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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Reduction of carbon monoxide emissions with regenerative thermal oxidizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) have been extensively used for the control of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from various sources. However, very little information is available on the ability of RTOs to control carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. This paper presents the results of extensive tests conducted on two RTOs to determine their VOC and CO control efficiencies. The inlet gas stream to the RTOs includes VOC and CO concentrations as high as 2,000 ppm and 3,600 ppm, respectfully. The testing demonstrated that both RTOs were capable of controlling greater than 98% of both inlet VOCs and CO. While the destruction efficiencies within the combustion chambers exceeded 99.9%, direct leakage past valves accounted for the lower control efficiencies. The tests indicated that the overall VOC and CO control efficiencies of the RTOs may be limited by valve leakage. The design and permitting of a RTO should include conservative control estimates which account for possible valve leakage.

Firmin, S.M.; Lipke, S.; Baturay, A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Influence of solid fuel on the carbon-monoxide and nitrogen-oxide emissions on sintering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory and industrial research now underway at the sintering plant of AO Mittal Steel Temirtau is focusing on the preparation of fuel of optimal granulometric composition, the replacement of coke fines, and the adaptation of fuel-input technology so as to reduce fuel consumption and toxic emissions without loss of sinter quality.

M.F. Vitushchenko; N.L. Tatarkin; A.I. Kuznetsov; A.E. Vilkov [AO Mittal Steel Temirtau, Temirtau (Kazakhstan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Why sequence carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? Many microbes that use carbon monoxide as an energy source are found in high temperature environments such as geothermal areas. Researchers think that these carboxydotrophs may be involved in reducing potentially toxic carbon monoxide hotspots by combine with water to form hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which are in turn used for thermophilic energy conservation and carbon sequestration mechanisms. The project focuses on sequencing two closely related microbes, one of which is Carboxydothermus hydrogenformans. A strain of C. hydrogenformans has been grown in hydrogen-enriched synthesis gas (syngas), which contains a mix of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Researchers are interested in sequencing both microbial strains to track the genome's evolution and

4

Kinetic model of catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mechanism is proposed for describing the previous disclosed multiplicity of equilibrium states in the oxidation of carbon monoxide on metallic nickel. In contrast to the known mechanism for oxidation of CO on platinum metals it includes a nonlinear stage of carbon monoxide adsorption and a linear stage of oxygen adsorption. A kinetic model has been obtained and stage velocity constants have been found, providing a basis for obtaining a quantitative agreement between the calculated and experimental relations between the reaction velocity and the reagent concentrations. Opinions are stated in relation to the causes for evolution of the CO oxidation reaction from platinum metals to nickel.

Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.; Ostapyuk, V.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity ...

Judy L. Mumford; Ron W. Williams; Debra B. Walsh; Robert M. Burton; David J. Svendsgaard; Jane C. Chuang; Virginia S. Houk; Joellen Lewtas

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Catalytic reactions on well-characterized vanadium oxide catalysts. 1. Oxidation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of carbon monoxide over unsupported and supported vanadium oxide catalysts was investigated from the standpoint of structure sensitivity. The activity of unsupported V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ markedly decreased the turnover frequency, while the reduction-oxidation treatment of the fused catalyst increased it. The turnover frequency of V/sub 2/O/sub 5//TiO/sub 2/ with low V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ content was much smaller than that of the V/sub 2/O/sub 5//TiO/sub 2/ with high V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ content or the unsupported V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Such a retarding effect of the TiO/sub 2/ support on the activity of the oxidation of carbon monoxide is in contrast to the known promoting effect of TiO/sub 2/ for the oxidations of various hydrocarbons. From these results coupled with the characterization of the catalysts, it was concluded that the oxidation of carbon monoxide on vanadium oxide catalysts is a structure-sensitive reaction and that the activity of surface defects such as steps, kinks, and vacancies is much higher than that of the surface V=O species in the smooth (010) face of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. 39 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

Mori, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Murakami, Y.

1984-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

7

Carbon Monoxide Oxidation by Bacteria Associated with the Roots of Freshwater Macrophytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...consumption and production of atmospheric carbon monoxide by...the consumption of atmospheric carbon monoxide by...rapid oxidation of atmospheric CO to CO2 by soils...D. Influence of water table on carbon dioxide...rice fields and biogas generators: CH4, N2O, CO...

Jeremy J. Rich; G. M. King

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Carbon monoxide oxidation on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the CO2 product  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide oxidation on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the CO2 product J. I and angular distributions of CO2 produced by CO oxidation on Rh 111 have been measured as a function a fundamental and a practical point of view. CO2 formation serves as a model recombina- tion reaction

Sibener, Steven

9

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

10

Total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane over transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalysts. I. Catalyst composition and activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane was prepared by combining fluorite oxides with active transition metals. The fluorite oxides, such as ceria and zirconia, are oxygen-ion-conducting materials having catalytic properties usually at high temperatures. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of these oxides. The contact of the two types of materials gave rise to a high active oxidation catalyst. At a space velocity of about 42,000 h{sup {minus}1}, complete carbon monoxide oxidation in air occurred at room temperature on the Au{sub 0.05}[Ce(La)]{sub 0.95}L{sub x} catalyst and at ca. 100{degrees}C on Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts. At the same space velocity, total oxidation of methane on the Cu-Ce-O catalyst doped with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SrO took place at ca. 550{degrees}C. The specific carbon monoxide oxidation activity of the Cu-Ce-O catalyst was several orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional copper-based catalysts and comparable or superior to platinum catalysts. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water vapor poisoning. The enhanced catalyst activity and stability resulted from strong interaction of the transition metal and fluorite oxide materials. 44 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, F. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)] [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

12

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

13

Analysis of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions and photochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and known emission factors for black carbon (BC) from South Asia yields 0.7 Tg yrÃ?1 (upper limit of about 1 Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325); KEYWORDS: Soot, black carbon, CO, emissions, India Citation of black carbon and carbon monoxide observed over the Indian Ocean: Implications for emissions

Dickerson, Russell R.

14

Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Cell Extracts of Pseudomonas carboxydovorans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Winzer. 1932. Uber die Bildung von Essigsaure bei der biologischen Umsetzung von Kohlenoxyd und Kohlensaure mit Wasserstoff zu Methan. Biochem. Z. 245:2-12. 9. Fuchs, G., G. Andress, and R. K. Thauer. 1975. CO- oxidation by anaerobic...

Ortwin Meyer; Hans G. Schlegel

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Transformation of carbon monoxide dimer surface structures on yttrium oxide modified by silver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been established that introducing ions of silver(II) in yttrium(III) oxide leads to the formation of a significant concentration of a paramagnetic dimer species (CO)/sub 2/-in the course of the adsorption of carbon monoxide, and that these dimers exhibit high thermal stability and reactivity. Reactions are proposed for the formation of the dimer species (CO)/sub 2//sup 2 -/ and (CO)/sub 2//sup -/ on the surface of the Ag/Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst that involve the reduction of the anion vacancies and a change in the oxidation state of the silver ions. Modifying the yttrium oxide with ionic silver leads to a marked decrease in the strength of the oxidative ability of the surface of the catalyst for CO, while the nature of the active sites of the yttrium oxide, which adsorbs CO in three forms, remains unchanged.

Vydrin, S.N.; Bobolev, A.V.; Loginov, A.Yu.

1987-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Infrared spectroscopic study of the adsorption of carbon monoxide on silica-supported copper oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption of carbon monoxide at room temperature (0.1 to 50 Torr) on silica-supported copper oxide was studied by infrared spectroscopy. Catalysts were prepared by deposition-precipitation or impregnation. After calcination two types of adsorbed CO were identified showing absorption bands at 2136 +- 3 and 2204 +- 1 cm/sup -1/, which are ascribed to CO adsorbed on copper(II) oxide and on isolated copper(II) ions in the silica surface, respectively. Reduction and reoxidation removed the band at 2204 cm/sup -1/ with all samples and raised the intensity of the 2136-cm/sup -1/ band with the precipitated catalysts but not with the impregnation catalyst. Evidence is brought forward that the isolated copper ions are mobilized during reduction and generate new copper (oxide) surface. The change in background transmission of the samples could be used to obtain further information about the interaction of O/sub 2/ and CO with copper oxide.

De Jong, K.P.; Geus, J.W.; Joziasse, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Chemisorption of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides on highly dispersed technetium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to study, in infrared spectroscopy, the surface compounds formed on adsorption of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides on Tc/SiO/sub 2/. The samples were prepared by soaking Aerosil with aqueous solution of ammonium pertechnetate containing 10 wt.% of Tc. Reduction with hydrogen to the metal was carried out at 700-800/sup 0/C. Results indicated that chemisorption of CO on highly dispersed technetium gives rise to a single type of linear and several types of multicentered adsorption forms. Occurrence of bridge form of adsorbed CO was also suggested on the basis of the data on chemisorption stoichiometry. Formation of a structure characterizable by absorption at 1790 cm/sup -1/ may indicate, only after protracted analysis, that the surface of the technetium introduced gradually suffers significant rearrangement facilitating formation of this type of complexes.

Serebryakova, N.V.; Sokolova, N.P.; Spitsyn, V.S.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

19

Oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons on platinum and palladium catalysts in the presence of sulfur dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on a study of the effect of sulfur dioxide on the activity of platinum and palladium catalysts with respect to oxidation of the principal toxic components in the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines: carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons (propylene (C/sub 3/H/sub 6/) and propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/)). The experiments were carried out in a flow system equipped with Beckman infrared analyzers to monitor the concentrations of CO and hydrocarbons and of sulfur dioxide. A series of thermal desorption experiments was carried out in a low-pressure flow system with mass spectrometric analysis of the gas phase. The results indicate that the low-temperature adsorption of sulfur dioxide on platinum (and also palladium) catalysts inhibits the oxidation of carbon monoxide and propylene. The poisoning effect of O/sub 2/ is due to blockage of the platinum centers for adsorption of the oxidizable compounds and oxygen.

Panchishnyi, V.I.; Bondareva, N.K.; Sklyarov, A.V.; Rozanov, V.V.; Chadina, G.P.

1988-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster presented at the 16th Directions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Interaction of copper oxides with reaction medium in heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen. IV. IR spectroscopic study of carbon monoxide interaction with copper oxide surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An IR spectroscopic study has been made of the interaction of CO with CuO prepared in different ways, and the interaction of O/sub 2/ with carbon monoxide preadsorbed on CuO. A number of Cu/sup +/CO surface complexes have been detected (2114-2148 cm/sup -1/) with a heat of adsorption about 79.5-180 kJ/mole. From an analysis of the nature of these complexes, we have evaluated the processes taking place on the CuO surface when it interacts with CO and have compared the properties of massive CuO with those of CuO on oxide supports. The data are interpreted on the assumption that extended defects - dislocations - exist and play an important role, determining to a considerable degree the properties of the massive CuO in the reaction of CO oxidation.

Lokhov, Y.A.; Popovskii, V.V.; Sadykov, V.A.; Tikhov, S.F.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Municipal Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from a Municipal Landfill ... Due to the small area of landfills as compared to other land-use classes, the total N2O emissions from landfills are estimated to be of minor importance for the total emissions from Finland. ...

Janne Rinne; Mari Pihlatie; Annalea Lohila; Tea Thum; Mika Aurela; Juha-Pekka Tuovinen; Tuomas Laurila; Timo Vesala

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration DPF regeneration experiments verified the...

24

Nitrogen oxides emission trends in Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides from space provide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 5 Nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia Abstract Monthly emission estimates present first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric

Haak, Hein

25

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Remarkable catalytic activity of cobalt tetraphenylporphyrin modified on a titania for the oxidation of carbon monoxide below room temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CoTPP on TiO/sub 2/-120s modified at 250 /sup 0/C under vacuum catalytically oxidized carbon monoxide rapidly with oxygen even at -79/sup 0/C. Its catalytic activity was incomparably higher than that of commercial Hopcalite. Comparison of its catalytic performance with those of the same catalyst or different TiO/sub 2/ supporting catalyst both evacuated at 200 /sup 0/C revealed unique features of the present catalyst in terms of its oxygen adsorption, the poisoning of adsorbed oxygen, and the insolubility of the complex in benzene. Both significant structural modification of the complex and its strong interaction with properly dehydrated TiO/sub 2/-120s brought about by evacuation at 250 /sup 0/C may induce such extraordinary activity. 14 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

Mochida, I.; Iwai, Y.; Kamo, T.; Fujitsu, H.

1985-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

27

Measuring the Kinetics of the Reduction of Iron Oxide with Carbon Monoxide in a Fluidized Bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combusting a solid fuel in the presence of a metal oxide rather than air, chemical looping combustion, generates CO2suitable for sequestration and the reduced metal. For the case of iron, the reduced oxide can be...

C. D. Bohnt; J. P. Cleeton; C. M. Miiller…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide concentrations in Santiago de Chile associated with traffic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO/CO2 ratios have been measured in different locations of Santiago de Chile city. Measurements were carried out in a tunnel (prevailing emissions from cars with catalytic converter) and close to heavy traffic st...

María A. Rubio; Irene Fuenzalida…

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electroreduction of carbon monoxide to liquid fuel on oxide-derived nanocrystalline copper  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... were used without further purification. Electrolyte solutions were prepared with deionized water (Ricca Chemical, ASTM Type I). Preparation of oxide-derived Cu 1

Christina W. Li; Jim Ciston; Matthew W. Kanan

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

30

Dissociation and oxidation of carbon monoxide over Rh/Al sub 2 O sub 3 catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activity of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts for CO oxidation was investigated by transient isotopic pulse experiments using packed-bed reactor. This transient experimental scheme revealed significant CO dissociation activity during CO oxidation over Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Results indicate that the oxidation of CO proceeds via dissociative oxidation by its own oxygen as well as via direct oxidation by gas-phase oxygen on well-dispersed Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. The rate of CO dissociation is on the same order of magnitude as the rate of CO oxidation; under steady-state conditions at 300{degree}C, the rate of CO dissociation is approximately half that of direct oxidation. Differences in CO dissociation activity between single-crystal Rh surfaces and well-dispersed supported Rh particles are explained in terms of the molecular bonding and adsorption characteristics on these two different surfaces. The importance of CO dissociation kinetics in the overall CO oxidation activity of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts is further discussed in view of the reaction lightoff behavior.

Cho, Byong K.; Stock, C.J. (General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Carbon monoxide line emission as a CMB foreground: tomography of the star-forming universe with different spectral resolutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rotational lines of carbon monoxide and the fine structure lines of CII and of the most abundant metals, emitted during the epoch of enhanced star formation in the universe, are redshifted in the frequency channels where the present-day and future CMB experiments are sensitive. We estimate the contribution to the CMB angular power spectrum by the emission in such lines in merging star-forming galaxies. We used the Lacey-Cole approach to characterize the distribution of the merging halos, together with a parametrization for the star formation rate in each of them. Using observational data from a sample of local, low-redshift, and high-redshift objects, we calibrated the luminosity in each line as a function of the star formation rate. We show that the correlation term arising from CO line emission is a significant source of foreground for CMB in a broad range of frequencies (in particular in the 20-60 GHz band) and for 1000

Mattia Righi; Carlos Hernandez-Monteagudo; Rashid Sunyaev

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

Relation between surface adsorption states and emf in a solid electrolyte concentration cell during carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum studied by local current measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of measuring adsorption during surface catalysis has been emphasized often. This is true for the oxidation of carbon monoxide on a platinum surface. Surface adsorption states during the reaction under steady states can be learned from electromotive force (emf) measurement with appropriate assumptions. Two mechanisms for emf generation have been proposed, one is that only oxygen activity generates emf, the other is that both oxygen and CO adsorption generates emf.

Okamoto, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kudo, T.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Evidence of Nanocrystalline Semiconducting Graphene Monoxide during Thermal Reduction of Graphene Oxide in Vacuum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our results indicate that the resulting thermally reduced G-O (TRG-O) consists of a two-dimensional nanocrystalline phase segregation: unoxidized graphitic regions are separated from highly oxidized regions of GMO. ... Two different systems are used as a platform to explore these interactions, namely, epitaxial graphene/SiC(0001) functionalized with atomic oxygen (graphene ... ...

Eric C. Mattson; Haihui Pu; Shumao Cui; Marvin A. Schofield; Sonny Rhim; Ganhua Lu; Michael J. Nasse; Rodney S. Ruoff; Michael Weinert; Marija Gajdardziska-Josifovska; Junhong Chen; Carol J. Hirschmugl

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon fuels must be reformed in a series of steps to provide hydrogen for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Preferential oxidation (PROX) is one method to reduce the CO concentration to less than 10 ppm in the presence of {approx}40% H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and steam. This will prevent CO poisoning of the PEMFC anode. Structured supports, such as ceramic monoliths, can be used for the PROX reaction. Alternatively, metal foams offer a number of advantages over the traditional ceramic monolith.

Paul Chin; Xiaolei Sun; George W. Roberts; Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Sourabh Pansare; James G. Goodwin Jr; Richard W. Rice; James J. Spivey

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Infrared spectroscopic studies of carbon monoxide adsorbed on a series of silica-supported copper catalysts in different oxidation states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the adsorption of carbon monoxide (358-493 K, 0.1-20 kPa) on four copper-on-silica (2-10 wt% Cu) catalysts prepared by the ion-exchange technique. The measurements are made for each sample in three different states: unreduced (predominantly Cu{sup 2+}), and reduced (Cu{sup 0}), and partially reoxidized in nitrous oxide (Cu{sup +}). On unreduced samples, a major absorption band between 2127 and 2132 cm{sup {minus}1} due to CO adsorbed on small CuO particles and a weak band at 2199 cm{sup {minus}1} due to CO on isolated Cu{sup 2+} ions incorporated in the silica surface have been identified. The former adsorption obeys a Langmuir isotherm with a heat of adsorption of 29 kJ/mol independent of CuO particle size and surface coverage. After catalyst reduction, the major absorption band lies between 2090 and 2113 cm{sup {minus}1} and arises from CO linearly bound to very small (1- to 5-nm) copper metal clusters. The observed frequency shifts indicate the presence of steps and terraces similar to low index Cu planes in very small particles (1- to 2-nm), and the presence of similar higher index Cu planes on larger clusters (2- to 5-nm). The absorption is described by a Freundlich isotherm with the heat of CO adsorption decreasing with coverage from 50 to 22 kJ/mol on bigger particles but more constant (27 to 22 kJ/mol) on small particles. A surface copper/CO atomic ratio increasing from 5 to 12 is established at equilibrium saturation between 358 and 493 K using extinction coefficients determined in this study. In the reduced catalysts, a weakly adsorbed ({Delta}H{sub a} = {minus}20 kJ/mol) species assigned to CO bound to isolated Cu{sup +} ions is also found and absorbs at 2175 cm{sup {minus}1}. The frequency of this band does not vary with catalyst loading and is not affected by reoxidation of the catalyst in nitrous oxide.

Kohler, M.A.; Wainwright, M.S.; Trimm, D.L.; Cant, N.W. (Macquarie Univ., New South Wales (Australia) Univ. of South Wales (Australia))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uses for structured catalytic supports, such as ceramic straight-channel monoliths and ceramic foams, have been established for a long time. One of the most prominent examples is the washcoated ceramic monolith as a three-way catalytic converter for gasoline-powered automobiles. A distinct alternative to the ceramic monolith is the metal foam, with potential use in fuel cell-powered automobiles. The metal foams are characterized by their pores per inch (ppi) and density ({rho}). In previous research, using 5 wt% platinum (Pt) and 0.5 wt% iron (Fe) catalysts, washcoated metal foams, 5.08 cm in length and 2.54 cm in diameter, of both varying and similar ppi and {rho} were tested for their activity (X{sub CO}) and selectivity (S{sub CO}) on a CO preferential oxidation (PROX) reaction in the presence of a H{sub 2}-rich gas stream. The variances in these metal foams' activity and selectivity were much larger than expected. Other structured supports with 5 wt% Pt, 0-1 wt% Fe weight loading were also examined. A theory for this phenomenon states that even though these structured supports have a similar nominal catalyst weight loading, only a certain percentage of the Pt/Fe catalyst is exposed on the surface as an active site for CO adsorption. We will use two techniques, pulse chemisorption and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), to characterize our structured supports. Active metal count, metal dispersion, and other calculations will help clarify the causes for the activity and selectivity variations between the supports. Results on ceramic monoliths show that a higher Fe loading yields a lower dispersion, potentially because of Fe inhibition of the Pt surface for CO adsorption. This theory is used to explain the reason for activity and selectivity differences for varying ppi and {rho} metal foams; less active and selective metal foams have a lower Fe loading, which justifies their higher metal dispersion. Data on the CO desorption temperature and average metal crystallite size for TPD are also collected.

Paul Chin; George W. Roberts; James J. Spivey

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Influence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on the distribution of atmospheric CO 2 : Implications for inversion analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on thedescription of reduced carbon emission and oxidationInfluence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on the

Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Randerson, James T; Krakauer, Nir; Logan, Jennifer A; Jacob, Daniel J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nitrogen oxide emissions from a kraft recovery furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions from a rebuilt kraft recovery furnace slightly exceeded the specified limit of 1.1 lb/ton (0.55 kg/metric ton) of black-liquor solids. Mill trials were undertaken to determine whether NOx emissions could be minimized by modifying furnace operation. NOx emissions increased when secondary air was shifted to tertiary ports. NOx emissions fell when the amounts of primary and total air were decreased, but this increased emissions of other pollutants. After demonstrating that best operation of the furnace could not meet the permit with an emissions limit that matched the furnace's performance at best operation.

Prouty, A.L.; Stuart, R.C. (James River Corp., Camas, WA (United States)); Caron, A.L. (NCASI West Coast Regional Office, Corvallis, OR (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory directions for this program include expending new strategies for anti-Markovnikov addition of water, alcohols, and amines with olefins, developing catalytic reactions of CO to give formamides and formic esters, and evaluating the potential for coupling reactions of CO to produce organic building blocks.

Wayland, B.B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specific ammonia oxidation rate. Symbols represent...Research Council (ARC) for funding this...correlated to its ammonia oxidation rate. 51 Arp, D...1146/annurev.micro.61.080706.093449...1146/annurev.micro.61.080706.093449...2004 Anaerobic oxidation of inorganic nitrogen...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ON IRON MONOXIDE NANOPARTICLES AS A CARRIER OF THE MYSTERIOUS 21 ?m EMISSION FEATURE IN POST-ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prominent mysterious emission feature peaking at ?20.1 ?m—historically known as the '21 ?m' feature—is seen in over two dozen Galactic and Magellanic Cloud carbon-rich, post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. The nature of its carrier remains unknown since the first detection of the 21 ?m feature in 1989. Over a dozen materials have been suggested as possible carrier candidates. However, none of them has been accepted: they either require too much material (compared to what is available in the circumstellar shells around these post-AGB stars), or exhibit additional emission features that are not seen in these 21 ?m sources. Recently, iron monoxide (FeO) nanoparticles seem to be a promising carrier candidate as Fe is an abundant element and FeO emits exclusively at ?21 ?m. In this work, using the proto-typical protoplanetary nebula HD 56126 as a test case, we examine FeO nanoparticles as a carrier for the 21 ?m feature by modeling their infrared emission, with FeO being stochastically heated by single stellar photons. We find that FeO emits too broad a 21 ?m feature to explain that observed and the Fe abundance required to be locked up in FeO exceeds what is available in HD 56126. We therefore conclude that FeO nanoparticles are not likely to be responsible for the 21 ?m feature.

Li, Aigen; Jiang, B. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Liu, J. M., E-mail: lia@missouri.edu, E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster Location P-19 Gregory K. Lilik, Andr L. Boehman Department of Energy & Mineral Engineering EMS Energy...

44

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requires any facility that emits 25 tons or more of NOx and/or 25 tons or more of VOC during the calendar year and is located in a county designated as nonattainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone submit emission statements. Any facility that is located in a county described above is exempt from these requirements. If NOx

45

Engine performance and exhaust emissions from a diesel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Carbon monoxide emissions increased by an average 15% using B5 and by an average of 19% using B100. Hydrocarbon emissions decreased by 14% using B5 and by 26% using B100. Nitrogen oxide emissions decreased by four percent with B5, five percent with B20...

Powell, Jacob Joseph

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

FTIR study of carbon monoxide oxidation and scrambling at room temperature over copper supported on ZnO and TiO{sub 2} No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An FTIR and quadrupole mass spectroscopic study of CO adsorption and oxidation with {sup 16}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O{sub 2} on copper supported on ZnO and TiO{sub 2} is presented. The experimental results indicate that CO is adsorbed on the metallic particles dispersed on both oxides on two kinds of sites, on the normal terrace sites and on sites at the borderline of the particles. Moreover, on titania, a band at 2126 cm{sup -1}, assigned to CO adsorbed on isolated Cu atoms and/or on two-dimensional small clusters, is detected. A frequency shift of the bands of CO adsorbed on the metallic particles observed in the CO-O{sub 2} coadsorption experiments and the occurrence of a scrambling reaction between CO and {sup 18}O{sub 2} reveal that on all these samples, there are metallic sites which are able to adsorb at the same time oxygen atoms and carbon monoxide. Carbon dioxide and carbonate-like species are formed: the asymmetric stretching frequencies of CO{sub 2} and the quadrupole mass spectroscopic analysis reveal that with {sup 18}O{sub 2}, different isotopic molecular CO{sub 2}`s are formed, while the carbonate-like species have the same frequencies of those produced in {sup 16}O{sub 2}. Moreover, these species are completely lacking in the absence of oxygen in the gas phase. The experimental results indicate the there are, on these samples, two independent pathways for the CO oxidation, a direct oxidation of CO at the surface of the metallic particles and an induced oxidation with the surface lattice oxygen species of the supports. 46 refs., 8 figs.

Baccuzzi, F.; Chiorino, A. [Universita di Torino (Italy)] [Universita di Torino (Italy)

1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

47

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

48

O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin is limited by nitrogen monoxide dissociation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Human serum heme-albumin displays globin-like properties. {yields} O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin. {yields} Allosteric modulation of human serum heme-albumin reactivity. {yields} Rifampicin is an allosteric effector of human serum heme-albumin. {yields} Human serum heme-albumin is a ROS and NOS scavenger. -- Abstract: Human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, kinetics of O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO) is reported. Values of the first-order rate constants for O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for ferric HSA-heme-Fe formation) and for NO dissociation from HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for NO replacement by CO) are k = 9.8 x 10{sup -5} and 8.3 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, and h = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} and 8.5 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, in the absence and presence of rifampicin, respectively, at pH = 7.0 and T = 20.0 {sup o}C. The coincidence of values of k and h indicates that NO dissociation represents the rate limiting step of O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO. Mixing HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO with O{sub 2} does not lead to the formation of the transient adduct(s), but leads to the final ferric HSA-heme-Fe derivative. These results reflect the fast O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous HSA-heme-Fe and highlight the role of drugs in modulating allosterically the heme-Fe-atom reactivity.

Ascenzi, Paolo, E-mail: ascenzi@uniroma3.it [Interdepartmental Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, University Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 79, I-00146 Roma (Italy) [Interdepartmental Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, University Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 79, I-00146 Roma (Italy); National Institute for Infectious Diseases I.R.C.C.S. 'Lazzaro Spallanzani', Via Portuense 292, I-00149 Roma (Italy); Gullotta, Francesca; Gioia, Magda; Coletta, Massimo [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma 'Tor Vergata', Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy) [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma 'Tor Vergata', Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for the Research on the Chemistry of Metals in Biological Systems, Piazza Umberto I 1, I-87100 Bari (Italy); Fasano, Mauro [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, and Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via Alberto da Giussano 12a, I-21052 Busto Arsizio, VA (Italy)] [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, and Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via Alberto da Giussano 12a, I-21052 Busto Arsizio, VA (Italy)

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DPF regeneration experiments verified the effects of NO2 and O2 emissions found from the thermogravimetric analyzer soot oxidation.

50

Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over Ir/SiO/sub 2/. An in situ infrared and kinetic study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of CO on a highly dispersed Ir/SiO/sub 2/ catalyst has been studied both in a Pyrex microreactor and by using an in situ infrared cell-reactor. Multiple steady states obtained under conditions of increasing and decreasing CO partial pressure were observed to lead to reaction rate hysteresis. The area under the hysteresis loop is strongly dependent on reaction temperature. This is explained by invoking competitive adsorption between CO and O/sub 2/ as a function of temperature. Self-sustained oscillations were obtained when certain conditions of partial pressure and temperature were met. Quantitative estimates of fluctuations in surface coverage and temperature during these oscillations were 10% and 3K, respectively. CO islands of reactivity were not observed under the conditions of this study. The presence of higher oxidation states of IR could not be unequivocally determined by using infrared spectroscopy. 29 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

Saymeh, R.A.; Gonzalez, R.D.

1986-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

51

Exhaust-catalyst development for methanol-fueled vehicles. II. Synergism between palladium and silver in methanol and carbon monoxide oxidation over an alumina-supported palladium-silver catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methanol and carbon monoxide oxidation were examined over 0.01 Pd, 5% Ag, and 0.01% Pd/5% Ag catalysts - all supported on ..gamma..-alumina. The bimetallic catalyst showed greater CO and CH/sub 3/OH oxidation activity than either of the single-component catalysts; moreover, the Pd and Ag interacted synergistically in the bimetallic catalyst to produce greater CO and CH/sub 3/OH oxidation rates and lower yields of methanol partial oxidation products than expected from a mixture of the single-component catalysts. Temperature-programmed oxidation experiments and reactivity experiments involving changes in O/sub 2/ partial pressure both provided evidence that the Pd-Ag synergism results from Pd promoting the rate of O/sub 2/ adsorption and reaction with CO and CH/sub 3/OH on Ag. The data also indicate that virtually all of the Pd in the bimetallic catalyst is present in Pd-Ag crystallites.

McCabe, R.W.; Mitchell, P.J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Method of making a catalytic metal oxide selective for the conversion of a gas and a coating system for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described of making a catalytic metal oxide selective to catalyzing the conversion of given gas species, comprising: intimately supporting a solid film of catalytic metal oxide on an electrically conducting material, said film having an exposed outer surface spaced no greater than 1,000 angstroms from said conducting material and said conducting material being matched to the composition of said oxide to change the electron state of the exposed outer surface to promote a reaction between given gas species and said oxide, said metal oxide being selected from the group consisting of TiO[sub 2], SnO[sub 2], FeO, SrTiO[sub 3], and CoO, and said conducting material being selected from the group consisting of Au, Pt, TiN, Pd, Rh, Ni, and Co.

Logothetis, E.M.; Soltis, R.E.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

An infrared spectroscopy study of carbon monoxide adsorption on. alpha. -chromia surfaces: Probing oxidation states of coordinatively unsaturated surface cations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO adsorption on thermoevacuated, H{sub 2}-reduced and O{sub 2}-treated {alpha}-chromia surfaces was studied by IR spectroscopy in the temperature range 77-298 K. Coordinatively unsaturated (cus) Cr{sup 3+} cation sites, probably in 3-coordinate and to a much lesser extent 5-coordinate states, are the adsorption sites on H{sub 2}-reduced {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The surface containing excess oxygen also exposes cus Cr{sup 4+} and Cr{sup 5+} sites. An empirical procedure is described which permits the determination of oxidation state and coordination number of the cus surface sites. This procedure is based on a correlation between C-O stretching frequency and electric field strength exerted by the cation. The latter is calculated from Pauling's strength of the electrostatic bond and effective ionic radii, both of which take the cation coordination into account.

Zaki, M.I.; Knoezinger, H. (Universitaet Muenchen (West Germany))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Carbon monoxide absorbing liquid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present disclosure is directed to a carbon monoxide absorbing liquid containing a cuprous ion, hydrochloric acid and titanum trichloride. Titanium trichloride is effective in increasing the carbon monoxide absorption quantity. Furthermore, titanium trichloride remarkably increases the oxygen resistance. Therefore, this absorbing liquid can be used continuously and for a long time.

Arikawa, Y.; Horigome, S.; Kanehori, K.; Katsumoto, M.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE;2 #12;MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N 20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE cli- mate has on natural emissions of N2 0 and CH4 from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere

56

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

57

Apparatus for photocatalytic destruction of internal combustion engine emissions during cold start  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the destruction of emissions from an internal combustion engine wherein a substrate coated with TiO.sub.2 is exposed to a light source in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine thereby catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions between gaseous hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and oxygen in the exhaust of the internal combustion engine.

Janata, Jiri (Richland, WA); McVay, Gary L. (Richland, WA); Peden, Charles H. (West Richland, WA); Exarhos, Gregory J. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of catalyst materials to facilitate the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons and CO in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) emissions.

59

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOBILE6 Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm Cost: Free References: http://www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Particulate Matter (PM), and toxics from cars, trucks, and motorcycles under various conditions. MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon

60

Nitric oxide emissions from the high-temperature viscous boundary layers of hypersonic aircraft within the stratosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors study the nitric oxide emission characteristics of supersonic aircraft resulting from heating of viscous boundary layers along the skin of the aircraft. Previous study has concentrated on nitric oxide emissions coming from combustion products from the scramjet engines. This work shows that above mach 8, emissions from viscous heating become a significant factor in total emission of nitric oxide. Above mach 16 it becomes the dominant source of emission.

Brooks, S.B.; Lewis, M.J.; Dickerson, R.R. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Crystallographic Snapshots of Cyanide- and Water-Bound C-Clusters from Bifunctional Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase/Acetyl-CoA Synthase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs) reversibly catalyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and are of vital importance in the global carbon cycle. The unusual catalytic CODH C-cluster ...

Kung, Yan

62

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels Exhaust emissions from engines operating in advanced combustion modes such as PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) and HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) are analyzed with an array of analytical tools. Furthermore, emissions from a variety of alternative fuels and mixtures thereof with conventional gasoline and diesel fuels are also measured. In addition to measuring the criteria pollutants nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HCs) are also measured and categorized based on chemistry. These chemical details of the emissions provide important information for optimizing combustion processes to maximize fuel efficiency while minimizing emissions

63

Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 14  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 14 MAY 1999 TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 14 A report on three projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between: The U.S. Department of Energy and * The Babcock & Wilcox Company * Energy and Environmental Research Corporation * New York State Electric & Gas Corporation MAY 1999 Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers Cover image: Schematic of reburning technology Source: Energy and Environmental Research Corporation Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers Executive Summary ..................................................................................................

64

Titanium dioxide based high temperature carbon monoxide selective sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Titanium dioxide based high temperature carbon monoxide selective sensor Nancy O. Savagea , Sheikh as a trap for the oxidation products of CO and CH4. Upon oxidation of CO on ALC, carbonate species were detected, whereas the reaction of CH4 produced negligible carbonate species. The insensitivity of the ALC

Dutta, Prabir K.

65

Quantum-chemical investigation of the interaction of nitrogen and carbon monoxide molecules with the Lewis acid sites of aluminium oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the framework of the cluster approximation, using covalent and ionic models of Lewis acid sites of aluminumoxide, their electronic structure, as well as that of complexes of nitrogen and carbon monoxide molecules with them, was calculated. It was shown that the Lewis acid sites, representing a truncated tetrahedron, exhibit stronger electron-acceptor properties than the corresponding sites in the form of a truncated octahedron. For both molecules, the linear form of adsorption is energetically more profitable than the T-shaped form. The results obtained by the nonempirical SCF MO LCAO method in the STO-3GF basis and by semiempirical methods in CNDO/2 and INDO approximatations, are qualitatively the same.

Senchenya, I.N.; Chuvylkin, N.D.; Kazanskii, V.B.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Process Modeling of Global Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas and is a major ozone-depleting substance. To understand and

Saikawa, E.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Methods of reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides at thermal power plants burning solid domestic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Essentially all the major methods of reducing the emissions of nitrogen oxides from flue gases employed in power generation have been tested on plants in Moscow which burn solid domestic waste for production of h...

A. N. Tugov; V. F. Moskvichev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Oxidation of Mercury Across  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxidation of Mercury Across SCR Catalysts in Coal-Fired Power Plants Burning Low Rank Fuels Oxidation of Mercury Across SCR Catalysts in Coal-Fired Power Plants Burning Low Rank Fuels The objective of the proposed research is to assess the potential for the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalysts in a coal fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. Results from the project will contribute to a greater understanding of mercury behavior across SCR catalysts. Additional tasks include: review existing pilot and field data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts and propose a mechanism for mercury oxidation and create a simple computer model for mercury oxidation based on the hypothetical mechanism. Related Papers and Publications: Final Report - December 31, 2004 [PDF-532KB]

69

Influence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on the distribution of atmospheric CO2: Implications for inversion analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of reduced carbon emissions and oxidation on the distribution of atmospheric CO2 carbon emissions. We used TransCom3 annual mean simulations from three transport models to evaluate carbon emission and oxidation processes in deriving inversion estimates of CO2 surface fluxes. Citation

Krakauer, Nir Y.

70

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

71

Modeling of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from CFB Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, a simplified description of combustion and nitrogen oxides chemistry was implemented in a 1.5D model framework with the aim to compare the results with ones earlier obtained with a detailed react...

S. Kallio; M. Keinonen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Persistent sensitivity of Asian aerosol to emissions of nitrogen oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a chemical transport model and its adjoint to examine the sensitivity of secondary inorganic aerosol formation to emissions of precursor trace gases from Asia. Sensitivity simulations indicate that secondary inorganic ...

Kharol, S. K.

73

Detection of iodine monoxide in the tropical free troposphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19, 2012) Atmospheric iodine monoxide (IO) is a radical that catalytically destroys heat trapping in the remote tropical marine boundary layer (MBL) (2­4). IO further affects the oxidative capacity iodine species over the remote ocean remain poorly understood (11, 14) but are currently thought

74

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

Minnesota, University of

75

ZIRCONIA-BASED MIXED POTENTIAL CARBON MONOXIDE/HYDROCARBON SENSORS WITH LANTHANUM MAGNESIUM OXIDE, AND TERBIUM-DOPED YTTRIUM STABILIZED ZIRCONIA ELECTRODES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the performance of dual metal oxide electrode mixed potential sensors in an engine-out, dynamometer environment. Sensors were fabricated by sputtering thin films of LaMnO{sub 3} and Tb-doped YSZ onto YSZ electrolyte. Au gauze held onto the metal oxide thin films with Au ink was used for current collection. The exhaust gas from a 4.8L, V8 engine operated in open loop, steady-state mode around stoichiometry at 1500 RPM and 50 Nm. The sensor showed a stable EMF response (with no hysteresis) to varying concentrations of total exhaust gas HC content. The sensor response was measured at 620 and 670 C and shows temperature behavior characteristic of mixed potential-type sensors. The results of these engine-dynamometer tests are encouraging; however, the limitations associated with Au current collection present the biggest impediment to automotive use.

E. L. BROSHA; R. MUKUNDAN; ET AL

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

77

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

78

Apparatus for photocatalytic destruction of internal combustion engine emissions during cold start  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the destruction of emissions from an internal combustion engine wherein a substrate coated with TiO{sub 2} is exposed to a light source in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine thereby catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions between gaseous hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and oxygen in the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. 4 figs.

Janata, J.; McVay, G.L.; Peden, C.H.; Exarhos, G.J.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

79

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING in strategies for climate protection. 1. Introduction Carbon sequestration has been highlighted recently concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmo- sphere include sequestering carbon (C) in soils

80

Assessment of soil nitrogen oxides emissions and implementation in LOTOS-EUROS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the formation and transport of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, particulate matter and other species throughout EuropeAssessment of soil nitrogen oxides emissions and implementation in LOTOS-EUROS Date 18 March 2013, climate and nitrogen availability. Nitrogen availability is in turn determined by N-deposition from

Haak, Hein

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SENSITIVE OPTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF CARBON MONOXIDE BY RESONANCE ABSORPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monoxide by Resonance Absorption Robert Gerlach and Nabil M.MONOXIDE BY RESONANCE ABSORPTION Robert Gerlach and Nabil M.the context of atmospheric absorption. The carbon monoxide

Gerlach, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Title Trends in On-Road Vehicle Emissions of Ammonia Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Kean, Andrew J., David Littlejohn, George Ban-Weiss, Robert A. Harley, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Melissa M. Lunden Journal Atmospheric Environment Abstract Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 ± 6%, from 640 ± 40 to 400 ± 20 mg kg-1. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

83

Catalyst for the methanation of carbon monoxide in sour gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention involves the synergistic effect of the specific catalytic constituents on a specific series of carriers for the methanation of carbon monoxide in the presence of sulfur at relatively high temperatures and at low steam to gas ratios in the range of 0.2:1 or less. This effect was obtained with catalysts comprising the mixed sulfides and oxides of nickel and chromium supported on carriers comprising magnesium aluminate and magnesium silicate. Conversion of carbon monoxide to methane was in the range of from 40 to 80%. Tests of this combination of metal oxides and sulfides on other carriers and tests of other metal oxides and sulfides on the same carrier produced a much lower level of conversion.

Kustes, William A. (Louisville, KY); Hausberger, Arthur L. (Louisville, KY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Inverse modeling of emissions for local photo-oxidant pollution : Testing a new methodology with kriging constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inverse modeling of emissions for local photo-oxidant pollution : Testing a new methodology. Abstract For chemistry-transport models operating at regional scales, surface emissions are the input data a methodology to optimize surface emissions at local scale i.e. to compute correction factors for the available

Menut, Laurent

85

Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1: Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1. Data set prepared by J.T. Randerson, G.R. van der Werf, L. Giglio, G.J. Collatz, and P.S. Kasibhatla. This data set provides monthly burned area, and monthly and annual fire emissions data from July 1996 to February 2012. Emissions data are available for carbon (C), dry matter (DM), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), particulate matter 2.5 micron (PM2p5), total particulate matter (TPM), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) among others. The C4 fraction of

86

Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emission Control R&D Emission Control R&D The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research and development of aftertreatment technologies to control advanced combustion engine exhaust emissions. All engines that enter the vehicle market must comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's emissions regulations. Harmful pollutants in these emissions include: Carbon monoxide Nitrogen oxides Unburned hydrocarbons Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) Particulate matter The energy required for emission control often reduces vehicle fuel economy and increases vehicle cost. VTO's Emission Control R&D focuses on developing efficient, durable, low-cost emission control systems that complement new combustion strategies while minimizing efficiency losses. VTO often leverages the national laboratories' unique capabilities and facilities to conduct this research.

87

Reducing Emissions of a Diesel Engine Using Fumigation Ethanol and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reducing Emissions of a Diesel Engine Using Fumigation Ethanol and a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst ... † Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China ... In contrast to the conventional approach of using ethanol in spark-ignition engines, this study demonstrates the potential of ethanol utilization in diesel engines using dual-fuel combustion, where ethanol is injected into the intake manifold and diesel ... ...

K. S. Tsang; Z. H. Zhang; C. S. Cheung; T. L. Chan

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Exhaust and evaporative emissions from gasohol-type fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted at the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville (Okla.) Energy Technology Center in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency to determine the characteristics of gasohol-type fuels with respect to exhaust and evaporative emissions. Five fuels, 2 gasolines (reference and commercial unleaded) and 3 gasohols (90% gasoline/10% ethanol) were tested in a fleet of 10 late-model automobiles. Six were equipped with oxidation catalysts and 4 were equipped with three-way catalysts. The results obtained from the 1978 Federal test procedure indicate that the addition of ethanol to the base gasoline, whether it is a reference fuel (Indolene) or a commercial fuel, has measurable effects on exhaust and evaporative emissions. However, on the average, the magnitude of these effects was generally within the 1978 emission standards established by the EPA. More specifically, the addition of ethanol, in the case of vehicles with oxidation catalysts, decreased hydrocarbons by an average of 27%, decreased carbon monoxide by 43%, decreased volumetric fuel economy by 3%, and increased oxides of nitrogen by 16%. Evaporative emissions were increased by 40%. In the case of vehicles with three-way catalysts, the addition of ethanol to the base fuel, on the average, decreased carbon monoxide by 7%, decreased fuel economy by 5%, increased hydrocarbons by 12%, increased oxides of nitrogen by 7%, and increased evaporative emissions by 49%.

Naman, T.M.; Allsup, J.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide from soil receiving urban wastewater for maize (Zea mays L.) cultivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated how amending maize with wastewater at 120 kg N ha?1 affected crop growth, soil characteristics and emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) compared to plants ferti...

Fabián Fernández-Luqueño; Verónica Reyes-Varela…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Disproportionation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disproportionation of carbon monoxide was investigated mainly on a 5.5% Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst by infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption. The reaction was found to be of first order with respect to the surface concentration of CO below 200/sup 0/C, while at 450/sup 0/C the reaction proceeded as a second order reaction for the pressure of CO. Results obtained with predeposited carbon indicated that the disproportionation reaction requires an ensemble of several nickel atoms. In agreement with this result, the disproportionation did not take place readily on a 1.1% Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst on which a high dispersion of the metal was indicated by both infrared spectroscopy and the chemisorption of hydrogen. In the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) carbon monoxide desorbed in a single peak before 300/sup 0/C. Some of the carbon monoxide, however, underwent disproportionation during TPD and a carbon dioxide peak appeared at about 220/sup 0/C. Furthermore, carbon thus deposited on the surface was oxidized to carbon monoxide by oxygen supplied from the catalysts and gave a second peak of CO in TPD at temperatures higher than 300/sup 0/C. Possible sources of the oxygen were discussed.

Galuszka, J.; Chang, J.R.; Amenomiya, Y.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Practical implications of marine diesel engine emission regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main pollutants from marine diesel engines are oxides of nitrogen (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx) and particulates (soot). However, the proposed marine diesel engine emission regulations will primarily focus on the levels of NOx and SOx. In the future, once the proposed regulations are met, the limits and levels of other emissions will come under increasing scrutiny, such as particulates, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Regardless of the type of pollutant, there are generally two classes of emission control: (1) techniques that reduce the amount of pollutant formed in the combustion process, or (2) prevent the pollutants from reaching the atmosphere. Unfortunately, some of these control techniques will not be able to meet the incoming regulations. Therefore, this paper identifies the diesel engine emissions of concern, the impending regulations, and the merits of current and future emission control technologies required to meet these regulations.

Bowen, C.E.; Potter, I.J.; Reader, G.T. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Snowmobile Contributions to Mobile Source Emissions in Yellowstone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were collected from in-use snowmobiles% of the annual emissions of carbon monoxide and 77% of annual emissions of hydrocarbons using an equivalent bestSnowmobile Contributions to Mobile Source Emissions in Yellowstone National Park G A R Y A . B I

Denver, University of

93

Process for treating ammonia and nitrite containing waters to prevent nitric oxide emissions therefrom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for controlling the emission of nitrogen dioxide from, and the amount of one or more organisms, selected from the group consisting of fungi, algae and bacteria, growing in a system for handling a flow of condensate of steam, the condensate containing ammonia, ammonia precursors, or a mixture thereof. It comprises contacting the condensate in a substantially continuous manner with an amount of an oxidizing biocide which substantially prevents the emission of nitrogen dioxide from the condensate handling system but which does not substantially inhibit the growth of the organisms in the condensate handling system; and periodically contacting the condensate with an amount of a second biocide which substantially reduces the amount of the organisms.

Gallup, D.L.; Featherstone, J.L.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evaluation of oxides of nitrogen emissions for the purpose of their transient regulation from a direct injection diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of defining a regulatory standard for the maximum allowable emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from a heavy-duty diesel engine on an instantaneous basis is presented. The significance of this concept from a regulatory point of view is the possibility to realise a steady brake specific NOx emissions result independent of the test schedule used. The emissions of oxides of nitrogen from a state-of-the-art direct injection diesel engine have been examined on an integral as well as on an instantaneous basis over the Federal Test Procedure as well as over several other arbitrary transient cycles generated for this study. Three candidate standards of specific NOx emissions have been evaluated on a real-time, continuous basis. These include brake power specific, fuel mass specific, and carbon dioxide mass specific NOx emissions. Retaining the stock engine control module, the carbon dioxide specific emissions of NOx have been shown to be the most uniform, varying only by about 30% of its mean value regardless of the test schedule or engine operation. The instantaneous fuel specific NOx emissions are shown to be relatively less invariant and the least steady are the brake power specific emissions with a coefficient of variation of up to 200%. Advancing injection timing has been shown to have a wide range of authority over the specific emissions of oxides of nitrogen regardless of the units used, when operating at full load in the vicinity of peak torque speeds. The carbon dioxide specific NOx emissions have shown a linear dependence on the power specific emissions, independent of the examined operating conditions. The trade-off between better brake thermal efficiency, lower exhaust gas temperature at advanced timing and lower NOx emissions has also been shown to be independent of the units of the specific standard used.

Yasser Yacoub; Chris Atkinson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Carbon and carbon monoxide hydrogenation on nickel: support effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of carbon, deposited on nickel catalysts by CO disproportionation, was investigated by temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) for four oxide supports, alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/), silica (SiO/sub 2/), titanium oxide (TiO/sub 2/), and SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was measured by temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) for comparison. The rate of carbon hydrogenation to methane was found to be independent of the support and an average activation energy of 42 kJ/mol was estimated. In contrast, the rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was very sensitive to the catalyst support. Nickel (Ni) supported on TiO/sub 2/ exhibited the highest specific activity, and two distinct sites for methanation were observed on Ni/TiO/sub 2/ and Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The lowest specific activities were observed for Ni/SiO/sub 2/ and Ni/SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. For all catalysts, carbon hydrogenation occurred at a lower temperature than carbon monoxide hydrogenation. For both TPR and TPSR, small amounts of ethane were formed and at a lower temperature than methane. The amount of less-active, ..beta..-carbon observed in TPSR experiments was very small on all catalysts. These results indicate that at high coverages, carbon hydrogenation does not depend on the support, and thus it is not rate-determining for CO hydrogenation in excess hydrogen. The support is also shown to change the specific rate of carbon monoxide methanation; activity differences seen in steady-state experiments are not just due to differences in site densities. 5 figures, 5 tables.

Ozdogan, S.Z.; Gochis, P.D.; Falconer, J.L.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

ZERO EMISSION POWER PLANTS USING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS AND OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 16,700 hours of operational experience was gained for the Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) elements of the proposed SOFC/OTM zero-emission power generation concept. It was repeatedly demonstrated that OTMs with no additional oxidation catalysts were able to completely oxidize the remaining depleted fuel in a simulated SOFC anode exhaust at an O{sub 2} flux that met initial targets. In such cases, neither residual CO nor H{sub 2} were detected to the limits of the gas chromatograph (<10 ppm). Dried OTM afterburner exhaust streams contained up to 99.5% CO{sub 2}. Oxygen flux through modified OTMs was double or even triple that of the standard OTMs used for the majority of testing purposes. Both the standard and modified membranes in laboratory-scale and demonstration-sized formats exhibited stable performance over extended periods (2300 to 3500 hours or 3 to 5 months). Reactor contaminants, were determined to negatively impact OTM performance stability. A method of preventing OTM performance degradation was developed and proven to be effective. Information concerning OTM and seal reliability over extended periods and through various chemical and thermal shocks and cycles was also obtained. These findings were used to develop several conceptual designs for pilot (10 kWe) and commercial-scale (250 kWe) SOFC/OTM zero emission power generation systems.

G. Maxwell Christie; Troy M. Raybold

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Field emission effects of nitrogenated carbon nanotubes on chlorination and oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With reference to our recent reports [Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 192107 (2007); Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 202102 (2007)] about the electronic structure of chlorine treated and oxygen-plasma treated nitrogenated carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs), here we studied the electron field emission effects on chlorination (N-CNT:Cl) and oxidation (N-CNT:O) of N-CNT. A high current density (J) of 15.0 mA/cm{sup 2} has been achieved on chlorination, whereas low J of 0.0052 mA/cm{sup 2} is observed on oxidation compared to J=1.3 mA/cm{sup 2} for untreated N-CNT at an applied electric field E{sub A} of {approx}1.9 V/{mu}m. The turn-on electric field (E{sub TO}) was {approx}0.875. The 1.25 V/{mu}m was achieved for N-CNT:Cl and N-CNT:O, respectively, with respect to E{sub TO}=1.0 V/{mu}m for untreated one. These findings are due to the formation of different bonds with carbon and nitrogen in the N-CNT during the process of chlorine (oxygen)-plasma treatment by the charge transfer, or else that changes the density of free charge carriers and hence enhances (reduces) the field emission properties of N-CNTs:Cl (N-CNTs:O)

Ray, S. C.; Palnitkar, U.; Pao, C. W.; Tsai, H. M.; Pong, W. F.; Lin, I-N. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [NRI, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, County Antrim BT37OQB, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Ganguly, Abhijit; Chen, L. C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, K. H. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulation involving oxidative Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

active phase. For example, thin metal oxide films have been... oxidation of carbon monoxide. Here, we present operando X-ray diffraction experiments on a palladium surface... ,...

99

Emissions and fuel economy of a prechamber diesel engine with natural gas dual fuelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A four-cylinder turbocharged prechamber diesel engine (Caterpillar 3304) was operated with natural gas and pilot diesel fuel ignition over a wide range of load and speed. Measurements were made of fuel consumption and the emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and the oxides of nitrogen. Improvements in fuel economy and emissions were found to be affected by the diesel fuel-gas fraction, and by air restriction and fuel injection timing. Boundaries of unstable, inefficient and knocking operation were defined and the importance of gas-air equivalance ratio was demonstrated in its effect on economy, emissions and stability of operation.

Ding, X.; Hill, P.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Vehicle-emission characteristics using mechanically emulsified alcohol/diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A light-duty diesel vehicle fueled with an emulsified alcohol/diesel fuel was operated under cyclic mode. Emission and fuel economy measurements were taken during vehicle operation. The test results showed the volumetric fuel economy decreased slightly. Carbon monoxide emissions increased slightly, and oxides of nitrogen showed no significant change. Particulate emissions were reduced slightly, and the particulate extractables increased slightly. The environmental effect of these data cancel each other resulting in no significant changes in the total release of biological activity into the environment.

Allsup, J.R.; Seizinger, D.E.; Cox, F.W.; Brook, A.L.; McClellan, R.O.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan [1] has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

Kumar Sridharan; Todd Allen; Mark Anderson; Guoping Cao; Gerald Kulcinski

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

102

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO{sub x} emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO{sub x} emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO{sub x} combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO[sub x] emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO[sub x] emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO[sub x] combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas, which method comprises: (a) contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate of the formula: ##STR1## wherein the water-soluble organic compound is selected from compounds of the formula: ##STR2## wherein: R is selected from hydrogen or an organic moiety having at least one polar functional group; Z is selected from oxygen, sulfur, or --N--A wherein N is nitrogen and A is hydrogen or lower alkyl having from one to four carbon atoms; and M is selected from hydrogen, sodium or potassium; and n is 1 or 2, in a contacting zone for a time and at a temperature effective to reduce the nitrogen monoxide. These mixtures are useful to provide an unexpensive method of removing NO from gases, thus reducing atmospheric pollution from flue gases.

Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA); Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monoxide Poisoning from Propane- Fueled Forklifts." JournalMonoxide Poisoning from Propane- Fueled Fotklifts" Journalto the Indoor Use of Propane-Fueled Forklifts in Colorado

Apte, Michael G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Carbon monoxide annealed TiO2 nanotube array electrodes for efficient biosensor applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide annealed TiO2 nanotube array electrodes for efficient biosensor applications by anodic oxidation of titanium foil followed with O2 and CO annealing were employed as matrices consisted of Ti3+ defects with carbon-doping and exhibited well defined quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric

Cao, Guozhong

107

Crystallization and mutational studies of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from moorella thermoacetica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase (CODH), also known as Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS), is one of seven known Ni containing enzymes. CODH/ACS is a bifunctional enzyme which oxidizes CO to CO2 reversibly and synthesizes acetyl-CoA. Recently, X-ray crystal...

Kim, Eun Jin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Effect of redox potential, sulfide ions and a persulfide forming cysteine residue on carbon monoxide dehydrogenase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ni-Fe-S C-cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODH), which catalyzes the reversible oxidation of CO to CO2, can be stabilized in four redox states: Cox, Cred1, Cint, and Cred2. The best-supported mechanism of catalysis involves a one...

Feng, Jian

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

109

Desorption of carbon monoxide from nickel using mercaptans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An IR spectroscopic study on the displacement of carbon monoxide with 1-propyl, 2-propyl-, 1-butyl-, 2-butyl-, and tert.-butyl mercaptan from nickel foil and silica-supported nickel showed that at low carbon monoxide coverage on supported nickel, mercaptan adsorption initially converted bridged to linear carbon monoxide surface species. At higher mercaptan pressures, carbon monoxide desorbed into the gas phase. A small amount of carbon monoxide remained on the surface when the poisoned sample was evacuated, and additional carbon monoxide adsorbed when 5 mm Hg of carbon monoxide was added to the evacuated sample.

Neff, L.D.; Sturdivant, A.E.; Wallace, J.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Emissions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the extra emissions that are generated from manufacturing the material used to make CNG tanks); they can amount tc more than 2% of the emissions from 32 the fuel production and...

111

Zero Emission Power Plants Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. (SWPC) is engaged in the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stationary power systems. SWPC has combined DOE Developmental funds with commercial customer funding to establish a record of successful SOFC field demonstration power systems of increasing size. SWPC will soon deploy the first unit of a newly developed 250 kWe Combined Heat Power System. It will generate electrical power at greater than 45% electrical efficiency. The SWPC SOFC power systems are equipped to operate on lower number hydrocarbon fuels such as pipeline natural gas, which is desulfurized within the SOFC power system. Because the system operates with a relatively high electrical efficiency, the CO2 emissions, {approx}1.0 lb CO2/ kW-hr, are low. Within the SOFC module the desulfurized fuel is utilized electrochemically and oxidized below the temperature for NOx generation. Therefore the NOx and SOx emissions for the SOFC power generation system are near negligible. The byproducts of the power generation from hydrocarbon fuels that are released into the environment are CO2 and water vapor. This forward looking DOE sponsored Vision 21 program is supporting the development of methods to capture and sequester the CO2, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system. To accomplish this, SWPC is developing a SOFC module design, to be demonstrated in operating hardware, that will maintain separation of the fuel cell anode gas, consisting of H2, CO, H2O and CO2, from the vitiated air. That anode gas, the depleted fuel stream, containing less than 18% (H2 + CO), will be directed to an Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) Afterburner that is being developed by Praxair, Inc.. The OTM is supplied air and the depleted fuel. The OTM will selectively transport oxygen across the membrane to oxidize the remaining H2 and CO. The water vapor is then condensed from the totally 1.5.DOC oxidized fuel stream exiting the afterburner, leaving only the CO2 in gaseous form. That CO2 can then be compressed and sequestered, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system operating on hydrocarbon fuel that adds only water vapor to the environment. Praxair has been developing oxygen separation systems based on dense walled, mixed electronic, oxygen ion conducting ceramics for a number of years. The oxygen separation membranes find applications in syngas production, high purity oxygen production and gas purification. In the SOFC afterburner application the chemical potential difference between the high temperature SOFC depleted fuel gas and the supplied air provides the driving force for oxygen transport. This permeated oxygen subsequently combusts the residual fuel in the SOFC exhaust. A number of experiments have been carried out in which simulated SOFC depleted fuel gas compositions and air have been supplied to either side of single OTM tubes in laboratory-scale reactors. The ceramic tubes are sealed into high temperature metallic housings which precludes mixing of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel and air streams. In early tests, although complete oxidation of the residual CO and H2 in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel was achieved, membrane performance degraded over time. The source of degradation was found to be contaminants in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream. Following removal of the contaminants, stable membrane performance has subsequently been demonstrated. In an ongoing test, the dried afterburner exhaust composition has been found to be stable at 99.2% CO2, 0.4% N2 and 0.6%O2 after 350 hours online. Discussion of these results is presented. A test of a longer, commercial demonstration size tube was performed in the SWPC test facility. A similar contamination of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream occurred and the performance degraded over time. A second test is being prepared. Siemens Westinghouse and Praxair are collaborating on the preliminary design of an OTM equipped Afterburner demonstration unit. The intent is to test the afterburner in conjunction with a reduced size SOFC test module that has the anode gas separati

Shockling, Larry A.; Huang, Keqin; Gilboy, Thomas E. (Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation); Christie, G. Maxwell; Raybold, Troy M. (Praxair, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

112

Photocatalytic destruction of automobile exhaust emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides contained in automobile exhaust emissions are among the major atmospheric air pollutants. During the first few minutes of a cold start of the engine, the emission levels of unburned hydrocarbon and CO pollutants are very high due to the inefficiency of the cold engine and the poor activity of the catalysts lower temperatures. Therefore, it is necessary to provide an alternative approach to deal with this specific problem in order to meet near-term regulatory requirements. Our approach has been to use known photocatalytic reactions obtainable on semiconducting powders such as titanium dioxide. In this presentation we describe our recent studies aimed at the photocatalytic reduction of unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide in automobile exhaust emissions. Our results demonstrate the effective destruction of propylene into water and carbon dioxide. The conversion was found to be dependent on the propylene flow rate. The reaction rate was studied as a function of time, humidity and temperature. The effect of the power of the UV source on conversion will also be presented.

Kaviranta, P.D.; Peden, C.H.F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Diesel exhaust emissions from engines for use in underground mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental data were obtained from two medium-duty diesel engines derated to qualify for use in underground mines. Gaseous and particulate emissions from these engines were measured and results provide information on the effect of exhaust treatment devices on the emissions. The devices in the study were a catalyst, a particulate trap, and an exhaust gas cooler of the water scrubber type. Emission levels of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons were observed to be very low in comparison with emission levels of comparable engines in full-rated operation. Oxides of nitrogen and benzo(a)pyrene content of the exhaust also were found to be somewhat low in comparison with previous findings. For particulate reduction, the combination of a particulate trap and a scrubber was observed to be the most effective combination tried; in some cases, over 60% particulate reduction was effected by the trap-scrubber combination.

Eccleston, B.H.; Seizinger, D.E.; Clingenpeel, J.M.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effects of the blends containing low ratios of alternative fuels on the performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to experimentally investigate the effects of blends containing various alternative fuels and diesel fuel on the performance and emissions of a diesel engine. The considered parameters are brake power, specific fuel consumption and thermal efficiency as well as carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide emissions. Blends of biodiesel, ethanol, methanol and vegetable oil with diesel fuel, each containing 15% alternative fuel in volume, were prepared. Then, these blends were tested in a naturally aspirated, direct injection diesel engine. The test results obtained with these blends were compared with those obtained with diesel fuel. It was found that the tested blends yielded usually different performance and emission characteristics compared to diesel fuel. The biodiesel blend resulted in performance parameters very close to those obtained in the use of diesel fuel. Ethanol and methanol blends yielded lower brake power, while they resulted in higher specific fuel consumption and lower carbon monoxide emissions. On the other hand, the vegetable oil blend yielded lower carbon monoxide emissions, while it caused only slight changes in the performance parameters.

Murat Karabektas; Gokhan Ergen; Murat Hosoz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Does the location of aircraft nitrogen oxide emissions affect their climate impact?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approximately balancing the IRF associated with aviation CO2 emissions (28 mWm�2 yr (TgNO2)�1 ). The overall climate impact of global aviation is often represented by a simple multiplier for CO2 emissions­3% of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions [Lee et al., 2009], yet these emissions fall outside the remit

116

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On-Road Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Road Emissions Estimates of Carbon Monoxide and Hydrocarbons for School and Transit Buses Report No. FHWY/NC/97Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Mobile Source Emissions 2 1.2 Emission Regulations 2 1.3 Emissions Contributions of "Non

Frey, H. Christopher

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft emissions simulation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute of Technology (MIT) Collection: Engineering 49 Inverting for emissions of carbon monoxide from Asia using aircraft observations over the western Pacific Summary:...

120

Exhaust emissions from two intercity passenger locomotives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To enhance the effectiveness of intercity passenger rail service in mitigating exhaust emissions in California, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) included limits on exhaust emissions in its intercity locomotive procurement specifications. Because there were no available exhaust emission test data on which emission reduction goals could be based, Caltrans funded a test program to acquire gaseous and particulate exhaust emissions data, along with smoke opacity data, from two state-of-the-art intercity passenger locomotives. The two passenger locomotives (an EMD F59PH and a GE DASH8-32BWH) were tested at the Association of American Railroads Chicago Technical Center. The EMD locomotive was equipped with a separate Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) 8V-149 diesel engine used to provide 480 V AC power for the trailing passenger cars. This DDC engine was also emission tested. These data were used to quantify baseline exhaust emission levels as a challenge to locomotive manufacturers to offer new locomotives with reduced emissions. Data from the two locomotive engines were recorded at standard fuel injection timing and with the fuel injection timing retarded 4 deg in an effort to reduce NO[sub x] emissions. Results of this emissions testing were incorporated into the Caltrans locomotive procurement process by including emission performance requirements in the Caltrans intercity passenger locomotive specification, and therefore in the procurement decision. This paper contains steady-state exhaust emission test results for hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]), and particulate matter (PM) from the two locomotives. Computed sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) emissions are also given, and are based on diesel fuel consumption and sulfur content. Exhaust smoke opacity is also reported.

Fritz, S.G. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Emissions Research)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 1 Gary A. Bishop, Sajal S to the national emission inventory.1 According to Heywood2 , carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles

Denver, University of

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - anesthetic nitrous oxide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

such concentrations of anesthetics are safe... ), hypoxemia (eg, nitrogen and carbon monoxide), addiction (eg, nitrous oxide), or health effects resulting... from chronic exposure...

123

The Performance of Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cells using Hydrogen-depleted Coal Syngas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since solid oxide fuel cells can operate on fuel containing both hydrogen and carbon monoxide, it may prove possible to remove hydrogen from syngas streams… (more)

Burnette, David D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

An oxygenating additive for improving the performance and emission characteristics of marine diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel engines provide the major power sources for marine transportation and contribute to the prosperity of the worldwide economy. However, the emissions from diesel engines also seriously threaten the environment and are considered one of the major sources of air pollution. The pollutants emitted from marine vessels are confirmed to cause the ecological environmental problems such as the ozone layer destruction, enhancement of the greenhouse effect, and acid rain, etc. Marine diesel engine emissions such as particulate matter and black smoke carry carcinogen components that significantly impact the health of human beings. Investigations on reducing pollutants, in particular particulate matter and nitrogen oxides are critical to human health, welfare and continued prosperity. The addition of an oxygenating agent into fuel oil is one of the possible approaches for reducing this problem because of the obvious fuel oil constituent influences on engine emission characteristics. Ethylene glycol monoacetate was found to be a promising candidate primarily due to its low poison and oxygen-rich composition properties. In this experimental study ethylene glycol monoacetate was mixed with diesel fuel in various proportions to prepare oxygenated diesel fuel. A four-cylinder diesel engine was used to test the engine performance and emission characteristics. The influences of ethylene glycol monoacetate ration to diesel oil, inlet air temperature and humidity parameters on the engine’s speed and torque were considered. The experimental results show that an increase in the inlet air temperature caused an increase in brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide emission, and exhaust gas temperature, while decreasing the excess air, oxygen and nitrogen oxide emission concentrations. Increasing the inlet air humidity increased the carbon monoxide concentration while the decreased excess air, oxygen and nitrogen oxide emission concentrations. In addition, increasing ethylene glycol monoacetate ratio in the diesel fuel caused an increase in the BSFC while the excess air and oxygen emission concentrations decreased.

C.-Y. Lin; J.-C. Huang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. , (2008a). Carbonyl and nitrogen dioxide emissions fromstudy of indoor nitrogen dioxide levels and respiratoryand modeled nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) concentrations. All

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Interaction of carbon monoxide with supported platinum catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of carbon monoxide with Pt/..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ containing 0.5-5% Pt by weight has been investigated by means of thermal desorption and IR spectroscopy. It has been shown that CO is adsorbed in three different forms, corresponding to the desorption temperature intervals 25-250/sup 0/C (I), and 250-700/sup 0/C (II), and 550-850/sup 0/C (III). In the adsorption of CO in the first two forms, the metal takes part (absorption band at 2080 cm/sup -1/), and also the support (1800, 1260, 1390, 1470, 1550, and 1640 cm/sup -1/). The adsorption in form III probably takes place on oxidized platinum centers with the formation of strong surface carbonate structures. High temperatures tend to increase the adsorption of CO in forms II and III.

Savel'eva, G.A.; Galeev, T.K.; Popova, N.M.; Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.; Mishchenko, V.M.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Carbon Monoxide Concentration Trends in Urban Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BOVE, J.L., AIRBORNE LEAD AND CARBON MONOXIDE...various procedures that release transmitter has been...conclusion for trans-mitter release. He also provided evidence...suburban counties, a larger fraction of the gasoline is undoubtedly...in the huts (indoor fires are used for space heating...

Merril Eisenbud; Laurel R. Ehrlich

1972-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Calculation of the emission of nitrogen oxides in electric resistance heating furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper is devoted to the least studied topic in the field of use of modern electric heating equipment, namely, pollution of the atmosphere by nitrogen oxides and reduction of the intensity of this e...

A. V. Aksenov; V. A. Belyakov; Z. G. Sadykova

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

131

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

132

Nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions from pelletized and nonpelletized poultry litter incorporated into soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While several studies have shown that the addition of animal manures to soil can increase N2O and CO2 emissions, limited information is available on the effect that manure physical characteristics can have on the...

M. L. Cabrera; S. C. Chiang; W. C. Merka; O. C. Pancorbo; S. A. Thompson

133

Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2001, the Technical Area 3 steam plant was the primary source of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while research and development activities were the primary source of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from chemical use for research and development activities were also reported.

Margorie Stockton

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

Wang, Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Enhanced carbon monoxide utilization in methanation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide - containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is subsequently reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Surprisingly, hydrogen and water vapor present in the feed gas do not adversely affect CO utilization significantly, and such hydrogen actually results in a significant increase in CO utilization.

Elek, Louis F. (Peekskill, NY); Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-produced electricity for battery electric vehicles. Already, vehicles powered by compressed natural gas, propane. LIPMAN AND MARK A. DELUCCHI example, promising strategies for powering motor vehicles with reduced GHGEMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES

Kammen, Daniel M.

137

High emissivity coatings on titanium alloy prepared by micro-arc oxidation for high temperature application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro-arc oxidation coatings were prepared on Ti6Al4V alloy in...3PO4-based electrolyte with different additives such as FeSO4, Co(CH3COO)2, Ni(CH3COO)2, and K2ZrF6. The composition, structure, surface morphology...

H. Tang; Q. Sun; C. G. Yi; Z. H. Jiang; F. P. Wang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Nitrous oxide emissions. Topical report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Published N{sub 2}O emissions data for experimental studies examining large numbers of coals are generally scarce at the pilot-scale fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) level, although some data are available at the laboratory scale. The primary objective of this study was to determine the atmospheric contribution of N{sub 2}O derived from coal combustion. Additionally, the goal was to establish a comprehensive engineering model to assist in the prediction of N{sub 2}O emissions based upon operating and design considerations. To meet the overall objectives of determining the overall contribution of N{sub 2}O derived from FBC and developing an engineering model seven tasks were originally proposed. The objective of each task as originally proposed and finally executed is presented in this topical report. The seven tasks were: (1) literature survey; (2) equipment design and test plan development; (3) experimental techniques; (4) pilot-scale determination of the impacts of coal properties and operating conditions on N{sub 2}O emissions; (5) role of coal char on N{sub 2}O formation and destruction; (6) homogeneous versus heterogeneous reactions; and (7) modeling of N{sub 2}O emissions.

Collings, M.E.; Mann, M.D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Control of air pollution emissions from municipal waste combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The November 1990 Clear Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) directed EPA to establish municipal waste combustor (MWC) emissions limits for particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, dioxins, dibenzofurans, cadmium, lead, and mercury. Revised MWC air pollution regulations were subsequently proposed by EPA on September 20, 1994, and promulgated on December 19, 1995. The MWC emission limits were based on the application of maximum achievable control technology (MACT). This paper provides a brief overview of MWC technologies, a summary of EPA`s revised air pollution rules for MWCs, a review of current knowledge concerning formation and control of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and a discussion of the behavior and control of mercury in MWC flue gases. 56 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Kolgroe, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Risk Management Research Lab.; Licata, A. [Licata Energy and Environmental Consultants, Inc., Yonkers, NY (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Performance analysis and exhaust emissions of neem methyl ester operated compression ignition engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neem oil methyl ester (NOME) was prepared from neem oil using alkaline catalyzed transesterification. The important fuel properties of NOME 20% blend of NOME with diesel were compared with those of diesel. Optimum injection pressures were determined for neat diesel and NOME-20 blend. Comparison of brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) brake thermal efficiency (BTE) exhaust gas temperature (EGT) and smoke density was done for diesel and NOME-20 blend at their respective optimum injection pressure. Higher BSFC a slight decrease in BTE and a sharp decrease in EGT and smoke density were recorded with NOME-20 blend. Emissions with NOME-20 blend were also compared with diesel emissions at their respective optimum injection pressures. Significant reductions in carbon monoxide hydrocarbon and oxides of nitrogen and increase in carbon-di-oxide were observed with NOME-20 blend. Hence neem biodiesel has an environmental importance over diesel and shows a promising future.

Vinod Singh Yadav; Kamal Kishore Khatri; Deepak Tanwar; Ajayta; Dilip Sharma; S. L. Soni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Isotopic equilibration of carbon monoxide catalyzed by supported ruthenium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopic equilibration of carbon monoxide catalyzed by supported ruthenium was studied with oxygen-18 and carbon-13 labeled carbon monoxide in the presence and absence of hydrogen. The results showed that carbon monoxide was present on commercial alumina-supported ruthenium in a reactive undissociated form at 373/sup 0/K; that it adsorbed as a single carbonyl and in a geminal dicarbonyl form; and that hydrogen inhibited the exchange reaction by competitive adsorption and by stabilizing the carbonyl bond. The results elucidate the carbon monoxide methanation and Fischer-Tropsch reactions on this catalyst.

Bossi, A. (Cent. Ric. Novara); Zanderighi, L.; Carnisio, G.; Garbassi, F.; Giunchi, G.; Petrini, G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

M. Stockton

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Los Angeles Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Los Angeles Area: Year 1 Gary A. Bishop.1 According to Heywood2 , carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles are at a maximum when the air

Denver, University of

144

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 1 Peter J. Popp, Sajal S to Heywood,2 carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles are at a maximum when the air/fuel ratio is rich

Denver, University of

145

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 1 Peter J. Popp, Gary A.1 Carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles are at a maximum when the air/fuel ratio is rich

Denver, University of

146

16 - Ultra-low nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions combustion in gas turbine systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The historical development of gas turbine low \\{NOx\\} combustion from the pioneering NASA work in the early 1970s to the present generation of ultra-low \\{NOx\\} industrial gas turbine combustors is reviewed. The principles of operation of single digit ultra-low \\{NOx\\} gas turbine combustion for industrial applications are outlined. The review shows the potential has been demonstrated by several investigators using different flame stabilizers for \\{NOx\\} to be reduced to 1 ppm at 1700 K, 2 ppm at 1800 K and 3–4 ppm at 1900 K with no influence of operating pressure and with a practical operating flame stability margin. Under these conditions it is shown that no thermal \\{NOx\\} should occur and all the \\{NOx\\} is formed by the prompt \\{NOx\\} mechanisms. The elimination of thermal \\{NOx\\} makes the \\{NOx\\} emissions independent of residence time or reference velocity and independent of pressure. Also there is no influence of air inlet temperature for the same flame temperature. Where legislation requires emissions to be as low as can be achieved, emissions below 4 ppm in production engines are current technology and this review shows the potential to get even lower than this in the future.

G.E. Andrews

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effect of idling on fuel consumption and emissions of a diesel engine fueled by Jatropha biodiesel blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An engine running at low load and low rated speed is said to be subject to high idling conditions, a mode which represents one of the major problems currently the transport industry is facing. During this time, the engine can not work at peak operating temperature. This leads to incomplete combustion and emissions level increase due to having fuel residues in the exhaust. Also, idling results in increase in fuel consumption. The purpose of this study is to evaluate fuel consumption and emissions parameters under high idling conditions when diesel blended with Jatropha curcas biodiesel is used to operate a diesel engine. Although biodiesel–diesel blends decrease carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions, they increase nitrogen oxides emissions in high idling modes. Compared to pure diesel fuel, fuel consumption also increases under all high idling conditions for biodiesel–diesel blends, with a further increase occurring as blend percentage rises.

S.M. Ashrafur Rahman; H.H. Masjuki; M.A. Kalam; M.J. Abedin; A. Sanjid; S. Imtenan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Reducing nitrogen oxides emissions from the combustion of LCV gas staged firing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with cotton gin tr ash, one of the primary fuels under consider ation, r esulted in flue NO levels ranging from 650-B60 ng/J (1. 5-2. 0 lb/MBtu). The Texas Air Control Board (TACB) will issue a facility a permit to operate only if NOx emissions are within... NO Methods of NOx Control Methods of NOx control may be lumped into two cate- gories: flue gas treatment (FGT) and combustion modifica- tion. The different processes are described below. Flue Gas Tr eatment Most of the research on FGT to date has been...

Finch, Stanley Frank

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main function of the CO instrument is to provide continuous accurate measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratio at the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) 60-meter tower (36.607 °N, 97.489 °W, 314 meters above sea level). The essential feature of the control and data acquisition system is to record signals from a Thermo Electron 48C and periodically calibrate out zero and span drifts in the instrument using the combination of a CO scrubber and two concentrations of span gas (100 and 300 ppb CO in air). The system was deployed on May 25, 2005.

Biraud, S

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient carbon monoxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FACT SHEET Carbon monoxide (CO), known as the Invisible Killer... , propane, oil, wood, coal, and gasoline. Exposure to carbon monoxide can cause flu-like symptoms and can... .)...

151

The Catalysis of the Carbon Monoxide-Steam Reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The Catalysis of the Carbon Monoxide-Steam Reaction F. J. Long K. W. Sykes The kinetics of the carbon monoxide-steam reaction occurring heterogeneously at...nearly unity, while that with respect to steam is correspondingly lowered; a slight...

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Emissions Inventory Report Summary Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is subject to emissions reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The Laboratory has the potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, and volatile organic compounds. For 1998, combustion products from the industrial sources contributed the greatest amount of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory. Research and development activities contributed the greatest amount of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20 NMAC 2.72 Construction Permits.

Air Quality Group, ESH-17

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Influence of Oxidized Biodiesel Blends on Regulated and Unregulated Emissions from a Diesel Passenger Car  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Few studies are available on modern passenger cars, employed common-rail engine systems, and after-treatment technologies, and even fewer studies report results, which are not necessarily representative of actual driving conditions, making it difficult to assess the fuel impact on diesel car fleet emissions. ... Although gasoline engines are expected to be replaced by hydrogen-powered fuel cells, compression-ignition engines, the diesel engines, are expected to remain in use for high-power applications because of limitations of hydrogen-storage densities. ... transesterification and sequential esterification-transesterification, followed by washing in water in both cases, in order to set out the most suitable operational conditions to achieve the highest FAME percentage in the shortest time. ...

Georgios Karavalakis; Evangelos Bakeas; Stamos Stournas

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Process for producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen from methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen which comprises contacting methanol vapor at a temperature of 200 degrees to 300 degrees C with an indirectly heated zinc containing catalyst to obtain an effluent gas in which the components of carbon monoxide and hydrogen constitute at least 90% by volume of said gas. At least a part of the impurities from said effluent gas are removed and said effluent gas is deparated into its carbon monoxide and hydrogen components by adsorption. The effluent gas can be separated into its carbon monoxide and hydrogen components by use of a plurality of adsorbers containing zeolite-type molecular sieve material where the zeolite is substantially permeable to hydrogen but sorbs carbon monoxide.

Jockel, H.; Marschner, F.; Moller, F.W.; Mortel, H.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Carbon monoxide exposure of subjects with documented cardiac arrhythmias  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of low-level carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency in patients with ischemic heart disease has not been thoroughly studied. The issue is of concern because of the potential proarrhythmic effect of carbon monoxide in patients with ischemic heart disease. We studied 30 subjects with well-documented coronary artery disease who had an average of at least 30 ventricular ectopic beats per hour over a 20-hour monitoring interval. By using appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria, subjects were selected and enrolled in a randomized double-blind study to determine the effects of carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency at rest, during exercise, and during ambulatory activities. The carbon monoxide exposure was designed to result in 3% or 5% carboxyhemoglobin levels, as measured by gas chromatography. The carbon monoxide exposure protocol produced target levels in 60 minutes, and the levels were maintained for an additional 90 minutes to provide adequate time to assess the impact of carbon monoxide on the frequency of ventricular ectopic beats. The data on total and repetitive ventricular arrhythmias were analyzed for seven specific time intervals: (1) two hours before carbon monoxide exposure; (2) during the two-hour carbon monoxide or air exposure; (3) during a two-hour rest period; (4) during an exercise period; (5) during an exercise recovery period; (6) six hours after carbon monoxide or air exposure; and (7) approximately 10 hours after exposure, or the remaining recording interval on the Holter monitor. There was no increase in ventricular arrhythmia frequency after carbon monoxide exposure, regardless of the level of carboxyhemoglobin or the type of activity.

Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E.; Byers, S.; Carroll, L.W.; Younis, L.T.; Wiens, R.D. (St. Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Comparison of Three CarbonComparison of Three Carbon Monoxide Databases in ConnecticutMonoxide Databases in Connecticut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Three CarbonComparison of Three Carbon Monoxide Databases in ConnecticutMonoxide Databases in Connecticut Brian Toal, MSPHBrian Toal, MSPH Patricia Miskell, MPHPatricia Miskell, MPH Connecticut Department of Public HealthConnecticut Department of Public Health Environmental & Occupational

157

On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors for Individual Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Title On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors for Individual Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Dallmann, Timothy R., Steven J. DeMartini, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Scott C. Herndon, Timothy B. Onasch, Ezra C. Wood, and Robert A. Harley Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 46 Issue 15 Pagination 8511-8518 Abstract Pollutant concentrations in the exhaust plumes of individual diesel trucks were measured at high time resolution in a highway tunnel in Oakland, CA, during July 2010. Emission factors for individual trucks were calculated using a carbon balance method, in which pollutants measured in each exhaust plume were normalized to measured concentrations of carbon dioxide. Pollutants considered here include nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, ethene, and black carbon (BC), as well as optical properties of emitted particles. Fleet-average emission factors for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and BC respectively decreased 30 ± 6 and 37 ± 10% relative to levels measured at the same location in 2006, whereas a 34 ± 18% increase in the average NO2 emission factor was observed. Emissions distributions for all species were skewed with a small fraction of trucks contributing disproportionately to total emissions. For example, the dirtiest 10% of trucks emitted half of total NO2 and BC emissions. Emission rates for NO2 were found to be anticorrelated with all other species considered here, likely due to the use of catalyzed diesel particle filters to help control exhaust emissions. Absorption and scattering cross-section emission factors were used to calculate the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, at 532 nm) for individual truck exhaust plumes, which averaged 0.14 ± 0.03.

158

Investigations on emission characteristics of the pongamia biodiesel–diesel blend fuelled twin cylinder compression ignition direct injection engine using exhaust gas recirculation methodology and dimethyl carbonate as additive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out on a twin cylinder direct injection compression ignition engine using pongamia biodiesel–diesel blend as fuel with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) as additive. The experimental results showed that pongamia biodiesel–diesel blend fuelled engine with EGR and DMC can simultaneously reduce smoke and nitric oxide ( NO x ) emission. The NO x emission was reduced by about 17.68% for 10% of EGR introduction and about 13.55% increase in smoke emission. When dimethyl carbonate was added with EGR the engine emits lower smoke with lesser NO x emission and it showed that the smoke reduction rate had a linear relationship with DMC percentage. The carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions also decreased when DMC was added. However the addition of DMC with EGR caused an increase in both BSEC and BTE.

M. Pandian; S. P. Sivapirakasam; M. Udayakumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Reduction of Carbon Monoxide. Past Research Summary  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Research programs for the year on the preparation, characterization, and reactions of binuclear tantalum complexes are described. All evidence to date suggest the following of these dimeric molecules: (1) the dimer does not break into monomers under mild conditions; (2) intermolecular hydride exchange is not negligible, but it is slow; (3) intermolecular non-ionic halide exchange is fast; (4) the ends of the dimers can rotate partially with respect to one another. The binuclear tantalum hydride complexes were found to react with carbon monoxide to give a molecule which is the only example of reduction of CO by a transition metal hydride to give a complex containing a CHO ligand. Isonitrides also reacted in a similar manner with dimeric tantalum hydride. (ATT)

Schrock, R. R.

1982-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

160

Titanium monoxide spectroscopy following laser-induced optical breakdown  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work investigates Titanium Monoxide (TiO) in ablation-plasma by employing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with 1 to 10 TW/cm{sup 2} irradiance, pulsed, 13 nanosecond, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The analysis of TiO is based on our first accurate determination of transition line strengths for selected TiO A-X, B-X, and E-X transitions, particularly TiO A-X {gamma} and B-X {gamma} Prime bands. Electric dipole line strengths for the A{sup 3}{Phi}-X{sup 3}{delta} and B{sup 3}{Pi}-X{sup 3}{delta} bands of TiO are computed. The molecular TiO spectra are observed subsequent to laser-induced breakdown (LIB). We discuss analysis of diatomic molecular spectra that may occur simultaneously with spectra originating from atomic species. Gated detection is applied to investigate the development in time of the emission spectra following LIB. Collected emission spectra allow one to infer micro-plasma parameters such as temperature and electron density. Insight into the state of the micro-plasma is gained by comparing measurements with predictions of atomic and molecular spectra. Nonlinear fitting of recorded and computed diatomic spectra provides the basis for molecular diagnostics, while atomic species may overlap and are simultaneously identified. Molecular diagnostic approaches similar to TiO have been performed for diatomic molecules such as AlO, C{sub 2}, CN, CH, N{sub 2}, NH, NO and OH.

Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.; Keszler, Anna; Nemes, Laszlo; Hornkohl, James O. [The University of Tennessee/UT Space Institute, Center for Laser Applications, 411 B.H. Goethert Parkway, Tullahoma, TN 37388-9700 (United States); Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, H-1025 Budapest (Hungary); Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, H-1025 Budapest (Hungary); Hornkohl Consulting, Tullahoma, TN 37388 (United States)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Nickel and iron EXAFS of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum strain DSM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nickel and iron EXAFS of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum strain DSM ...

Neil R. Bastian; Gabriele. Diekert; Eric C. Niederhoffer; Boon Keng. Teo; Christopher T. Walsh; William H. Orme-Johnson

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Carbon monoxide sensor and method of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide sensors suitable for use in hydrogen feed streams and methods of use thereof are disclosed. The sensors are palladium metal/insulator/semiconductor (Pd-MIS) sensors which may possess a gate metal layer having uniform, Type 1, or non-uniform, Type 2, film morphology. Type 1 sensors display an increased sensor response in the presence of carbon monoxide while Type 2 sensors display a decreased response to carbon monoxide. The methods and sensors disclosed herein are particularly suitable for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs).

McDaniel; Anthony H. (Livermore, CA), Medlin; J. Will (Boulder, CO), Bastasz; Robert J. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

Transition metal-promoted oxygen ion conductors as oxidation catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons was prepared by combining oxygen ion conducting materials with active transition metals. The oxygen ion conductors used were typical fluorite-type oxides, such as ceria, zirconia, and others. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of oxygen ion conductors. The intimate contact of the two kinds of materials gave rise to a highly active oxidation catalyst. On Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts, 95% of carbon monoxide was oxidized by air at {approximately} 100 C. Complete methane oxidation on the same catalyst took place at {approximately} 550 C. When the stoichiometric amount of sulfur dioxide was sued to oxidize carbon monoxide, 96% of sulfur dioxide was reduced to elemental sulfur at temperatures above 460 C with 99% of sulfur dioxide conversion. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water poisoning.

Liu, W.; Sarofim, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - al4o2cl102- oxide species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

active phase. For example, thin metal oxide films have been... oxidation of carbon monoxide. Here, we present operando X-ray diffraction ... Source: Frenken, J.W.M. - Leiden...

165

Dynamic Incompressible Navier-Stokes Model of Catalytic Converter in 1-D Including Fundamental Oxidation Reaction Rate Expressions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, this work includes the history of the fundamental reactions of automotive catalysts including carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2) and nitric oxide (NO) oxidation on a widely used material formulation (platinum catalyst on alumina washcoat). A detailed report...

Loya, Sudarshan Kedarnath

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Impact of N2 dilution on combustion and emissions in a spark ignition CNG engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to reduce \\{NOx\\} (nitrogen oxides) emissions, N2 (nitrogen) was introduced as dilution gas to dilute mixture with a specially-designed injection device. The impacts of varying N2 DR (dilution ratio) on the combustion and the exhaust emissions were investigated, including engine heat release rate, indicator diagram, NOx, CO (carbon monoxide), THC (total hydrocarbon) emissions and so on. For this study, a modified 6.6 L CNG (compressed natural gas) engine was tested and N2 was injected into the end of intake manifold by a specially-designed device. The results showed that N2 dilution has a significant influence on the combustion and the exhaust emissions. With the rise of N2 DR, the maximum of pressure in cylinder and the maximum of heat release rate exhibited decrease trends, the centre of heat release curve showed a moving backward tendency. Higher N2 DR exhibited lower \\{NOx\\} (17–81%) emissions, but higher emissions of THC (3–78%) and CO (1–28%). The change of BSFC (brake specific fuel consumption) can be ignored with N2 DR no more than 167%. Satisfactory results can be obtained, with lower \\{NOx\\} (31%) emissions, lower BSFC (0.5%), and relatively higher THC (6%) and CO (1%) emissions, when N2 DR is 67%.

Zhongshu Wang; Hongbin Zuo; Zhongchang Liu; Weifeng Li; Huili Dou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization October 5, 2010 - 10:56am Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this mean for me? Getting your heating pipes fixed can not only save you money, but also improve your health. "If we'd had a couple cold nights where I would've had to use my heat more than usual, it probably would've put me to sleep and left me there -- it was just too much carbon monoxide coming out in the house," says Mark Pickartz, of Van Buren, Ark. Pickartz's home was weatherized in February by his local community action agency, Crawford-Sebastian Community Development Council (C-SCDC). When energy auditors arrived to his house, they found that his home's heater was severely leaking the poisonous gas. C-SCDC, based in Fort Smith, Ark.,

168

Carbon Monoxide Toxicity after Lighting Coals at a Hookah Bar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unintentional non-fire-related (UNFR) carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings continue to account for a significant health and economic burden in the United States. While most of these poisonings are related to faulty...

Ryan Misek; Christine Patte

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Carbon monoxide-silicon carbide interaction in HTGR fuel particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The corrosion of the coating-layers of silicon carbide (SiC) by carbon monoxide (CO) was observed in irradiated Triso-coated uranium dioxide particles, used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, by optical ...

Kazuo Minato; Toru Ogawa; Satoru Kashimura; Kousaku Fukuda…

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Emission characteristics of GTL fuel as an alternative to conventional marine gas oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study examine the gaseous, smoke and particulate matter emission characteristics of a turbocharged heavy-duty diesel engine operated on conventional marine gas oil and gas-to-liquid Fischer–Tropsch fuel under modes of propulsion and generator operation. The gas-to-liquid showed average reductions up to 19% in nitrogen oxides, 25% in carbon monoxide, 4% in carbon dioxide and 30% in smoke with slight increase in unburned hydrocarbon emissions. Particulate number concentrations for gas-to-liquid were up to 21% higher, whereas particulates mass showed a 16% decrease at medium and high loads, while increasing by 12–15% under lower load conditions. Very low aromatic content of gas-to-liquid fuel and nearly zero sulfur level are responsible for particulate reduction.

Sergey Ushakov; Nadine G.M. Halvorsen; Harald Valland; Dag H. Williksen; Vilmar Æsøy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Intelligent emissions controller for substance injection in the post-primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The control of emissions from fossil-fired boilers wherein an injection of substances above the primary combustion zone employs multi-layer feedforward artificial neural networks for modeling static nonlinear relationships between the distribution of injected substances into the upper region of the furnace and the emissions exiting the furnace. Multivariable nonlinear constrained optimization algorithms use the mathematical expressions from the artificial neural networks to provide the optimal substance distribution that minimizes emission levels for a given total substance injection rate. Based upon the optimal operating conditions from the optimization algorithms, the incremental substance cost per unit of emissions reduction, and the open-market price per unit of emissions reduction, the intelligent emissions controller allows for the determination of whether it is more cost-effective to achieve additional increments in emission reduction through the injection of additional substance or through the purchase of emission credits on the open market. This is of particular interest to fossil-fired electrical power plant operators. The intelligent emission controller is particularly adapted for determining the economical control of such pollutants as oxides of nitrogen (NO.sub.x) and carbon monoxide (CO) emitted by fossil-fired boilers by the selective introduction of multiple inputs of substances (such as natural gas, ammonia, oil, water-oil emulsion, coal-water slurry and/or urea, and combinations of these substances) above the primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers.

Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL); Feldman, Earl E. (Willowbrook, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Glickert, Roger W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Determination of the atherogenic potential of inhaled carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

he effects of chronic exposure to moderate levels of carbon monoxide upon the augmentation of arteriosclerotic plaque development were investigated in a series of in vivo studies in the cockerel (young rooster). This animal model has been well characterized, especially regarding the role of environmental agents in exacerbating early stages of plaque development. Cockerels injected with subtumorigenic doses of carcinogens exhibit markedly accelerated development of aortic arteriosclerotic plaques. Inhalation of mainstream smoke from two packs of cigarettes (100 minutes/day for 16 weeks) causes small but statistically significant increases in plaque size. As is the case with many animal models of plaque development, raised fat-proliferative plaques also appear in these animals following cholesterol feeding. Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous pollutant in urban environments, where it is derived largely from mobile sources and cigarette smoke. Exposure to chronically elevated carbon monoxide levels has been implicated in a number of health-related problems. Whether such exposure plays a role in the development of arteriosclerosis has not been determined conclusively. In the present study, three questions were posed: 1. Will inhaled carbon monoxide at levels of 50 to 200 parts per million (ppm)* (two hours/day for 16 weeks) be sufficient to augment arteriosclerotic plaque development in cockerels, in the absence of other plaque-promoting agents 2. Will the inhalation of 100 ppm carbon monoxide (two hours/day for 16 weeks), concomitant with the feeding of low levels (0.1%) of cholesterol, yield larger plaques than those obtained with either of these agents administered alone 3. Will inhalation of 100 ppm carbon monoxide (two hours/day for 11 or 22 weeks), by cockerels in whom plaques have already appeared, further augment plaque development Cockerels were exposed to carefully regulated levels of carbon monoxide in stainless-steel and Plexiglas dynamic exposure chambers.

Penn, A. (New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A population-based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a carbon monoxide passive sampler and occupational dosimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two devices, an occupational carbon monoxide (CO) dosimeter (LOCD), and an indoor air quality (IAQ) passive sampler were developed for use in population-based CO exposure assessment studies. CO exposure is a serious public health problem in the U.S., causing both morbidity and mortality (lifetime mortality risk approximately 10{sup -4}). Sparse data from population-based CO exposure assessments indicate that approximately 10% of the U.S. population is exposed to CO above the national ambient air quality standard. No CO exposure measurement technology is presently available for affordable population-based CO exposure assessment studies. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested in the laboratory and field. The palladium-molybdenum based CO sensor was designed into a compact diffusion tube sampler that can be worn. Time-weighted-average (TWA) CO exposure of the device is quantified by a simple spectrophotometric measurement. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested over an exposure range of 40 to 700 ppm-hours and 200 to 4200 ppm-hours, respectively. Both devices were capable of measuring precisely (relative standard deviation <20%), with low bias (<10%). The LOCD was screened for interferences by temperature, humidity, and organic and inorganic gases. Temperature effects were small in the range of 10{degrees}C to 30{degrees}C. Humidity effects were low between 20% and 90% RH. Ethylene (200 ppm) caused a positive interference and nitric oxide (50 ppm) caused a negative response without the presence of CO but not with CO.

Apte, M.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Combustion and emission characteristics of a turbocharged diesel engine using high premixed ratio of methanol and diesel fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combustion and emission characteristics of a dual fuel diesel engine with high premixed ratio of methanol (PRm) were investigated. Experiments were performed on a 6-cylinder turbocharged, inter-cooling diesel engine. Methanol was injected through the intake port and ignited by direct injected diesel in the cylinder, the maximum \\{PRm\\} was over 70%. The experimental results showed that with high PRm, the maximum in-cylinder pressure increased from medium to high engine load but varied little or even decreased at low engine speed and load. High \\{PRm\\} prolonged the ignition delay but shortened the combustion duration and decreased the in-cylinder gas temperature at ignition timing. Hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), formaldehyde emissions and the proportion of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in nitrogen oxides (NOX) increased significantly with the increase of \\{PRm\\} while NOX and dry soot emissions were significantly reduced, which meant the trade-off relationship between NOX and soot emissions disappeared. The increased HC, CO and formaldehyde emissions could be effectively reduced by diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) when the exhaust gas temperature reached the light off temperature of the DOC. After DOC, the NO2 proportion in NOX was greatly reduced to less than that of baseline engine at methanol premixed mode but increased slightly at pure diesel mode. The maximum \\{PRm\\} was confined by in-cylinder pressure at high engine speed and load. But at low engine speed and load, it was confined by the high emissions of HC, CO and formaldehyde even after DOC.

Lijiang Wei; Chunde Yao; Quangang Wang; Wang Pan; Guopeng Han

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Diesel emission control: Catalytic filters for particulate removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The European diesel engine industry represents a vital sector across the Continent, with more than 2 million direct work positions and a turnover of over 400 billion Euro. Diesel engines provide large paybacks to society since they are extensively used to transport goods, services and people. In recent years increasing attention has been paid to the emissions from diesel engines which, like gasoline engine emissions, include carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Diesel engines also produce significant levels of particulate matter (PM), which consists mostly of carbonaceous soot and a soluble organic fraction (SOF) of hydrocarbons that have condensed on the soot.Meeting the emission levels imposed for NOx and PM by legislation (Euro IV in 2005 and, in the 2008 perspective, Euro V) requires the development of a number of critical technologies to fulfill these very stringent emission limits (e.g. 0.005 g/km for PM). This review is focused on these innovative technologies with special reference to catalytic traps for diesel particulate removal.

Debora Fino

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reduction of particulate matter and gaseous emission from marine diesel engines using a catalyzed particulate filter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel engines are used widely as the power sources of coastal ships and international vessels primarily due to their high thermal efficiency, high fuel economy and durable performance. However, the gaseous and solid substances exhausted from diesel engines during the combustion process cause air pollution, in particular around harbor regions. In order to effectively reduce particulate matter and gaseous pollution emissions, a catalyzed particulate filter was equipped in the tail pipe of a marine diesel engine. The engine's performance and emission characteristics under various engine speeds and torques were measured using a computerized engine data control and acquisition system accompanied with an engine dynamometer. The effectiveness of installing a catalyzed particulate filter on the reduction of pollutant emissions was examined. The experimental results show that the exhaust gas temperature, carbon monoxide and smoke opacity were reduced significantly upon installation of the particulate filter. In particular, larger conversion of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide — and thus larger CO2 and lower CO emissions — were observed for the marine diesel engine equipped with a catalyzed particulate filter and operated at higher engine speeds. This is presumably due to enhancement of the catalytic oxidation reaction that results from an exhaust gas with stronger stirring motion passing through the filter. The absorption of partial heating energy from the exhaust gas by the physical structure of the particulate filter resulted in a reduction in the exhaust gas temperature. The particulate matter could be burnt to a greater extent due to the effect of the catalyst coated on the surface of the particulate filter. Moreover, the fuel consumption rate was increased slightly while the excess oxygen emission was somewhat decreased with the particulate filter.

Cherng-Yuan Lin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nitrogen Oxides, Sulphur Trioxide and Mercury Emissions during Oxy-Fuel Fluidized Bed Combustion of Victorian Brown Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates, for the first time, the NOX, N2O, SO3 and Hg emissions from combustion of a Victorian brown coal in a 10 kWth fluidized bed unit under oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Compared to air combustion, lower NOX emissions and higher N2O ...

Bithi Roy; Luguang Chen; Sankar Bhattacharya

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Impact of natural gas fuel composition on criteria, toxic, and particle emissions from transit buses equipped with lean burn and stoichiometric engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigated the impacts of varying natural gas composition on the exhaust emissions from different technology transit buses. For this study, two CNG (compressed natural gas) buses equipped with lean burn combustion and \\{OCs\\} (oxidation catalysts), and one stoichiometric CNG bus equipped with a TWC (three-way catalyst) and EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) were tested on a chassis dynamometer over the CBD (Central Business District) cycle on six different gas blends each. The gases represented a range of compositions from gases with high levels of methane and correspondingly lower energy contents/WN (Wobbe number) to gases with higher levels of heavier hydrocarbons and correspondingly higher energy contents/WN. For the lean burn buses, gases with low methane contents exhibited higher \\{NOx\\} (nitrogen oxides) (19%–53%) and NMHC (non-methane hydrocarbon) (39%–102%) emissions, but lower emissions of THC (total hydrocarbon) (9%–24%), CH4 (methane) (23%–33%), and formaldehyde emissions (14%–45%). The stoichiometric engine bus with a TWC showed significantly reduced \\{NOx\\} and THC emissions compared to the lean burn buses, but did show higher levels of CO (carbon monoxide) and NH3 (ammonia). PM (particulate matter) mass emissions did not show any fuel effects, while PN (particle number) emissions exhibited some reductions for the higher WN gases.

Maryam Hajbabaei; Georgios Karavalakis; Kent C. Johnson; Linda Lee; Thomas D. Durbin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effect of E85 on Tailpipe Emissions from Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

E85, which consists of nominally 85% fuel grade ethanol and 15% gasoline, must be used in flexible-fuel (or 'flexfuel') vehicles (FFVs) that can operate on fuel with an ethanol content of 0-85%. Published studies include measurements of the effect of E85 on tailpipe emissions for Tier 1 and older vehicles. Car manufacturers have also supplied a large body of FFV certification data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, primarily on Tier 2 vehicles. These studies and certification data reveal wide variability in the effects of E85 on emissions from different vehicles. Comparing Tier 1 FFVs running on E85 to similar non-FFVs running on gasoline showed, on average, significant reductions in emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 54%), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs; 27%), and carbon monoxide (CO; 18%) for E85. Comparing Tier 2 FFVs running on E85 and comparable non-FFVs running on gasoline shows, for E85 on average, a significant reduction in emissions of CO (20%), and no significant effect on emissions of non-methane organic gases (NMOGs). NOx emissions from Tier 2 FFVs averaged approximately 28% less than comparable non-FFVs. However, perhaps because of the wide range of Tier 2 NOx standards, the absolute difference in NOx emissions between Tier 2 FFVs and non-FFVs is not significant (P 0.28). It is interesting that Tier 2 FFVs operating on gasoline produced approximately 13% less NMOGs than non-FFVs operating on gasoline. The data for Tier 1 vehicles show that E85 will cause significant reductions in emissions of benzene and butadiene, and significant increases in emissions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in comparison to emissions from gasoline in both FFVs and non-FFVs. The compound that makes up the largest proportion of organic emissions from E85-fueled FFVs is ethanol.

Yanowitz, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Terpolymerization of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a high molecular weight terpolymer of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide stable to 280.degree. C. and containing as little as 36 mol % ethylene and about 41-51 mol % sulfur dioxide; and to the method of producing said terpolymer by irradiation of a liquid and gaseous mixture of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide by means of Co-60 gamma rays or an electron beam, at a temperature of about 10.degree.-50.degree. C., and at a pressure of about 140 to 680 atmospheres, to initiate polymerization.

Johnson, Richard (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Tin oxide based gas sensor for in-door air quality monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tin oxide nanograins doped with 0.1 at% of antimony have shown highly sensitivity towards tail gas, carbon monoxide and second-hand smoke. Such sensors are very useful for air quality...

Zhu, Lianfeng; Gai, Guosheng; Zhang, Changyue; Ji, Xuewen; Yao, Youwei

184

Estimation of nitrous oxide emissions (GHG) from wastewater treatment plants using closed-loop mass balance and data reconciliation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The amount of greenhouse gases (GHG), especially, nitrous oxide (N2O) emitted from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) using data reconciliation and closed-loop mass balance was estimated. This study is based on a...

JungJin Lim; Boddupalli Sankarrao; TaeSeok Oh…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Effect of encapsulated calcium carbide on dinitrogen, nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide emissions from flooded rice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficiency of N use in flooded rice is usually low, chiefly due to gaseous losses. Emission of CH4, a gas implicated in global warming, can also be substantial in flooded rice. In a greenhouse study, the nitr...

K. F. Bronson; A. R. Mosier

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Photobiogeochemical cycling of carbon monoxide in the southeastern Beaufort Sea in spring and autumn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photobiogeochemical cycling of carbon monoxide in the southeastern Beaufort Sea in spring the distribution, photoproduction, microbial uptake, and air­sea exchange of carbon monoxide (CO), a key that in warmer seas. Carbon monoxide (CO) is the dominant sink for hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, thus

Vincent, Warwick F.

187

Mechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice analog samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be produced via radiolysis of carbon monoxide ices.5 Indeed, the effects of ionizing radiation on pure carbonMechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice901220f Binary ice mixtures of two carbon monoxide isotopomers, 13 C16 O and 12 C18 O, were subjected

Kaiser, Ralf I.

188

Emission Changes Resulting from the San Pedro Bay, California Ports Truck Retirement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emissions regulations have resulted in lower emissions of particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen from heavy-duty diesel trucks. To accelerate fleet turnover the State of California in 2008 along with the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach (San Pedro Bay Ports) in 2006 passed regulations establishing timelines forcing the retirement of older diesel trucks. On-road emissions measurements of heavy-duty diesel trucks were collected over a three-year period, beginning in 2008, at a Port of Los Angeles location and an inland weigh station on the Riverside freeway (CA SR91). At the Port location the mean fleet age decreased from 12.7 years in April of 2008 to 2.5 years in May of 2010 with significant reductions in carbon monoxide (30%), oxides of nitrogen (48%) and infrared opacity (a measure of particulate matter, 54%). We also observed a 20-fold increase in ammonia emissions as a result of new, stoichiometrically combusted, liquefied natural gas powered trucks. These results compare with changes at our inland site where the average ages were 7.9 years in April of 2008 and 8.3 years in April of 2010, with only small reductions in oxides of nitrogen (10%) being statistically significant. Both locations have experienced significant increases in nitrogen dioxide emissions from new trucks equipped with diesel particle filters; raising the mean nitrogen dioxide to oxides of nitrogen ratios from less than 10% to more than 30% at the Riverside freeway location.

Bishop, G. A.; Schuchmann, B. G.; Stedman, D. H.; Lawson, D. R.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Operating with In-Cylinder Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blending  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced combustion regimes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer benefits of reduced nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, these combustion strategies often generate higher carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. In addition, aldehydes and ketone emissions can increase in these modes. In this study, the engine-out emissions of a compression-ignition engine operating in a fuel reactivity- controlled PCCI combustion mode using in-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuel have been characterized. The work was performed on a 1.9-liter, 4-cylinder diesel engine outfitted with a port fuel injection system to deliver gasoline to the engine. The engine was operated at 2300 rpm and 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) with the ratio of gasoline to diesel fuel that gave the highest engine efficiency and lowest emissions. Engine-out emissions for aldehydes, ketones and PM were compared with emissions from conventional diesel combustion. Sampling and analysis was carried out following micro-tunnel dilution of the exhaust. Particle geometric mean diameter, number-size distribution, and total number concentration were measured by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For the particle mass measurements, samples were collected on Teflon-coated quartz-fiber filters and analyzed gravimetrically. Gaseous aldehydes and ketones were sampled using dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated solid phase extraction cartridges and the extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In addition, emissions after a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) were also measured to investigate the destruction of CO, HC and formaldehydes by the catalyst.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Kinetics of the Reduction of Wüstite by Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide for the Chemical Looping Production of Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced could be stored, e.g. by geological sequestration, making the overall process “carbon-neutral”, or “carbon-negative” when biomass is used as fuel. In addition, the hydrogen produced during the oxidation of FexO and metallic Fe in steam can be kept... Kinetics of the reduction of wüstite by hydrogen and carbon monoxide for the chemical looping production of hydrogen Wen Liu a,n, Jin Yang Lim b, Marco A. Saucedo a, Allan N. Hayhurst b, Stuart A. Scott a, J.S. Dennis b a Department of Engineering...

Liu, Wen; Lim, Jin Yang; Saucedo, Marco A.; Hayhurst, Allan N.; Scott, Stuart A.; Dennis, J. S.

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

Infrared spectra of carbon monoxide adsorbed on palladium black  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors investigate the heterogeneous adsorption of carbon monoxide and the concurrent catalytic and sorptive properties of palladium black from the standpoint of a comprehensive analysis of the infrared spectra of the reaction pathways and their various products as well as the pressure dependence of the line behavior at various wavelengths.

Vozdvizhenskii, V.F.; Levintova, T.D.; Sokol'skii, D.V.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

States of cobalt and iron in catalysts supported in TiO{sub 2} from data of diffuse reflectance IR spectra of adsorbed carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The variations in the oxidation states of cobalt and iron atoms in pure and mixed Co- and Fe-containing catalysts supported on TiO{sub 2} as a function of the conditions in which the catalysts were prepared and preliminarily treated were studied by analysis of the IR spectra of carbon monoxide adsorbed on these catalysts. A mutual influence of the components was discovered; iron was found to promote reduction of cobalt.

Davydov, A.A. [G.K. Boreskov Inst. of Catalysis, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Coville, N. [Univ. of the Wiswatersrand Wits, Johannesburg (South Africa)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Effect of use of low oxygenate gasoline blends upon emissions from California vehicles. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to investigate the emissions effects of low-oxygenate gasoline blends on exhaust and evaporative emissions from a test fleet of California certified light-duty autos. Thirteen vehicles were procured and tested using four gasoline-oxygenate blends over three test cycles. The four gasoline blends were: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE), Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE), and 'match' and 'splash' blends of ethanol (in the 'match' blend the fuel Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) is held constant, while in the 'splash' blend the fuel RVP is allowed to increase). Hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide exhaust emissions were generally reduced for the oxygenated blends, the exception being the 'splash-blended' ethanol gasoline which showed mixed results. Older technology vehicles (e.g., non-catalyst and oxidation catalyst) showed the greatest emissions reductions regardless of gasoline blend, while later technology vehicles showed the smallest reductions. Evaporative emissions and toxics were generally reduced for ETBE, while results for the other blends were mixed.

Born, G.L.; Lucas, S.V.; Scott, R.D.; DeFries, T.H.; Kishan, S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The influence of fuel composition on the combustion and emission characteristics of natural gas fueled engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As global energy demand rises, natural gas (NG) plays an important strategic role in energy supply. Natural gas is the cleanest fossil fuel that has been investigated extensively for use in spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the research on the effects of natural gas composition on combustion and emission characteristics of natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) and reports the most achievements obtained by researchers in this field. It has been reported that the engine performance and emission are greatly affected by varying compositions of natural gas. The most important NG fuel property is the Wobbe number (WN). Generally, it was agreed by researchers that the fuels with higher hydrocarbons, higher WN, and higher energy content exhibited better fuel economy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions were also increased for gases with higher levels of higher WN, while total hydrocarbons (THCs), carbon monoxide (CO), showed some reductions for these gases. On the other hand, particulate matter (PM) emissions did not show any fuel effects. Moreover, adding of small fractions of higher alkanes, such as ethane and propane, significantly improved ignition qualities of natural gas engines. The results presented provide a good insight for researchers to pursue their future research on natural gas fueled ICEs.

Amir-Hasan Kakaee; Amin Paykani; Mostafa Ghajar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Exhaust emissions characteristics of a multi-cylinder 18.1-L diesel engine converted to fueled with natural gas and diesel pilot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A six-cylinder, turbocharged and aftercooled diesel engine was converted to operate with natural gas and diesel pilot for generator application. The flow of natural gas was electronically controlled using a throttle valve, and it was pre-mixed with air before being introduced into the combustion chambers. The aim of this work was to study the exhaust emissions characteristics under diesel and dual fuel operations at different operating conditions. Exhaust emissions of total hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), soot, particulate matter and carbon dioxide were measured at different loads. This work also presents the effects of diesel oxidation catalyst on HC and CO conversions under dual fuel operation. Results showed that \\{NOx\\} emission was reduced at all operating loads under dual fuel operation compared to diesel operation. HC and CO emissions were increased under dual fuel operation, but their concentrations were considerably reduced with oxidation catalyst. Contrary to conventional wisdom, it was found that soot and particulate matter were increased under dual fuel operation compared to diesel operation.

Mayank Mittal; Ron Donahue; Peter Winnie; Allen Gillette

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Characteristics of the performance and emissions of a HSDI diesel engine running with cottonseed oil or its methyl ester and their blends with diesel fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study has been conducted to evaluate the use of various blends of cottonseed oil or its methyl ester (bio-diesel) with diesel fuel, in blend ratios from 10/90 up to 100/0, in a fully instrumented, four-stroke, High Speed Direct Injection (HSDI), Ricardo/Cussons 'Hydra' diesel engine. The tests were conducted using each of the above fuel blends or neat fuels, with the engine working at a medium and a high load. Volumetric fuel consumption, exhaust smokiness and exhaust-regulated gas emissions such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and unburnt hydrocarbons were measured. The differences in the performance and exhaust emissions from the baseline operation of the engine, that is, when working with neat diesel fuel, were determined and compared, as well as the differences between cottonseed oil or its methyl ester and their blends. Theoretical aspects of diesel engine combustion were used to aid the correct interpretation of the engine behaviour.

Constantine D. Rakopoulos; Kimon A. Antonopoulos; Dimitrios C. Rakopoulos; Emmanuel C. Kakaras; Efthimios G. Pariotis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1985--1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth`s capacity to support life depends on the moderating influences of gases that envelop the planet and warm its surface and protect it from harmful radiation. These gases are referred to as ``greenhouse gases.`` Their warming capacity, called ``the greenhouse effect,`` is essential to maintaining a climate hospitable to all plant, animal, and human life. In recent years, however, there has been increasing concern that human activity may be affecting the intricate balance between the Earth`s absorption of heat from the sun and its capacity to reradiate excess heat back into space. Emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities may be an important mechanism that affects global climate. Thus, research is intensifying to improve our understanding of the role human activities might play in influencing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. On the basis of scientific findings of the past few decades, the US Government and the international community at large are now taking steps toward stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions. This report contributes to that process. Mandated by Congress this report provides estimates of US emissions of the principal greenhouse gases--carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorcarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane volatile organic compounds. Estimates are for the period 1985 to 1990. Preliminary estimates for 1991 have also been included, whenever data were available.

Not Available

1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters deer11johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Diesel Emission...

200

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 ERRATA Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard July 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Energy Information Adminis- tration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler @eia.doe.gov), Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Scott B. Sitzer (202/586-2308,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 The Advanced Tangentially Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides (NO ) Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers X Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment March 2000 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

202

Evolution of anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of air pollutants at global and regional scales during the 1980-2010 period  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several different inventories of global and regional anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are assessed for the 1980-2010 period. The species considered in this study are carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and black carbon. The inventories considered include the ACCMIP historical emissions developed in support of the simulations for the IPCC AR5 assessment. Emissions for 2005 and 2010 from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) are also included. Large discrepancies between the global and regional emissions are identified, which shows that there is still no consensus on the best estimates for surface emissions of atmospheric compounds. At the global scale, anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and SO2 show the best agreement in most years. The agreement is low for BC emissions, particularly in the period prior to 2000. The best consensus is for NOx emissions for all periods and all regions, except for China where emissions in 1980 and 1990 need to be better defined. Emissions of CO need a better quantification in the USA for all periods; in Central Europe, the evolution of emissions during the past two decades needs to be better determined. The agreement between the different SO2 emissions datasets is rather good for the USA, but better quantification is needed elsewhere, particularly for Central Europe and China. The comparisons performed in this study show that the use of RCP8.5 for the extension of the ACCMIP inventory beyond 2000 is reasonable, until more global or regional estimates become available. Concerning biomass burning emissions, most inventories agree within 50-80%, depending on the year and season. The large differences are due to differences in the estimates of burned areas from the different available products, as well as in the amount of biomass burnt.

Granier, Claire; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Bond, Tami C.; D'Angiola, Ariela; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Frost, G. J.; Heil, Angelika; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Kinne, Stefan; Klimont, Z.; Kloster, Jean; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liousse, Catherine; Masui, Toshihiko; Meleux, Frederik; Mieville, Aude; Ohara, Toshimasa; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Riahi, Keywan; Schultz, Martin; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.; van Aardenne, John; van der Werf, Guido R.; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

Catalytic activation of carbon monoxide on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In discussing the important basic aspects of carbon monoxide chemistry, this review covers the adsorption and reaction of CO with H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ on reduced metal surfaces. Carbon monoxide adsorption of the Group VIII metals exhibits certain patterns. Typically, as coverages exceed one-half, compression occurs in the monolayer and the molecules lose registry with the surface metal atoms. Particular sites associated with rough surfaces facilitate CO dissociation to the surface carbon; these sites may have a significant effect on selectivity in the CO hydrogenation reaction. The support used and the metal crystallite size both affect the catalyst activity and product selectivity. Indications are strong that a better knowledge of metal-support interactions combined with a more complete understanding of the surface chemistry involved will lead to improved catalyst systems in the future.

Vannice, M.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Carbon monoxide adsorption/desorption processes over NaX zeolite and supported ruthenium catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The binding states of CO on NaX zeolite and RuNaX were investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy. Desorption peaks centered at around 390, 430, 490, and 520 K were observed from NaX following room-temperature adsorption of CO. The activation energy values corresponding to these peaks were calculated to be 41.4, 45.7, 53.8, and 57.7 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These peaks were also observed in desorption profiles from RuNaX although their temperatures were higher by 10 to 20 K. In addition, the desorption spectra from RuNaX also comprise two high-temperature peaks at around 575 and 640 K. With both the RuNaX and the NaX samples the temperature and relative intensities of the desorption peaks depended on pretreatment conditions and on the lapsed time between CO exposure to the sample and the commencement of programmed heating. Mass spectral analysis revealed that the gas desorbed at 300-500 K consisted mainly of CO while at higher temperatures CO{sub 2} was the main component. The desorption peaks below 500 K are attributed to the release of carbon monoxide from structural and intragranular or intergranular zeolitic pores. Lewis sites on the zeolite surface are found to facilitate activation of CO, resulting in its transformation to CO{sub 2}. The initial adsorption of carbon monoxide in zeolite pores and subsequent diffusion to metal sites leading to its disproportionation/oxidation is found to play an important role in the CO adsorption/desorption process on RuNaX.

Kamble, V.S.; Gupta, N.M.; Iyer, R.M. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON NICKEL FILMS: A LOW TEMPERATURE THERMAL DETECTION TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. B. Optical System Absorption Signal C. Small SignalNoise . Sensitivity of Absorption Spectroscopy EXPERIMENTSINFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON

Bailey, Robert Brian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute carbon monoxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

28, 2007 Summary: OSHAReproToxin AcutelyHazardousWaste Carbon monoxide CalOSHAReproToxin Carbon Tetrachloride IARC-2BNTP Carbonic... toxins, biotoxins and acutely toxic...

207

The comparative analysis of diesel engine combustion and emission parameters fuelled with palm oil methyl esters and its diesel blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, the combustion and emission characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition engine fuelled with diesel-Palm Oil Methyl Ester (POME) blends are investigated. This study shows that the ignition delay decreases with increase in the POME addition. The maximum rate of pressure rise and maximum rate of heat release decreases with increase in POME addition at all loads. As the percentage of POME in the blend increases, the crank angle at which the maximum rate of heat release takes place advances. The brake thermal efficiency decreases with increase in POME addition. The unburned hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide and soot intensity decreases, while nitrogen oxides (NOx) increase with increase in POME addition. [Received: April 4, 2008; Accepted: November 24, 2008

G. Lakshmi Narayana Rao; S. Saravanan; P. Selva Ilavarasi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Mathematical modeling for the performance and emission parameters of dual fuel diesel engine using hydrogen as secondary fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, mathematical models were developed to correlate the brake thermal efficiency, un-burnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxides and oxides of nitrogen by varying engine parameters like Load and Gaseous (H2) fuel substitution. The developed models can be used to predict the important performance and emission parameters for diesel-hydrogen operation in various combinations at different loads within the experimental domain. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied for developing the models using the techniques of design of experiments and multi linear regression analysis. General factorial design was used to plan the experiments. Second order response surface models were found to be the most suitable in the present work. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the experimental results at 95% confidence level revealed that the developed models are significant. Comparison of experimental output with those predicted by the developed models showed close proximity having high correlation coefficients R2 for the various response variables.

A.E. Dhole; R.B. Yarasu; D.B. Lata; S.S. Baraskar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Clean coal technology: selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report discusses a project carried out under the US Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program which demonstrated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of NOx emissions from high-sulphur coal-fired boilers under typical boilers conditions in the United States. The project was conducted by Southern Company Services, Inc., who served as a co-funder and as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into boiler flue gas and passing the flue gas through a catalyst bed where the Nox and NH{sub 3} react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The results of the CCTDP project confirmed the applicability of SCR for US coal-fired power plants. In part as a result of the success of this project, a significant number of commercial SCR units have been installed and are operating successfully in the United States. By 2007, the total installed SCR capacity on US coal-fired units will number about 200, representing about 100,000 MWe of electric generating capacity. This report summarizes the status of SCR technology. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs., 10 photos.

NONE

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The catalytic oxidation of propylene: investigation of catalyst activity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- thur oxidation resulted in the formation oi' dioxymsthylperoxides acetalde- hydes formic aoids carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide~ hydrogen and water, &t temperatures above 500 degrees Centigrade the polymer1sation of eth- ylene became significant... that water vapor exerted a catalytio effeot on the oxidation of ethylene, while carbon dioxide showed no aooelerating effeot. Davis (ll) observed that water vapor possessed a oatalytio ei'- feet on ths oxidation of olefins. Thompson and Hinshslwood (SS...

Woodham, John Frank

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Regulated and Unregulated Exhaust Emissions Comparison for Three Tier II Non-Road Diesel Engines Operating on Ethanol-Diesel Blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regulated and unregulated emissions (individual hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes and ketones, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and soluble organic fraction of particulate matter) were characterized in engines utilizing duplicate ISO 8178-C1 eight-mode tests and FTP smoke tests. Certification No. 2 diesel (400 ppm sulfur) and three ethanol/diesel blends, containing 7.7 percent, 10 percent, and 15 percent ethanol, respectively, were used. The three, Tier II, off-road engines were 6.8-L, 8.1-L, and 12.5-L in displacement and each had differing fuel injection system designs. It was found that smoke and particulate matter emissions decreased with increasing ethanol content. Changes to the emissions of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen varied with engine design, with some increases and some decreases. As expected, increasing ethanol concentration led to higher emissions of acetaldehyde (increases ranging from 27 to 139 percent). Benzene emissions were reduced by up to 50 percent with the ethanol-blended fuels. Emissions of 1,3-butadiene were also substantially decreased, with reductions ranging from 24 to 82 percent. Isolated trends were noted for certain PAHs. There was a decrease in 1-nitropyrene with use of ethanol in all cases. Particulate phase 1-nitropyrene was reduced from 18 to 62 percent. There was also a general increase in the proportion of heavy PAHs in the particulate phase with ethanol use, and although less pronounced, a general decrease in light PAHs in the particulate phase.

Merritt, P. M.; Ulmet, V.; McCormick, R. L.; Mitchell, W. E.; Baumgard, K. J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Flow reactor experiments on the selective non-catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?CO, and H, O are initially present in exhaust stream [57]. .. . . . 42 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Reaction path diagram for RAPRENOx process [63]. .. . Reduction of nitric oxide as a function of temperature, concentration of oxygen, carbon monoxide, and water... the influence of carbon monoxide [89]. . . . . . . . . 58 Fig. 28 Effect of residence time on the NOxOUT process as a function of temperature, NO(initial)=125ppm, 0-ratio of 4 [90]. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Fig. 29 Ammonia slip as a function...

Gentemann, Alexander M.G.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Remote Sensing of Commercial Aircraft Emissions Peter J. Popp & Donald H. Stedman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and nitrogen oxides (NOx, which is the sum of nitrogen oxide, NO, and nitrogen dioxide, NO2) emitted from,4 The instrument consists of a non-dispersive infrared (IR) component for detecting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide (CO2), and hydrocarbons (HC), and a dispersive ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer for measuring nitrogen

Denver, University of

214

Field evaluation of natural gas and dry sorbent injection for MWC emissions control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), in cooperation with the Olmsted Waste-to-Energy Facility (OWEF) and with subcontracted engineering services from the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), has completed the detailed engineering and preparation of construction specifications for an Emissions Reduction Testing System (ERTS). The ERTS has been designed for retrofit to one of two 100-ton/day municipal waste combustors at the OWEF, located in Rochester, Minnesota. The purpose of the retrofit is to conduct a field evaluation of a combined natural gas and sorbent injection process (IGT`s METHANE de-TOX{sup SM}, IGT Patent No. 5,105,747) for reducing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), hydrochloric acid (HCI), oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and chlorinated hydrocarbons (dioxin/furans). In addition, the design includes modifications for the control of heavy metals (HM). Development of the process should allow the waste-to-energy industry to meet the Federal New Source Performance Standards for these pollutants at significantly lower costs when compared to existing technology of Thermal deNO{sub x} combined with spray dryer scrubber/fabric filters. Additionally, the process should reduce boiler corrosion and increase both the thermal and power production efficiency of the facility.

Wohadlo, S.; Abbasi, H.; Cygan, D. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)] Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Removal of carbon monoxide. Physical adsorption on natural and synthetic zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The utilization of natural zeolite materials in the elimination of polluting gases is investigated. Carbon monoxide pollution is emphasized because its concentration may reach dangerous levels in places such as vehicle tunnels, underground parking lots, etc. The elimination of carbon monoxide is also of interest in some industrial processes relating to the production of pure gases.

Alfani, F.; Greco, G. Jr.; Iroio, G.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Submitted to the Annals of Applied Statistics INTERPOLATING FIELDS OF CARBON MONOXIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transport. CO AMS 2000 subject classifications: Carbon monoxide; satellite data; Bayesian hierarchi- cal models; interpolation; data assimilation 1 imsart-aoas ver. 2007/04/13 file: COpaper.tex date: March 24Submitted to the Annals of Applied Statistics INTERPOLATING FIELDS OF CARBON MONOXIDE DATA USING

Nychka, Douglas

217

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b , Y.F. Zheng a , C.S. Lee a , N was used to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a hot-®lament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system in the formation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT)s. The CNTs synthesized from carbon monoxide validate

Zheng, Yufeng

218

Supplement of "Inversion of and emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' $ 9 -pinene @ ¤ ¦ other hydrocarbons ¦§ carbon monoxide ¦ ¤ % ¤ methanol ¦ ¤ ¡¥ formaldehyde¦ ¤ ¥¨ ¦ ¤ `$ dimethyl sulfide ¦§¨ ¡ carbon disulfide ¤ ¡¥¨ hydrogen sulfide 7 E $ oxygen atom (excited state ppbv hydrogen £ ¡¥ : 311 ppbv nitrous oxide ¦§ ©¨ : 0.5 ppbv carbonyl sulfide ozone ¤ ¡¥ ©¡ hydrogen

Meskhidze, Nicholas

219

NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of liquefied natural gas on pollutant emissions was evaluated experimentally with used and new appliances in the laboratory and with appliances installed in residences, targeting information gaps from previous studies. Burner selection targeted available technologies that are projected to comprise the majority of installed appliances over the next decade. Experiments were conducted on 13 cooktop sets, 12 ovens, 5 broiler burners, 5 storage water heaters, 4 forced air furnaces, 1 wall furnace, and 6 tankless water heaters. Air-free concentrations and fuel-based emission factors were determined for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide, and the number of (predominantly ultrafine) particles over complete burns?including transient effects (device warm-up and intermittent firing of burners) following ignition--and during more stable end-of-burn conditions. Formaldehyde was measured over multi-burn cycles. The baseline fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number (a measure of fuel energy delivery rate) of 1320-1340; test fuels had Wobbe numbers of roughly 1390 and 1420, and in some cases 1360. No ignition or operational problems were observed during test fuel use. Baseline emissions varied widely across and within burner groups and with burner operational mode. Statistically significant emissions changes were observed for some pollutants on some burners.

Singer, Brett C.; Apte, Michael G.; Black, Douglas R.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Lucas, Donald; Lunden, Melissa M.; Mirer, Anna G.; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development of an ultra-safe, ultra-low emissions natural gas fueled school bus: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work conducted under Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Project 03-6871, ``Development of an Ultra-Safe and Low-Emission Dedicated Alternative Fuel School Bus.`` The project was sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Subcontract No. ZCF-5-13519-01. This report documents Phase 3 -- Integration and Phase 4 -- Demonstration and serves as the final report for this project. Phase 1 -- Systems Design and Phase 2 -- Prototype Hardware Development were documented in NREL publications TP-425-7609 and TP-425-2 1081, respectively. Several significant areas of work are summarized in this report. Integration of the engine technologies developed under Phase 2 into a production Deere 8.1-L, spark-ignition compressed natural gas engine is detailed, including information on the engine and control system modifications that were made. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions results verifying the ultra-low emissions output of this engine are also included. The informal project goal of producing oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions less than or equal to 1.0 g/bhp-hr over the FTP heavy-duty engine cycle was attained. In addition, a test run that resulted in less than one half of the Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle limit for NO{sub x} plus non-methane hydrocarbons was obtained. These results were for engine-out (no catalyst) emissions. Results using a catalyst produced very low formaldehyde emissions and virtually zero carbon monoxide and particulate matter emissions. Following these excellent results, a duplicate engine was assembled and integrated into the prototype ultra-safe school bus, the Envirobus 2000. Many of the new and modified subsystems developed during this project for the engine are considered strong candidates for inclusion into the production Deere 8.1-L gas engine in the near future.

Kubesh, J.T. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Relative and kinetic properties of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide on a graphite surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) results after chemisorption of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) on polycrystalline graphite are presented. CO adsorbs onto graphite with a very low sticking coefficient. After CO chemisorption CO (mass 28 amu) desorbs in two temperature regions, between 400 and 700 K and between 1000 and 1300 K, and CO/sub 2/ (mass 44 amu) desorbs below 950 K. The intensity of the CO/sub 2/ signal is less than 1 order of magnitude lower than the CO intensity. After CO/sub 2/ adsorption the major desorption product is CO at high temperatures (1000 < T (K) < 1300), whereas a small amount of CO/sub 2/ desorbs around 450 K. The adsorption of C/sup 16/O/sub 2/ and C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ mixture leads to a nearly total oxygen scrambling of the CO/sub 2/ desorbed. A mechanism for CO and CO/sub 2/ interconversion on the graphite surface is presented in terms of surface oxide species, mainly lactones and semiquinones, and their relative stability. Assignments of the TPD features are proposed accordingly. Reaction studies on the CO/sub 2/ gasification of clean graphite and the CO disproportionation (Boudouard reaction) have been performed. A good agreement is found between the activation energies obtained and the desorption energies calculated from the analysis of the TPD results.

Marchon, B.; Tysoe, W.T.; Carrazza, J.; Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

1988-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cysteine 295 indirectly affects Ni coordination of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase-II C-cluster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •CODH-II harbors a unique [Ni-Fe-S] cluster. •We substituted the ligand residues of Cys{sup 295} and His{sup 261}. •Dramatic decreases in Ni content upon substitutions were observed. •All substitutions did not affect Fe-S clusters assembly. •CO oxidation activity was decreased by the substitutions. -- Abstract: A unique [Ni–Fe–S] cluster (C-cluster) constitutes the active center of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs). His{sup 261}, which coordinates one of the Fe atoms with Cys{sup 295}, is suggested to be the only residue required for Ni coordination in the C-cluster. To evaluate the role of Cys{sup 295}, we constructed CODH-II variants. Ala substitution for the Cys{sup 295} substitution resulted in the decrease of Ni content and didn’t result in major change of Fe content. In addition, the substitution had no effect on the ability to assemble a full complement of [Fe–S] clusters. This strongly suggests Cys{sup 295} indirectly and His{sup 261} together affect Ni-coordination in the C-cluster.

Inoue, Takahiro; Takao, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Takashi [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Wada, Kei [Organization for Promotion of Tenure Track, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)] [Organization for Promotion of Tenure Track, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Daifuku, Takashi; Yoneda, Yasuko [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Fukuyama, Keiichi [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)] [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Sako, Yoshihiko, E-mail: sako@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

Adsorbate effects on a mixed-valence compound: Carbon monoxide chemisorption on CeIr/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of stoichiometry change and CO chemisorption on the surface electronic structure of the mixed-valence compound CeIr/sub 2/. We show that the surface iridium to cerium ratio can be varied by changing sample temperature while sputtering. Carbon monoxide is found to adsorb 80% molecularly on the surface and cause a mild surface oxidation which induces a shift of electron density into available cerium f orbitals. Peaks due to the 4sigma, 1..pi.., and 5sigma CO molecular orbitals appear at different binding energies than those due to molecular CO on the pure iridium surface. This binding-energy shift as well as the high percentage of molecular CO on the surface (CO adsorption on pure cerium is completely dissociative) points toward a surface which has lost much of the elemental character of its two constituents upon compound formation.

Lindquist, J.M.; Hemminger, J.C.; Lawrence, J.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Adsorbate effects on a mixed-valence compound: carbon monoxide chemisorption on CeIr/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors studied the effects of stoichiometry change and CO chemisorption on the surface electronic structure of the mixed-valence compound CeIr/sub 2/. It is shown that the surface iridium to cerium ratio can be varied by changing sample temperature while sputtering. Carbon monoxide is found to adsorb 80% molecularly on the surface and cause a mild surface oxidation which induces a shift of electron density into available cerium f orbitals. Peaks due to the 4 sigma, 1 pi, and 5 sigma CO molecular orbitals appear at different binding energies than those due to molecular CO on the pure iridium surface. This binding-energy shift as well as the high percentage of molecular CO on the surface (CO adsorption on pure cerium is completely dissociative) points toward a surface which has lost much of the elemental character of its two constituents upon compound formation.

Lindquist, J.M.; Hemminger, J.C.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Correlation between speciated hydrocarbon emissions and flame ionization detector response for gasoline/alcohol blends .  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. renewable fuel standard has made it a requirement to increase the production of ethanol and advanced biofuels to 36 billion by 2022. Ethanol will be capped at 15 billion, which leaves 21 billion to come from other sources such as butanol. Butanol has a higher energy density and lower affinity for water than ethanol. Moreover, alcohol fueled engines in general have been shown to positively affect engine-out emissions of oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide compared with their gasoline fueled counterparts. In light of these developments, the variety and blend levels of oxygenated constituents is likely to increase in the foreseeable future. The effect on engine-out emissions for total hydrocarbons is less clear due to the relative insensitivity of the flame ionization detector (FID) toward alcohols and aldehydes. It is well documented that hydrocarbon (HC) measurement using a conventional FID in the presence of oxygenates in the engine exhaust stream can lead to a misinterpretation of HC emissions trends for alcohol fuel blends. Characterization of the exhaust stream for all expected hydrocarbon constituents is required to accurately determine the actual concentration of unburned fuel components in the exhaust. In addition to a conventional exhaust emissions bench, this characterization requires supplementary instrumentation capable of hydrocarbon speciation and response factor independent quantification. Although required for certification testing, this sort of instrumentation is not yet widely available in engine development facilities. Therefore, an attempt is made to empirically determine FID correction factors for oxygenate fuels. Exhaust emissions of an engine fueled with several blends of gasoline and ethanol, n-butanol and iso-Butanol were characterized using both a conventional FID and a Fourier transform infrared. Based on these results, a response factor predicting the actual hydrocarbon emissions based solely on FID results as a function of alcohol type and content is presented. Finally, the correlation derived from data presented in this study is compared with equations and results found in the literature.

Wallner, T. (Energy Systems)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Fundamental kinetics of methane oxidation in supercritical water. Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental understanding of the oxidation of compounds in supercritical water is essential for the design, development and operation of a supercritical water oxidation unit. Previous work in our group determined the oxidation kinetics of carbon monoxide and ethanol in supercritical water for temperatures ranging from 400 to 540 C. Oxidation studies of methane up to 700 C have recently been completed and are presented in this report. Theoretical studies of fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for the oxidation of methane in supercritical water are discussed. Application of current gas phase elementary reaction models are briefly presented and their limitations discussed.

Webley, P.A.; Tester, J.W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1989-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

228

Some observations on the kinetics of the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the hydrogenation of CO a positive order of hydrogen and a slightly negative or a zero order in carbon monoxide are generally reported. The negative (or zero) order in carbon monoxide is often explained by assuming a strong adsorption of carbon monoxide on the same sites as used by the hydrogen. It is then assumed that the surface is ''almost totally'' covered by carbon monoxide. From experiments in which the surface products on an unsupported cobalt catalyst after the reaction were stripped off by a hydrogen treatment it was concluded that more than 95% of the surface (as determined from the adsorption of carbon monoxide at room temperature) was covered by carbon-containing species. This paper illustrates that ''zero order in carbon monoxide'' can be obtained with much lower coverage of carbon-containing species in equilibrium with gas-phase carbon monoxide than indicated above. Equations for reaction rates are presented, and data is calculated on the fraction of the catalyst surface covered by active carbon-containing species when the reaction is zero order in CO. The results suggest that only a small fraction of the catalyst surface is actively engaged in the hydrogenation of CO. This further suggests that the low turnover frequencies found for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis could be caused by a small number of sites which are active in the rate-determining step. (MWF)

Rautavuoma, A.O.I.; van der Baan, H.S.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thermodynamic Analysis of Syngas Production via the Solar Thermochemical Cerium Oxide Redox Cycle with Methane-Driven Reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Analysis of Syngas Production via the Solar Thermochemical Cerium Oxide Redox Cycle with Methane-Driven Reduction ... Of particular interest is the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds via the splitting of water and carbon dioxide to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide, referred to collectively as syngas. ... The coupled cycle produces high-quality syngas by the partial oxidation of methane in the ceria reduction step in addition to the carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by splitting carbon dioxide and water in the oxidation step. ...

Peter T. Krenzke; Jane H. Davidson

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fuel saving, carbon dioxide emission avoidance, and syngas production by tri-reforming of flue gases from coal- and gas-fired power stations, and by the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flue gases from coal, gas, or oil-fired power stations, as well as from several heavy industries, such as the production of iron, lime and cement, are major anthropogenic sources of global CO2 emissions. The newly proposed process for syngas production based on the tri-reforming of such flue gases with natural gas could be an important route for CO2 emission avoidance. In addition, by combining the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide with the partial oxidation of the carbon source, an overall thermoneutral process can be designed for the co-production of iron and syngas rich in CO. Water-gas shift (WGS) of CO to H2 enables the production of useful syngas. The reaction process heat, or the conditions for thermoneutrality, are derived by thermochemical equilibrium calculations. The thermodynamic constraints are determined for the production of syngas suitable for methanol, hydrogen, or ammonia synthesis. The environmental and economic consequences are assessed for large-scale commercial production of these chemical commodities. Preliminary evaluations with natural gas, coke, or coal as carbon source indicate that such combined processes should be economically competitive, as well as promising significant fuel saving and CO2 emission avoidance. The production of ammonia in the above processes seems particularly attractive, as it consumes the nitrogen in the flue gases.

M. Halmann; A. Steinfeld

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Role of Microorganisms in the Consumption and Production of Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide by Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Winzer. 1932. Uber die Bildung von Essigsaure bei der biologischen Umsetzung von Kohlenoxyd und Kohlensaure mit Wasserstoff zu Methan. Biochem. Z. 245:2-12. 14. Fuchs, G., U. Schnitker, and R. K. Thauer. 1974. Carbon monoxide...

Ralf Conrad; Wolfgang Seiler

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

Golden, Timothy Christopher (Allentown, PA); Farris, Thomas Stephen (Bethlehem, PA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

233

Quantum cascade laser-based carbon monoxide detection on a second time scale from human breath  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present three different detection schemes for measuring carbon monoxide (CO) in direct absorption using a thermoelectrically cooled, distributed-feedback pulsed quantum cascade (qc) laser operating between 217...

B.W.M. Moeskops; H. Naus; S.M. Cristescu; F.J.M. Harren

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from forest emissions measured at mid-mountain and high- elevation mountain sites in Whistler, BC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with fossil fuel combustion and marine emissions (Russell etfuel combustion, and biomass burning (BB). Natural sources include biogenic (from the biosphere), marine (

Schwartz, Rachel E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Continuous Measurement of Carbon Monoxide Improves Combustion Efficiency of CO Boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF CARBON MONOXIDE IMPROVES COMBUSTION EFFICIENCY OF CO BOILERS Russell L. Branham ana James J. Prichard Ashland Oil Company Catlettsburg, KY ABSTRACT The paper describes the application of in-situ flue gas CO... measurement in the operation of CO Boilers and details the steps needed to optimize combustion efficiency. INTRODUCTION In the petroleum industry, the efficient operation of a fluid-cata1ytic-cracking unit, produces gases rich in carbon monoxide...

Gilmour, W. A.; Pregler, D. N.; Branham, R. L.; Prichard, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Influence of the electrode material on carbon monoxide adsorption and electroreduction in aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide electroreduction was studied at rotating disk electrodes made of different materials (Cu, Au, Zn, Cd; amalgamated Cu; Al, Ga, In, glassy carbon, Sn, Pb, Mo, Fe, Ni, and certain binary systems). Positive partial currents which are evidence for a direct electroreduction of CO have been observed only at Zn, Ga, and Cd. The observation that CO is less susceptible to electroreduction than carbon dioxide is explained by the stronger chemisorption of carbon monoxide on the electrodes.

Osetrova, N.V.; Vasil'ev, Yu.B.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Syngas (H2/CO) in a spark-ignition direct-injection engine. Part 1: Combustion, performance and emissions comparison with CNG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combustion, performance, and emissions of syngas (H2/CO) in a four-stroke, direct-injection, spark-ignition engine were experimentally investigated. The engine was operated at various speeds, ranging from 1500 to 2400 rev/min, with the throttle being held in the wide-open position. The start of fuel injection was fixed at 180° before the top dead center, and the ignition advance was set at the maximal brake torque. The air/fuel ratio was varied from the technically possible lowest excess air ratio (?) to lean operation limits. The results indicated that a wider air/fuel operating ratio is possible with syngas with a very low coefficient of variation. The syngas produced a higher in-cylinder peak pressure and heat-release rate peak and faster combustion than for CNG. However, CNG produced a higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and lower brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC). The BTE and BSFC of the syngas were on par to those of CNG at higher speeds. For the syngas, the total hydrocarbon emission was negligible at all load conditions, and the carbon monoxide emission was negligible at higher loads and increased under lower load conditions. However, the emission of nitrogen oxides was higher at higher loads with syngas.

Ftwi Yohaness Hagos; A. Rashid A. Aziz; Shaharin A. Sulaiman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Carbon Monoxide Tolerant Electrocatalyst with Low Platinum Loading...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particle. When used as an electrocatalyst for the oxidation of fuel at a fuel cell anode, this structure exhibits low platinum loading and elevated tolerance to carbon...

239

Selective production of methanol from syngas over LaTi1?xCuxO3 mixed oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide hydrogenation was studied over partially substituted copper-containing LaTi1?xCuxO3 oxides and on copper supported on La2O3. The unsubstituted (x = 0) oxide was weakly active for CO hydrogenation,...

R. van Grieken; J. L. Peña; A. Lucas; G. Calleja; M. L. Rojas…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Emissions and fuel economy of a vehicle with a spark-ignition, direct-injection engine : Mitsubishi Legnum GDI{trademark}.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1997 Mitsubishi Legnum station wagon with a 150-hp, 1.8-L, spark-ignition, direct-injection (SIDI) engine was tested for emissions by using the FTP-75, HWFET, SC03, and US06 test cycles and four different fuels. The purpose of the tests was to obtain fuel-economy and emissions data on SIDI vehicles and to compare the measurements obtained with those of a port-fuel-injection (PFI) vehicle. The PFI vehicle chosen for the comparison was a 1995 Dodge Neon, which meets the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) emissions goals of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) less than 0.125 g/mi, carbon monoxide (CO) less than 1.7 g/mi, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} ) less than 0.2 g/mi, and particulate matter (PM) less than 0.01 g/mi. The Mitsubishi was manufactured for sale in Japan and was not certified to meet current US emissions regulations. Results show that the SIDI vehicle can provide up to 24% better fuel economy than the PFI vehicle does, with correspondingly lower greenhouse gas emissions. The SIDI vehicle as designed does not meet the PNGV goals for NMHC or NO{sub x} emissions, but it does meet the goal for CO emissions. Meeting the goal for PM emissions appears to be contingent upon using low-sulfur fuel and an oxidation catalyst. One reason for the difficulty in meeting the NMHC and NO{sub x} goals is the slow (200 s) warm-up of the catalyst. Catalyst warm-up time is primarily a matter of design. The SIDI engine produces more NMHC and NO{sub x} than the PFI engine does, which puts a greater burden on the catalyst to meet the emissions goals than is the case with the PFI engine. Oxidation of NMHC is aided by unconsumed oxygen in the exhaust when the SIDI engine operates in stratified-charge mode, but the same unconsumed oxygen inhibits chemical reduction of NO{sub x} . Thus, meeting the NO{sub x} emissions goal is likely to be the greatest challenge for the SIDI engine.

Cole, R. L.; Poola, R. B.; Sekar, R.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...

242

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project.

Not Available

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

243

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project.

Not Available

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

244

Excitation mechanism and thermal emission quenching of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition—Do we need silicon nanoclusters?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we will discuss the excitation and emission properties of Tb ions in a Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide (SRSO) matrix obtained at different technological conditions. By means of electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition, undoped and doped SRSO films have been obtained with different Si content (33, 35, 39, 50 at. %) and were annealed at different temperatures (600, 900, 1100?°C). The samples were characterized optically and structurally using photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation, time resolved PL, absorption, cathodoluminescence, temperature dependent PL, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how the matrix modifications influence excitation and emission properties of Tb ions.

Podhorodecki, A., E-mail: artur.p.podhorodecki@pwr.wroc.pl; Golacki, L. W.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W. [School of EECS, Ohio University, Stocker Center 363, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Fedus, K. [Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5/7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Wojcik, J.; Wilson, P. R. J.; Mascher, P. [Department of Engineering Physics and Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S4L7 (Canada)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

IMPACTT5A model : enhancements and modifications since December 1994 - with special reference to the effect of tripled-fuel-economy vehicles on fuel-cycle energy and emissions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Version 5A of the Integrated Market Penetration and Anticipated Cost of Transportation Technologies (IMPACTT5A) model is a spreadsheet-based set of algorithms that calculates the effects of advanced-technology vehicles on baseline fuel use and emissions. Outputs of this Argonne National Laboratory-developed model include estimates of (1) energy use and emissions attributable to conventional-technology vehicles under a baseline scenario and (2) energy use and emissions attributable to advanced- and conventional-technology vehicles under an alternative market-penetration scenario. Enhancements to IMPACIT made after its initial documentation in December 1994 have enabled it to deal with a wide range of fuel and propulsion system technologies included in Argonne's GREET model in a somewhat modified three-phased approach. Vehicle stocks are still projected in the largely unchanged STOCK module. Vehicle-miles traveled, fuel use, and oil displacement by advanced-technology vehicles are projected in an updated USAGE module. Now, both modules can incorporate vehicle efficiency and fuel share profiles consistent with those of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. Finally, fuel-cycle emissions of carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, toxics, and greenhouse gases are computed in the EMISSIONS module via an interface with the GREET model that was developed specifically to perform such calculations. Because of this interface, results are now more broadly informative than were results from earlier versions of IMPACTT.

Mintz, M. M.; Saricks, C. L.

1999-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, [October--December, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. During this quarter, tests of the LNCFS Level III system were conducted to determine the effect that fuel fineness has on NOx emissions and unburned carbon levels. Results showed that changing the fineness of the fuel has almost no effect on NOx emissions; however, unburned carbon levels can be reduced significantly by increasing fuel fineness.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume I. Recent airport measurement programs, data analyses, and sub-model development. Final report Jan78-Jul 80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nitrogen oxide stack sampling at the U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Steam Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 7, 1997, the EPA proposed a Nitrogen Oxides State Implementation Plan Call (NO{sub x} SIP Call) for 22 states in the Eastern US which included the state of Tennessee. This initial proposal was followed by proposed statewide NO{sub x} budgets in the May 11, 1998, Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. In the development of the NO{sub x} SIP Call, EPA performed a number of air quality analyses and determined that NO{sub x} emissions from Tennessee should be reduced. Industrial boilers, turbines, stationary internal combustion engines, and cement manufacturing are the only non-electric generating unit sources for which reductions are assumed in the budget calculation. Emission reductions are required if specific source heat input capacity is greater than 250 million Btu per hour. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes pulverized coal fired boilers each rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 298 million Btu per hour, and will therefore be impacted by these regulatory actions. Each boiler is equipped with two pulverizing mills. Coal or natural gas or a combination of these two fuels may be fired. This paper provides the results of NO{sub x} emission stack testing conducted June 15--21, 1999, on the Y-12 Steam Plant Boilers 1 and 2. Measurements of oxygen (O{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and stack gas flow were also performed. Information gained from these stack tests will be used to determine NO{sub x} emission control strategies for the steam plant for compliance with future emission requirements resulting from the NO{sub x} SIP Call.

L.V. Gibson, jr.; M.P. Humphreys; J.M. Skinner

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Reducing the contribution of the power sector to ground-level ozone pollution : an assessment of time-differentiated pricing of nitrogen oxide emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen oxide (NOx) is a prevalent air pollutant across the United States and a requisite precursor for tropospheric (ground-level) ozone formation. Both pollutants significantly impact human health and welfare, so National ...

Craig, Michael T. (Michael Timothy)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The effects of cycle-to-cycle variations on nitric oxide (NO) emissions for a spark-ignition engine: Numerical results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To carry out the proposed study, an engine simulation model was used. The simulation determines engine performance and NO emissions as functions of engine operating conditions, engine design parameters, and combustion parameters. An automotive, spark-ignition...

Villarroel, Milivoy

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fact #825: June 16, 2014 Tier 3 Non-Methane Organic Gases Plus Nitrogen Oxide Emission Standards, Model Years 2017-2025  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Environmental Protection Agency finalized Tier 3 emission standards in a rule issued in March 2014. One effect of the rule is a decrease in the combined amount of non-methane organic gases ...

254

Supporting Information for Impact of Chlorine Emissions from Sea-Salt Aerosol on Coastal Urban Ozone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIOXIDE H2O2 HYDROGEN PEROXIDE NH3 AMMONIA NIT AEROSOL NITRATE SO2 SULFUR DIOXIDE SO3 SULFUR TRIOXIDE OSD extensions* NO NITRIC OXIDE NO2 NITROGEN DIOXIDE O3 OZONE HONO NITROUS ACID HNO3 NITRIC ACID HNO4 PERNITRIC ACID N2O5 NITROGEN PENTOXIDE NO3 NITRATE RADICAL HO2 HYDROPEROXY RADICAL CO CARBON MONOXIDE CO2 CARBON

Dabdub, Donald

255

Application of holographic neural networks for flue gas emissions prediction in the Burnaby incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the development of a parametric prediction system (PPS) for various emission species at the Burnaby incinerator. The continuous emissions monitoring system at the Burnaby incinerator is shared between three boilers and therefore actual results are only available 5 minutes out of every 15 minutes. The PPS was developed to fill in data for the 10 minutes when the Continuous Emission Monitor (CEM) is measuring the other boilers. It bases its prediction on the last few actual readings taken and parametrically predicts CO, SO2 and NOx. The Burnaby Incinerator is located in the commercial/industrial area of South Burnaby, British Columbia. It consists of three separate lines, each burning ten tonnes of garbage per hour and producing about three tonnes of steam for every tonne of garbage burned. The air pollution control system first cools the combustion products with water injection and then scrubs them with very fine hydrated lime. Carbon is added to the lime to enhance the scrubbing of the combustion products. The CEM monitors the levels of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and opacity. In 1996, an expert system was installed on one of boilers at the Burnaby Incinerator plant to determine if it could improve the plant=s operations and reduce overall emission. As part of the expert system, the PPS was developed. Holographic Neural Technology (HNeT), developed by AND Corporation of Toronto, Ontario, is a novel neural network technology using complex numbers in its architecture. Compared to the traditional neural networks, HNeT has some significant advantage. It is more resilient against converging on local minima; is faster training and executing; less prone to over fitting; and, in most cases, has significantly lower error. Selection of independent variabs, training set preparation, testing neural nets and other related issue will be discussed.

Zheng, L.; Dockrill, P.; Clements, B. [Natural Resources Canada, Nepean, Ontario (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Kinetic study of the reaction between nitric oxide and carbon monoxide catalyzed by clean polycrystalline platinum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics of the platinum catalyzed reaction between NO and CO has been studied under conditions chosen to approximate those observed during operation of catalysts in automotive exhaust gas treatment applications. The catalysts were polycrystalline platinum foils and wires. The reaction was studied over a range of reactant partial pressures of 10 V Torr to 1 Torr and catalyst temperatures of 500 to 1500K. The steady-state kinetics results could not be fit by a simple Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model over all experimental conditions studied. The kinetics at high coverage were most consistent with Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics assuming a bimolecular reaction between NO and CO as the rate-limiting step. At high temperature, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood assumption of fast adsorption-desorption equilibrium relative to the surface reaction rate was no longer appropriate and the mechanism of adsorption of NO had to be considered explicitly.

Klein, R.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Sulfur adsorption on nickel(100) and its effect on carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, and deuterium chemisorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption of CO, NO, and D/sub 2/ was studied on clean and sulfided Ni(100) near 100K using Auger electron spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies, and work function change measurements. The evidence suggests that sulfur's effects are predominantly steric in nature. Weak, short-range (approx.4 angstrom) electrostatic effects are also present, due to charge transfer of about 0.04 of an electron from nickel to sulfur. The blocking effect of S on the adsorption of each gas at various temperatures is discussed.

Hardegree, E.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke in the development of cardiorespiratory disease in smokers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Rep 1983). This could be due to indoor air pollution but respiratory disease in childhood may affect later respiratory function ( Burrows, Knudson and Lebvitz 1977). Similarly the decline in bronchitis mortality i n the U.K . in re c ent years which... anteceded the decline in cigarette cons umption might, in addition, suggest an effect of outdoor pollution Air Acts". The marked internat ional differences in mortality and the high figures for the British I sles...

Borland, Colin David Ross

1988-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

Coadsorption of hydrogen and ethylene, and carbon monoxide and ethylene on the Ru(001) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed investigation of the coadsorption of ethylene with both preadsorbed hydrogen and preadsorbed carbon monoxide on the Ru(001) surface is reported here. Both preadsorbed hydrogen and carbon monoxide reduce the saturation coverage of subsequently chemisorbed ethylene. The coadsorption of hydrogen with ethylene results in detectable hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane below 250 K, whereas no self-hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane is observed. High-resolution electron energy loss spectra show that ethylene coadsorbed with either hydrogen or carbon monoxide decomposes to ethylidyne (CCH/sub 3/) and acetylide (CCH), as it does on the clean surface. Carbon monoxide preadsorption enhances the stability of the ethylidyne such that it decomposes at approximately 420 K, rather than 355 K as on the initially clean Ru(001) surface. Preadsorbed carbon monoxide also reduces the ratio of ethylidyne to acetylide that is formed from ethylene, compared to the ratio observed from an equivalent coverage of ethylene on the clean surface; hydrogen preadsorption, on the other hand, increases this ratio.

Hills, M.M.; Parmeter, J.E.; Weinberg, W.H.

1986-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

260

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

Not Available

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Numerical study on the combustion and emission characteristics of a methanol/diesel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An improved multi-dimensional model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics mechanism was applied to investigate the combustion and emission characteristics of a methanol/diesel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine. The fuel was supplied separately by directly injecting diesel fuel into cylinder well before top dead center, while premixing methanol through the intake port in the tested methanol/diesel RCCI engine. The effects of mass fraction of premixed methanol, start of injection (SOI) of diesel and initial in-cylinder temperature at intake valve closing (IVC) on engine combustion and emission were investigated in detail. The results show that both methanol mass fraction and SOI have a significant impact on cetane number (CN) distribution, i.e. fuel reactivity distribution, which determines the ignition delay and peak of heat release rate (HRR). Due to larger area with high-temperature region and more homogeneous fuel distribution with increased methanol, and the oxygen atom contained by methanol molecule, all the emissions are reduced with moderate methanol addition. Advanced SOI with high combustion temperature is favorable to hydrocarbon (HC) and soot reduction, yet not to the decrease of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Both increasing methanol fraction and advancing the SOI are beneficial to improve fuel economy and avoid engine knock. Moreover, it was revealed that the initial temperature must be increased with increased methanol fraction to keep the 50% burn point (CA50) constant, which results in decrease of the equivalent indicated specific fuel consumption (EISFC) and all emissions, except for slight increase in \\{NOx\\} due to the higher burning temperature.

Yaopeng Li; Ming Jia; Yaodong Liu; Maozhao Xie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A novel soluble nano-catalysts in diesel–biodiesel fuel blends to improve diesel engines performance and reduce exhaust emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study was aimed at synthesizing a novel soluble hybrid nanocatalyst to decrease emissions i.e., nitrogen oxide compounds (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and soot, of a DI engine fueled with diesel–biodiesel blends. Moreover, enhancement of performance parameters i.e. power, torque and fuel consumption was also simultaneously targeted. The hybrid nanocatalyst containing cerium oxide on amide-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was investigated using two types of diesel–biodiesel blends (B5 and B20) at three concentrations (30, 60 and 90 ppm). The results obtained revealed that high surface area of the soluble nano-sized catalyst particles and their proper distribution along with catalytic oxidation reaction resulted in significant overall improvements in the combustion reaction specially in B20 containing 90 ppm of the catalyst B20(90 ppm). More specifically, all pollutants i.e., NOx, CO, HC and soot were reduced by up to 18.9%, 38.8%, 71.4% and 26.3%, respectively, in B20(90 ppm) compared to neat B20. The innovated fuel blend also increased engine performance parameters i.e., power and torque by up to 7.81%, 4.91%, respectively, and decreased fuel consumption by 4.50%.

Mehrdad Mirzajanzadeh; Meisam Tabatabaei; Mehdi Ardjmand; Alimorad Rashidi; Barat Ghobadian; Mohammad Barkhi; Mohammad Pazouki

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO[sub x] burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulatecharacteristics and boiler efficiency. Baseline, AOFA, and LNB without AOFA test segments have been completed. Analysis of the 94 days of LNB long-term data collected show the full-load NO[sub x] emission levels to be approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu. Flyash LOI values for the LNB configuration are approximately 8 percent at full-load. Corresponding values for the AOFA configuration are 0.94 lb/MBtu and approximately 10 percent. Abbreviated diagnostic tests for the LNB+AOFA configuration indicate that at 500 MWe, NO[sub x] emissions are approximately 0.55 lb/MBtu with corresponding flyash LOI values of approximately 11 percent. For comparison, the long-term full-load, baseline NO[sub x] emission level was approximately 1.24 lb/MBtu at 5.2 percent LOI. Comprehensive testing of the LNB+AOFA configuration will be performed when the stackparticulate emissions issue is resolved. Testing of a process optimization package on Plant Hammond Unit 4 was performed during this quarter. The software was configured to minimize NO[sub x] emissions using total combustion air flow and advanced overfire air distribution as the controlled parameters. Preliminary results from this testing indicate that this package shows promise in reducing NO[sub x] emissions while maintaining or improving other boiler performance parameters.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Artificial neural networks based prediction of performance and exhaust emissions in direct injection engine using castor oil biodiesel-diesel blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study the performance and emission characteristics of a direct injection diesel engine using castor oil biodiesel (COB)-diesel blended fuels were investigated experimentally and then predicted by artificial neural networks. For this aim castor oil was converted to its biodiesel via transesterification approach. Then the effects of the biodiesel percentage in blend engine load and speed on brake power brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) nitrogen oxides (NOx) carbon dioxide (CO2) carbon monoxide (CO) and particle matter (PM) have been considered. Fuel blends with various percentages of biodiesel (0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% and 30%) at various engine speeds and loads were tested. The results indicated that blends of COB with diesel fuel provide admissible engine performance; on the other side emissions decreased so much. Two types of neural networks a group method of data handling (GMDH) and feed forward were used for modeling of the diesel engine to predict brake power BSFC and exhaust emissions such as CO CO2 NOx and PM values. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the feed forward neural networkmodels over GMDH type models in terms of the statistical measures in the training and testing data but in the number of hidden neurons and model simplicity GMDH models are preferred.

M. H. Shojaeefard; M. M. Etghani; M. Akbari; A. Khalkhali; B. Ghobadian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

ARM - CARES Campaign Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide are formed from various combustion processes, and they are typically present in vehicle exhaust and power plant emissions....

266

Mechanism of methanol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen on copper catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors examine possible mechanisms of methanol synthesis from carbon monoxide and hydrogen on supported copper catalysts. Two broad categories of reaction mechanism can be identified: (a) Type I: Carbon monoxide, adsorbed on the copper surface, is hydrogenated by the addition of hydrogen atoms while the C-O bond remains intact. A second C-O bond is neither formed nor broken. (b) Type II: Carbon monoxide (or a partially hydrogenated intermediate, e.g., HCO) reacts with an oxygen atom on the catalyst surface to give an intermediate, typically a formate, which contains two C-O bonds. Subsequent reaction leads overall to methanol and the reformation of the surface oxygen atom. Both mechanisms are discussed.

Fakley, M.E.; Jennings, J.R.; Spencer, M.S. (ICI Chemicals and Polymers Ltd, Billingham, Cleveland (England))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Reformer-pressure swing adsorption process for the production of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved process for the production of carbon monoxide by the steam reforming of hydrocarbons is described comprising: (a) catalytically reacting a fluid hydrocarbon feed stream with steam in a steam reformer; (b) passing the reformer effluent containing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from the steam reformer, without scrubbing to remove the carbon dioxide content thereof, to a pressure swing adsorption system having at least four adsorbent beds, each bed of which, on a cyclic basis, undergoes a processing sequence; (c) recycling the carbon dioxide-rich stream to the steam reformer for reaction with additional quantities of the hydrocarbon feed stream being passed to the stream reformer to form additional quantities of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, with product recovery being enhanced and the need for employing a carbon dioxide wash system being obviated.

Fuderer, A.

1988-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a larger study of liquefied natural gas impacts on device performance and pollutant emissions for existing equipment in California, this report describes a cmoputer modeling study of a partially premixed flame issueing from a single cooktop burner port. The model consisted of a reactive computational fluid dynamics three-dimensional spatial grid and a 71-species chemical mechanism with propane combustion capability. Simulations were conducted with a simplified fuel mixture containing methane, ethane, and propane in proportions that yield properties similar to fuels distributed throughout much of California now and in recent years (baseline fuel), as well as with two variations of simulated liquefied natural gas blends. A variety of simulations were conducted with baseline fuel to explore the effect of several key parameters on pollutant formation and other flame characteristics. Simulations started with fuel and air issuing through the burner port, igniting, and continuing until the flame was steady with time. Conditions at this point were analyzed to understand fuel, secondary air and reaction product flows, regions of pollutant formation, and exhaust concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and formaldehyde. A sensitivity study was conducted, varying the inflow parameters of this baseline gs about real-world operating conditions. Flame properties responded as expected from reactive flow theory. In the simulation, carbon monoxide levels were influenced more by the mixture's inflow velocity than by the gas-to-air ratio in the mixture issuing from the inflow port. Additional simulations were executed at two inflow conditions - high heat release and medium heat release - to examine the impact of replacing the baseline gas with two mixtures representative of liquefied natural gas. Flame properties and pollutant generation rates were very similar among the three fuel mixtures.

Tonse, S. R.; Singer, B. C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Combustion, performance and emission characteristics of a DI CI engine using biodiesel with varied fatty acid composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five Biodiesel produced from different vegetable oils were tested on a diesel engine to study the effect of biodiesel fatty acid composition specifically unsaturated composition on the engine combustion. The results from fuel analysis show that biodiesel (93% unsaturated fatty acid ester composition) with 55% linolenic ester has a higher density of 0.89 kg/m³, lower viscosity of 3.8 cSt, heating value of 39 MJ/kg and cetane number of 49. The engine combustion results exhibits a longer premixed and shorter diffusion burning phase with higher peak pressure of 72 bars and higher cumulative heat release compared to other fatty ester composition. The performance and emission results show that emits more oxides of nitrogen of 16.83 g/kWh and exhibits higher thermal efficiency of 29.76% compared to diesel of 12.83 g/kWh and 28.41% respectively. Biodiesel with 45% saturated ester and 55% unsaturated ester composition shows a NOX neutral fuel with a penalty of 1.75% in thermal efficiency. No significant differences in unburnt hydrocarbon (UBHC), carbon monoxide (CO) and smoke emissions among the biodiesel fuels were noticed except linseed oil methyl ester.

Sukumar Puhan; A. Gopinath; G. Nagarajan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Detection of Carbon Monoxide within the Magellanic Bridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mopra 22m and SEST 15m telescopes have been used to detect and partially map a region of 12CO(1-0) line emission within the Magellanic Bridge, a region lying between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The emission appears to be embedded in a cloud of neutral hydrogen, and is in the vicinity of an IRAS source. The CO emission region is found to have a 60um/100um flux density ratio typical for 12CO(1-0) detections within the SMC, although it has a significantly lower 12CO brightness and velocity width. These suggest that the observed region is of a low metallicity, supporting earlier findings that the Magellanic Bridge is not as evolved as the SMC and Magellanic Stream, which are themselves of a lower metallicity than the Galaxy. Our observations, along with empirical models based on SMC observations, indicate that the radius of the detected CO region has an upper limit of ~16 pc. This detection is, to our knowledge, the first detection of CO emission from the Magellanic Bridge and is the only direct evidence of star formation through molecular cloud collapse in this region.

E. Muller; L. Staveley-Smith; W. Zealey

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

272

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with “ultra low-NO{sub X}” burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase with increasing fuel Wobbe number.

Rapp, VH; Singer, BC

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Emissions and fuel consumption characteristics of an HCNG-fueled heavy-duty engine at idle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The idle performance of an 11-L, 6-cylinder engine equipped with a turbocharger and an intercooler was investigated for both compressed natural gas (CNG) and hydrogen-blended CNG (HCNG) fuels. HCNG, composed of 70% CNG and 30% hydrogen in volume, was used not only because it ensured a sufficient travel distance for each fueling, but also because it was the optimal blending rate to satisfy EURO-6 emission regulation according to the authors' previous studies. The engine test results demonstrate that the use of HCNG enhanced idle combustion stability and extended the lean operational limit from excess air ratio (?) = 1.5 (CNG) to 1.6. A decrease of more than 25% in the fuel consumption rate was achieved in HCNG idle operations compared to CNG. Total hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions decreased when fueled with HCNG at idle because of the low carbon content and enhanced combustion characteristics. In particular, despite hydrogen enrichment, less nitrogen oxides (NOx) were emitted with HCNG operations because the amount of fuel supplied for a stable idle was lower than with CNG operations, which eventually induced lower peak in-cylinder combustion temperature. This low HCNG fuel quantity in idle condition also induced a continuous decrease in \\{NOx\\} emissions with an increase in ?. The idle engine test results also indicate that cold-start performance can deteriorate owing to low exhaust gas temperature, when fueled with HCNG. Therefore, potential solutions were discussed, including combustion strategies such as retardation of spark ignition timing combined with leaner air/fuel ratios.

Sunyoup Lee; Changgi Kim; Young Choi; Gihun Lim; Cheolwoong Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Electron Emission from Slightly Oxidized Depleted Uranium Generated by its Own Radioactivity Measured by Electron Spectroscopy, and Electron-Induced Dissociation and Ionization of Hydrogen Near its Surface.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy dependent electron emission (counts per second) between zero and 1.4 keV generated by the natural reactivity of uranium was measured by an electrostatic spectrometer with known acceptance angle and acceptance area. The electron intensity decreases continuously with energy, but at different rates in different energy regimes, suggesting that a variety of processes may be involved in producing the observed electron emission. The spectrum was converted to energy dependent electron flux (e-/cm{sup 2} s) using the assumption that the emission has a cosine angular distribution. The flux decreased rapidly from {approx}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s in the energy range from zero to 200 eV, and then more slowly from {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}3*10{sup 4}/cm{sup 2} s in the range from 200 to 1400 eV. The energy dependent electron mean free path in gases together with literature cross sections for electron induced reactions were used to determine the number of ionization and dissociation reactions per cm{sup 2}s within the inelastic mean free path of electrons, and found to be about 1.3*10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.5*10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively, for hydrogen. An estimate of the number of ionization and dissociation reactions occurring within the total range, rather than the mean free path of electrons in gases resulted in 6.2*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.3*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively. The total energy flux carried by electrons from the surface is suspiciously close to the total possible energy generated by one gram of uranium. A likely source of error is the assumption that the electron emission has a cosine distribution. Angular distribution measurements of the electron emission would check that assumption, and actual measurement of the total current emanating from the surface are needed to confirm the value of the current calculated in section II. These results must therefore be used with caution - until they are confirmed by other measurements.

Siekhaus, W J; Nelson, A J

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mechanism of iron catalysis of carbon monoxide decomposition in refractories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors discuss the catalytic effects of selected iron phases (metals, oxides, sulfides, and carbides) on the Boudouard reaction studied in an effort to more fully understand the disintegration of refractories when exposed to CO for long periods of time. It was found that active Fe atoms generated from the reduction of the iron oxides, especially {alpha}-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, are the actual catalysts for the Boudouard reaction. The catalytic process confirmed by thermodynamic calculations, kinetic data, and X-ray diffraction data, consists of adsorption and decomposition of CO simultaneously forming carbides of iron. The chemisorption and subsequent decomposition of the iron carbides, rather than diffusion, constitute the rate-controlling process for carbon deposition.

Xu, M.W.P.; Brown, J.J. Jr. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Materials Engineering)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis . Field Emission Measurements of Cobalt Implanted Porous Silicon Differences between the 1mplanted Porous Silicon Field Emission Devioe and the Al-anode Oxidized Porous Silicon Field Emission Diode VII CONCLUSION 70 94 99 REFERENCES... Emission Diode (OPSFED) was developed and studied [8] . The OPSFED was using the irregularity on the interface between the oxidized porous silicon film and silicon substrate as field emission cathodes, and a thin aluminum layer deposited...

Liu, Hongbiao

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Observations of rotating jets of carbon monoxide in comet Hale-Bopp with the IRAM interferometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of rotating jets of carbon monoxide in comet Hale-Bopp with the IRAM interferometer;eres, France Abstract. CO was observed on March 11, 1997 in comet Hale-Bopp with the IRAM Plateau de for parent molecules. We have developed a 3-D model simulating rotating spiral jets of CO gas. We present

Demoulin, Pascal

278

Study of hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on modified Zn/Cr catalysts by adsorption calorimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential heat of adsorption (q) of hydrogen (a) and carbon monoxide (b) as a function of the adsorbed amount (a) on Zn/Cr catalysts at 463/sup 0/K; 1) unpromoted catalyst, 2) catalyst promoted with 2.5% of K/sub 2/O.

Yoshin, S.V.; Klyacho, A.L.; Kondrat'ev, L.T.; Leonov, V.E.; Skripchenko, G.B.; Sushchaya, L.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Dissociation and excitation coefficients of nitrogen molecules and nitrogen monoxide generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The excitation coefficient ?{sub N2} is calculated for the excited metastable level of N{sub 2}(A{sub 3}?{sub u}{sup +}) in nitrogen molecules. In addition, the dissociation coefficient of nitrogen molecules is investigated by making use of the Boltzmann distribution of the electrons in atmospheric plasmas. The excitation and electron-impact dissociation coefficients of nitrogen molecules are analytically expressed in terms of the electron temperature T{sub e} for evaluations of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in atmospheric plasmas. As an application example of these coefficients, the nitrogen monoxide generation through a microwave torch is carried out for a development of medical tool. The nitrogen monoxide concentration from a microwave plasma-torch can be easily controlled by the nitrogen flow rate, mole fraction of the oxygen gas, and the microwave power. A simple analytic expression of the nitrogen monoxide concentration is obtained in terms of the oxygen molecular density and gas flow rate. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical results from the analytical expression. A microwave nitrogen-torch can easily provide an appropriate nitrogen monoxide concentration for the wound healings.

Uhm, Han S.; Na, Young H.; Choi, Eun H.; Cho, Guangsup [Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electronic and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Association of hydrogen metabolism with unitrophic or mixotrophic growth of Methanosarcina barkeri on carbon monoxide.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by the simultaneous consumption of methanol and CO...by the simultaneous consumption of methanol and CO...conbustion of fossil fuels. Carbon monoxide is...involves the production and consumption of a carbonyl group...served as experi- mental vessels. Immediately after...

J M O'Brien; R H Wolkin; T T Moench; J B Morgan; J G Zeikus

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electrochemical Removal of Carbon Monoxide in Reformate Hydrogen for Fueling Proton Exchange Membrane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical Removal of Carbon Monoxide in Reformate Hydrogen for Fueling Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Sivagaminathan Balasubramanian, Charles E. Holland,* and John W. Weidner*,z Center in reformate hydrogen. In this design, the potential and gas flow are switched between the two filter cells so

Weidner, John W.

282

An experimental investigation of the ignition properties of hydrogen and carbon monoxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for syngas turbine applications S.M. Walton *, X. He, B.T. Zigler, M.S. Wooldridge Department of Mechanical of simulated syngas mixtures of hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and carbon mechanism for H2 and CO. Ã? 2006 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

283

Factors Affecting the Efficiency of Carbon Monoxide Photoproduction in the St. Lawrence Estuarine System (Canada)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Factors Affecting the Efficiency of Carbon Monoxide Photoproduction in the St. Lawrence Estuarine System (Canada) ... The solar insolation-weighted mean apparent quantum yield of CO (?CO) decreased as much as fourfold with increasing salinity and showed a strong positive correlation with the dissolved organic carbon-specific absorption coefficient at 254 nm. ...

Yong Zhang; Huixiang Xie; Guohua Chen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Modifications of the surface properties of metals by oxide overlayers: 1, Oxidized zirconium deposited on the Pt(100) single crystal surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic zirconium was deposited on a single crystal Pt(100) surface by thermal evaporation in UHV conditions. The deposit was oxidized by exposure to oxygen immediately after deposition. Oxidized zirconium was found to grow on the platinum ace by the layer-by-layer mechanism. The adsorption of carbon monoxide on the surface was studied as a function of the zirconium coverage. The results show that oxidized zirconium forms a chemically inert layer which blocks the adsorptive sites of the underlying platinum substrate. The properties of the free Pt surface were unaffected by the presence of the oxidized zirconium layer.

Bardi, U.; Ross, P.N.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

287

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, First quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO[sub x] combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO[sub x] burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

289

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

291

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

Quantitative X-ray microanalysis of submicron carbide formation in chromium (III) oxide rich scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the chemical microanalysis techniques adapted to identify the precipitates that form on the surface of, or within, the oxide scale of a Fe-22Cr ferritic steel during exposure to a carbon-monoxide rich environment at 750C for 800 hours. Examination of oxidized test coupons revealed the presence of a fiber like structure at the surface, shown in figure 1. Other studies have reported that these structures are carbon precipitates.

Collins, W.K.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Danielson, P.; Hunt, A.H

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions trading is a comparatively new policy instrument which ... electricity systems in Europe. The development of emissions trading thus represents an innovation in its own...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

Not Available

1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

The realisation of an on-board emission measuring system serving as a R&D tool for ultra low emitting vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The negative impact of deteriorating air quality on public health etc. is receiving growing attention. As a result, the contributing emission sources are increasingly regulated. Thus, the emissions of road transport - being one of the largest contributors - are under constant pressure. As such, the evolving legislation on emissions of new cars is forcing to ultra low emitting vehicles. To assist in the development of those vehicles an on-board measuring system capable of determining ppm level emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) is realised. This system combines the latest in laboratory grade analysers with a high speed condensing type sampling system in a state of the-art shock proof design. The regulated emission components can be detected to at least one ppm. The data-acquisition allows for the simultaneous retrieval of engine and vehicle parameters in order to calculate on-line mass based time resolved emissions that can be quickly linked to relevant parameters of the emission control system. The data treatment is automated under LabView. The on-board system is validated by over 130 comparative simultaneous measurements on a Constant Volume Sampling chassis dynamometer. The tests are executed on three modern light duty vehicles of which one ultra low emitting Euro 4 certified petrol one. The comparison revealed that differences in emissions are below 10% except for very low levels i.e. underneath 0.02 g/km where the reference system is thought to be more inaccurate then the on-board one. On-board emission measurements performed on a Euro 4 petrol vehicle showed differences of more then a decade when compared to the type approval cycle on chassis dynamometer. An in-depth analysis revealed that, outside this cycle, the engine can be differently calibrated resulting in deviations from the stoichiometric air to fuel ratio and subsequent raise in emissions. Also, very short emission events could be studied such as NOx raise during accelerations immediately following a motoring period. This could be attributed to a slightly lean air fuel mixture just at the start of fuel injection.

G. Lenaers; L. Pelkmans; P. Debal

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Reduction of NOx emission on NiCrAl-Titanium Oxide coated direct injection diesel engine fuelled with radish (Raphanus sativus) biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the experimental investigation of single cylinder DI diesel engine with and without coating. Diesel and radish (Raphanus sativus) oil Methyl Ester are used as fuels and the results are compared to find the effect of biodiesel in a thermal barrier coating engine. For this purpose engine cylinder head valves and piston crown are coated with 100??m of nickel-chrome-aluminium bond coat and 450??m of TiO2 by the plasma spray method. Radish oil methyl ester is produced by the transesterification process method. From the experimental investigation slight increase in specific fuel consumption in thermal barrier coating engine is observed when compared with the uncoated engine whereas NOx HC Smoke and CO emissions decreased with coated engine for all test fuels used in the coated engine when compared with that of the uncoated engine.

V. Ravikumar; D. Senthilkumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Aerosol Jet Printing of LSCF-CGO Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology has attracted great attention due to advantages such as low emissions and high efficiency. In this work, solid oxide… (more)

Gardner, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Response surface methodology based prediction of engine performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fuelled with canola oil methyl ester  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fuel injection timing and engine speed on engine performance and exhaust emission parameters using a diesel engine running on canola oil methyl ester (COME). COME was produced by means of the transesterification method and tested at full load with various engine speeds by changing fuel injection timing (12 15 and 18?°CA) in a turbocharged direct injection (TDI) diesel engine. The experiments were designed using response surface methodology (RSM) which is one of the well-known design of experiment technique for predicting the responses engine performance and exhaust emission parameters from a second order polynomial equation obtained by modeling the relation between fuel injection timing (t) and engine speed (n) parameters. By using the second order full quadratic RSM models obtained from experimental results responses brake power brake torque brake mean effective pressure brake specific fuel consumption brake thermal efficiency exhaust gas temperature oxygen (O2) oxides of nitrogen (NOx) carbon dioxide (CO2) carbon monoxide (CO) and light absorption coefficient (K) affected from factors t and n were able to be predicted by 95% confidence interval.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

An experimental study of combustion and emissions of two types of woody biomass in a 12-MW reciprocating-grate boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The gaseous emissions of primary concern from biomass combustion are nitrogen oxides (NOX), carbon monoxide, and various unburned gaseous components. Detailed characterization of the gas in the hot reaction zones is necessary to study the release, formation, and evolution of the gas components. In the present study, gas temperature and concentration were measured in a 12-MWth biomass-fired reciprocating-grate boiler operated with over-fire air and flue-gas recirculation. Temperature measurement was combined with flue gas quenching and sample gas extraction using two water-cooled stainless-steel suction pyrometers. The concentration profiles of O2, NO, and CO were experimentally determined throughout the furnace, and the profile gas temperature was measured in several positions inside the furnace for the two types of woody biomass studied. For both fuels, the gas temperature varied between approximately 450 °C (average primary chamber temperature) and 1200 °C (average secondary chamber temperature). The concentration profiles of CO and O2 suggested no conclusive difference between the two types of biomass. However, the local mean concentrations of NO and NOX emission factors (measured in the stack) were higher for Greenery fuel due to its higher nitrogen content than that of Standard fuel.

Hamid Sefidari; Narges Razmjoo; Michael Strand

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3]. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Vacancies in ordered and disordered titanium monoxide: Mechanism of B1 structure stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic structure and stability of three phases of titanium monoxide TiO{sub y} with B1 type of the basic structure have been studied. Cubic phase without structural vacancies, TiO, and two phases with structural vacancies, monoclinic Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} and cubic disordered TiO{sub 1.0}, was treated by means of first-principles calculations within the density functional theory with pseudo-potential approach based on the plane wave's basis. The ordered monoclinic phase Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} was found to be the most stable and the cubic TiO without vacancies the less stable one. The role of structural vacancies in the titanium sublattice is to decrease the Fermi energy, the role of vacancies in the oxygen sublattice is to contribute to the appearance of Ti–Ti bonding interactions through these vacancies and to reinforce the Ti–Ti interactions close to them. Listed effects are significantly pronounced if the vacancies in the titanium and oxygen sublattices are associated in the so called “vacancy channels” which determine the formation of vacancy ordered structure of monoclinic Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5}-type. - Graphical abstract: Changes in total DOS of titanium monoxide when going from vacancy-free TiO to TiO with disordered structural vacancies and to TiO with ordered structural vacancies. Highlights: • Ordered monoclinic Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} is the most stable phase of titanium monoxide. • Vacancy-free TiO is the less stable phase of the titanium monoxide. • Ordering of oxygen vacancies leads to the appearance of Ti–Ti bonding interactions. • Titanium vacancies contribute significantly to the decreasing of the Fermi energy.

Kostenko, M.G. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, The Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pervomayskaya 91, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Lukoyanov, A.V. [Institute of Metal Physics, The Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, S. Kovalevskoy 18, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University named after First President of Russia B.N. Yeltsin, Mira 19, Ekaterinburg 620002 (Russian Federation); Zhukov, V.P. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, The Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pervomayskaya 91, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Rempel, A.A., E-mail: rempel@ihim.uran.ru [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, The Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pervomayskaya 91, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University named after First President of Russia B.N. Yeltsin, Mira 19, Ekaterinburg 620002 (Russian Federation)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Technical Report: Design and operation of a new transportable laboratory for emissions testing of heavy duty trucks and buses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A significant number of city buses, city tractors and utility trucks are already operating on alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol and natural gas. In response to the need for reliable emissions data from these vehicles, a transportable laboratory has been constructed and has operated on six different dates over the past nine months. This laboratory consists of a semi-trailer incorporating a chassis rolls dynamometer and a second trailer containing the necessary emissions and controls equipment. The semi-trailer can be lowered to the ground using specially designed hydraulic jacks and the vehicle to be tested is driven up ramps onto the rolls. Power is taken from the vehicle to flywheels and air-cooled eddy-current absorbers which simulate inertia and road load. The vehicle is driven through a speed-time cycle by a driver receiving a prompt on a screen, and vehicle speed is monitored by shaft encoders at three locations. The load applied to the vehicle is found using a road load equation: part of this energy is dissipated in rotating component parasitic losses determined during a calibration procedure and the remainder is dissipated by the computer-controlled power absorbers. Tailpipe emissions are ducted to a dilution tunnel, powered by a blower with critical flow venturies, while probes in the tunnel draw continuous samples to an analyser bench. Total hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are all monitored, while a composite particulate matter sample is obtained on a filter. A bank of such data for methanol, diesel, jet fuel and natural gas powered buses operating primarily on the Central Business District Cycle is presently being gathered and analysed.

Nigel N. Clark; Mridul Gautam; Reda M. Bata; Wen-Guang Wang; John L. Loth; G. Michael Palmer; Donald W. Lyons

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove Title Quantification of Black Carbon and Other Pollutant Emissions from a Traditional and an Improved Cookstove Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6062E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Chelsea Preble, Odelle L. Hadley, and Ashok J. Gadgil Keywords aethalometer, Berkeley Darfur Stove, black carbon, carbon monoxide, climate change, DustTrak, global warming, improved cookstoves, indoor air quality, LBNL Stove Testing Facility, particulate matter, photoacoustic absorption spectrometer, pollutant emission factor, three-stone fire Abstract Traditional methods of cooking in developing regions of the world emit pollutants that

305

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

306

Compression ignition engine performance and emission evaluation of industrial oilseed biofuel feedstocks camelina, carinata, and pennycress across three fuel pathways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Industrial oilseeds camelina (Camelina sativa L.), carinata (Brassica carinata), and pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) offer great potential as biofuel feedstocks due to their non-food nature and positive agronomic attributes. This research focused on compression ignition (CI) engine performance and emissions of these industrial oilseeds as compared to both traditional feedstocks and petroleum diesel. A John Deere 4.5 L test engine was used to evaluate these oils using three fuel pathways (triglyceride blends, biodiesel, and renewable diesel). This engine research represents the first direct comparison of these new biofuel feedstocks to each other and to conventional sources. For some industrial oilseed feedstock and fuel pathway combinations, this study also represents the first engine performance data available. The results were promising, with camelina, carinata, and pennycress engine performance very similar to the traditional oils for each fuel pathway. Fuel consumption, thermal efficiency, and emissions were all were typical as compared to traditional oilseed feedstocks. Average brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) for the industrial oilseed biofuels was within ±1.3% of the conventional oilseed biofuels for each fuel type. Initial research with triglyceride blends (TGB), formed by blending straight vegetable oil with gasoline, indicate it may be an ideal fuel pathway for farm-scale fuel production, and was compatible with a direct injection CI engine without modification. TGB had lower fuel consumption and a higher thermal efficiency than biodiesel for each feedstock tested. For several categories, TGB performed similar to petroleum diesel. TGB volumetric bsfc was only 1.9% higher than the petroleum runs. TGB combustion characteristics were similar to biodiesel. Biodiesel runs had several emission benefits such as reductions in carbon monoxide (CO), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and formaldehyde (CH20) emissions as compared to TGB runs. The renewable diesels had petroleum-like engine performance and combustion characteristics, while still maintaining some of the benefits of biodiesel such as reduced CO emissions. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions were also 6% lower for renewable diesel runs than petroleum. Both crude and refined oil was used as feedstock, and did not significantly affect engine performance or emissions in a modern CI engine.

A.C. Drenth; D.B. Olsen; P.E. Cabot; J.J. Johnson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions trading is a market-based instrument to achieve ... The current international dissemination and intended linking of emissions trading schemes underlines the growing relevance of this ... . There are thr...

Edwin Woerdman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter covers a series of operations which are essential for the implementation of an efficient emissions trading market on the domestic and international level. An introduction to how a national emissions trading

Dr. Michael See

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effect of different percentages of biodiesel–diesel blends on injection, spray, combustion, performance, and emission characteristics of a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A comparative study of effect of different biodiesel–diesel blends (B5, B10, B15, B20, B25, B50 and B100) on injection, spray, combustion, performance, and emissions of a direct injection diesel engine at constant speed (1500 rpm) was carried out. The penetration distance increased with increase in percentage of biodiesel in diesel due to enhanced in-line fuel pressure. The simulation results indicate the spray penetration with biodiesel–diesel blend up to B15 does not lead to wall impingement but B20 is to be a critical limit of wall impingement (within uncertainty ±1.3%). However, it is observed clearly from the simulation results that probability of wall impingement is more with higher blends (B25, B50 and B100). The ignition delay period decreased with all biodiesel blends due to higher cetane number resulting in less rate of pressure rise and the smooth engine running operation. The engine torque does not change significantly with biodiesel–diesel blends up to 20% (B20). However, the torque reduction is about 2.7% with B100 at the rated load. Carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) and smoke emissions decreased with all biodiesel–diesel blends. However, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission increased in the range of 1.4–22.8% with all biodiesel–diesel blends at rated load due to oxygenated fuel, automatic advance in dynamic injection timing (DIT), higher penetration and higher in-cylinder temperature. A notable conclusion emerged from this study is the optimum biodiesel–diesel blend based on no wall impingement (B15: 0% and B20 ±1.3% uncertainty limit) and increase in \\{NOx\\} emission (B15: 4.1% and B20: 15.6%) in a conventional (unmodified) diesel engine is up to B15.

Subhash Lahane; K.A. Subramanian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Biomass torrefaction and CO2 capture using mining wastes A new approach for reducing greenhouse gas emissions of co-firing plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an efficient biomass/coal co-firing could thus be further enhanced by curbing the overall process CO2 emissions as well as using ionic-liquid-impregnated torrefac- tion to increase birch wood constituents' torrefaction saturation, and carbon monoxide and methane concen- trations on mining residues CO2 uptake was studied

Devernal, Anne

311

A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

Sen, Ayusman

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

313

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

314

Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

M. Aslam K. Khalil

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control CO and hydrocarbon emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion Effectiveness of a...

316

Development of non-premixed porous inserted regenerative thermal oxidizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, a porous inserted regenerative thermal oxidizer (PRTO) system was developed for a... x emissions and high radiant efficiency. Zirconium dioxide (ZrO2...) ceramic ...

Jun-chun Zhang; Le-ming Cheng; Cheng-hang Zheng…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Volatile Carbon Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed & Volatile Carbon Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research...

318

Zero emission coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

320

Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

Biruduganti, Munidhar S. (Naperville, IL); Gupta, Sreenath Borra (Naperville, IL); Sekar, R. Raj (Naperville, IL); McConnell, Steven S. (Shorewood, IL)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effects of boundaries on pattern formation: Catalytic oxidation of CO on platinum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of boundaries on pattern formation was studied for the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on platinum surfaces. Photolithography was used to create microscopic reacting domains on polycrystalline foils and single-crystal platinum (110) surfaces with inert titanium overlayers. Certain domain geometries give rise to patterns that have not been observed on the untreated catalyst and bring to light surface mechanisms that have no analog in homogeneous reaction-diffusion systems.

Graham, M.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)); Kevrekidis, I.G. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)); Asakura, K.; Lauterbach, J.; Krischer, K.; Rotermund, H.H.; Ertl, G. (Fritz-Haber-Institut de Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The effect of reformer gas mixture on the performance and emissions of an HSDI diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Exhaust gas assisted fuel reforming is an attractive on-board hydrogen production method, which can open new frontiers in diesel engines. Apart from hydrogen, and depending on the reactions promoted, the reformate typically contains a significant amount of carbon monoxide, which is produced as a by-product. Moreover, admission of reformed gas into the engine, through the inlet pipe, leads to an increase of intake air nitrogen to oxygen ratio. It is therefore necessary to study how a mixture of syngas and nitrogen affects the performance and emissions of a diesel engine, in order to gain a better understanding of the effects of supplying fuel reformer products into the engine. In the current research work, a bottled gas mixture with H2 and CO contents resembling those of typical diesel reformer product gas was injected into the inlet pipe of an HSDI diesel engine. Nitrogen (drawn from a separate bottle) at the same volumetric fraction to syngas was simultaneously admitted into the inlet pipe. Exhaust analysis and performance calculation was carried out and compared to a neat diesel operation. Introduction of syngas + N2 gas mixture resulted in simultaneous reduction of the formation of \\{NOx\\} and smoke emissions over a broad range of the engine operating window. Estimation of the bottled carbon monoxide utilisation showed that by increasing either the load or the speed the admitted carbon monoxide is utilised more efficiently. As a general rule, CO2 emissions increase when the bottled carbon monoxide utilisation is approximately over 88%. Isolation of the H2 and N2 effect revealed that a CO diluted flame promotes the formation of smoke. When the intake air is enriched with syngas + N2, an increase of engine speed results in reduction of maximum pressure rise rate (dp/da). The effect of load on dp/da varies depending on engine speed. Finally, the engine is more fuel efficient when running on neat diesel.

Fanos Christodoulou; Athanasios Megaritis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...samples followed by GC analysis has been used in both laboratory scale reactors and full-scale plants...two laboratory scale reactors. Foley et al. [23...measurements. Combining the analyses of both the microsensor...significantly increases the reliability of data. Similar to...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic study of the interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benzene on the Pt(111) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of potassium with carbon monoxide and benezene has been studied on the Pt(111) crystal surface by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The adsorptive changes reported in previous studies for carbon monoxide and benzene when potassium is coadsorbed are correlated with the UPS results presented here and are explained with the aid of a molecular orbital analysis. The authors find that the valence molecular orbitals increase their binding energy slightly when the potassium is coadsorbed, implying a model in which the adsorbates sense the potassium-induced changes in dipole field at the surface. 36 references, 11 figures.

Kudo, M.; Garfunkel, E.L.; Somorjai, G.A.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

Observation of two-dimensional compositional ordering of a carbon monoxide and argon monolayer mixture physisorbed on graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commensurate monolayers of a mixture of 70% carbon monoxide and 30% argon on graphite are studied by neutron and low-energy-electron diffraction. A 2 x 2 superstructure due to 3:1 compositional ordering is observed below 25 K. The compositional ordering is most likely due to molecular-axis ordering of carbon monoxide molecules into a pinwheel pattern with argon atoms at the central sites of each pinwheel. Such a pinwheel structure has been predicted by Harris, Mouritsen, and Berlinsky for planar rotors with anisotropic interactions on a triangular lattice with vacancies.

You, H.; Fain, S.C. Jr.; Satija, S.; Passell, L.

1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

326

Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts which were examined by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The metal particle size and number of particles per area of catalyst increased with increasing metal loading. The particles were approx. 10 A. in diameter, cubo-octahedral shaped, and approx. 80-90% disperse. The STEM electron beam caused negligible damage to the samples. Hydrogen adsorption measurements showed that the hydrogen-iridium atom ratio was 1.2:1-1.3:1 and increased with decreasing metal loading. Temperature-programed desorption showed four types of adsorbed hydrogen desorbing at -90/sup 0/C (I), 15/sup 0/C (IV), 115/sup 0/C (II), and 245/sup 0/C (III). Types II and IV desorb from single atom sites and Types I and III from multiple atom sites. Type I is in rapid equilibrium with the gas phase. All desorption processes appear to be first order. Carbon monoxide adsorbed nondissociatively at 25/sup 0/C with approx. 0.7:1 CO/Ir atom ratio. It adsorbed primarily in linear forms at low coverage, but a bridged form appeared at high coverage.

Etherton, B.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Daily and 3-hourly variability in global fire emissions and consequences for atmospheric model predictions of carbon monoxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biomass burning in South?America, Int. J. Remote Sens. ,D24303 fire season in South America, J. Geophys. Res. , 103(across North, South and Central America, Remote Sens.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Combustion and emission characteristics of diesel engine fuelled with methyl esters of pungam oil and rice bran oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biodiesel derived from vegetable oils and animal fats can be used in diesel engines with little or no modifications. In this work, the combustion, performance and emission characteristics of various biodiesel (rice bran oil and pungam oil) and their blends are evaluated in a direct injection diesel engine. Lower ignition delay, higher peak pressure and heat release rate with almost same brake thermal efficiency are obtained for 20% biodiesel blend as compared with diesel fuel. They exhibited lower unburned hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide and soot emissions with a penalty of higher NOx emissions.

G. Lakshmi Narayana Rao; N. Nallusamy; S. Sampath; K. Rajagopal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation by Erica Bickford A dissertation rights reserved. #12;Abstract Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford.S. transportation is the largest source of national nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and the third largest source

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

330

MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 MEASURING GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM STORED PIG SLURRY S. Espagnol1 , L. Loyon2 , F. Guiziou2 , P to measure emissions factors of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from stored pig slurry and measured the variations of the emissions in time and space. In 2006, dynamic

Boyer, Edmond

331

NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) Agency/Company /Organization: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: gcmd.nasa.gov/records/GCMD_NASA_AMES_GLEMIS.html NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) Screenshot References: NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS)[1] "NASA-CASA data sets include global maps for predicted fluxes of soil nitrogen gases (N2O and NO), methane (CH4), and carbon monoxide (CO), plus predictions of net primary production (NPP) and carbon storage in leaf, wood, root, litter, and surface soil pools. Others data sets will follow.

332

Vietnam-Integrated Action Plan to Reduce Vehicle Emissions | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Integrated Action Plan to Reduce Vehicle Emissions Vietnam-Integrated Action Plan to Reduce Vehicle Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Integrated Action Plan to Reduce Vehicle Emissions Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Focus Area Transportation Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.adb.org/documents/o Program Start 2002 Country Vietnam UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Vietnam-Integrated Action Plan to Reduce Vehicle Emissions[1] Background "A major goal of this strategy is to reduce mobile sources of air pollution in Viet Nam's largest cities. According to this strategy, industry, business units, management agencies and the transport sector must carefully control pollutant emissions such as carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide

333

Studies on the sulfur poisoning of Ru-RuO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst for the adsorption and methanation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of sulfur poisoning on the chemisorption and on the methanation of carbon monoxide over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalyst were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and volumetric gas adsorption measurements. The CS{sub 2} molecules are {eta}` bonded to Ru sites through one of the sulfur atoms and decompose to the constituent elements on thermal activation. Each S atom may deactivate 3 to 10 metal sites even at low coverages, the effect being more pronounced on the chemisorption of hydrogen. The deposited sulfur (and possibly carbon also) sterically hinders the formation of certain multicarbonyl and monocarbonyl species (vCO in 2055-2140 cm{sup -1} region), which otherwise transform to methane via surface methylene groups in the presence of chemisorbed hydrogen and are found to play an important role in the low-temperature methanation activity of the studied catalyst. The Ru-CO species giving rise to lower frequency vibrational bands are affected to a lesser extent. The presence of sulfur also results in the development of some new CO binding states which are weak and are identified with the CO and S coadsorbed at Ru sites of different oxidation states or of varying crystallographic nature. The CO adsorbed in these states is not reactive to hydrogen. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Kamble, V.S.; Londhe, V.P.; Gupta, N.M. [Bhambha Atomic Research centre, Bombay (India)] [and others] [Bhambha Atomic Research centre, Bombay (India); and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Metal Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal oxides are the class of materials having the widest application in gas sensors. This chapter presents information related to the application of various metal oxides in gas sensors designed on different p...

Ghenadii Korotcenkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150 to 260/sup 0/C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO/sub 4/ and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect. 3 tables.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Foran, M.T.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Design and Development of a Mid-Infrared Carbon Monoxide Sensor for a High-Pressure Combustor Rig  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A sensor for carbon monoxide measurement has been developed using a mid-infrared quantum-cascade (QC) laser operating in the fundamental band (?v= 1) of CO near 4.5 ?m. The fundamental band was chosen due to its stronger absorption line...

Camou, Alejandro

2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

337

Reducing Emissions of Persistent Organic Pollutants from a Diesel Engine by Fueling with Water-Containing Butanol Diesel Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An increasing energy demand and environmental pollution has motivated a search for bio-fuels, such as bio-diesels(1, 2) and bio-alcohols,(3, 4) that can be used as alternative fuels for diesel engines. ... In general, both bio-diesel and bio-alcohols, such as ethanol and butanol, have the advantages of higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and lower emissions of particulate matter (PM), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbons (HC). ... Diesel Engine and Test Cycle ...

Yu-Cheng Chang; Wen-Jhy Lee; Hsi-Hsien Yang; Lin-Chi Wang; Jau-Huai Lu; Ying I. Tsai; Man-Ting Cheng; Li-Hao Young; Chia-Jui Chiang

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Economic impact analysis for proposed emission standards and guidelines for municipal waste combustors: A description of the basis for, and impacts of, proposed revisions to air pollutant emission regulations for new and existing municipal waste combustors under Clean Air Act Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPA is proposing revised and expanded air pollutant emission standards for new, and guidelines for existing, municipal waste combustors (MWCs), pursuant to Sections 111(b), 111(d), and 129 of the Clean Air Act of 1990. The regulations will replace or supplement those promulgated by EPA on February 11, 1991. The standards and guidelines will apply to MWCs with a capacity to combust 35 or more Mg of municipal solid waste per day. The pollutants to be regulated are particulate matter (total and fine), opacity, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, lead, cadmium mercury, and dibenzofurans and dioxins. The report describes the standards and guidelines, their potential economic impacts, and related matters. EPA estimates the national annual cost of the standards in 1994 will be $44 million, plus the cost of the 1991 standards, $157 million, for a total of $201 million. EPA estimates the equivalent cost of the guidelines at $280 million plus $168 million for a total of $448 million.

Jellicorse, B.L.; Dempsey, J.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE BY CARBON MONOXIDE OVER A SILICA SUPPORTED PLATINUM CATALYST: INFRARED AND KINETIC STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System. • B. Procedures. Catalyst Preparation Infrared DiskPreparation. Catalyst Characterization. PreliminaryReduction by CO Over a Pt Catalyst," M.S. thesis, Department

Lorimer, D.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Strain-induced band-gap engineering of graphene monoxide and its effect on graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using first-principles calculations we demonstrate the feasibility of band-gap engineering in two-dimensional crystalline graphene monoxide (GMO), a recently reported graphene-based material with a 1:1 carbon/oxygen ratio. The band gap of GMO, which can be switched between direct and indirect, is tunable over a large range (0–1.35 eV) for accessible strains. Electron and hole transport occurs predominantly along the zigzag and armchair directions (armchair for both) when GMO is a direct- (indirect-) gap semiconductor. A band gap of ?0.5 eV is also induced in graphene at the K? points for GMO/graphene hybrid systems.

H. H. Pu; S. H. Rhim; C. J. Hirschmugl; M. Gajdardziska-Josifovska; M. Weinert; J. H. Chen

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modification of copper-chromium catalyst for steam conversion of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of model tests that show that the copperchromium sample is superior in stability and activity to the industrial NTK-5 catalyst. Under unfavorable conditions with the use of industrial converted gas containing more than 20 vol.% of carbon monoxide, and with sulfur compounds, chlorine, and ammonia as impurities, after 3 months of continuous operation in the temperature range 190-260 degrees the catalyst lost less than 10% of inactivity (with respect to the degree of CO conversion), whereas the activity of the industrial NTK-4 catalyst fell by 15% under the same conditions. It is shown that a catalyst not inferior in properties to the industrial NTK-4 catalyst can be obtained by modifying the copper-chromium catalyst with aluminum compounds.

Khabibullin, R.R.; Torocheshnikov, N.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Visualizing a Catalyst at Work during the Ignition of the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ignitions or light-offs of heterogeneously catalyzed oxidation reactions are a special challenge for operando studies on catalytic reactors, which have gained increasing attention for the identification of active sites of catalysts and optimal reactor design. ... One of these reactions is the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of hydrocarbons to carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which is considered an important alternative to presently utilized processes in natural gas and biomass conversion such as steam and autothermal reforming. ... In conclusion, we demonstrate that the ignition of heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions can be visualized in a spatiotemporal manner by means of synchrotron radiation based high resolution transmission X-ray absorption imaging combined with IR thermography. ...

Bertram Kimmerle; Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt; Alfons Baiker; Pieter Glatzel; Pit Boye; Sandra Stephan; Christian G. Schroer

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

Radon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR,-Wendy Barnaby (August 28) writes on the problem of radon emission from the tailings of uranium milling in Sweden. This problem would arise from ... that has to be treated. She describes Professor Robert O. Pohl's report that "radon can escape more easily from the broken ground of a mine than from an undisturbed ...

SVEN-ERIC BRUNNSJO

1975-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

344

Separate determination of PM10 emission factors of road traffic for tailpipe emissions and emissions from abrasion and resuspension processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Little is known about the relevance of mechanically produced particles of road traffic from abrasion and resuspension processes in relation to the exhaust pipe particles. In this paper, emission factors of PM10 and PM1 for light and heavy-duty vehicles were derived for different representative traffic regimes from concentration differences of particles and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in ambient air upwind and downwind of busy roads, or alternatively of kerbsides and nearby background sites. Hereby, PM1 was interpreted as direct exhaust emissions and PM10-PM1 as mechanically produced emissions from abrasion and resuspension processes. The results show that abrasion and resuspension processes represent a significant part of the total primary PM10 emissions of road traffic. At sites with relatively undisturbed traffic flow they are in the same range as the exhaust pipe emissions. At sites with disturbed traffic flow due to traffic lights, emissions from abrasion/resuspension are even higher than those from the exhaust pipes.

Robert Gehrig; Matz Hill; Brigitte Buchmann; David Imhof; Ernest Weingartner; Urs Baltensperger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Effects of Future Ship Emissions in the North Sea on Air Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By means of model simulations with the chemistry transport model CMAQ the influence of ship emissions in the North Sea on concentrations ... and nitrogen oxides over Europe was investigated. Ship emissions for th...

Armin Aulinger; Volker Matthias…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Influence of surface defects and local structure on acid/base properties and oxidation pathways over metal oxide surfaces. Final report, June 1990--January 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report covers work done during project period one and project period two. All the work in project period one was focused on the selective oxidation of oxygenated hydrocarbons over the SnO{sub 2}(110) single crystal surface. In project period two, the emphasis was on the acid/base properties of SnO{sub 2}(110) as well as two different Cu{sub 2}O single crystal surfaces. Prior to the summary of results, a description of these different surfaces is given as background information. Results are described for the dissociation and reaction of Bronsted acids (methanol, formic acid, water, formaldehyde, acetone, propene, acetic acid, and carbon monoxide). Results from project period two include: ammonia adsorption, CO{sub 2} adsorption, propene adsorption and oxidation, with tin oxides; complimentary work with copper oxides; and STM investigations.

Cox, D.F.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Non-Incineration Treatment to Reduce Benzene and VOC Emissions from Green Sand Molding Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report describing laboratory, pilot scale and production scale evaluation of advanced oxidation systems for emissions and cost reduction in metal casting green sand systems.

Fred S. Cannon; Robert C. Voigt

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Impact of aircraft emissions on air quality in the vicinity of airports. Volume II. An updated model assessment of aircraft generated air pollution at LAX, JFK, and ORD. Final report Jan 1978-Jul 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)/Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air quality study which has been conducted to assess the impact of aircraft emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in the vicinity of airports. This assessment includes the results of recent modeling and monitoring efforts at Washington National (DCA), Los Angeles International (LAX), Dulles International (IAD), and Lakeland, Florida airports and an updated modeling of aircraft generated pollution at LAX, John F. Kennedy (JFK) and Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airports. The Airport Vicinity Air Pollution (AVAP) model which was designed for use at civil airports was used in this assessment. In addition the results of the application of the military version of the AVAP model the Air Quality Assessment Model (AQAM), are summarized. Both the results of the pollution monitoring analyses in Volume I and the modeling studies in Volume II suggest that: maximum hourly average CO concentrations from aircraft are unlikely to exceed 5 parts per million (ppm) in areas of public exposure and are thus small in comparison to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 35 ppm; maximum hourly HC concentrations from aircraft can exceed 0.25 ppm over an area several times the size of the airport; and annual average NO2 concentrations from aircraft are estimated to contribute only 10 to 20 percent of the NAAQS limit level.

Yamartino, R.J.; Smith, D.G.; Bremer, S.A.; Heinold, D.; Lamich, D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Using the HP-41CV calculator as a data acquisition system for personal carbon monoxide exposure monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of small, personal monitors as instruments for air pollution data acquisition, storage, and retrieval presents a new set of monitoring considerations. Portability, ruggedness, power supplies, and data capture are functions to be addressed in designing personal monitoring systems. The emphasis herein is on the data capture function. This paper describes experiences using the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV system as a data management system interfaced with personal carbon monoxide monitors (General Electric Carbon Monoxide Detector, Model 15EC53CO3). In general, the HP-41CV proved to be reliable, adaptable, and easy to use. Problems with the monitor power source (battery failure) were more frequent than with the HP-41CV itself. Using the HP-41CV for the specific data collection requirements of the Washington Microenvironment Study is a focal point of this presentation.

Fitz-Simons, T.; Sauls, H.B.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

nitrogen oxides | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279720 Varnish cache server nitrogen oxides Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

353

Performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine using esters of palm olein/soybean oil blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this experimental study, the engine performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel direct injection engine using mixed palm oleinâ??soybean vegetable oil ethyl ester (POSEE) and methyl ester (POSME) have been examined. The results of experimental studies have shown that the torque and brake power output of an engine, which uses biodiesels, is slightly lower and specific fuel consumption is higher than in an engine using conventional diesel fuel. It has also been observed that there is a decrease in both carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions, which indicates an advantage of exhaust emissions. Although methyl ester's CO2 emissions decreased compared with those of diesel fuel, NO and NOX emissions were higher with the biodiesels.

Imdat Taymaz; Mucahit Sengil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Controls (Agreement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Controls (Agreement Number 13425)NPBF Effects on PM OxidationNPBF Effects on EGR System Performance Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels:...

355

Preliminary GHG Emissions Inventory for the Slovak Republic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a greenhouse gas emissions inventory for the Slovak Republic. The key gases included are carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Chlorofluorocarbons are excluded ...

Katarína Mare?kova; Pavol Bielek; Stanislav Kucirek…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal-oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxides - such as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxide - was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H{sub 2}S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H{sub 2}S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H{sub 2}S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H{sub 2}S for all four metal oxides.

Tian, H.J.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R. [US DOE, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on a smooth palladium electrode: an in-situ infrared spectroscopic study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption of carbon monoxide on a smooth palladium electrode in 1 M HClO/sub 4/ saturated with CO was studied by two in-situ IR reflectance spectroscopic methods: EMIRS (electrochemically modulated infrared reflectance spectroscopy) and LPSIRS (linear potential sweep infrared reflectance spectroscopy). Two types of adsorbed CO, linear and bridged, were identified from the observed IR spectra, the latter being the predominant surface species. The C-O stretching frequency of the linear CO shifts to higher frequencies at more positive potentials with a slope of 48 cm/sup -1//V. The frequency of the bridged CO increases by 63 cm/sup -1/ between -0.5 and 0.9 V(NHE) and its integrated band intensity decreases continuously in the same potential region while the intensity of the linear CO is almost constant up to 0.1 V and then decreases gradually with increasing positive potential. The surface selection rule of the IR reflection absorption spectroscopy was tested for the present system by using the p- and s-polarized light. It was found that only p-polarized light gave the IR spectra of CO adsorbed on the palladium electrode thus proving the selection rule at the electrode/solution interface.

Kunimatsu, K.

1984-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

358

Solar Carbon Monoxide, Thermal Profiling, and the Abundances of C, O, and their Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A solar photospheric "thermal profiling" analysis is presented, exploiting the infrared rovibrational bands of carbon monoxide (CO) as observed with the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Kitt Peak, and from above the Earth's atmosphere by the Shuttle-borne ATMOS experiment. Visible continuum intensities and center-limb behavior constrained the temperature profile of the deep photosphere, while CO center-limb behavior defined the thermal structure at higher altitudes. The oxygen abundance was self consistently determined from weak CO absorptions. Our analysis was meant to complement recent studies based on 3-D convection models which, among other things, have revised the historical solar oxygen (and carbon) abundance downward by a factor of nearly two; although in fact our conclusions do not support such a revision. Based on various considerations, an oxygen abundance of 700+/-100 ppm (parts per million relative to hydrogen) is recommended; the large uncertainty reflects the model sensitivity of CO. New solar isotopic ratios also are reported for 13C, 17O, and 18O.

Thomas R. Ayres; Claude Plymate; Christoph U. Keller

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au{sub 3}{sup +} and Ag{sub 3}{sup +} clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au{sub 3}{sup +} the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag{sub 3}O{sub x}{sup +} (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N{sub 2}O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M. [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Optimization of Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2 Bin 5 Emission Limits  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Drastic reduction of engine-out emissions and complicated aftertreatment system comprising of oxidation catalyst, particulate filter, and DeNOx catalyst are implemented to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 limits for U.S. market diesel engines.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Extending surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to transition-metal surfaces: carbon monoxide adsorption and electrooxidation on platinum- and palladium-coated gold electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin (ca. one to three monolayers) films of platinum and palladium electrodeposited on electrochemically roughened gold are observed to yield surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra for adsorbed carbon monoxide. The major vibrational band(s) on these surfaces are diagnosed from their frequencies as arising from C-O stretching vibrations, nu/sub CO/ bound to the transition-metal overlayers rather than to residual gold sites. The observed SFR nu/sub CO/ frequencies are closely similar to (within ca. 10 cm/sup -1/ of) those obtained for these systems from potential-difference infrared (PDIR) spectra. The major SERS and PDIR nu/sub CO/ features for the platinum and palladium surfaces appear at 2060-2090 and 1965-1985 cm/sup -1/, respectively, consistent with the presence of terminal and bridging CO on these two electrodes. The infrared as well as electrochemical properties of these systems are closely similar to those for the corresponding polycrystalline bulk electrodes. A difference between the SER- and IR-active adsorbed CO, however, is that the former undergoes electrooxidation on both surfaces at 0.2-0.3 V higher overpotentials than the latter form. Examination of the potential-dependent SERS bands for metal oxide vibrations, nu/sub PtO/, on the platinum surface shows that the electrooxidation potential for the SERS-active adsorbed CO coincides with that for the appearance of the nu/sub PtO/ band. Some broader implications to the utilization of SERS for examining transition-metal surfaces are pointed out.

Leung, L.W.H.; Weaver, M.J.

1987-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Elastic emission polishing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

3Compliance Status 2005 Site environmental report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Environmental Conservation. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide were all within permit limits. Numerous opacity excursions due to routine soot blowing occurred in the first three

364

Carbon monoxide in the solar atmosphere I. Numerical method and two-dimensional models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radiation hydrodynamic code CO5BOLD has been supplemented with the time-dependent treatment of chemical reaction networks. Advection of particle densities due to the hydrodynamic flow field is also included. The radiative transfer is treated frequency-independently, i.e. grey, so far. The upgraded code has been applied to two-dimensional simulations of carbon monoxide (CO) in the non-magnetic solar photosphere and low chromosphere. For this purpose a reaction network has been constructed, taking into account the reactions which are most important for the formation and dissociation of CO under the physical conditions of the solar atmosphere. The network has been strongly reduced to 27 reactions, involving the chemical species H, H2, C, O, CO, CH, OH, and a representative metal. The resulting CO number density is highest in the cool regions of the reversed granulation pattern at mid-photospheric heights and decreases strongly above. There, the CO abundance stays close to a value of 8.3 on the usual logarithmic abundance scale with [H]=12 but is reduced in hot shock waves which are a ubiquitous phenomenon of the model atmosphere. For comparison, the corresponding equilibrium densities have been calculated, based on the reaction network but also under assumption of instantaneous chemical equilibrium by applying the Rybicki & Hummer (RH) code by Uitenbroek (2001). Owing to the short chemical timescales, the assumption holds for a large fraction of the atmosphere, in particular the photosphere. In contrast, the CO number density deviates strongly from the corresponding equilibrium value in the vicinity of chromospheric shock waves. Simulations with altered reaction network clearly show that the formation channel via hydroxide (OH) is the most important one under the conditions of the solar atmosphere.

S. Wedemeyer-Boehm; I. Kamp; J. Bruls; B. Freytag

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

Kinetics of Diesel Nanoparticle Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxidation rates in air of diesel nanoparticles sampled directly from the exhaust stream of a medium-duty diesel engine were measured over the temperature range of 800?1140 °C using online aerosol techniques. ... Particulate emission from diesel engines is currently a topic of great concern from both pollution and public health standpoints. ... In addition, the fundamental carbon-to-hydrogen ratio may be different in diesel particles as compared to the commonly used surrogates (15). ...

Kelly J. Higgins; Heejung Jung; David B. Kittelson; Jeffrey T. Roberts; Michael R. Zachariah

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

366

TEXIN2: a model for predicting carbon monoxide concentrations near intersections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association emitted along straight roadways, where traffic is wel 1-def ined and flows uniformly at constant speeds. This scenario is extremely inap- propriate for intersections. A simple conversion from straight... are presented in Chapter V. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW The task of modeling pollutant concentrations near intersections has traditionally been approached by first enlisting an emissions model to estimate a composite emission rate for vehicular traffic...

Korpics, J. J

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

Holcomb, Gordon R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal---oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxidesssuch as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxideswas investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H2S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H2S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H2S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H2S for all four metal oxides.

Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions ... Life cycle GHG emissions were found to decrease by less than 4% in almost all scenarios modeled. ... Resulting changes in fuel use, life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides are estimated. ...

Aranya Venkatesh; Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

370

Growth direction of oblique angle electron beam deposited silicon monoxide thin films identified by optical second-harmonic generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oblique angle deposited (OAD) silicon monoxide (SiO) thin films forming tilted columnar structures have been characterized by second-harmonic generation. It was found that OAD SiO leads to a rotationally anisotropic second-harmonic response, depending on the optical angle of incidence. A model for the observed dependence of the second-harmonic signal on optical angle of incidence allows extraction of the growth direction of OAD films. The optically determined growth directions show convincing agreement with cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy images. In addition to a powerful characterization tool, these results demonstrate the possibilities for designing nonlinear optical devices through SiO OAD.

Vejling Andersen, Søren; Lund Trolle, Mads; Pedersen, Kjeld [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Skjernvej 4A, DK-9220 Aalborg Øst (Denmark)] [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Skjernvej 4A, DK-9220 Aalborg Øst (Denmark)

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

371

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 6, October--December, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 5, July--September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 2, October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 3, January--March 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, First quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 (LS-2) located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This quarterly update provides a description of the flow modeling study. This modeling effort centers on evaluating the in-furnace flow and mixing phenomena for the various low NOx firing systems being demonstrated at LS-2. Testing on the 1/12 scale model of the LS-2 boiler and the 1/6 scale model of the overfire air ductwork was completed. The test matrix included an analysis of the overfire air ductwork and three different boiler configurations. This report also contains results from the Phase 1 baseline tests. Data from the diagnostic, performance, and verification tests are presented. In addition, NOx emissions data and unit load profiles collected during long-term testing are reported. At the full load condition, the baseline NOx emission level at LS-2 is 0.62 lb/mBtu.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Role of oxygen vacancies in water vapor chemisorption and CO oxidation on titania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Titanium dioxide is widely used as support for various important catalysts. Although nonstoichiometric titania behaves as an n-type semiconductor, the nature of the defect sites is not yet fully understood. In the present investigation the water vapor adsorption and carbon monoxide oxidation on TiO[sub 2] is explained considering oxygen vacancies as the major defect. It is also shown that incorporation of an Al[sup 3+] ion in TiO[sub 2] reduces the concentration of oxygen ion vacancies and inhibits the transformation of anatase to rutile.

Sengupta, G.; Chatterjee, R.N.; Maity, G.C. (Project and Development India Ltd. Sindri, Dhanbad, Bihar (India)); Satyanarayna, C.V.V. (RSIC, Bombay (India). Indian Inst. of Tech. Powai)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Third quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving 50% NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level 1 long-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Review - 2011 (so far) Tim Johnson October 4, 2011 DOE DEER Conference, Detroit JohnsonTV@Corning.com 2 Summary * California LD criteria emission regs are tightening....

382

Novel Carbon Monoxide Sensor for PEM Fuel Cell Systems C.T. Holt, A.-M. Azad, S.L. Swartz, W.J. Dawson, and P.K. Dutta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Carbon Monoxide Sensor for PEM Fuel Cell Systems C.T. Holt, A.-M. Azad, S.L. Swartz, W The importance of carbon monoxide sensors for automotive PEM fuel cell systems is illustrated by a schematic will protect the PEM fuel cell stack; detection of CO is extremely important because too much CO will poison

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

383

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Title Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Edward J. Dlugokencky, Colm Sweeney, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 39 Issue 16 Keywords atmospheric transport, inverse modeling, nitrous oxide Abstract We estimate nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from Central California for the period of December 2007 through November 2009 by comparing N2O mixing ratios measured at a tall tower (Walnut Grove, WGC) with transport model predictions based on two global a priori N2O emission models (EDGAR32 and EDGAR42). Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models. Regression analyses show that the slopes of predicted on measured N2O from both emission models are low, suggesting that actual N2O emissions are significantly higher than the EDGAR inventories for all seasons. Bayesian inverse analyses of regional N2O emissions show that posterior annual N2O emissions are larger than both EDGAR inventories by factors of 2.0 ± 0.4 (EDGAR32) and 2.1 ± 0.4 (EDGAR42) with seasonal variation ranging from 1.6 ± 0.3 to 2.5 ± 0.4 for an influence region of Central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. These results suggest that if the spatial distribution of N2O emissions in California follows the EDGAR emission models, then actual emissions are 2.7 ± 0.5 times greater than the current California emission inventory, and total N2O emissions account for 8.1 ± 1.4% of total greenhouse gas emissions from California.

384

Oxidation of Propane by Doped Nickel Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... present study, however, indicate that in the absence of excess oxygen, direct oxidation of propane by the oxide lattice can occur.

D. W. McKEE

1964-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Near-Zero Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Project No.: DE-NT0005341 Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment. Praxair Inc. will develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing coal-fired power plants retrofit with oxy-combustion technology. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and mercury (Hg) will be reduced by at least 99 percent, and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions will be reduced by greater than 90 percent without the need for wet flue gas desulfurization and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Two separate processes are proposed depending on the sulfur content of the coal. For high-sulfur coal, SO2 and NOx will be recovered as product sulfuric acid and nitric acid, respectively, and Hg will be recovered as

386

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

387

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Adsorption of CO, CO2, H2, and H2O on titania surfaces with different oxidation states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorptive properties of titania surfaces with different oxidation states were proved by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO, H2, CO2, and H2O. Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that vacuum annealing an oxidized titanium foil at temperatures from 300 to 800 K was an effective means of systematically varying the average surface oxidation state from TiU to TiS . Carbon monoxide weakly adsorbed (desorption energy of 44-49 kJ x mol ) in a carbonyl fashion on coordinatively unsaturated cation sites. Titania surfaces were inert with respect to H2 adsorption and dissociation. Carbon dioxide adsorbed in a linear molecular fashion. Water adsorbed both molecularly and dissociatively. Results are discussed in terms of the role of titania oxidation state in CO hydrogenation over titania-supported metal catalysts. 74 references, 7 figures.

Raupp, G.B.; Dumesic, J.A.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Synthesis of higher alcohols from carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a slurry reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Higher, i.e. C{sub 2{sup +}}, alcohols are desired as gasoline additives, feedstocks for producing ethers and as alternative fuels for automobiles. In all cases, the backbone branching of an alcohol improves octane rating, which is essential for good engine performance. These types of branched, higher alcohols are the desired products for a process converting synthesis gas, a CO and H{sub 2} mixture, often generated from coal gasification. Based on this premise, promoted ZnCr oxide catalysts appear to be as one of the best avenues for further investigation. Once this investigation is complete, a natural extension is to replace the Cr in the ZnCr oxide catalyst with Mo and W, both in the same elemental triad with Cr. Mo has already been shown as an active HAS catalyst, both on a SiO{sub 2} support and in the MoS{sub 2} form. The three catalyst combinations, ZnMo, ZnW, and MnCr oxides will be tested in the stirred autoclave system. However, if none of the three indicate any comparable activity and/or selectivity toward higher alcohols as compared with other HAS catalysts, then an investigation of the effects of Cs promotion on the ZnCr oxide methanol catalysts will be executed.

McCutchen, M.S.

1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Enforcing Emissions Trading when Emissions Permits are Bankable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose enforcement strategies for emissions trading programs with bankable emissions permits that guarantee...

John K. Stranlund; Christopher Costello…

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Excellent oxidation endurance of boron nitride nanotube field electron emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are considered as a promising cold electron emission material owing to their negative electron affinity. BNNT field emitters show excellent oxidation endurance after high temperature thermal annealing of 600?°C in air ambient. There is no damage to the BNNTs after thermal annealing at a temperature of 600?°C and also no degradation of field emission properties. The thermally annealed BNNTs exhibit a high maximum emission current density of 8.39?mA/cm{sup 2} and show very robust emission stability. The BNNTs can be a promising emitter material for field emission devices under harsh oxygen environments.

Song, Yenan [Department of Micro/Nano Systems, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Ho [Nano Electron-Source Creative Research Center, Creative and Challenging Research Division, ETRI, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Milne, William I. [Electrical Engineering Division, Engineering Department, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Jin Lee, Cheol, E-mail: cjlee@korea.ac.kr [Department of Micro/Nano Systems, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Novel Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecule Fully Protects Mice from Severe Malaria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...temperature under a nitrogen atmosphere. The solution was concentrated...C O) cm deltaH (400 MHz, D2O) 2.23 (3H...an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer...growth factor (VEGF) in plasma samples was determined...elevated VEGF levels in plasma, followed by death between...

Ana C. Pena; Nuno Penacho; Liliana Mancio-Silva; Rita Neres; João D. Seixas; Afonso C. Fernandes; Carlos C. Romão; Maria M. Mota; Gonçalo J. L. Bernardes; Ana Pamplona

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Carbon Monoxide Pollution Promotes Cardiac Remodeling and Ventricular Arrhythmia in Healthy Rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

worldwide by outdoor air pollution caused by vehicles and industrial emissions (http://www.who.int; http:// www.infoforhealth.org). Notably, air pollution increases the risk of mortality from cardiovascular investigating the effects of urban air pollution in humans are mainly restricted to epide- miological studies

Boyer, Edmond

394

Measurement and Meaning of Oxidatively Modified DNA Lesions in Urine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...commercially available kits presently on the market. Two are available from JICA, named...oxidative stress-inducing agents, such as diesel emission particles or potassium bromate...Moller P, et al. Repeated inhalations of diesel exhaust particles and oxidatively damaged...

Marcus S. Cooke; Ryszard Olinski; and Steffen Loft

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 81. Carbon diioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2007 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 82. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 83. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rate of Increase in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Slows in the Projections Even with rising energy prices, growth in energy use leads to increasing

396

Experimental design on marine exhaust emissions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Important variables in the operation of internal combustion engines were identified, and statistically-designed experiments were developed to evaluate the multivariate interactions for both diesel and spark ignition engines. For the lab engines: the diesel design included use of dual fuels (natural gas in diesel fuel); the spark ignition engine included the use of propane as well as gasoline. Experiments conducted on the diesel engine showed reduced exhaust emissions at high levels of natural gas (80%), but only at reduced compression ratios. Still another design was developed for shipboard testing using portable emissions equipment. This design was applied to three 82` CG Cutters (WPBs) and their emissions measured according to ISO 8178 protocol. The results showed no significant difference based on depth between 30 and 120 feet. Carbon monoxide was reduced with increased engine load (e.g., higher speed, or towing), whereas the NOx output was fairly constant for a given shaft rpm. The NOx value levels off at about 10 g/kW-hr or 25 kg/tonne fuel; CO at about 2 g/kW-hr or 6 kg/tonne of fuel.

Goodwin, M.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Grain-size effects in nanoscaled electrolyte and cathode thin films for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Due to their high energy conversion efficiencies and low emissions, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) show promise as a replacement for combustion-based electrical generators at… (more)

Peters, Christoph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Multiwavelength Thermal Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

California at Santa Cruz, University of

399

Electrical Properties of Tungsten Oxide Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... appear that the mechanism of electron emission with oxide films is different from that with roughened electrodes. This would be the case for short gaps if the electrons were drawn ... located on the upper surface of the film, as envisaged by Paetov1, while with roughened electrodes it is possible that photo-ionization can take place throughout the gap due to ...

F. LLEWELLYN JONES

1946-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Envlron. Sci. Technol. 1993, 27, 1885-1891 On-Road Hydrocarbon Remote Sensing in the Denver Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), oxides of nitrogen (NO,), and other toxic air pollutants. These emissions play important roles in all emission control technology. Introduction Automobile emissionsoriginate from fuelrich-burning, misfiring or nonfunctional emission control system can produce high emission rates for carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC

Denver, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Use of carbon monoxide and third-derivative EPR spectra to probe the coordination of surface V/sup 4 +/ ions on reduced V/sub 2/O/sub 5//SiO/sub 2/ catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coordination properties of surface V/sup 4 +/ ions of reduced V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ supported on silica have been studied by EPR using the adsorption of various probe molecules. The spectrum resolution, greatly enhanced with the third-derivative presentation, indicates an orthorhombic symmetry for the V/sup 4 +/ ions after CO adsorption (g/sub 1/ approx. g/sub 2/ = 1.985, g/sub 3/ = 1.931, A/sub 1/ approx. A/sub 2/ 71.4 G, A/sub 3/ = 191.4 G). The use of /sup 13/C-enriched carbon monoxide allows us to observe that the V/sup 4 +/ surface ions can coordinate two CO molecules from the gas phase to form, together with four lattice oxide ions, a distorted octahedron with one pronounced vanadyl character bond. The /sup 13/C superhyperfine coupling constant is found to be about 7 G. The influence of the adsorbed molecules (CO, H/sub 2/O, C/sub 2/H/sub 4/) on the properties of the V/sup 4 +/ ions at the surface is further discussed. 33 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Che, M.; Canosa, B.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

1986-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

Sensing mechanism of a carbon monoxide sensor based on anatase titania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports results on a TiO{sub 2} (anatase)-based CO sensor and proposes a possible surface-controlled sensing mechanism. The complex plane analysis of the ac electrical data provides quantitative evidence supporting the mechanism. The grain-boundary capacitance and conductance, extracted from the impedance plane, were observed to increase with the CO concentration. This effect is attributed to a change in the depletion region thickness and barrier height at the TiO{sub 2} intergranular contact. The analysis of the electrical data combined with x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy observations support the proposed sensing mechanism involving CO adsorption and ionization on the titania surface, and not an oxidation-reduction type reaction as observed in most oxide-based sensors.

Akbar, S.A.; Younkman, L.B. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of converting low H.sub.2 /CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200.degree. to 350.degree. C. in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinium, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n+1).gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n.gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Goldberg, Robert I. (Selden, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of converting low H/sub 2//CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200 to 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinum, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n + 1) greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Goldberg, R.I.

1985-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 8, April--June, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

J. Phys. Chem. 1994, 98, 11213-11219 11213 Vibrational Dynamics of Carbon Monoxide at the Active Site of Myoglobin: Picosecond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Phys. Chem. 1994, 98, 11213-11219 11213 Vibrational Dynamics of Carbon Monoxide at the Active Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, Califomia 94305 Received: April 27, 1994: In Final Form at Urbana-Champaign. Deparlment of Chemistry, Sfanford University. Hansen ExperimentaJ Physics Laboratory

Fayer, Michael D.

408

Impact of the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide on Gas Oil Hydrotreatment: Investigation on Liquids from Biomass Cotreatment with Petroleum Cuts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide on Gas Oil Hydrotreatment: Investigation on Liquids from Biomass Cotreatment with Petroleum Cuts ... A potential way of utilizing these bioliquids as fuels could be the direct hydrotreatment(6) or the cohydrotreatment with petroleum fractions,(7) such as atmospheric gas oils, to achieve the technical and environmental fuel standards, especially in terms of sulfur content. ...

Ana Pinheiro; Nathalie Dupassieux; Damien Hudebine; Christophe Geantet

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

Process for the production of hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide from hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide using a metal boride, nitride, carbide and/or silicide catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide are produced by a process comprising contacting gaseous hydrogen sulfide with gaseous carbon monoxide in the presence of a metal boride, carbide, nitride and/or silicide catalyst, such as titanium carbide, vanadium boride, manganese nitride or molybdenum silicide.

McGuiggan, M.F.; Kuch, P.L.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first and second quarters 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involve injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in a boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The project is being conducted in the following three phases: permitting, environmental monitoring plan and preliminary engineering; detailed design engineering and construction; and operation, testing, disposition and final report. The project was in the operation and testing phase during this reporting period. Accomplishments for this period are described.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from pulverized-coal utility boilers using medium- to high-sulfur US coal. The prototype SCR facility, built in and around the ductwork of Plant Crist Unit 5, consisted of three large SCR reactor units (Reactors A, B, and C), each with a design capacity of 5,000 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) of flue gas, and six smaller reactors (Reactors D through J), each with a design capacity of 400 scfm of flue gas. The three large reactors contained commercially available SCR catalysts as offered by SCR catalyst suppliers. These reactors were coupled with small-scale air preheaters to evaluate (1) the long-term effects of SCR reaction chemistry on air preheater deposit formation and (2) the impact of these deposits on the performance of air preheaters. The small reactors were used to test additional varieties of commercially available catalysts. The demonstration project was organized into three phases: (1) Permitting, Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Preparation, and Preliminary Engineering; (2) Detail Design Engineering and Construction; and (3) Operation, Testing, Disposition, and Final Report Preparation. Section 2 discusses the planned and actual EMP monitoring for gaseous, aqueous, and solid streams over the course of the SCR demonstration project; Section 3 summarizes sampling and analytical methods and discusses exceptions from the methods specified in the EMP; Section 4 presents and discusses the gas stream monitoring results; Section 5 presents and discusses the aqueous stream monitoring results; Section 6 presents and discusses the solid stream monitoring results; Section 7 discusses EMP-related quality assurance/quality control activities performed during the demonstration project; Section 8 summarizes compliance monitoring reporting activities; and Section 9 presents conclusions based on the EMP monitoring results.

NONE

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

412

Resilience of gas-phase anharmonicity in the vibrational response of adsorbed carbon monoxide and breakdown under electrical conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In surface catalysis, the adsorption of carbon monoxide on transition-metal electrodes represents the prototype of strong chemisorption. Notwithstanding significant changes in the molecular orbitals of adsorbed CO, spectroscopic experiments highlight a close correlation between the adsorbate stretching frequency and equilibrium bond length for a wide range of adsorption geometries and substrate compositions. In this work, we study the origins of this correlation, commonly known as Badger's rule, by deconvoluting and examining contributions from the adsorption environment to the intramolecular potential using first-principles calculations. Noting that intramolecular anharmonicity is preserved upon CO chemisorption, we show that Badger's rule for adsorbed CO can be expressed solely in terms of the tabulated Herzberg spectroscopic constants of isolated CO. Moreover, although it had been previously established using finite-cluster models that Badger's rule is not affected by electrical conditions, we find here th...

Dabo, Ismaila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Auger electron spectroscopy, electron loss spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction of oxygen and carbon monoxide adsorption of Pd films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption of oxygen and carbon monoxide at room temperature on polycrystalline and (111) monocrystalline thin films of Pd vapor deposited on mice was investigated by AES, ELS, and LEED. The results show that adsorbate coverage depends strongly on surface microstructure, composition, and topography. Polycrystalline or Cl contaminated surfaces adsorb large amounts of the gases, while flat, monocrystalline surfaces will adsorb almost none. These results are quite different from those observed earlier using sputter etched and annealed bulk single cyrstals where adsorbate superlattices formed after rather low gaseous exposures. In the present work no superlattices were observed after exposures ranging up to several thousand langmuirs. The contradictory results obtained in the two cases are attributed to probable differences in surface microtopography and microstructure.

Vook, R.W.; De Cooman, B.C.; Vankar, V.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Seasonal variation of carbon monoxide in northern Japan: Fourier transform IR measurements and source-labeled model calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions, fossil and bio- fuel burning and biomass burningof contributions from fossil and bio- fuel burning (FF) and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Test results of a ceramic-based carbon monoxide sensor in the automotive exhaust manifold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype CO sensor based on the anatase phase of TiO{sub 2} was fabricated and tested in a Ford V6 engine. Fuel combustion was programmed to be near stoichiometric conditions, and emissions were monitored with an FT-IR analytical instrument. The sensor, positioned near the oxygen sensor in the exhaust manifold, was successfully tested for 50 cycles of revving and idling, and was observed to respond quickly and reproducibly. The sensor response was correlated to the CO concentration at specific engine temperatures and was found to vary systematically with increasing concentrations. The results are promising and the sensor shows potentials to monitor the efficiency of the catalytic converter.

Azad, A.M.; Younkman, L.B.; Akbar, S.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

417

Emissions from Ships  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Turbine and Diesel) Engine Exhaust Emission...of relative fuel consumption. For commercial...Marine Diesel Engine and Gas Turbine...Turbine and Diesel) Engine Exhaust Emission...of relative fuel consumption. For commercial...

James J. Corbett; Paul Fischbeck

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Introduction to Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter constitutes an introduction to emissions trading. First, we detail the latest developments ... Second, we introduce the main characteristics of emissions trading, be it in terms of spatial and...2 al...

Dr. Julien Chevallier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Synthesis and characterizations of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide nanosheets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in graphene on its excellent mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties, it’s very high specific surface area, and our ability to influence these properties through chemical functionalization. Chemical reduction of graphene oxide is one of the main routes of preparation for large quantities of graphenes. Hydrazine hydrate used as reducing agent to prepare for the reduced graphene oxide (RGO). There are a number of methods for generating graphene and chemically modified graphene from natural graphite flakes, graphite derivative (such as graphite oxide) and graphite interaction compounds (i.e. expandable graphite). Here we review the use of colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with large scalable, and is adaptable to a wide variety of applications. The graphene oxide (GO) and the reduced material (RGO) were characterized by XRD, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and Field emission Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) etc.

Venkanna, M., E-mail: venkanna.pcu@gmail.com; Chakraborty, Amit K., E-mail: venkanna.pcu@gmail.com [Carbon Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur, M.G. Avenue, Durgapur - 713209 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement...

Jin, Xin

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

422

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ? ?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend1 ? ?)? i + ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect toSeries Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation 

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Kinetics and mechanisms of interactions of nitrogen and carbon monoxide with liquid niobium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics and mechanisms of interactions of N{sub 2} and CO with liquid niobium were investigated in the temperature range of 2,700 to 3,000 K in samples levitated in N{sub 2}/Ar and CO/Ar streams. The nitrogen absorption and desorption processes were found to be second-order with respect to nitrogen concentration, indicating that the rate controlling step is either the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the liquid surface or dissociation of absorbed nitrogen molecules into adsorbed atoms. The carbon and oxygen dissolution in liquid niobium from CO gas is an exothermic process and the solubilities of carbon and oxygen (C{sub Ce}, C{sub Oe} in at%) are related to the temperature and the partial pressure of CO. The reaction CO {yields} (C) + (O) along with the evaporation of niobium oxide takes place during C and O dissolution, whereas C and O desorption occurs via CO evolution only.

Park, H.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

ORIGINAL PAPER Short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions Pascal Boeckx negative to positive. We studied the short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions. We site, an intermediately aerated Luvisol in Belgium, were similar. Nitrous oxide and CO2 emissions were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

425

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

426

Evaluation of platinum-based catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation in phosphoric acid electrolyte  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon-supported catalysts of Pt, Pt/Ru, Pt/Ru/W, and Pt/Ru/Pd were evaluated for the electro-oxidation of methanol in phosphoric acid at 180 C. These catalysts were characterized using cyclic voltammetry and x-ray diffraction. Addition of Ru to a 0.5 mg/cm{sup 2} Pt catalyst (1:1 atomic ratio) caused a large reduction in polarization. The open-circuit voltage was reduced by 100 mV and polarization at 400 mA/cm{sup 2} was reduced by 180 mV. A Pt/Ru (5:2) catalyst with the same Pt content lowered the open-circuit voltage 70 mV. Additions of W to form Pt/Ru/W (1:1:1, atomic ratio) and Pd to form Pt/Ru/Pd (2:2:1), all with the same platinum loading, gave the same performance as Pt/Ru (1:1) without the additions. All of the catalysts showed two Tafel slopes, 140 mV/dec at lower polarizations and 100 to 120 mV/dec at higher polarizations, indicating that the reaction mechanisms are the same for all of the catalysts. Methanol oxidation is greatly enhanced at 180 C in phosphoric acid compared to the lower operating temperatures of a perfluorosulfonic acid electrolyte. The exchange current density for methanol oxidation is higher than that for O{sub 2} reduction. Ru metal dissolves from catalysts at high potentials. Hydrogen oxidation in the presence of 1 mole percent carbon monoxide showed carbon monoxide tolerance in the order: Pt/Ru/Pd > Pt/Ru > Pt.

He, C.; Kunz, H.R.; Fenton, J.M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Reducing NOx in Fired Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6, 2000 Reducing NOx in Fired Heaters Air Pollution Control and Boilers Keeping the environment clean Presented by Ashutosh Garg Furnace Improvements Low cost solutions for fired heaters Trace compounds ? Nitric oxides ? Carbon monoxide ? Sulfur... it is essential to estimate accurately baseline NOx emissions. ? This will establish each units current compliance status. ? Emissions ? Current excess air level ? Carbon monoxide ? Combustibles ? NOx corrected to 3% 02 314 ESL-IE-00-04-46 Proceedings...

Garg, A.

428

Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. Bromly, Reduction of Nitrogen Dioxide Emissions from Gasthan 10 ! lm), and nitrogen dioxide ( N0 2) standards areare nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (N0 2); although,

Traynor, G.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

430

ASH EMISSIVITY CHARACTERIZATION AND PREDICTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased use of western subbituminous coals has generated concerns regarding highly reflective ash disrupting heat transfer in the radiant zone of pulverized-fuel boilers. Ash emissivity and reflectivity is primarily a function of ash particle size, with reflective deposits expected to consist of very small refractory ash materials such as CaO, MgO, or sulfate materials such as Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. For biomass fuels and biomass-coal blends, similar reflectivity issues may arise as a result of the presence of abundant organically associated calcium and potassium, which can transform during combustion to fine calcium, and potassium oxides and sulfates, which may act as reflective ash. The relationship of reflectivity to ash chemistry is a second-order effect, with the ash particle size distribution and melting point being determined by the size and chemistry of the minerals present in the starting fuel. Measurement of the emission properties of ash and deposits have been performed by several research groups (1-6) using both laboratory methods and measurements in pilot- and full-scale combustion systems. A review of the properties and thermal properties of ash stresses the important effect of ash deposits on heat transfer in the radiant boiler zone (1).

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Charlene R. Crocker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

New gas turbine combustor supports emissions limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas Research Institute, in partnership with Allison Engine Co. of Indianapolis, has introduced a natural gas-fired, low-emissions combustor that it says will give customers of industrial gas turbines a least-cost approach for meeting US emissions regulations. The LE IV combustor uses dry, low-nitrogen oxides (DLN) technology to reduce emissions from the Allison 501K industrial gas turbine to 25 parts per million or less (corrected to 15 percent oxygen)--levels that are expected to meet pending federal emissions regulations. GRI is funding similar efforts with other manufacturers of turbines commonly used at pipeline compressor stations and industrial power generation sites. The Allison combustor features a dual operating mode. During the pilot mode of operation, fuel is directly injected into the combustor`s liner where it is consumed in a diffusion flame reaction. During higher power operation, the fuel and air are uniformly premixed in fuel-lean proportions to control NO{sub x} formation. In addition, optimum engine performance is maintained by the dry, lean-mixed combustion technology as it suppresses NO{sub x} formation in the turbine`s combustion section. An added advantage of the LE IV combustor is its ability to lower emissions without any adverse affect on engine performance and operations, according to GRI> The combustor is available as either a retrofit or as an option on a new engine.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

433

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

434

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

435

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

436

emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emissions emissions Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for emissions. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords emissions New Zealand projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010 New Zealand emissions outlook (xls, 1.2 MiB)

437

Effect of the type of carrier on the properties of cobalt catalysts in the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of catalysts used in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/ are determined to a significant degree by the carriers used in their preparation. This paper deals with a study of the effect of the type of carrier on the properties of cobalt-based catalysts in the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/. Co catalysts that are active in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/ are those on which the adsorption of H/sub 2/ exceeds 3.10/sup -2/ mmole/g Co and the adsorptin of carbon monoxide exceeds 7.10/sup -2/ mmole/g Co. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen are adsorbed on active catalysts in weakly bound forms. A mechanism is proposed for the formatin of an active center and the adsorption of carbon monoxide on Co-catalysts which includes the appearance of a partial positive charge on the cobalt atom.

Lapidus, A.L.; Jem, H.C.; Krylova, A.Y.

1983-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Plant Emission Reductions Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard by J. Alan Beamon, Tom Leckey, and Laura Martin There are many policy instruments available for reducing power plant emissions, and the choice of a policy will affect compliance decisions, costs, and prices faced by consumers. In a previous analysis, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, assuming a policy instru- ment patterned after the SO 2 allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. 1 This report compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard (GPS) as an instrument for reducing CO 2 emissions. 2 In general, the results of the two analyses are similar: to reduce

439

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Tim Johnson October 16, 2012 2 Environmental Technologies Summary * Regulations - LEVIII finalized, Tier 3? RDE in Europe developing and very...

442

EMSL - emission spectra  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emission-spectra en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

443

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

444

Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Global and regional drivers of accelerating CO2 emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emissions from fossil-fuel combustion and industrial...flux from fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes...sources: national-level combustion of solid, liquid...oxidation of nonfuel hydrocarbons; and fuel from...renewables, mainly as heat from biomass...

Michael R. Raupach; Gregg Marland; Philippe Ciais; Corinne Le Quéré; Josep G. Canadell; Gernot Klepper; Christopher B. Field

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Performance and emission enhancements of a variable geometry turbocharger on a heavy-duty diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variable Geometry Turbochargers (VGTs) have emerged in the heavy-duty diesel market with the simultaneous introduction of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) in meeting emission standards. From a military perspective, VGTs offer considerable promise of improving low speed torque and overall fuel economy. Despite these gains, nitric oxides (NOx) emissions generally increase with increased boost. During times when the military can reduce its environmental impact, VGTs can drive EGR and counter the increase in NOx emissions with relatively minor penalty in particulate matter (PM) emissions. This study highlights the performance and emission enhancements enabled by a VGT on a heavy-duty diesel engine.

Timothy J. Jacobs; Chad Jagmin; Wesley J. Williamson; Zoran S. Filipi; Dennis N. Assanis; Walter Bryzik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Chemicl-looping combustion of coal with metal oxide oxygen carriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combustion and reoxidation properties of direct coal chemical-looping combustion (CLC) over CuO, Fe2O3, Co3O4, NiO, and Mn2O3 were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor studies. When coal is heated in either nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO2), 50% of weight loss was observed because of partial pyrolysis, consistent with the proximate analysis. Among various metal oxides evaluated, CuO showed the best reaction properties: CuO can initiate the reduction reaction as low as 500 °C and complete the full combustion at 700 °C. In addition, the reduced copper can be fully reoxidized by air at 700 °C. The combustion products formed during the CLC reaction of the coal/metal oxide mixture are CO2 and water, while no carbon monoxide was observed. Multicycle TGA tests and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor tests strongly supported the feasibility of CLC of coal by using CuO as an oxygen carrier. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of solid reaction products indicated some changes in the surface morphology of a CuO-coal sample after reduction/oxidation reactions at 800 °C. However, significant surface sintering was not observed. The interactions of fly ash with metal oxides were investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermodynamic analysis. Overall, the results indicated that it is feasible to develop CLC with coal by metal oxides as oxygen carriers.

Siriwardane, R.; Tian, H.; Richards, G.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Oxidation of propylene over copper oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the study of propylene oxidation. Dunlop (17) reported that small quantities of iron compounds substantially enhanced the catalytic activity of chromia-alumina catalysts with respect to propylene oxidation, Woodharn (72) has suggested that under... between 360 C and 430oC the rate of propane oxidation decreases as the teznperature is increased, and the rate of conversion to olefins, especially propylene, becomes progressively greater. Above 430 C the proportion of propane converted to ethylene in...

Billingsley, David Stuart

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

REAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are International. b DOC = Diesel Oxidation Catalyst; DPF = Diesel Particulate Filter; EGR = Exhaust GasREAL-WORLD EFFICACY OF HEAVY DUTY DIESEL TRUCK NOX AND PM EMISSIONS CONTROLS Gurdas Sandhu H 26-28, 2012 #12;2 Objectives 1. Quantify inter-run variability in exhaust emission rates 2. Assess

Frey, H. Christopher

450

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission Controls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for controlling NOx from lean engines are studied in great detail at FEERC. Lean NOx Traps (LNTs) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) are two catalyst technologies of interest. Catalysts are studied from the nanoscale to full scale. On the nanoscale, catalyst powders are analyzed with chemisorptions techniques to determine the active metal surface area where catalysis occurs. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy is used to observe the chemical reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during catalyst operation. Both powder and coated catalyst samples are analyzed on bench flow reactors in controlled simulated exhaust environments to better characterize the chemical

451

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Combustion, performance and emission analysis of diesel engine fuelled with methyl esters of Pongamia oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methyl esters of vegetable oils, known as biodiesel are increasingly becoming popular because of their low environmental impact and potential as a green alternative fuel for diesel engine, and that they would not require significant modification of existing engine hardware. Methyl ester of Pongamia oil (PME) is derived through transesterification process. Experimental investigations have been carried out to examine properties, performance and emissions of different blends (B00, B20, B40, B60, B80 and B100) of PME comparison to diesel. A computer assisted single cylinder constant speed water cooled four stroke direct diesel engine (5 HP), which is commonly used in the agricultural sector for driving the pumps and small electrical generators is selected for the experimental investigation. The performance, emissions and combustion characteristics are analysed. The combustion parameters considered for this analysis are cylinder pressure and rate of heat release. The brake thermal efficiency is slightly reduced and hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide and smoke emissions in the exhaust are reduced when fuelled with methyl esters compared to diesel. But the NOx emissions are high when fuelled with methyl esters compared to diesel. [Received: December 11, 2009; Accepted: March 21, 2010

T. Hari Prasad; K. Hema Chandra Reddy; M. Muralidhara Rao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Observation of green emission from Ce3+ doped gadolinium oxide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

freshly-prepared Gd2O3 undoped nanoparticles which is attributed to the stabilizer, polyethylene glycol biscarboxymethyl ether. Upon aging, the undoped particles show similar...

454

Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...82071; e Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge, TN 37831; f Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology...experiments on their lands. We also acknowledge the many workers who helped with the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen experiments...

Jake J. Beaulieu; Jennifer L. Tank; Stephen K. Hamilton; Wilfred M. Wollheim; Robert O. Hall; Jr.; Patrick J. Mulholland; Bruce J. Peterson; Linda R. Ashkenas; Lee W. Cooper; Clifford N. Dahm; Walter K. Dodds; Nancy B. Grimm; Sherri L. Johnson; William H. McDowell; Geoffrey C. Poole; H. Maurice Valett; Clay P. Arango; Melody J. Bernot; Amy J. Burgin; Chelsea L. Crenshaw; Ashley M. Helton; Laura T. Johnson; Jonathan M. O'Brien; Jody D. Potter; Richard W. Sheibley; Daniel J. Sobota; Suzanne M. Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Oxide coated silicon tip arrays for electron emission.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The study of cold cathode materials is currently an active topic of research due to widespread and important applications of these materials in products such… (more)

Bian, Haijiao.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

UK emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...other land use, (v) waste, and (vi) other sources...forestry (LULUCF) and waste are similarly proportioned...8 per cent and manure storage systems for 6 per cent...is reported here from long-term monitoring of greenhouse...are still not enough long-term datasets to provide the...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

UK emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ranges from 33 to 170 per cent for fuel combustion processes and 195 per cent for other combustion processes (annex 7 of MacCarthy et al. [11...manure storage and N fertilizers. Combustion processes are the main source of NO x and microbial...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Mechanistic, sensitivity, and uncertainty studies of the atmospheric oxidation of dimethylsulfide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The global-scale emissions and reactivity of dimethylsulfide (CH3SCH3, DMS) make it an integral component in the atmospheric sulfur cycle. DMS is rapidly oxidized in the atmosphere by a complex gas-phase mechanism involving ...

Lucas, Donald David, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction on transition metal oxide catalysts for high temperature fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with its high energy conversion efficiency, low emissions, silent operation and its ability to utilize commercial fuels has the potential to create a large impact on the energy landscape. ...

La O', Gerardo Jose Cordova

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Performance and emissions of a diesel tractor engine fueled with marine diesel and soybean methyl ester  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel that is cleaner than petrodiesel. Biodiesel can be used directly as fuel for a diesel engine without having to modify the engine system. It has the major advantages of having high biodegradability, excellent lubricity and no sulfur content. This paper presents the results of investigations carried out in studying the fuel properties of soybean methyl ester (SME) and its blend with marine diesel fuel from 5%, 20% and 50% blends by volume and in running a diesel engine with these fuels. The results indicate that the use of biodiesel produces lower smoke opacity (up to 74%), but higher brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) (up to 12%) compared to marine fuel (MF). The measured carbon monoxide (CO) emissions of B5 and B100 fuels were found to be 3% and 52% lower than that of the MF, respectively.

B. Gokalp; E. Buyukkaya; H.S. Soyhan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "monoxide emissions oxidize" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

Ruether, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is typically composed of two porous electrodes, interposed between an electrolyte made of a particular solid oxide ceramic material. The system originates from the work of Nernst...

Nigel M. Sammes; Roberto Bove; Jakub Pusz

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

464

Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy. Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy. Abstract: Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) is a versatile...

465

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