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Sample records for monox ide nonattainment

  1. Britt Ide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Britt Ide About Us Britt Ide - President, Ide Law & Strategy, PLLC, C3E Ambassador Most Recent The Top Ten Things I Learned at the Ambassador Retreat September

  2. Title I implementation: Status report on nonattainment areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenkeremath, L.D.; Snyder, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    Key provisions of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) focus on bringing cities and other areas into attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone, carbon monoxide (CO), and fine particulates (PM-10). The CAAA's new classification scheme for pollutant nonattainment areas is based on the relative severity of pollution in these areas and determines the stringency of control measures and the dates by which attainment of the standards will be required. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) final rule on air quality designations and classifications, published in late 1991, shows that ozone pollution remains a persistent problem; the number of counties that fail to meet the ozone standard has sharply increased since 1987. In contrast, incidence of PM-10 pollution has decreased; many counties have achieved the PM-10 standard since 1987. Nationwide, the number of CO nonattainment areas has increased, though not dramatically. Many of the new Title I requirements focus on the role of nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) in the formation of ground-level ozone. In ozone nonattainment areas and ozone transport regions, Title I generally requires major sources of NO[sub x] to have the same control measures as those that apply to major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This requirement compels state regulators to adopt an integrated VOC/NO[sub x] control strategy. The NO[sub x] emission standards proposed by state regulators are considerably more stringent than those given in federal guidelines. Both the EPA and the states plan to allow the use of multifacility emissions averaging in state NO[sub x] control strategies, thereby providing industry flexibility. Proposed federal Economic Incentive Program (EIP) rules would also allow sources in states with approved EIPs to use mobile source emission reduction credits to meet certain stationary source emission reduction requirements.

  3. Title I implementation: Status report on nonattainment areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenkeremath, L.D.; Snyder, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    Key provisions of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) focus on bringing cities and other areas into attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone, carbon monoxide (CO), and fine particulates (PM-10). The CAAA`s new classification scheme for pollutant nonattainment areas is based on the relative severity of pollution in these areas and determines the stringency of control measures and the dates by which attainment of the standards will be required. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) final rule on air quality designations and classifications, published in late 1991, shows that ozone pollution remains a persistent problem; the number of counties that fail to meet the ozone standard has sharply increased since 1987. In contrast, incidence of PM-10 pollution has decreased; many counties have achieved the PM-10 standard since 1987. Nationwide, the number of CO nonattainment areas has increased, though not dramatically. Many of the new Title I requirements focus on the role of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in the formation of ground-level ozone. In ozone nonattainment areas and ozone transport regions, Title I generally requires major sources of NO{sub x} to have the same control measures as those that apply to major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This requirement compels state regulators to adopt an integrated VOC/NO{sub x} control strategy. The NO{sub x} emission standards proposed by state regulators are considerably more stringent than those given in federal guidelines. Both the EPA and the states plan to allow the use of multifacility emissions averaging in state NO{sub x} control strategies, thereby providing industry flexibility. Proposed federal Economic Incentive Program (EIP) rules would also allow sources in states with approved EIPs to use mobile source emission reduction credits to meet certain stationary source emission reduction requirements.

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/8-ID-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-e < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/3-ID-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-e < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  6. Volatile organic compound emissions from usaf wastewater treatment plants in ozone nonattainment areas. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouellette, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    In accordance with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), this research conducts an evaluation of the potential emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from selected Air Force wastewater treatment plants. Using a conservative mass balance analysis and process specific simulation models, volatile organic emission estimates are calculated for four individual facilities--Edwards AFB, Luke AFB, McGuire AFB, and McClellan AFB--which represent a cross section of the current inventory of USAF wastewater plants in ozone nonattainment areas. From these calculations, maximum facility emissions are determined which represent the upper limit for the potential VOC emissions from these wastewater plants. Based on the calculated emission estimates, each selected wastewater facility is evaluated as a potential major stationary source of volatile organic emissions under both Title I of the 1990 CAAA and the plant's governing Clean Air Act state implementation plan. Next, the potential impact of the specific volatile organics being emitted is discussed in terms of their relative reactivity and individual contribution to tropospheric ozone formation. Finally, a relative comparison is made between the estimated VOC emissions for the selected wastewater facilities and the total VOC emissions for their respective host installations.

  7. 2-ID-E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Users. For example, in collaboration with G. Woloschak et al, we have looked at TiO2-DNA nanocomposites in mammalian cells 1; B. Twining et al investigate trace elements...

  8. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnolog...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ide, Kayo (Kayo Ide) - Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Maryland at College Park Ide, Kayo (Kayo Ide) - Department of ...

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and must be garaged in areas of air quality nonattainment, as recognized by the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement program. Point of Contact ...

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    The Clean Fuel Advanced Technology (CFAT) project provides grant funding to reducing transportation-related emissions in nonattainment and maintenance counties for National Ambient ...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    the VALE Program is to reduce ground level emissions at commercial service airports located in designated ozone and carbon monoxide air quality nonattainment and maintenance areas. ...

  12. Reformulated Gasoline Use Under the 8-Hour Ozone Rule

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact on gasoline price and supply when additional ozone non-attainment areas come under the new 8-hour ozone standard.

  13. Microsoft Word - Chapter 11.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Continued Operation of the Department of EnergyNational Nuclear Security Administration ... Protection Agency), 2010c, The Green Book Nonattainment Areas for Criteria ...

  14. Microsoft Word - 01a - Cover.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Unclassified areas are typically rural or remote, with few sources of air pollution. While Clark County is still considered in nonattainment for CO, the county has not experienced ...

  15. http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=0292cf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... EPA Regional office(s), the affected State(s) andor air pollution control agencies, and any Federal recognized Indian tribal government in the nonattainment or maintenance area. ...

  16. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François- Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.

  17. Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program (Released in the STEO June 1999)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Section 107(d) of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1990 (the Act), required states to identify all areas that do not meet the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone, and directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to designate these areas as ozone nonattainment areas. Section 181 of the Act required EPA to classify each area as a marginal, moderate, serious, severe or extreme ozone nonattainment area. EPA classified all areas that were designated as in nonattainment for ozone at the time of the enactment of the 1990 Amendments, except for certain "nonclassifiable" areas (56 FR 56694, November 6, 1991).

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    3 through 8 trucks operating 70% of the time and garaged in any nonattainment or maintenance area of New York State; Vouchers for private and non-profit fleets for 80% of the...

  19. X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    its lowest level in several years. More specifically, despite the mandated use of federal Phase II reformulated gasoline in ozone non-attainment areas as of January 1, gasoline...

  20. Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Air pollution would be reduced in a non-attainment air basin as the debris has been previously burned for removal. Following negotiation of final funding amounts, projects are ...

  1. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  2. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; et al

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisinglymore » impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.« less

  3. Mohegan Indian Tribe- 1995 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Located in Uncasville, Connecticut, the Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut is in an area classified by EPA as ozone non-attainment. The air shed of the reservation receives trans-boundary ozone and its precursors from upwind non-Native American sources. Therefore, conservation, prevention, and mitigation of air pollution are important. Use of sustainable energy is preferred.

  4. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 4. Federal Regions V and VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01

    The following material is provided for each state in Federal Regions V and VII: state title page lists nonattainment areas for each pollutant, the number of monitors with valid readings for a particular averaging time for a pollutant, and the number of monitors that recorded a violation of the standard); revised State Implementation Plan (SIP) outline (covers sources of the problems, the proposed strategies for achieving attainment, and new state review procedures); maps of nonattainment areas, as designated; SAROAD (Storage and Retrieval of Aerometric Data) data; SAROAD data maps; power plant data; power plant maps; and county maps. States in Federal Region V are Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Federal Region VII includes Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. (JGB)

  5. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 5. Federal Regions VIII, IX, and X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01

    The following material is provided for each state in Federal Regions VIII, IX, and X: state title page (lists nonattainment areas for each pollutant, the number of monitors with valid readings for a particular averaging time for a pollutant, and the number of monitors that recorded a violation of the standard); revised State Implementation Plan (SIP) outline (covers sources of the problems, the proposed strategies for achieving attainment, and new state review procedures); maps of nonattainment areas, as designated; SAROAD (Storage and Retrieval of Aerometric Data) data; SAROAD data maps; power plant data; power plant maps; and county maps. States in Federal Region VIII are Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming. Federal Region IX includes Arizona, California, and Nevada. Federal Region X includes Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. (JGB)

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) administers the Alternative Fueling Facilities Program (AFFP) as part of the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan. AFFP provides grants for 50% of eligible costs, up to $600,000, to construct, reconstruct, or acquire a facility to store, compress, or dispense alternative fuels in Texas air quality nonattainment areas. Qualified alternative fuels include biodiesel, electricity, natural gas, hydrogen, propane,

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants - Sacramento The Sacramento Emergency Clean Air and Transportation (SECAT) Program provides grants to offset the costs of projects that reduce on-road emissions within the Sacramento federal ozone nonattainment area. Eligible projects include upgrades and exchanges of heavy-duty diesel vehicles with vehicles compliant with Air Resources Board diesel regulations. Other advanced technology implementation projects may also qualify. For more information, including

  8. Time-Resolved Research (XSD-TRR) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at 8-ID-E is focused on correlating the structure of OPV thin films with light-harvesting performance and probing defects in self-assembled block copolymers with applications...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ), a ceramic-metal material showing a highmore electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. ...

  10. PDSF User Meeting 09-01-15.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 --- Past Outages * 81215 ( 2 d ays): N ERSC s ystem w ide o utage f rom power e vent Planned Outages * None Several PDSF Nodes Moved to CRT * About 3 00 c ores w ork o f c ...

  11. Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    correspondence with the Agenc y about your request. You have renuested the following; Prop ide copies of all A gcmic I)ccision Frameworks related to the Network Open Season 2009...

  12. TRANSIMS Interface Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transims TRANSIMS Interface Development TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling TRANSIMS Studio (Figure 1) has been developed by TRACC for the TRANSIMS community as part of the TRANSIMS Open Source project. It provides an integrated development environment (IDE) for TRANSIMS by combining a number of components that work seamlessly with each other. The visible part of the IDE is the graphical user interface (GUI) that allows

  13. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.

    2012-05-25

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the A{beta} peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  14. Structure–activity relationships of imidazole-derived 2-[N-carbamoylmethyl-alkylamino]acetic acids, dual binders of human insulin-degrading enzyme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charton, Julie; Dumont, Julie; Liang, Wenguang G.; Leroux, Florence; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-10-30

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is a zinc metalloprotease that degrades small amyloid peptides such as amyloid-â and insulin. So far the dearth of IDE-specific pharmacological inhibitors impacts the understanding of its role in the physiopathology of Alzheimer's disease, amyloid-â clearance, and its validation as a potential therapeutic target. Hit 1 was previously discovered by high-throughput screening. Here we describe the structure-activity study, that required the synthesis of 48 analogues. We found that while the carboxylic acid, the imidazole and the tertiary amine were critical for activity, the methyl ester was successfully optimized to an amide or a 1,2,4-oxadiazole. Along with improving their activity, compounds were optimized for solubility, lipophilicity and stability in plasma and microsomes. The docking or co-crystallization of some compounds at the exosite or the catalytic site of IDE provided the structural basis for IDE inhibition. The pharmacokinetic properties of best compounds 44 and 46 were measured in vivo. As a result, 44 (BDM43079) and its methyl ester precursor 48 (BDM43124) are useful chemical probes for the exploration of IDE's role.

  15. S. 2424: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, April 5, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Bill S.2424 has been introduced in the Senate of the United States on April 5, 1990. The purpose of this bill is to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide for the imposition of certain excise taxes related to the enforcement of provisions of the Clean Air Act added by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Chapter 38 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (relating to environmental taxes) is amended by adding a new subchapter regarding taxes relating to the Clean Air Act requirements. Attention is focused on the following: tax on permits for air quality nonattainment areas; fees not collected by states; and taxes on certain products.

  16. Clean air amendments put big burden on refinery planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherr, R.C.; Smalley, G.A. Jr.; Norman, M.E. )

    1991-06-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will not only require the production of reformulated gasoline but also have significant impact on other refinery-related construction. This must be considered when developing sound planning strategy. The three titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments that will have the greatest effect on refining are: Title I: Nonattainment; Title III: Air toxics; Title V: Permitting. To understand the ramifications of these amendments, it is necessary to review the interactions of new requirements with the permitting and construction schedule shown.

  17. Areas Participating in the Oxygenated Gasoline Program (Released in the STEO July 1999)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Section 211(m) of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401-7671q) requires that gasoline containing at least 2.7% oxygen by weight is to be used in the wintertime in those areas of the county that exceed the carbon monoxide National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The winter oxygenated gasoline program applies to all gasoline sold in the larger of the Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA) or Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in which the nonattainment area is located.

  18. The Top Ten Things I Learned at the Ambassador Retreat | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Top Ten Things I Learned at the Ambassador Retreat The Top Ten Things I Learned at the Ambassador Retreat September 4, 2014 - 1:36pm Addthis Britt Ide President, Ide Law & Strategy, PLLC, C3E Ambassador Editor's Note: This blog is cross-posted from the Clean Energy, Education, Empowerment (C3E) online network, www.c3enet.org. Learn more about C3E here. I am delighted to be serving as a C3E Ambassador. The retreat in July was my first and I learned a ton and deeply enjoyed

  19. EPA programs to reduce NO{sub x} and particulate matter emissions from electric utility sources and the possible impact of deregulation on those EPA programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, A.B.

    1997-12-31

    At the same time that the electric utility industry is in the midst of deregulation, it could be hit with numerous additional regulatory burdens. For example, EPA now plans to decide by July 1997 whether to make major changes to the current ozone and particulate matter ambient standards -- changes which could force utilities to reduce significantly both their nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions. Even if EPA does not adopt new ambient standards, though, many electric utilities still face the prospect of making additional NO{sub x} reductions if they are found to be contributing to ozone levels in areas that are not meeting the current ozone ambient standards. Several multi-state groups -- notably the Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG) and the Northeast Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) -- are evaluating programs that could lead to calls for additional NO{sub x} reductions from power plants in ozone nonattainment areas and from plants located outside the nonattainment areas but found to be contributing to ozone levels in those areas. And these multi-state groups are motivated not only by pollution levels they see now, but also by what they fear will be increased pollution levels as a result of deregulation. This paper examines the status of the major rulemakings now underway that could force substantial additional reductions in electric utility NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions. It also discusses the impacts that deregulation could have in those rulemakings.

  20. Guidance for growth factors, projections, and control strategies for the 15 percent rate-of-progress plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Section 182(b)(1) of the Clean Air Act (Act) requires all ozone nonattainment areas classified as moderate and above to submit a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision by November 15, 1993, which describes, in part, how the areas will achieve an actual volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions reduction of at least 15 percent during the first 6 years after enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). In addition, the SIP revision must describe how any growth in emissions from 1990 through 1996 will be fully offset. It is important to note that section 182(b)(1) also requires the SIP for moderate areas to provide for reductions in VOC and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as necessary to attain the national primary ambient air quality standard for ozone by November 15, 1996. The guidance document focuses on the procedures for developing 1996 projected emissions inventories and control measures which moderate and above ozone nonattainment areas must include in their rate-of-progress plans. The document provides technical guidance to support the policy presented in the 'General Preamble: Implementation of Title I of the CAAA of 1990' (57 FR 13498).

  1. Using electromagnetic sensors (magnetometers and dielectrometers) to detect corrosion beneath and moisture within paint coatings on aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldfine, N.; Greig, N.A.

    1994-12-31

    Current nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques, such as visual inspection, ultrasonic testing, and eddy current testing, do not adequately detect the early stages of hidden corrosion under paint in critical structures such as airframes. This paper proposes a sensor system that uses meandering winding magnetometers (MWMs) and interdigital electrode dielectrometers (IDEDs) to detect hidden corrosion under paint and to measure the depth of moisture within barrier paint coatings. The MWM uses magnetic fields and inductive coupling to measure profiles of the properties of conducting media (such as the reduced conductivity near a metal surface caused by an oxygen diffusion layer resulting from early-stage corrosion). The IDED uses electric fields and capacitive coupling to measure the properties of multiple-layered insulating media, such as paint or the metal oxides formed during corrosion. MWM and IDED sensor designs permit Cartesian coordinate modal continuum modeling, which takes advantage of sensor geometries to provide more precise response predictions than are generally possible with conventional eddy current probes. Data are presented to describe the limitations of current NDI techniques, address the need for a new type of corrosion-detection system and discuss the underlying theory and potential of using MWMs and IDEDs to detect corrosion.

  2. CX-011861: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Easts Ide Renovation Project Zone 1-Revision (T-1-11) CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.2, B5.4, B5.5 Date: 03/13/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  3. Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The N ortheast c onsists o f a n umber o f l arge a nd d ensely populated u rban a nd i ndustrial a reas, a s w ell a s w ide--- ranging r ural a reas a nd d eciduous f orestland. ...

  4. NERSC_ASCR_Requirements_Review-1.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2014 LBNL Outline * Goal: i mproved w idely u sed l inear a lgebra (and o ther) l ... t o a Nain n eeded a ccuracy * What H WSW f eatures d o w e n eed t o d o t his? ...

  5. CX-011863: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Easts Ide Renovation Project Zone 1-Revision (T-1-11) CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.2, B5.4, B5.5 Date: 03/13/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  6. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 3: Federal Regions IV and VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01

    This is the third volume of a five-volume report, designed to provide useful information for policy analysis in the Department of Energy, especially for the examination of possible areas of conflict between the implementation of a national energy policy calling for the increased use of coal and the pursuit of clean air. Information is presented for each state in Federal Regions IV and VI under the following section headings: state title page (includes a summary of air quality data); revised state implementation plan outline; maps of nonattainment areas, as designated; Storage and Retrieval of Aerometric Data (SAROAD); SAROAD data maps; power plant data; power plant maps; and county maps. States in Federal Region IV include: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Those in Federal Region VI include: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. (JGB)

  7. Assessment of the Potential to Reduce Emissions from Road Transportation, Notably NOx, Through the Use of Alternative Vehicles and Fuels in the Great Smoky Mountains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.

    2001-08-30

    Air pollution is a serious problem in the region of the Great Smoky Mountains. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may designate non-attainment areas by 2003 for ozone. Pollutants include nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), lead, and particulate matter (PM), which are health hazards, damage the environment, and limit visibility. The main contributors to this pollution are industry, transportation, and utilities. Reductions from all contributors are needed to correct this problem. While improvements are projected in each sector over the next decades, the May 2000 Interim Report issued by the Southern Appalachian Mountains Initiative (SAMI) suggests that the percentage of NO{sub x} emissions from transportation may increase.

  8. Alternative fuels: Promise or Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyad, A. )

    1989-11-01

    The Bush administration's proposals to revamp the Clean Air Act received mixed reviews. The alternative fuels proposal in the administration's bill, if passed, would mandate the sale of so-called clean-fueled vehicles (CFVs) in the nine worst ozone non-attainment areas in the country. In areas failing to plan for reductions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and toxic air chemicals equivalent to those outlined in the Bush proposal, a total of 500,000 CFVs would have to be sold in 1995, 750,000 in 1996, and 1,000,000 each year from 1997-2004. What is unclear, however, is who will manufacture, sell, or purchase these vehicles. The paper discusses the pros and cons of ethanol, methanol, and compressed natural gas (CNG), the major alternative fuels being considered as supplements or replacements for gasoline.

  9. EPA`s proposed renewable oxygenate requirement (ROR): Pros and cons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czeskleba, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    In December 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its final rule that sets for the details for requirements to sell reformulated gasoline (RFG) in certain ozone non-attainment areas. At the same time, EPA also issued a proposed rule to require that 30% of the oxygen required in RFG be based on a renewable oxygenate. Renewables include ethanol and its ether derivatives such as ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE). The RFG rule is a final rule, while the Renewable Oxygenate Requirement (ROR) rule is a proposed rule yet to be finalized and subject to revision. Included in this paper are brief reviews of Ashland petroleum Company`s ethanol usage, oxygenated fuel and reformulated gasoline blending economics, and some comments on the EPA proposed renewable oxygenate requirement.

  10. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  11. Applications for ACTS Workshop Due June 24

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for ACTS Workshop Due June 24 Applications for ACTS Workshop Due June 24 June 1, 2012 by Francesca Verdier The 13th Workshop on the DOE Advanced Computational Software (ACTS) Collection, Scalable and Robust Computational Libraries and Tools for High-End Computing, will be held in Berkeley, CA, on August 14-17, 2012.ide range of applications and fields in computational sciences. The four-day workshop will include tutorials on the tools currently available in the collection, discussion sessions to

  12. Polymerization of MIP-1 chemokine (CCL3 and CCL4) and clearance of MIP-1 by insulin-degrading enzyme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Min; Guo, Qing; Guo, Liang; Lenz, Martin; Qian, Feng; Koenen, Rory R.; Xu, Hua; Schilling, Alexander B.; Weber, Christian; Ye, Richard D.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2010-12-07

    Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1), MIP-1{alpha} (CCL3) and MIP-1{beta} (CCL4) are chemokines crucial for immune responses towards infection and inflammation. Both MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-1{beta} form high-molecular-weight aggregates. Our crystal structures reveal that MIP-1 aggregation is a polymerization process and human MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-1{beta} form rod-shaped, double-helical polymers. Biophysical analyses and mathematical modelling show that MIP-1 reversibly forms a polydisperse distribution of rod-shaped polymers in solution. Polymerization buries receptor-binding sites of MIP-1{alpha}, thus depolymerization mutations enhance MIP-1{alpha} to arrest monocytes onto activated human endothelium. However, same depolymerization mutations render MIP-1{alpha} ineffective in mouse peritoneal cell recruitment. Mathematical modelling reveals that, for a long-range chemotaxis of MIP-1, polymerization could protect MIP-1 from proteases that selectively degrade monomeric MIP-1. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is identified as such a protease and decreased expression of IDE leads to elevated MIP-1 levels in microglial cells. Our structural and proteomic studies offer a molecular basis for selective degradation of MIP-1. The regulated MIP-1 polymerization and selective inactivation of MIP-1 monomers by IDE could aid in controlling the MIP-1 chemotactic gradient for immune surveillance.

  13. Donald Frederick, LLNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donald Frederick, LLNL - Presented at Supercomputing 11 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551! Case Study: Beyond Homogeneous Decomposition with Qbox Scaling Long-Range Forces on Massively Parallel Systems LLNL---PRES---508651 Case S tudy: O utline * Problem D escripBon * ComputaBonal A pproach * Changes f or S caling LLNL---PRES---508651 Computer s imulaBons o f m aterials Computer s imulaBons a re w idely used t o p redict t he p roperBes o f new m aterials

  14. Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Group Using Modules at NERSC --- 1 --- September 10, 2013 NERSC Supported Software * NERSC p rovides a w ide r ange o f s cien=fic a nd c omputer programming s o@ware t o u sers - Scien)fic A pplica)ons: V ASP, A mber, N AMD, ABySS, ... - Compilers: p gi, i ntel, g cc, c ray - Scrip)ng L anguages: perl, p ython, R * and p ackages f or e ach! - SoIware L ibraries: b las/lapack ( MKL), b oost, h df5, n etcdf, ... - U)li)es: gnuplot, g it, m ercurial, 7 zip, c make, . .. - Debuggers &

  15. Communication: X-ray coherent diffractive imaging by immersion in nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanyag, Rico Mayro P.; Bernando, Charles; Jones, Curtis F.; Bacellar, Camila; Ferguson, Ken R.; Anielski, Denis; Boll, Rebecca; Carron, Sebastian; Cryan, James P.; Englert, Lars; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Gomez, Luis F.; Hartmann, Robert; Neumark, Daniel M.; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Siefermann, Katrin R.; Ullrich, Joachim; Weise, Fabian; Bostedt, Christoph; Gessner, Oliver; Vilesov, Andrey F.

    2015-10-14

    Lensless x-ray microscopy requires the recovery of the phase of the radiation scattered from a specimen. Here, we demonstrate a <i>de novo phase retrieval technique by encapsulating an object in a superfluid helium nanodroplet, which provides both a physical support and an approximate scattering phase for the iterative image reconstruction. The technique is robust, fast-converging, and yields the complex density of the immersed object. As a result, images of xenon clusters embedded in superfluid helium droplets reveal transient configurations of quantum vortices in this fragile system.

  16. Compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments: Challenge of the 90's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odegard, G.J.; Van, H. )

    1993-01-01

    With its 17,593 miles of pipeline, El Paso Natural Gas Company is one of the country's largest interstate natural gas transmission companies. To keep the gas continually moving through the pipeline, it is compressed back to high pressures at 73 stations comprising 1,210,120 horsepower located along the pipeline route. These compressor stations, which operate 24 hours a day every day, house 316 reciprocating engines and 92 gas turbines. As fuel, these engines and turbines burn natural gas. Natural gas combustion releases emissions of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide with small amounts of particulates, sulfur dioxide and volatile organic compounds. This presentation will describe how one large energy company plans to comply with these new requirements over the next several years. El Paso has developed an extensive Air Program designed to obtain all needed operating permits by the November 1995 deadline. Work is underway to quantify and document emissions at every operating facility. Emissions tests will measure NOx, CO, oxygen, CO[sub 2], water, stack temperature, stack velocity and fuel flow rate. Data generated by the Emissions Inventory System will be used not only for permit applications, but to develop alternative emission reduction strategies at facilities located in nonattainment areas. Dispersion modeling will be performed to analyze compliance with PSD increments and National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

  17. Full body powder antichip. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-17

    Chipping is the major paint defect listed for automobile customer dissatisfaction. The improved chip resistance and smoother paint surfaces produced by full body powder antichip will result in greater customer satisfaction and greater demand for US-produced automobiles. Powder antichip contains virtually no solvent, thereby reducing the potential VOC emissions from Newark Assembly by more than 90 tons per year as compared to the solvent-borne material presently applied in most full body applications. Since Newark Assembly Plant is in a severe non-attainment air quality area, which must demonstrate a 15% reduction in emissions by 1996, projects such as this are crucial to the longevity of industry in this region. The liquid paint spray systems include incineration of the oven volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) at 1,500 F. Since there are minimal VOC`s in powder coatings and the only possible releases occur only during polymerization, incineration is not required. The associated annual savings resulting from the elimination of the incinerator utilized on the liquid spray system is 1.44 {times} 10{sup 10} BTU`s per unit installed. The annual cost savings is approximately $388 thousand, far below the original estimates.

  18. Emissions trading programs, making sense of the options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahrer, S.

    1996-03-01

    In an attempt to move away from the traditional command-and-control approach to regulation, the US Environmental Protection Agency has begun to develop economic incentive programs. These programs encourage compliance with nationwide pollution-reduction goals, but seek industry action based on market or profit incentives, rather than fear of retribution or penalty. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) require that stringent means be taken to reduce NOx pollution in so-called ozone-nonattainment areas. Under CAAA Title IV, the SO{sub 2} trading program went into effect in 1993 to reduce acid rain. For NO{sub x}, several programs are either already in operation, or are under development. These include the Cap and Trade program, the Open Market trading program and New Source Review Offset Trading program. These 3 programs are described. To obtain a Title V operating permit, issues to consider are operation, job descriptions, certification process, value, estimating future emissions, confidentiality, permits, inter-media coordination, costs, and publicity.

  19. Air quality/energy management review of production facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, J.W.

    1995-06-01

    This is the only presentation that integrates energy management and air quality. You will learn how to reduce energy operating costs while minimizing air pollution. This presentation is condensed from a full day course focusing on hands-on techniques for conducting an air quality/energy management review of your operation or plant. The stringent (Non-attainment for PM{sub 10}, Ozone and CO) South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) of Southern California rules and regulations are applied to the die casting (metals) industry as well as other production processes. Examples and a case study of real energy intensive production facilities will be used. Developing options for air quality improvement with energy cost control are the key goals of the presentation. Also, the review techniques can be used to determine the {open_quotes}maximum potential to emit{close_quotes} as required for the new Federal EPA, Title V requirements. The outline of the one day course is provided to give the overall scope covered during performing an Air Quality/Energy Management Review of a Production Facility.

  20. Recycling paint and solvents and reducing use of 1,1,1-trichloroethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walpole, D. )

    1993-01-01

    Great Dane Trailers Tennessee, Inc., manufacturers over-the-road platform truck trailers in an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) non-attainment area in Memphis. Because plant management was concerned about air emissions, it began a waste-reduction program in February 1990. Their goal was to identify process changes and alternative coatings to reduce both solvent vapor emissions and paint-related RCRA hazardous wastes. Great Dane, working with the University of Tennessee's Center for Industrial Services, implemented waste-reduction measures that recycled 100% of the paint-related wastes previously shipped offsite for disposal, and eliminated 100% of the total hazardous waste. These measures reduced emissions of 1,1,1-trichloroethane by 93.6%. They also replaced purchased undercoating with an undercoating blended from recycled paint sludge residue. These innovations saved the Memphis plant more than $135,000 in 1991. Because Great Dane now generates virtually no hazardous waste, it went from a large-quantity generator to a conditionally exempt small-quantity generator. In recognition of Great Dane's contribution to the environment, Governor Ned McWherter awarded Great Dane the 1990 Tennessee Governor's Award for Excellence in Hazardous Waste Management.

  1. Emission factors for leaks in refinery components in heavy liquid service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taback, H.; Godec, M.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this program was to provide sufficient screening data so that EPA can develop an official set of emission factors (expressed in lb/hr/component) for refinery components (valves, flanged connectors, non-flanged connectors, pumps, open-ended lines, and other) in heavy liquid (BL) service. To accomplish this, 211,000 existing HL screening values from Southern California refineries were compiled and compared with 2,500 new HL screening measurements taken at two refineries in the state of Washington. Since Southern California is an area in extreme non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore has tight emission control regulations, it was felt that its screening data may not be representative of refineries without tight emission controls. Thus, the Southern California screening data were compared to screening measurements at refineries in an area that is in attainment of the NAAQS and without emissions control, which is the case for those refineries in Washington. It was found that statistically there was no significant difference in emission factors between the two areas and, therefore, there appears to be no difference in emissions from heavy liquid components in areas with and without leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs. The new emission factors range from 1/7 to 1/3 times the current EPA emission factors. This program was sponsored by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and an API report will soon be released providing complete details.

  2. MOBILE4. 1: Highway-vehicle mobile-source emission-factor model (Apple MacIntosh version) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    MOBILE4.1 is the latest revision to EPA's highway vehicle mobile source emission factor model. Relative to MOBILE4, it contains numerous revisions and provides the user with additional options for modeling highway vehicle emission factors. it will calculate emission factors for hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide, (CO), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from highway motor vehicles. It calculates emission factors for eight individual vehicle types, in two regions of the country (low and high altitude). The emission factors depend on various conditions such as ambient temperature, fuel volatility, speed, and mileage accrual rates. It will estimate emission factors for any calendar year between 1960 and 2020 inclusive. The 25 most recent model years are considered in operation in each calendar year. EPA is requiring that states and others preparing emission inventories for nonattainment areas for CO and ozone to use MOBILE4.1 in the development of the base year 1990 emission inventories required under the Clean Air Act of 1990.

  3. ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

    2005-01-20

    Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

  4. Helping the utility compete and comply: Lessons learned lead to informed decision making for NO{sub x} emission reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R.; Gregory, M.G.; Rummenhohl, V.

    1995-12-31

    Utilities are facing complex decisions regarding system compliance with emission regulations. Both Title I and Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) have requirements for additional reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. These regulations of the CAAA will be issued through various vessels such as State Implementation Plans (SIPs) and the mandates of the Northeast Ozone Transport Region (NOTR). Once implemented, NOTR regulations will likely require the reduction of NO{sub x} emissions to a level approximately 55 to 65 percent from baseline. As the rules for governing these environmental mandates are finalized, it is anticipated that utilities will be allowed a large amount of flexibility in determining appropriate control strategies for their systems. For example, intrastate and possibly even interstate trading (similar to the SO{sub 2} Acid Rain Program) of emission reduction will likely be allowed. Also, a {open_quotes}seasonal{close_quotes} approach to NO{sub x} emission controls is being considered since ozone nonattainment episodes normally take place during the summer months. Determining the optimum combination of these widely differing alternatives for system wide compliance is the crux of utilities` dilemmas.

  5. Gas reburn retrofit on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, H.; Latham, C.E.; Maringo, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, is being retrofitted with the gas reburning technology developed by Babcock & Wilcox (B & W) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the Title I, ozone nonattainment, of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit set in New York`s regulation is about 47%. Eastman Kodak and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are cosponsoring this project. B & W is the prime contractor and contract negotiations with Chevron as the gas supplier are presently being finalized. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system is scheduled for a September 1995 outage. No. 43 Boiler`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}. Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient gas residence time to use pulverized coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Based on successful completion of this gas reburn project, modifying the other three cyclone boilers with gas reburn technology is anticipated. The paper will describe B & W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B & W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn design information specific to Eastman Kodak No. 43 Boiler, and numerical modeling experiences based on the pilot-scale Small Boiler Simulator (SBS) results along with those from a full-scale commercial boiler.

  6. The Federal Highway Administration Gasohol Consumption Estimation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, HL

    2003-08-28

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is responsible for estimating the portion of Federal highway funds attributable to each State. The process involves use of State-reported data (gallons) and a set of estimation models when accurate State data is unavailable. To ensure that the distribution of funds is equitable, FHWA periodically reviews the estimation models. Estimation of the use of gasohol is difficult because of State differences in the definition of gasohol, inability of many States to separate and report gasohol usage from other fuel types, changes in fuel composition in nonattainment areas to address concerns over the use of certain fuel additives, and the lack of a valid State-level surrogate data set for gasohol use. Under the sponsorship of FHWA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the regression-based gasohol estimation model that has been in use for several years. Based on an analytical assessment of that model and an extensive review of potential data sets, ORNL developed an improved rule-based model. The new model uses data from Internal Revenue Service, Energy Information Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, ORNL, and FHWA sources. The model basically consists of three parts: (1) development of a controlled total of national gasohol usage, (2) determination of reliable State gasohol consumption data, and (3) estimation of gasohol usage for all other States. The new model will be employed for the 2004 attribution process. FHWA is currently soliciting comments and inputs from interested parties. Relevant data, as identified, will be pursued and refinements will be made by the research team if warranted.

  7. NO{sub x} control using natural gas reburn on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, H.; Maringo, G.J.; Beard, C.T.; Weed, G.E.; Pratapas, J.

    1997-07-01

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, has been retrofitted with the gas reburn. technology developed by the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the New York State regulations adopted in conformance with the Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. At the peak load, the ozone nonattainment required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit for cyclone boilers in this regulation is 56%. Eastman Kodak Company and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are co-sponsoring this project. Chevron has supplied the natural gas. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system was performed in a September 1995 outage. Boiler No. 43`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow (or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}). Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient furnace residence time to use coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Contingent upon successful completion of this gas reburn project, modification of Kodak`s other cyclone boilers to include reburn technology will be considered. The paper will describe B&W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B&W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn system design, manufacturing, and installation information specific to Kodak`s Unit No. 43. In addition, the paper will discuss numerical modeling and the full-scale commercial boiler test results.

  8. NO{sub x} control using natural gas reburn on an industrial cyclone boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, H.; Maringo, G.J.; Beard, C.T.; Weed, G.E.; Pratapas, J.

    1996-12-31

    Eastman Kodak Company`s cyclone boiler (Unit No. 43), located in Rochester, New York, has been retrofitted with the gas reburn technology developed by the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Company to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the New York State regulations adopted in conformance with the Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. At the peak load, the ozone nonattainment required NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels necessary to meet the presumptive limit for cyclone boilers in this regulation is 56%. Eastman Kodak Company and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) are co-sponsoring this project. Chevron has supplied the natural gas. Equipment installation for the gas reburn system was performed in a September 1995 outage. Boiler No. 43`s maximum continuous rating (MCR) is 550,000 pounds per hour of steam flow (or approximately equivalent to 60 MW{sub e}). Because of the compact boiler design, there is insufficient furnace residence time to use coal or oil as the reburn fuel, thus making it a prime candidate for gas reburn. Kodak currently has four cyclone boilers. Contingent upon successful completion of this gas reburn project, modification of Kodak`s other cyclone boilers to include reburn technology will be consideredd. The paper will describe B and W`s gas reburn data from a cyclone-equipped pilot facility (B and W`s Small Boiler Simulator), gas reburn system design, manufacturing, and installation information specific to Kodak`s Unit No. 43. In addition, the paper will discuss numerical modeling and the full-scale commercial boiler test results.

  9. Implementation of the Clean Air Act, Title V operating permit program requirements for the U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, M.P.

    1998-12-31

    Title V of the Clean Air Act (CAA) establishes a new permit program requiring major sources and sources subject to Title III (Hazardous Air Pollutants) to obtain a state operating permit. Historically, most states have issued operating permits for individual emission units. Under the Title V permit program, a single permit will be issued for all of the emission units at the facility much like the current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program. The permit will specify all reporting, monitoring, and record-keeping requirements for the facility. Sources required to obtain permits include (a) major sources that emit 100 tons per year or more of any criteria air contaminant, (b) any source subject to the HAP provisions of Title III, (c) any source subject to the acid rain provisions of Title IV, (d) any source subject to New Source Performance Standards, and (e) any source subject to new source review under the nonattainment or Prevention of Significant Deterioration provisions. The State of Tennessee Title V Operating Permit Program was approved by EPA on August 28, 1996. This paper will provide details of initiatives underway at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title V Operating Permit Program. The ORR encompasses three DOE Facilities: the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The Y-12 Plant manufactures component parts for the national nuclear weapons program; the ORNL is responsible for research and development activities including nuclear engineering, engineering technologies, and the environmental sciences; and the ETTP conducts a variety of research and development activities and is the home of a mixed waste incinerator. Each of the three DOE Facilities is considered a major source under Title V of the CAA.

  10. Short time proton dynamics in bulk ice and in porous anode solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basoli, Francesco; Senesi, Roberto; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Licoccia, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and incorporation into solid electrolytes and the reverse reaction of oxygen evolution play a cru-cial role in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) applications. However a detailed un derstanding of the kinetics of the cor-responding reactions, i.e. on reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps, reaction paths, electrocatalytic role of materials, is still missing. These include a thorough characterization of the binding potentials experienced by protons in the lattice. We report results of Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) measurements of the vibrational state of the protons in Ni- YSZ highly porous composites (75% to 90% ), a ceramic-metal material showing a high electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. The results are compared with INS and Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on the proton binding states in bulk ice.

  11. NERSC Schedule.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    :00---9:30 Registration a nd l aptop s et---up 9:30---9:45 Introductions 9:45---10:45 Chapter 1 . W hy o bject---oriented p rogramming ( OOP)? 10:45---11:00 Break 11:00---11:30 Example: F ireworks s imulation v ia p rocedural p rogramming 11:30---12:00 Section 2 .1 N omenclature, S ection 2 .2 O bject---Oriented A nalysis a nd D esign 12:00---1:00 Lunch B reak 1:00---1:30 Section 2 .3 E ncapsulation a nd I nformation H iding , S ection 2 .4 W rapping L egacy S oftware 1:30---2:00 Section 2 .5 C

  12. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grsoy, Do?a; Bier, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversion approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.

  13. WIPP Update 3_29_14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2 014 Seven a ctivities t o r ecovery a nd r e---entry NWP h as d eveloped a nd i mplemented a r ecovery p lan t hat i ncorporates s even a ctivities n ecessary t o keep the p ublic, e nvironment, a nd employees s afe, m itigate t he r adiation s ource, a nd r estore operations. T he s even a ctivities i nclude: * Activity 1 - I solate v entilation f low---through: T wo 1 0---foot w ide b ypass d ampers, t hat c ould a llow limited a irflow t o b ypass H EPA f ilters, w ere s ealed w ith h

  14. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grsoy, Do?a; Bier, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversionmoreapproaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.less

  15. Clean Cities ozone air quality attainment and maintenance strategies that employ alternative fuel vehicles, with special emphasis on natural gas and propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Saricks, C.L.

    1998-08-04

    Air quality administrators across the nation are coming under greater pressure to find new strategies for further reducing automotive generated non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established stringent emission reduction requirements for ozone non-attainment areas that have driven the vehicle industry to engineer vehicles meeting dramatically tightened standards. This paper describes an interim method for including alternative-fueled vehicles (AFVs) in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality. This method could be used until EPA can develop the Mobile series of emissions estimation models to include AFVs and until such time that detailed work on AFV emissions totals by air quality planners and emissions inventory builders is warranted. The paper first describes the challenges confronting almost every effort to include AFVs in targeted emissions reduction programs, but points out that within these challenges resides an opportunity. Next, it discusses some basic relationships in the formation of ambient ozone from precursor emissions. It then describes several of the salient provisions of EPA`s new voluntary emissions initiative, which is called the Voluntary Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Program (VMEP). Recent emissions test data comparing gaseous-fuel light-duty AFVs with their gasoline-fueled counterparts is examined to estimate percent emissions reductions achievable with CNG and LPG vehicles. Examples of calculated MOBILE5b emission rates that would be used for summer ozone season planning purposes by an individual Air Quality Control Region (AQCR) are provided. A method is suggested for employing these data to compute appropriate voluntary emission reduction credits where such (lighter) AFVs would be acquired. It also points out, but does not quantify, the substantial reduction credits potentially achievable by substituting gaseous

  16. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2014-07-21

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  17. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

    2000-01-12

    Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Today’s symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

  18. Rational design and adaptive management of combination therapies for Hepatitis C virus infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Ruian; Loverdo, Claude; Qi, Hangfei; Sun, Ren; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-06-30

    Recent discoveries of direct acting antivirals against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have raised hopes of effective treatment via combination therapies. Yet rapid evolution and high diversity of HCV populations, combined with the reality of suboptimal treatment adherence, make drug resistance a clinical and public health concern. We develop a general model incorporating viral dynamics and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics to assess how suboptimal adherence affects resistance development and clinical outcomes. We derive design principles and adaptive treatment strategies, identifying a high-risk period when missing doses is particularly risky for <i>de novo resistance, and quantifying the number of additional doses needed to compensate when doses are missed. Using data from large-scale resistance assays, we demonstrate that the risk of resistance can be reduced substantially by applying these principles to a combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. By providing a mechanistic framework to link patient characteristics to the risk of resistance, these findings show the potential of rational treatment design.

  19. Ecophysiology of an uncultivated lineage of Aigarchaeota from an oxic, hot spring filamentous ‘streamer’ community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, Jacob P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Schmid, Markus C.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan de M.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Wagner, Michael; Inskeep, William P.

    2015-07-03

    In this study, the candidate archaeal phylum ‘Aigarchaeota’ contains microorganisms from terrestrial and subsurface geothermal ecosystems. The phylogeny and metabolic potential of Aigarchaeota has been deduced from several recent single-cell amplified genomes; however, a detailed description of their metabolic potential and in situ transcriptional activity is absent. Here, we report a comprehensive metatranscriptome-based reconstruction of the in situ metabolism of Aigarchaeota in an oxic, hot spring filamentous ‘streamer’ community. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that these newly discovered Aigarchaeota are filamentous, which is consistent with the presence and transcription of an actin-encoding gene. Aigarchaeota filaments are intricately associated with other community members, which include both bacteria (for example, filamentous Thermocrinis spp.) and archaea. Metabolic reconstruction of genomic and metatranscriptomic data suggests that this aigarchaeon is an aerobic, chemoorganoheterotroph with autotrophic potential. A heme copper oxidase complex was identified in the environmental genome assembly and highly transcribed in situ. Potential electron donors include acetate, fatty acids, amino acids, sugars and aromatic compounds, which may originate from extracellular polymeric substances produced by other microorganisms shown to exist in close proximity and/or autochthonous dissolved organic carbon (OC). Transcripts related to genes specific to each of these potential electron donors were identified, indicating that this aigarchaeon likely utilizes several OC substrates. Characterized members of this lineage cannot synthesize heme, and other cofactors and vitamins <i>de novo, which suggests auxotrophy. We propose the name Candidatus ‘Calditenuis aerorheumensis’ for this aigarchaeon, which describes its filamentous morphology and its primary electron acceptor, oxygen.

  20. Canted Undulator Upgrade for GeoSoilEnviroCARS Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, Stephen

    2013-02-02

    Support for the beamline component of the canted undulator upgrade of Sector 13 (GeoSoilEnviroCARS; managed and operated by the University of Chicago) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS; Argonne National Laboratory) was received from three agencies (equally divided): NASA-SRLIDAP (now LARS), NSF-EAR-IF (ARRA) and DOE-Single Investigator Small Group (SISGR). The associated accelerator components (undulators, canted front end) were provided by the APS using DOE-ARRA funding. The intellectual merit of the research enabled by the upgrade lies in advancing our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials; the processes they control; and the processes that produce them. The upgrade will facilitate scientific advances in the following areas: high pressure mineral physics and chemistry, non-crystalline and nano-crystalline materials at high pressure, chemistry of hydrothermal fluids, reactions at mineral-water interfaces, biogeochemistry, oxidation states of magmas, flow dynamics of fluids and solids, and cosmochemistry. The upgrade, allowing the microprobe to operate 100% of the time and the high pressure and surface scattering and spectroscopy instruments to receive beam time increases, will facilitate much more efficient use of the substantial investment in these instruments. The broad scientific community will benefit by the increase in the number of scientists who conduct cutting-edge research at GSECARS. The user program in stations 13ID-C (interface scattering) and 13ID-D (laser heated diamond anvil cell and large volume press) recommenced in June 2012. The operation of the 13ID-E microprobe station began in the Fall 2012 cycle (Oct.-Dec 2012). The upgraded canted beamlines double the amount of undulator beam time at Sector 13 and provide new capabilities including extended operations of the X-ray microprobe down to the sulfur K edge and enhanced brightness at high energy. The availability of the upgraded beamlines will advance the

  1. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as <i>de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  2. Transuranic (Tru) waste volume reduction operations at a plutonium facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E; Nixon, Archie E; Dodge, Robert L; Fife, Keith W; Sandoval, Arnold M; Garcia, Vincent E

    2010-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA 55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Size-reduction operations on glovebox equipment are a common activity when a process has been discontinued and the room is being modified to support a new customer. The Actin ide Processing Group at TA-55 uses one-meter-long glass columns to process plutonium. Disposal of used columns is a challenge, since they must be size-reduced to get them out of the glovebox. The task is a high-risk operation because the glass shards that are generated can puncture the bag-out bags, leather protectors, glovebox gloves, and the worker's skin when completing the task. One of the Lessons Learned from these operations is that Laboratory management should critically evaluate each hazard and provide more effective measures to prevent personnel injury. A bag made of puncture-resistant material was one of these enhanced controls. We have investigated the effectiveness of these bags and have found that they safely and effectively permit glass objects to be reduced to small pieces with a plastic or rubber mallet; the waste can then be easily poured into a container for removal from the glove box as non-compactable transuranic (TRU) waste. This size-reduction operation reduces solid TRU waste generation by almost 2% times. Replacing one-time-use bag-out bags with multiple-use glass crushing bags also contributes to reducing generated waste. In addition, significant costs from contamination, cleanup, and preparation of incident documentation are avoided. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National

  3. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques; Zhu, Xuewei

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from the carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to <i>de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These

  4. Research and Development of High-Power and High-Energy Electrochemical Storage Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No, author

    2014-04-30

    and provides direction on future areas of technology and performance needs for vehicle applications. The report was developed using information such as program plans, gap analysis charts, quarterly reports and final project reports submitted by the developers. The public benefit served by this USABC program is that it continues the development of critical advanced battery technology that is needed to make electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles attractive to a wide segment of the vehicle market. This will allow for a substantial savings in petroleum fuel use as these vehicles are introduced into the nation’s transportation system. It will also allow a sharp reduction in automotive air pollution emissions in critical areas that are currently classified as non-attainment by the Environmental Protection Agency. This program will also help ensure the long term health and viability of the U.S. Battery and Ultracapacitor Manufacturing Industry. The goals of eight categories of projects follow and summarization of each of the project’s accomplishments are in sequence of the list above.

  5. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E; Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Ponnusamy, Senthil; Ferguson, Harley Douglas; Williams, Aaron M; Tassitano, James B

    2007-09-01

    Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the

  6. JBlulce Data Acquisition Software for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-06-01

    JBlulce (Java Beam Line Universal Integrated Configuration Environment is a data acquisition software for macromolecular crystallography conforming user interface of the SSRL Blulce that has become a de-factor standard in the field. Besides this interface conformity, JBlulce is a unique system in terms of architecture, speec, capability and osftware implementation. It features only two software layers, the JBlulce clients and the EPICS servers, as compared to three layers present in Blulc and most of similarmore » systems. This layers reduction provides a faster communication with hardware and an easier access to advanced hardware capabilities like on-the-fly scanning. Then JBlulc clients are designed to operate in parallel with the other beamline controls which streamlines the tasks performed by staff such as beamline preparation, maitenance, audting and user assistance. Another distinction is the deployment of multiple plugins that can be written in any programming languag thus involving more staff into the development. further on, JBlulce makes use of unified motion controls allowing for easy scanning and optimizing of any beamline component. Finally, the graphic interface is implemented in Java making full use of rich Java libraries and Jave IDE for debugging. to compare, Blulce user interface is implemented with aging Tcl/tk language providing very restricted capabilities. JBlulce makes full use of the industrial power and wide drivers selection of EPICS in controlling hardware; all hardware commuication is routed via multiple EPICS servers residing on local area network. JBlulce also includes several EPICS State Notation servers aimed at making hardware communication more robust. Besides using EPICS for controlling hardware, JBlulce extensively uses EPICS databases for efficien communications between multiple instances of JBlulce clients and JBlulce pplugins that can run in parallel on different computers. All of the above makes JBlulce one of the biggest