Majorana particles, we have derived the complete list of mixing patterns achievable in this way, as well as the symmetry groups associated to each case. Partial computer scans done in the past have hinted that such list is limited, and this does indeed turn out to be the case. In addition, most mixing patterns are already 3-sigma excluded by neutrino oscillation data.

  1. Direct Observation of Ion-irradiation-induced Chemical Mixing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ion-irradiation induced elemental mixing and dissolution of 2550 nm titanium oxycarbonitrides in a nanostructured ferritic alloy irradiated at 173 K. The...

  2. Optimization Online - Control problems with mixed constraints and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Fr d ric Bonnans

    2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 4, 2009 ... ... mixed constraints and application to an optimal investment problem ... of a control entering linearly in the state equation and cost function, we...

  3. aqueous mixed waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and characterization alternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedial action DARA solids storage facility (SSF) University of California eScholarship...

  4. al mixed waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and characterization alternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedial action DARA solids storage facility (SSF) University of California eScholarship...

  5. advanced mixed waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and characterization alternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedial action DARA solids storage facility (SSF) University of California eScholarship...

  6. andradionuclide mixed wastes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and characterization alternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedial action DARA solids storage facility (SSF) University of California eScholarship...

  7. An Exact Penalty Global Optimization Approach for Mixed-Integer ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords. Mixed-Integer Programming, Global Optimization, Exact Penalty Functions. .... Theorem 1 Let W and X be compact sets. Let be a suitably chosen

  8. Electrically Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase Multiferroics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Q.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase2001). Chakhalian, J. et al. Magnetism at the interfacelocal nature of this magnetism. We find that the spontaneous

  9. A mixed integer programming approach to reduce fuel load ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramya Rachmawati

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 12, 2015 ... A mixed integer programming approach to reduce fuel load accumulation for prescribed burn planning. Ramya Rachmawati(ramya.rachmawati...

  10. asia energy mixes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    general equilibrium model of the world economy. Historic ... Paltsev, Sergey 3 Dark energy and particle mixing HEP - Theory (arXiv) Summary: We show that the vacuum condensate...

  11. Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass More Documents & Publications Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway Design Case Summary: Production of...

  12. Extended model for Richtmyer-Meshkov mix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikaelian, K O

    2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine four Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) experiments on shock-generated turbulent mix and find them to be in good agreement with our earlier simple model in which the growth rate h of the mixing layer following a shock or reshock is constant and given by 2{alpha}A{Delta}v, independent of initial conditions h{sub 0}. Here A is the Atwood number ({rho}{sub B}-{rho}{sub A})/({rho}{sub B} + {rho}{sub A}), {rho}{sub A,B} are the densities of the two fluids, {Delta}V is the jump in velocity induced by the shock or reshock, and {alpha} is the constant measured in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments: {alpha}{sup bubble} {approx} 0.05-0.07, {alpha}{sup spike} {approx} (1.8-2.5){alpha}{sup bubble} for A {approx} 0.7-1.0. In the extended model the growth rate beings to day after a time t*, when h = h*, slowing down from h = h{sub 0} + 2{alpha}A{Delta}vt to h {approx} t{sup {theta}} behavior, with {theta}{sup bubble} {approx} 0.25 and {theta}{sup spike} {approx} 0.36 for A {approx} 0.7. They ascribe this change-over to loss of memory of the direction of the shock or reshock, signaling transition from highly directional to isotropic turbulence. In the simplest extension of the model h*/h{sub 0} is independent of {Delta}v and depends only on A. They find that h*/h{sub 0} {approx} 2.5-3.5 for A {approx} 0.7-1.0.

  13. Method for making fine and ultrafine spherical particles of zirconium titanate and other mixed metal oxide systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Michael Z.

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for making amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate and crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate comprising the steps of mixing an aqueous solution of zirconium salt and an aqueous solution of titanium salt into a mixed solution having equal moles of zirconium and titanium and having a total salt concentration in the range from 0.01 M to about 0.5 M. A stearic dispersant and an organic solvent is added to the mixed salt solution, subjecting the zirconium salt and the titanium salt in the mixed solution to a coprecipitation reaction forming a solution containing amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate wherein the volume ratio of the organic solvent to aqueous part is in the range from 1 to 5. The solution of amorphous spherical particles is incubated in an oven at a temperature .ltoreq.100.degree. C. for a period of time .ltoreq.24 hours converting the amorphous particles to fine or ultrafine crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate.

  14. Cosmic ray muon charge ratio in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beall, Erik B; /Minnesota U.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINOS Far Detector is a 5.4 kiloton (5.2 kt steel plus 0.2 kt scintillator plus aluminum skin) magnetized tracking calorimeter located 710 meters underground in the Soudan mine in Northern Minnesota. MINOS is the first large, deep underground detector with a magnetic field and thus capable of making measurements of the momentum and charge of cosmic ray muons. Despite encountering unexpected anomalies in distributions of the charge ratio (N{sub {mu}{sup +}}/N{sub {mu}{sup -}}) of cosmic muons, a method of canceling systematic errors is proposed and demonstrated. The result is R{sub eff} = 1.346 {+-} 0.002 (stat) {+-} 0.016 (syst) for the averaged charge ratio, and a result for a rising fit to slant depth of R(X) = 1.300 {+-} 0.008 (stat) {+-} 0.016 (syst) + (1.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -5} x X, valid over the range of slant depths from 2000 < X < 6000 MWE. This slant depth range corresponds to minimum surface muon energies between 750 GeV and 5 TeV.

  15. Spherical codes, maximal local packing density, and the golden ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Hopkins; F. H. Stillinger; S. Torquato

    2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The densest local packing (DLP) problem in d-dimensional Euclidean space Rd involves the placement of N nonoverlapping spheres of unit diameter near an additional fixed unit-diameter sphere such that the greatest distance from the center of the fixed sphere to the centers of any of the N surrounding spheres is minimized. Solutions to the DLP problem are relevant to the realizability of pair correlation functions for packings of nonoverlapping spheres and might prove useful in improving upon the best known upper bounds on the maximum packing fraction of sphere packings in dimensions greater than three. The optimal spherical code problem in Rd involves the placement of the centers of N nonoverlapping spheres of unit diameter onto the surface of a sphere of radius R such that R is minimized. It is proved that in any dimension, all solutions between unity and the golden ratio to the optimal spherical code problem for N spheres are also solutions to the corresponding DLP problem. It follows that for any packing of nonoverlapping spheres of unit diameter, a spherical region of radius less than or equal to the golden ratio centered on an arbitrary sphere center cannot enclose a number of sphere centers greater than one more than the number that can be placed on the region's surface.

  16. Analysis of fragment yield ratios in the nuclear phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Tripathi; A. Bonasera; S. Wuenschel; L. W. May; Z. Kohley; G. A. Souliotis; S. Galanopoulos; K. Hagel; D. V. Shetty; K. Huseman; S. N. Soisson; B. C. Stein; S. J. Yennello

    2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The critical phenomena of the liquid-gas phase transition has been investigated in the reactions 78,86Kr+58,64Ni at beam energy of 35 MeV/nucleon using the Landau free energy approach with isospin asymmetry as an order parameter. Fits to the free energy of fragments showed three minima suggesting the system to be in the regime of a first order phase transition. The relation m =-{\\partial}F/{\\partial}H, which defines the order parameter and its conjugate field H, has been experimentally verified from the linear dependence of the mirror nuclei yield ratio data, on the isospin asymmetry of the source. The slope parameter, which is a measure of the distance from a critical temperature, showed a systematic decrease with increasing excitation energy of the source. Within the framework of the Landau free energy approach, isoscaling provided similar results as obtained from the analysis of mirror nuclei yield ratio data. We show that the external field is primarily related to the minimum of the free energy, which implies a modification of the source concentration \\Delta used in isospin studies.

  17. New Curved Spacetime Dirac Equations - On the Anomalous Gyromagnetic Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Nyambuya

    2008-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose three new curved spacetime versions of the Dirac Equation. These equations have been developed mainly to try and account in a natural way for the observed anomalous gyromagnetic ratio of Fermions. The derived equations suggest that particles including the Electron which is thought to be a point particle do have a finite spatial size which is the reason for the observed anomalous gyromagnetic ratio. A serendipitous result of the theory, is that, two of the equation exhibits an asymmetry in their positive and negative energy solutions the first suggestion of which is clear that a solution to the problem as to why the Electron and Muon - despite their acute similarities - exhibit an asymmetry in their mass is possible. The Mourn is often thought as an Electron in a higher energy state. Another of the consequences of three equations emanating from the asymmetric serendipity of the energy solutions of two of these equations, is that, an explanation as to why Leptons exhibit a three stage mass hierarchy is possible.

  18. Shear Viscosity to Entropy Density Ratio in Six Derivative Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabamita Banerjee; Suvankar Dutta

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in presence of four derivative (with coefficient $\\alpha'$) and six derivative (with coefficient $\\alpha'^2$) terms in bulk action. In general, there can be three possible four derivative terms and ten possible six derivative terms in the Lagrangian. Among them two four derivative and eight six derivative terms are ambiguous, i.e., these terms can be removed from the action by suitable field redefinitions. Rest are unambiguous. According to the AdS/CFT correspondence all the unambiguous coefficients (coefficients of unambiguous terms) can be fixed in terms of field theory parameters. Therefore, any measurable quantities of boundary theory, for example shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, when calculated holographically can be expressed in terms of unambiguous coefficients in the bulk theory (or equivalently in terms of boundary parameters). We calculate $\\eta/s$ for generic six derivative gravity and find that apparently it depends on few ambiguous coefficients at order $\\alpha'^2$. We calculate six derivative corrections to central charges $a$ and $c$ and express $\\eta/s$ in terms of these central charges and unambiguous coefficients in the bulk theory.

  19. Tissue phantom ratios for a Clinac 4/100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, P.J.; Doppke, K.P.; Leong, J.C.; Russell, M.D.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue phantom ratios (TPR), based on a normalization depth of 5 cm, have been measured in water for field sizes from 5 x 5 cm/sup 2/ to approximately 40 x 40 cm/sup 2/ and for depths from 1 to 40 cm for a Varian Clinac 4/100. These TPR's have been compared with those calculated from percent depth doses measured at the same time, and the two sets of data generally agree to better than 1%, with an average ratio of measured to calculated TPR of 0.999 +- 0.013. Beam profiles have been measured for open and wedged fields, with particular concern for the often observed ''horns,'' or the increase in dose at the corners of the field. The maximum dose at a depth of 1 cm, along the diagonal of the field for this machine, is approximately 5% higher than at the same depth on the central axis, whereas along the principal plane the maximum dose is only about 3% higher.

  20. Bound for entropy and viscosity ratio for strange quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manjari Bagchi; Jishnu Dey; Mira Dey; Taparati Gangopadhyay; Sibasish Laha; Subharthi Ray; Monika Sinha

    2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy density ($\\eps$) and temperature (T) links general relativity and hydrodynamics leading to a lower bound for the ratio of shear viscosity ($\\eta$) and entropy density ($s$). We get the interesting result that the bound is saturated in the simple model for quark matter that we use for strange stars at the surface for $T \\sim 80 MeV$. At this $T$ we have the possibility of cosmic separation of phases. At the surface of the star where the pressure is zero - the density $\\eps$ has a fixed value for all stars of various masses with correspondingly varying central energy density $\\eps_c$. Inside the star where this density is higher, the ratio of $\\eta/s$ is larger and are like the known results found for perturbative QCD. This serves as a check of our calculation. The deconfined quarks at the surface of the strange star at $T = 80 MeV$ seem to constitute the most perfect interacting fluid permitted by nature.

  1. ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  2. ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  3. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  4. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  5. THE NEW DETECTIONS OF {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ISOTOPIC RATIO IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawanomoto, S.; Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Ando, H.; Noguchi, K.; Tanaka, W. [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Bessell, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, 2611 ACT (Australia); Suzuki, T. K. [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Honda, S. [Gunma Astronomical Observatory, 6860-86 Nakayama Takayama-mura, Agatsuma-gun, Gunma 377-0702 (Japan); Izumiura, H.; Kambe, E.; Okita, K.; Watanabe, E.; Yoshida, M. [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Sadakane, K. [Astronomical Institute, Osaka-Kyoiku University, Kashiwara-shi, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan); Sato, B. [Global Edge Institute Global Edge Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Tajitsu, A. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Takada-Hidai, M. [Liberal Arts Education Center, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname, Hisatsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined the isotopic abundance ratio of {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li in the interstellar media (ISMs) along lines of sight to HD169454 and HD250290 using the High-Dispersion Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope. We also observed {zeta} Oph for comparison with previous data. The observed abundance ratios were {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li = 8.1{sup +3.6} {sub -1.8} and 6.3{sup +3.0} {sub -1.7} for HD169454 and HD250290, respectively. These values are in reasonable agreement with those observed previously in the solar neighborhood ISMs within {+-}2{sigma} error bars and are also consistent with our measurement of {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li = 7.1{sup +2.9} {sub -1.6} for a cloud along the line of sight to {zeta} Oph. This is good evidence for homogeneous mixing and instantaneous recycling of the gas component in the Galactic disk. We also discuss several source compositions of {sup 7}Li, Galactic cosmic-ray interactions, stellar nucleosynthesis, and big bang nucleosynthesis.

  6. Mixing times via super-fast coupling Mixing times via super-fast coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovchegov, Yevgeniy

    (n)) with cut-off asymptotics at 1 2 n log(n). Method used: relatively rarified mathematical residential be improved to match O(n log n) Transpositions a , b called label-to-label. #12;logo Mixing times via super is group invariant if dist(Xm+1|Xm = ) = dist(Xm+1|Xm = -1 ) for all , Sn. In other words, label-to-label

  7. Oscillation dynamics of active-unsterile neutrino mixing in a 2+1-tilde mixing scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyanovsky, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Holman, R.; Hutasoit, Jimmy A. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility that sterile neutrinos exist and admit a description as unparticles; we call these unsterile neutrinos. We then examine the nature of neutrino oscillations in a model where an unsterile can mix with two active flavors with a very simple mass matrix of the seesaw type. Despite these simplifications, we find a number of remarkable features, all of which will occur generically when more realistic cases are considered. These include momentum dependent mixing angles, invisible decay widths for the unsterile-like mode, as well as the inheritance of a nonvanishing spectral density for the massive activelike modes. We also obtain the disappearance and appearance probabilities for the activelike neutrinos and find remarkable interference effects between the active and unsterile neutrinos as a consequence of threshold effects, yielding new oscillatory contributions with different oscillation lengths. These effects are only measurable on short baseline experiments because there both probabilities are suppressed as compared to mixing with a canonical sterile neutrino, thereby providing a diagnostics tool to discriminate unsterile from canonical sterile neutrinos. We conclude with a discussion of whether these new phenomena could aid in the reconciliation of the LSND and MiniBooNE results.

  8. Chemical inventory control program for mixed and hazardous waste facilities at SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ades, M.J.; Vincent, A.M. III

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed Waste (MW) and Hazardous Waste (HW) are being stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) pending onsite and/or offsite treatment and disposal. The inventory control for these wastes has recently been brought under Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) in accordance with DOE Order 5480.22. With the TSRs was the question of the degree of rigor with which the inventory is to be tracked, considering that the variety of chemicals present, or that could be present, numbers in the hundreds. This paper describes the graded approach program to track Solid Waste (SW) inventories relative to TSRs. The approach uses a ratio of the maximum anticipated chemical inventory to the permissible inventory in accordance with Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) limits for on- and off-site receptors. A specific threshold ratio can then be determined. The chemicals above this threshold ratio are to be included in the chemical inventory control program. The chemicals that fall below the threshold ratio are managed in accordance with existing practice per State and RCRA hazardous materials requirements. Additionally, the facilities are managed in accordance with process safety management principles, specifically using process hazards analyses, which provides safety assurance for even the small quantities that may be excluded from the formal inventory control program. The method yields a practical approach to chemical inventory control, while maintaining appropriate chemical safety margins. The resulting number of specific chemicals that require inclusion in a rigorous inventory control program is greatly reduced by about 80%, thereby resulting in significant reduction in chemical data management while preserving appropriate safety margins.

  9. INTRODUCTION TO THREE-NEUTRINO MIXING PARAMETERS LISTINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .79 of the review "Neutrino Mass, Mixing and Oscillations" by K. Nakamura and S.T. Petcov.) Whether appear in the listings. The familiar two neutrino form for oscillations is P(a b) = sin2 (2) sin2 (m2 L 1 INTRODUCTION TO THREE-NEUTRINO MIXING PARAMETERS LISTINGS Updated April 2012 by M. Goodman

  10. Effect of $?$--$?'$ mixing on $D \\to PV$ decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhubanjyoti Bhattacharya; Jonathan L. Rosner

    2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Charmed meson decays to a light pseudoscalar ($P$) and light vector ($V$) meson are analyzed taking account of $\\eta$--$\\eta'$ mixing. A frequently-used octet-singlet mixing angle of $19.5^\\circ$ is compared with a value of $11.7^\\circ$ favored by a recent analysis of $D \\to PP$ decays.

  11. Ethanol production in fermentation of mixed sugars containing xylose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viitanen, Paul V. (West Chester, PA); Mc Cutchen, Carol M. (Wilmington, DE); Li; Xu (Newark, DE); Emptage, Mark (Wilmington, DE); Caimi, Perry G. (Kennett Square, PA); Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Chou, Yat-Chen (Lakewood, CO); Franden, Mary Ann (Centennial, CO)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Xylose-utilizing Z. mobilis strains were found to have improved ethanol production when grown in medium containing mixed sugars including xylose if sorbitol or mannitol was included in the medium. The effect was seen in concentrations of mixed sugars where no growth lag period occurs, as well as in higher sugars concentrations.

  12. Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes ABSTRACT Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important

  13. A mixed-dimensional finite volume method for multiphase flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ; Numerical reservoir simulation; Fractured reser- voir; Mixed-dimensional Finite Volume Method; MultigridA mixed-dimensional finite volume method for multiphase flow in fractured porous media Volker method for the fully coupled, fully implicit discretization of two-phase flow in fractured porous media

  14. Mixed Reality Environment for Web-Based Laboratory Interactive Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1(8) Mixed Reality Environment for Web-Based Laboratory Interactive Learning Ashraf Saleem1 , Kasim learning, Mixed reality environment, Laboratory learning, Fuzzy logic, Learner modeling. Abstract environment for e-learning of applied sciences by incorporating hal-00197209,version1-14Dec2007 Author

  15. Apparatus for mixing char-ash into coal stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaskowski, Henry J. (Avon, CT)

    1982-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for obtaining complete mixing of char with coal prior to the introduction of the mixture into the combustor (30) of a coal gasifier (10). The coal is carried in one air stream (22), and the char in another air stream (54), to a riffle plate arrangement (26), where the streams of solid are intimately mixed or blended.

  16. Variability of hot mix asphalt produced with reclaimed asphalt pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Guiqin

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    percent does not significantly influence the mix variability; it is desirable to use a large percentage of RAP in the Type S-I mix, i.e., more than 40% RAP; iii) On the average, the aggregate variability increases after transportation and stockpiling...

  17. Constraints of mixing matrix elements in the sequential fourthgeneration model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Huo

    2002-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review our works on the sequential fourth generation model and focus on the constriants of $4\\times 4$ quark mixing matrix elements. We investigate the quark mixing matrix elements from the rare $K,B$ meson decays. We talk about the $ hierarchy$ of the $4\\times 4$ matrix and the existence of fourth generation.

  18. Test for Radial Mixing of Stars in M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Andrew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective radial migration and mixing of orbits throughout the stellar disk has been definitively established in the Milky Way, but not in any other galaxy. We show how such radial mixing can be measured (or strongly constrained) in M31 using a combination of existing data and readily available facilities.

  19. Article Atmospheric Science Entrainment-mixing parameterization in shallow cumuli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    an important role in global radiation budget [14]. Turbulent entrainment-mixing processes in cumulus clouds are critical to cloudclimate feedbacks, evaluation of aerosol indirect effects, and precipitationArticle Atmospheric Science Entrainment-mixing parameterization in shallow cumuli and effects

  20. Rutting Performance of Airport Hot-Mix Asphalt Characterized by Laboratory Performance Testing, Full-Scale Accelerated Pavement Testing, and Finite Element Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushing, John Ford

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    California Bearing Ratio DoD Department of Defense DSR Dynamic Shear Rheometer ERDC U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center FAA Federal Aviation Administration FN flow number FT flow time HMA Hot Mix Asphalt HVS heavy vehicle simulator... aircraft continue to necessitate modifications in the procedures by which HMA mixtures are designed so that rutting does not become a prevalent distress on airport pavements. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has predominantly required use...