Sample records for monosodium titanate mst

  1. Rheology Of MonoSodium Titanate (MST) And Modified Mst (mMST) Mixtures Relevant To The Salt Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D. C.; Martino, C. J.; Shehee, T. C.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory performed measurements of the rheology of suspensions and settled layers of treated material applicable to the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility. Suspended solids mixtures included monosodium titanate (MST) or modified MST (mMST) at various solid concentrations and soluble ion concentrations with and without the inclusion of kaolin clay or simulated sludge. Layers of settled solids were MST/sludge or mMST/sludge mixtures, either with or without sorbed strontium, over a range of initial solids concentrations, soluble ion concentrations, and settling times.

  2. URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM LOADING ONTO MONOSODIUM TITANATE MST IN TANK 50H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A possible disposition pathway for the residue from the abandoned In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) sends the material from Tank 48H in increments to Saltstone via aggregation in Tank 50H. After entering Tank 50H, the amount of fissile material sorbed on MST may increase as a result of contacting waste solutions with dissolved uranium and plutonium. SRNL recommends that nuclear criticality safety evaluations use uranium and plutonium loadings onto MST of 14.0 {+-} 1.04 weight percent (wt %) for uranium and 2.79 {+-} 0.197 wt % for plutonium given the assumed streams defined in this report. These values derive from recently measured for conditions relevant to the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and serve as conservative upper bounds for uranium and plutonium loadings during the proposed transfers of MST from Tank 48H into Tank 50H.

  3. Analysis of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot #46000824120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000824120 qualification and the 16 verification samples failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids.

  4. Analysis of Harrell Monosodium Titanate Lot #46000908120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000908120 qualification and the 16 verification samples failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids.

  5. Prediction Models for Plutonium, Strontium, Uranium and Neptunium Loading onto Monosodium Titanate (MST)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Hobbs, D. T.; Barnes, M. J.; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The DA isotherm parameters for U, Pu, Sr and Np have been updated to include additional data obtained since the original derivation. The DA isotherms were modified to include a kinetic function derived by Rahn to describe sorbate loading from the beginning of sorption up to equilibrium. The final functions describe both kinetic and thermodynamic sorption. We selected the Rahn function to describe radionuclide sorption because it originates from diffusion and absorption controlled sorption. An investigation of the thermal behavior of radionuclide sorption on MST as shown by this data revealed the sorption process is diffusion (or transport) controlled (in solution). Transport in solution can in theory be accelerated by vigorous mixing but the range of available mixing speed in the facility design will probably not be sufficient to markedly increase radionuclide sorption rate on MST from diffusion-controlled sorption. The laboratory studies included mixing energies hydraulically-scaled to match those of the Actinide Removal Process and these likely approximate the range of energies available in the Salt Waste Processing Facility.

  6. Phase IV Simulant Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified the adsorption kinetics of actinides and strontium onto monosodium titanate (MST) as a technical risk in several of the processing alternatives selected for additional evaluation in Phase III of their effort.

  7. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #46000524120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot No.46000524120 qualification and the 14 verification samples met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  8. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #46000619120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #46000619120 qualification and the 13 verification samples met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  9. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT 46000908120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The original Harrell Industries Lot #46000908120 qualification and 16 verification samples received in October 2012 failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids. The lot was returned to the vendor, and in February 2014 a new qualification sample and set of 16 verification samples were received from this lot. The new lot met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  10. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT 46000824120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The original Harrell Industries Lot #46000824120 qualification and 16 verification samples received in September 2012 failed to meet the specification for weight percent solids. All of the pails sampled and tested contained less than 15 wt % MST solids. The lot was returned to the vendor, and in February 2014 a new qualification sample and set of 14 verification samples were received from this lot. The new lot met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested and, consequently, the material is acceptable for use in the ARP process.

  11. Final Report on Phase III Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study consisted of a statistically designed set of tests to determine the extent and rate of adsorption of strontium, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium as a function of temperature, monosodium titanate (MST) concentration, and concentrations of sodium, strontium, plutonium, uranium, and neptunium.

  12. Resuspension and Settling of Monosodium Titanate and Sludge in Supernate Simulate for the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, P.A.; Mattus, C.H.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is testing several methods for their effectiveness in removing the major radionuclides from the supernate solutions that are stored in the high-level waste tanks at the site. One option is to mix the tank contents (sludge and supernate), in situ, with monosodium titanate (MST) powder to remove 90Sr and transuranics. The sludge and MST would be allowed to settle, and thet reated supernate would then be decanted. The sludge and MST would need to be resuspended later so that the solids could be pumped to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. Small-scale tests evaluated the effect of various storage conditions on the rheological properties of the sludge/MST slurry. Laboratory-scale and pilot-scale tests were conducted to determine the mixing requirements for resuspending slurries of sludge simulant and MST, following settleing periods of various lengths.`

  13. ANALYSIS OF HARRELL MONOSODIUM TITANATE LOT #s 46000606120, 46000722120, AND 46000808120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Monosodium titanate (MST) for use in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) must be qualified and verified in advance. A single qualification sample for each batch of material is sent to SRNL for analysis, as well as a statistical sampling of verification samples. The Harrell Industries Lot #s 46000706120, 46000722120, and 460008081120 qualification and verification samples met each of the selected specification requirements that were tested with the exception of a few pails being marginally below the lower weight percent solids limit. These deviations from the specifications are viewed as negligible since the corresponding density of the slurries indicates no appreciable shortage of MST solids. Therefore, SRNL recommends acceptance and use of these pails.

  14. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D; Thomas Peters, T; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Major Thompson, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a final report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger scale by a commercial vendor, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and measurement of filtration characteristics. Key findings and conclusions include the following. Testing evaluated three synthetic methods and eleven process parameters for the optimum synthesis conditions for the preparation on an improved form of MST. We selected the post synthesis method (Method 3) for continued development based on overall sorbate removal performance. We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. The laboratory prepared modified MST exhibited increased sorption kinetics with simulated and actual waste solutions and similar filtration characteristics to the baseline MST. Characterization of the modified MST indicated that the post synthesis treatment did not significantly alter the particle size distribution, but did significantly increase the surface area and porosity compared to the original MST. Testing indicated that the modified MST exhibits reduced affinity for uranium compared to the baseline MST, reducing risk of fissile loading. Shelf-life testing indicated no change in strontium and actinide performance removal after storing the modified MST for 12-months at ambient laboratory temperature. The material releases oxygen during the synthesis and continues to offgas after the synthesis at a rapidly diminishing rate until below a measurable rate after 4 months. Optima Chemical Group LLC prepared a 15-kilogram batch of the modified MST using the post synthesis procedure (Method 3). Performance testing with simulated and actual waste solutions indicated that the material performs as well as or better than batches of modified MST prepared at the laboratory-scale. Particle size data of the vendor-prepared modified MST indicates a broader distribution centered at a larger particle size and microscopy shows more irregular particle morphology compared to the baseline MST and laboratory prepared modified MST. Stirred-cell (i.e., dead-end) filter testing revealed similar filtration rates relative to the baseline MST for both the laboratory and vendor-prepared modified MST materials. Crossflow filtration testing indicated that with MST-only slurries, the baseline MST produced between 30-100% higher flux than the vendor-prepared modified MST at lower solids loadings and comparable flux at higher solids loadings. With sludge-MST slurries, the modified MST produced 1.5-2.2 times higher flux than the baseline MST at all solids loadings. Based on these findings we conclude that the modified MST represents a much improved sorbent for the separation of strontium and actinides from alkaline waste solutions and recommend continued development of the material as a replacement for the baseline MST for waste treatment facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  15. PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these conditions.

  16. THE HYDROTHERMAL REACTIONS OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE, CRYSTALLINE SILICOTITANATE AND SLUDGE IN THE MODULAR SALT PROCESS: A LITERATURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Pennebaker, F.; Fink, S.

    2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) is proposed for an at-tank process to treat High Level Waste at the Savannah River Site. The proposed configuration includes deployment of ion exchange columns suspended in the risers of existing tanks to process salt waste without building a new facility. The CST is available in an engineered form, designated as IE-911-CW, from UOP. Prior data indicates CST has a proclivity to agglomerate from deposits of silica rich compounds present in the alkaline waste solutions. This report documents the prior literature and provides guidance for the design and operations that include CST to mitigate that risk. The proposed operation will also add monosodium titanate (MST) to the supernate of the tank prior to the ion exchange operation to remove strontium and select alpha-emitting actinides. The cesium loaded CST is ground and then passed forward to the sludge washing tank as feed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Similarly, the MST will be transferred to the sludge washing tank. Sludge processing includes the potential to leach aluminum from the solids at elevated temperature (e.g., 65 C) using concentrated (3M) sodium hydroxide solutions. Prior literature indicates that both CST and MST will agglomerate and form higher yield stress slurries with exposure to elevated temperatures. This report assessed that data and provides guidance on minimizing the impact of CST and MST on sludge transfer and aluminum leaching sludge.

  17. FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE, AN IMPROVED SORBENT FOR PRETREATMENT OF HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove Cs-137, Sr-90, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. Separation processes planned at SRS include caustic side solvent extraction, for Cs-137 removal, and sorption of Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides onto monosodium titanate (MST). The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-240. This paper describes recent results from the development of an improved titanate material that exhibits increased removal kinetics and effective capacity for Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the baseline MST material.

  18. STABLE SR VS 85SR SORPTION FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTIONS BY MST AND MMST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests were performed to examine the sorption of stable Sr versus the sorption of {sup 85}Sr by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) from simulated waste solutions. Earlier testing indicated a discrepancy between the decontamination factors (DFs) obtained by measuring the stable Sr concentrations by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and the {sup 85}Sr activities by gamma spectroscopy. One hypothesis to explain this discrepancy was that the stable Sr and {sup 85}Sr were in different chemical forms in the simulated solutions. Several simulants were prepared using different methods for adding the Sr and performance tests were carried out using MST and mMST to determine the Sr and {sup 85}Sr DFs with the various simulants. Testing indicated no discrepancy between the Sr and {sup 85}Sr DFs in tests with these simulants.

  19. Sample results from the integrated salt disposition program macrobatch 6 tank 21H qualifications MST solids sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 6 processing. As part of this qualification work, SRNL performed an Actinide Removal Process (ARP) test. From this test, the residual monosodium titanate (MST) was analyzed for radionuclide uptake. The results of these analyses are reported and are within historical precedent.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide modified sodium titanates with improved sorption capabilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hobbs, David T. (North Augusta, SC)

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorption capabilities (e.g., kinetics, selectivity, capacity) of the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) sorbent material currently being used to sequester Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radioisotopes at the Savannah River Site are significantly improved when treated with hydrogen peroxide; either during the original synthesis of MST, or, as a post-treatment step after the MST has been synthesized. It is expected that these peroxide-modified MST sorbent materials will have significantly improved sorption capabilities for non-radioactive cations found in industrial processes and waste streams.

  1. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATEPHASE II INTERIM REPORT FOR EXTERNAL RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Mary Thompson, M

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an interim summary report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST materials. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger laboratory scale, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and characterization of the modified MST. Key findings and conclusions include the following: (1) Samples of the modified MST prepared by Method 2 and Method 3 exhibited the best combination of strontium and actinide removal. (2) We selected Method 3 to scale up and test performance with actual waste solution. (3) We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using the Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. (4) Performance tests indicated successful scale-up to the 25-gram scale with excellent performance and reproducibility among each of the three batches. For example, the plutonium decontamination factors (6-hour contact time) for the modified MST samples averaged 13 times higher than that of the baseline MST sample at half the sorbent concentration (0.2 g L{sup -1} for modified MST versus 0.4 g L{sup -1} for baseline MST). (5) Performance tests with actual waste supernate demonstrated that the modified MST exhibited better strontium and plutonium removal performance than that of the baseline MST. For example, the decontamination factors for the modified MST measured 2.6 times higher for strontium and between 5.2 to 11 times higher for plutonium compared to the baseline MST sample. The modified MST did not exhibit improved neptunium removal performance over that of the baseline MST. (6) Two strikes of the modified MST provided increased removal of strontium and actinides from actual waste compared to a single strike. The improved performance exhibited by the modified MST indicates that fewer strikes of the modified MST would be needed to successfully treat waste that contain very high activities of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the baseline MST. (7) Reuse tests with actual waste confirmed that partially loaded MST exhibits reduced removal of strontium and actinides when contacted with fresh waste. (8) Samples of modified MST prepared by Method 3 and the baseline MST exhibited very similar particle size distributions. (9) Dead-end filtration tests showed that the modified MST samples exhibited similar filtration characteristics as the baseline MST sample. (10) Performance testing indicated no change in strontium and neptunium removal after storing the modified MST for 6-months at ambient temperature. The results suggested that plutonium removal performance may be decreased slightly after 6-months of storage. However, the change in plutonium removal is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence limit. Based on these findings we recommend continued development of the modified MST as a replacement for the baseline MST for waste treatment facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  2. Interim salt disposition program macrobatch 6 tank 21H qualification monosodium titanate and cesium mass transfer tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 6 processing. This qualification material was a set of six samples from Tank 21H in October 2012. This sample was used as a real waste demonstration of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests process. The Tank 21H sample was contacted with a reduced amount (0.2 g/L) of MST and characterized for strontium and actinide removal at 0 and 8 hour time intervals in this salt batch. {sup 237}Np and {sup 243}Am were both observed to be below detection limits in the source material, and so these results are not reported in this report. The plutonium and uranium samples had decontamination factor (DF) values that were on par or slightly better than we expected from Batch 5. The strontium DF values are slightly lower than expected but still in an acceptable range. The Extraction, Scrub, and Strip (ESS) testing demonstrated cesium removal, stripping and scrubbing within the acceptable range. Overall, the testing indicated that cesium removal is comparable to prior batches at MCU.

  3. INVESTIGATING SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A PILOT-SCALE WASTE TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending and resuspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is for the pumps to resuspend the MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles so that they can be removed from the tank, and to suspend the MST so it can contact strontium and actinides. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5, B3, and B1). Previous testing showed that three Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank, and to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST and CST that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 84% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (2) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST, CST, and simulated sludge that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 82% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (3) A contact time of 6-12 hours is needed for strontium sorption by MST in a jet mixed tank with cooling coils, which is consistent with bench-scale testing and actinide removal process (ARP) operation.

  4. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification MST Solids Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 7 processing. The Marcrobatch 7 material was received with visible fine particulate solids, atypical for these samples. The as received material was allowed to settle for a period greater than 24 hours. The supernatant was then decanted and utilized as our clarified feed material. As part of this qualification work, SRNL performed an Actinide Removal Process (ARP) test using the clarified feed material. From this test, the residual monosodium titanate (MST) was analyzed for radionuclide uptake after filtration from H-Tank Farm (HTF) feed salt solution. The results of these analyses are reported and are within historical precedent.

  5. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with MST impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% Sr-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with co-sintered active MST cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the MST impregnated membrane cartridges and CST impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active MST cartridges and co-sintered active CST cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of Cs-137 with co-sintered CST cartridges. Tests results with CST impregnated membrane cartridges for Cs-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating MST and CST sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semi-continuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

  6. Titan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPointsThrust 1: Structure andBlandineTitan

  7. PILOT-SCALE TESTING OF THE SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A SLUDGE TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Following strontium, actinide, and cesium removal, the concentrated solids will be transported to a sludge tank (i.e., monosodium titanate (MST)/sludge solids to Tank 42H or Tank 51H and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to Tank 40H) for eventual transfer to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST, CST, and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST and CST with sludge in a sludge tank and to determine whether segregation of particles occurs during settling. Tank 40H and Tank 51H have four Quad Volute pumps; Tank 42H has four standard pumps. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 40H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 40H. The pump locations correspond to the current locations in Tank 40H (Risers B2, H, B6, and G). The pumps are pilot-scale Quad Volute pumps. Additional settling tests were conducted in a 30 foot tall, 4 inch inner diameter clear column to investigate segregation of MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles during settling.

  8. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions using monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST)-laden filter cartridges. Four types of ion exchange cartridge media (CST and MST designed by both 3M and POROX{reg_sign}) were evaluated. In these proof-of-principle tests effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 was observed. However, the experiments were not performed long enough to determine the saturation levels or breakthrough curve for each filter cartridge. POREX{reg_sign} MST cartridges, which by design were based on co-sintering of the active titanates with polyethylene particles, seem to perform as well as the 3M-designed MST cartridges (impregnated filter membrane design) in the uptake of strontium. At low salt simulant conditions (0.29 M Na{sup +}), the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with the 3M-design MST cartridge measured 26, representing the removal of 96% of the Sr-85. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with the POREX{reg_sign} design MST cartridge measured 40 or 98% removal of the Sr-85. Strontium removal with the 3M-design MST and CST cartridges placed in series filter arrangement produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 or 97.6% removal compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 or 99.7% removal of the strontium with the POREX{reg_sign} MST and CST cartridge design placed in series. At high salt simulant conditions (5.6 M Na{sup +}), strontium removal with 3M-designed MST cartridge only and with 3M-designed MST and CST cartridges operated in a series configuration were identical. The instantaneous decontamination factor and the strontium removal efficiency, under the above configuration, averaged 8.6 and 88%, respectively. There were no POREX{reg_sign} cartridge experiments using the higher ionic strength simulant solution. At low salt simulant conditions, the uptake of Cs-137 with POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridge out performed the 3M-designed CST cartridges. The POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridge, with a Cs-137 instantaneous decontamination factor of 55 and a Cs-137 removal efficiency of 98% does meet the Cs-137 decontamination goals in the low salt simulant liquor. The Cs-137 removal with 3M-designed CST cartridge produced a decontamination factor of 2 or 49% removal efficiency. The Cs-137 performance graph for the 3M-designed CST cartridge showed an early cessation in the uptake of cesium-137. This behavior was not observed with the POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridges. No Cs-137 uptake tests were performed with the POREX{reg_sign} CST cartridges at high salt simulant conditions. The 3M-designed CST cartridges, with an instantaneous Cs-137 decontamination factor of less than 3 and a Cs-137 removal efficiency of less than 50% failed to meet the Cs-137 decontamination goals in both the low and high salt simulant liquors. This poor performance in the uptake of Cs-137 by the 3M CST cartridges may be attributed to fabrication flaws for the 3M-designed CST cartridges. The reduced number of CST membrane wraps per cartridge during the cartridge design phase, from 3-whole wraps to about 1.5, may have contributed to Cs-137 laden simulant channeling/by-pass which led to the poor performance in terms of Cs-137 sorption characteristics for the 3M designed CST cartridges. The grinding of CST ion exchange materials, to reduce the particle size distribution and thus enhance their easy incorporation into the filter membranes and the co-sintering of MST with polyethylene particles, did not adversely affect the sorption kinetics of both CST and MST in the uptake of Cs-137 and Sr-85, respectively. In general, the POREX{reg_sign} based cartridges showed more resistance to simulant flow through the filter cartridges as evidenced by higher pressure differences across the cartridges. Based on these findings they conclude that incorporating MST and CST sorbents into filter membranes represent a promising method for the semi-continuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium a

  9. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both strontium-85 and cesium-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor for strontium-85 with monosodium titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% strontium-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the strontium-85 instantaneous decontamination factor with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the monosodium titanate impregnated membrane cartridges and crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges and co-sintered active crystalline silicotitanate cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of cesium-137 with co-sintered crystalline silicotitanate cartridges. Tests results with crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges for cesium-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semicontinuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

  10. MST14/iMST1 First Announcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -situ studies, and relevant modeling efforts will all be welcome. Contributed and invited talks, signal processing, and quality control 5) Meteor studies and observations 6) MST scattering, micro scatter radars (e.g. radars/forecast models, radars/lidars, radars/in situ (rockets or satellites), radars

  11. CX-009101: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Monosodium Titanate (MST) Rheology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  12. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Abstract: Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning,...

  13. MST14/iMST1 Deadline for Abstract submission is February 14, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and other instruments like lidars and in-situ studies, and relevant modeling efforts will all be welcome instruments, signal processing, and quality control. 6. Meteor studies and observations. 7. Middle Atmosphere include MST radars, wind profilers and ionospheric coherent scatter radars (e.g. radars/forecast models

  14. Electron Bernstein Wave Studies in MST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseC Supports - Energy Bernstein Wave Studies in MST

  15. Titan Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Titan Titan is a two-beam laser platform. The nanosecond "long-pulse" beam is one of the Janus lasers, up to 1 kJ at 1.053 m. The "short-pulse" beam is 1-to-10 ps and energies up...

  16. Electron Bernstein Wave Studies in MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seltzman, Andrew H.; Anderson, Jay K.; Nonn, Paul D.; Kauffold, Jason X.; Forest, Cary B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dept. Of Physics, 1150 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Diem, Stephanie J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The overdense plasma in an RFP prevents electromagnetic waves from propagating past the edge, however use of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) has the potential to heat and drive current in the plasma. MHD simulations have demonstrated that resistive tearing mode stability is very sensitive to gradients in the edge current density profile allowing EBW to potentially be a stabilizing influence. A new MW level experiment is being commissioned on MST to evaluate the potential use of the EBW for current profile control on the RFP. The development of new equipment includes a 5.5 GHz klystron driven by a novel switchmode power supply. A quartz window has been constructed and coupling with a cylindrical molybdenum wave guide antenna has been studied. Due to the steep edge density gradient in the RFP, it is possible to efficiently couple to the EBW with O or X mode launch. The EBW is strongly damped at the electron cyclotron resonance where it couples to the electron gyromotion and alters the electron distribution. Either Fisch-Boozer or Ohkawa current drive mechanisms can be activated to drive off axis current in the plasma. Preliminary experiments have been performed to verify high power coupling and understand heating via observed x-ray emission when compared to Fokker-Plank modeling in CQL3D.

  17. Sawteeth in the MST reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckstead, J.A.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamo mechanism has been used in astrophysics to explain the self-generation of the magnetic fields observed throughout the universe. This same type of phenomenon is believed to occur in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The RFP dynamo has been a major theoretical and experimental investigation since the first observations of the self-reversal process in early pinch research. A discrete dynamo event has been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas; this event is termed the RFP sawtooth. This phenomenon is similar to the sawtooth phenomenon observed in tokamak plasmas, but the two events differ in many respects. Both events are a result of the inward diffusion of the plasma current density. This causes the plasma to become unstable to the m = 1 tearing modes. It has been shown theoretically that the nonlinear interaction of these modes can generate the reversed toroidal field in the RFP. This thesis is a study of the RFP sawtooth phenomenon on the MST RFP. This includes experimental observations as well as 1-D numerical simulations of the sawtooth rise-time. During the rise-time of the sawtooth, the plasma is undergoing a purely diffusive process -- no dynamo is occurring during this phase. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. During the rise-time, the m = 1 modes are observed to grow, and nonlinear interactions are observed prior to the sawtooth crash. At the time of the crash, many of the plasma profiles are flattened; these include the current density, the plasma temperature and the plasma density. The period of the sawteeth is observed to increase with the plasma current, as well as the magnetic Reynolds number, S.

  18. Assessment of performing an MST strike in Tank 21H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, Michael R.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tank mixing studies performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project have shown that 3 Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) installed in Tank 41 are sufficient to support actinide removal by MST sorption as well as subsequent resuspension and removal of settled solids. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is pursuing MST addition into Tank 21 as part of the Large Tank Strike (LTS) project. The preliminary scope for LTS involves the use of three standard slurry pumps (installed in N, SE, and SW risers) in a Type IV tank. Due to the differences in tank size, internal interferences, and pump design, a separate mixing evaluation is required to determine if the proposed configuration will allow for MST suspension and strontium and actinide sorption. The author performed the analysis by reviewing drawings for Tank 21 [W231023] and determining the required cleaning radius or zone of influence for the pumps. This requirement was compared with previous pilot-scale MST suspension data collected for SCIX that determined the cleaning radius, or zone of influence, as a function of pump operating parameters. The author also reviewed a previous Tank 50 mixing analysis that examined the ability of standard slurry pumps to suspend sludge particles. Based on a review of the pilot-scale SCIX mixing tests and Tank 50 pump operating experience, three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend sludge and MST to effectively sorb strontium and actinides onto the MST. Using the SCIX data requires an assumption about the impact of cooling coils on slurry pump mixing. The basis for this assumption is described in this report. Using the Tank 50 operating experience shows three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend solids if the shear strength of the settled solids is less than 160 Pa. Because Tank 21 does not contain cooling coils, the shear strength could be larger.

  19. Propane on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. G. Roe; T. K. Greathouse; M. J. Richter; J. H. Lacy

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first observations of propane (C$_3$H$_8$) on Titan that unambiguously resolve propane features from other numerous stratospheric emissions. This is accomplished using a $R=\\lambda/\\delta\\lambda\\approx10^5$ spectrometer (TEXES) to observe propane's $\

  20. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  1. Locked modes and magnetic field errors in MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Kerst, D.W.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the MST reversed field pinch magnetic oscillations become stationary (locked) in the lab frame as a result of a process involving interactions between the modes, sawteeth, and field errors. Several helical modes become phase locked to each other to form a rotating localized disturbance, the disturbance locks to an impulsive field error generated at a sawtooth crash, the error fields grow monotonically after locking (perhaps due to an unstable interaction between the modes and field error), and over the tens of milliseconds of growth confinement degrades and the discharge eventually terminates. Field error control has been partially successful in eliminating locking.

  2. MST eNews: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3vnd.ms-excelMST

  3. Materials Science & Technology, MST: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition | NationalMaterialsMPA AdvancedMST

  4. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750 to about 950 C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 microns, and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 micron. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  5. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

  6. Neutral beam heating of a RFP plasma in MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waksman, J.; Anderson, J. K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1390 (United States); Liu, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Rd, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Stupishin, N.; Deichuli, P. P. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva Prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Sakakita, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron temperature is observed to rise due to neutral beam injection (NBI) in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). Heating is observed to be 100 {+-} 50 eV in the core of 200 kA plasmas. This is the first definitive measurement of auxiliary heating of a reversed-field pinch (RFP). This heating is consistent with a 1D classical model which was developed. This 1D model calculates the evolving thermal conductivity and ohmic power input profiles during enhanced confinement, and can calculate NBI deposition and classical fast ion diffusion and slowing. The predicted temperature change is consistent with measured beam heating both during and after enhanced confinement, which is consistent with previous observations that fast ions are well confined and behave roughly classically in the RFP.

  7. Magnetic Reconnection in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crocker, N.E.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic field line reconnection is a process whereby magnetic field lines which are otherwise topologically preserved by, and frozen into, a plasma can break and reconnect to form field lines with different topologies. It plays a significant role in a wide variety of plasmas, including stellar, space and laboratory plasmas. The focus of this dissertation is the underlying dynamics of reconnection in one particular kind of laboratory plasma: the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Specifically, this dissertation reports measurements, made using a pair of insertable diagnostics in conjunction with arrays of magnetic sensing coils positioned near the plasma surface, of the spatial structure of the magnetic and parallel current density fluctuations associated with reconnection in the edge of MST. At least 4 significant results are obtained form such measurements. First we observe direct evidence of reconnection which takes the form of tearing modes in an RFP. Specifically we measure a (radial) magnetic field fluctuation that causes reconnection in the so-called reversal surface, or q = 0 surface, in the edge of MST. Notably this evidence of reconnection at the reversal surface is the first of its kind in an RFP. Second, we measure the radial width of the associated current sheet, or fluctuation in the component of the current density parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field. Such current sheets are a characteristic feature of the reconnection process but their radial widths are sensitive to the specific effects that allow reconnection to occur sometimes call non-ideal effects because reconnection is forbidden by ideal MHD. We compare the observed width to those expected from models of reconnection that incorporate different non-ideal effects in Ohm's law. In particular we see that the observed width is significantly larger than those expected form resistivity in the context of linearly unstable tearing modes and electron inertia. It is a factor of a few larger than the width expected form the electron pressure gradient effect. It is significantly smaller than the width expected from the ion inertia, but this width is not expected to be relevant to a strongly magnetized plasma such as an RFP. Notably it is comparable to the width of the magnetic island produced by the associated tearing mode. This is consistent with expectation for saturated or fully developed resistive tearing modes such as MST is believed to exhibit. It is also consistent with the broadening of a smaller width current sheet through current transport due to parallel streaming of charge carriers (along the field lines of the associated island). Third we obtain estimates of the radial charge transport or radial current density due to streaming charge of carriers along magnetic field lines that results from reconnection in the edge of MST. We find that in contradiction with the theoretical expectation for isolated tearing modes it is non-vanishing and in fact large enough to imply both the existence of another charge transport mechanism to maintain charge neutrality and a significant difference in the radial ion and electron particle fluxes due to parallel streaming of particles. Fourth we interpret the flux surface average of j and b as a J x B force density on the plasma. We observe in agreement with theory and observation for interacting tearing modes in an RFP that the radial structure of the force density during sawtooth crashes is such as to flatten the equilibrium radial gradient in toroidal velocity. We observe also that it is sufficiently large as to imply the existence of other force densities on the plasma.

  8. System studies of rf current drive for MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J. K.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Hendries, E. R.; Seltzman, A. H.; Thomas, M. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Diem, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA (United States); Kaufman, M. C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two rf schemes are being studied on the MST reversed field pinch for their potential in current profile control experiments. MHD modeling has shown that a substantial externally-driven off axis parallel current can improve stability of the dominant core tearing modes. A radially localized axisymmetric population of fast electrons has been observed by SXR emission during LH injection (100kW at 800MHz), and is consistent with CQL3D modeling which predicts a small driven current. Computational work suggests that doubling the input power will statistically improve the LH-induced SXR signal to background ratio, and that about 2MW of injected power (an order of magnitude increase) will drive enough current for stabilization of tearing modes. Additionally, a 1 MW 5.5 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) experiment is under construction, which utilizes a very simple and compact antenna compatible with the demands of the RFP. EBW allows access to electron cyclotron heating and current drive in the overdense plasma. Coupling of the external electromagnetic wave to the EBW has been demonstrated, and initial tests at {approx}100kW power have produced a small, localized xray flux consistent with rf heating and high diffusivity of fast electrons. Computational work is currently underway to answer the very important questions of how much power is required, and what level of electron diffusivity is tolerable, to generate a consequential amount of EBW current.

  9. TITAN TECH TALK INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    TITAN TECH TALK INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY VOLUME I, ISSUE II AUGUST 2013 INSIDE THIS ISSUE Pg. 6 Mobile Yes Yes Yes PC Yes TOP 4 REASONS to use iFullerton: With more than 20 features, you may be asking management system, powered by Moodle, gives you access to your classes. 2. MAPS First day at Cal State

  10. DECONTAMINATION FACTORS AND FILTRATION FLUX IMPACT TO ARP AT REDUCED MST CONCENTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank Farm and Closure Engineering is evaluating changes to the Actinide Removal Process facility operations to decrease the MST concentration from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L and the contact time from 12 hours to between 6 and 8 hours. For this evaluation, SRNL reviewed previous datasets investigating the performance of MST at 0.2 g/L in salt solutions ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration. In general, reducing the MST concentration from 0.4 to 0.2 g/L and increasing the ionic strength from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration will decrease the measured decontamination factors for plutonium, neptunium, uranium and strontium. The decontamination factors as well as single standard deviation values for each sorbate are reported. These values are applicable within the sorbate and sodium concentrations used in the experimental measurements. Decreasing the MST concentration in the ARP from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L will produce an increase in the filter flux, and could lead to longer operating times between filter cleaning. The increase in flux is a function of a number of operating parameters, and is difficult to quantify. However, it is estimated that the reduction in MST could result in a reduction of filtration time of up to 20%.

  11. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison WI (United States); Diem, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA (United States)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ? 10{sup 4}) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ? 3×10{sup 6}) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  12. Flipping the switch on magnetism in strontium titanate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flipping the switch on magnetism in strontium titanate Flipping the switch on magnetism in strontium titanate Researchers have found a way to magnetize this material using light,...

  13. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, Mark E.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ?32?MPa. Results are discussed in context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

  14. B{sub 4}C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Cekic, M.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Kendrick, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B{sub 4}C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by ``superthermal`` (not ``runaway``) electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod.

  15. B sub 4 C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Cekic, M.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Kendrick, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B{sub 4}C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by superthermal'' (not runaway'') electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod.

  16. Solar cycle modulation of Titan's ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edberg, N. J. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Shebanits, O.; Å gren, K.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Cravens, Thomas Edward; Girazian, Z.

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    During the six Cassini Titan flybys T83–T88 (May 2012 to November 2012) the electron density in the ionospheric peak region, as measured by the radio and plasma wave science instrument/Langmuir probe, has increased ...

  17. Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12; Titan Student Centers Fiscal Year 20142015 Budget California State University, Fullerton This budget has been approved by the ASI Board of Directors, the ASI% Budgeted # of Paying Students 7,500 37,250 34

  18. Investigation of modified strontium titanate photoanodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkisyan, A.G.; Arutyunyan, V.M.; Melikyan, V.V.; Putnyn', E.V.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies semiconducting phases on the basis of single-crystal and polycrystalline strontium titanate. An attempt is made to correlate the photoelectrochemical behavior of SrTiO/sub 3/ photoanodes with their electrophysical properties. It is shown that the photoelectrochemical properties of the photoanodes studied largely depend on the electrophysical parameters of the semiconducting strontium titanate. Ceramic electrodes doped with lanthanum display high photosensitivity.

  19. New ORNL Pellet Injection System and Installation/Initial Operations on MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, S.K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Baylor, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Fehling, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Fisher, P.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Foust, C.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Rasmussen, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Wilgen, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Chapman, B.E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Oliva, S.P. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Prager, S.C. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Sarff, J.S. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Wyman, M.D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Brower, D.L. [University of California-Los Angeles (United States); Ding, W.X. [University of California-Los Angeles (United States); Terry, S.D. [University of California-Los Angeles (United States); Deng, B.H. [University of California-Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact pellet injection system that was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) at University of Wisconsin and used in initial plasma fueling experiments. The system, referred to as a ''pellet injector in a suitcase,'' is a pipe gun device with a four-barrel capability (presently equipped with two 1.0-mm-bore barrels), and it uses a cryogenic refrigerator for in-situ hydrogen pellet formation (typically, D{sub 2} pellets). This new, portable, stand-alone pellet injection system was developed to provide a flexible means of plasma fueling on a wide variety of magnetic confinement devices, with relatively low costs for installation and operation. The injector has already been used to produce useful results with pellets on MST plasmas, including significant and rapid increases (almost 100%) in the line average density, and effectively depositing fuel in the plasma core (central densities of [approximately equal to] 1.4 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}). In this paper, the injection system, its performance, and reliability will be described, and results from some initial MST pellet experiments will be highlighted.

  20. Parallel contingency statistics with Titan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes existing statistical engines in VTK/Titan and presents the recently parallelized contingency statistics engine. It is a sequel to [PT08] and [BPRT09] which studied the parallel descriptive, correlative, multi-correlative, and principal component analysis engines. The ease of use of this new parallel engines is illustrated by the means of C++ code snippets. Furthermore, this report justifies the design of these engines with parallel scalability in mind; however, the very nature of contingency tables prevent this new engine from exhibiting optimal parallel speed-up as the aforementioned engines do. This report therefore discusses the design trade-offs we made and study performance with up to 200 processors.

  1. Dissolution on Titan and on Earth: Towards the age of Titan's karstic landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornet, Thomas; Bahers, Tangui Le; Bourgeois, Olivier; Fleurant, Cyril; Mouélic, Stéphane Le; Altobelli, Nicolas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan's polar surface is dotted with hundreds of lacustrine depressions. Based on the hypothesis that they are karstic in origin, we aim at determining the efficiency of surface dissolution as a landshaping process on Titan, in a comparative planetology perspective with the Earth as reference. Our approach is based on the calculation of solutional denudation rates and allow inference of formation timescales for topographic depressions developed by chemical erosion on both planetary bodies. The model depends on the solubility of solids in liquids, the density of solids and liquids, and the average annual net rainfall rates. We compute and compare the denudation rates of pure solid organics in liquid hydrocarbons and of minerals in liquid water over Titan and Earth timescales. We then investigate the denudation rates of a superficial organic layer in liquid methane over one Titan year. At this timescale, such a layer on Titan would behave like salts or carbonates on Earth depending on its composition, which mea...

  2. Morphology of fluvial networks on Titan: Evidence for structural control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burr, Devon M.

    Although Titan’s surface shows clear evidence of erosional modification, such as fluvial incision, evidence for tectonism has been less apparent. On Earth, fluvial networks with strongly preferred orientations are often ...

  3. RESULTS OF ANALYSES OF MACROBATCH 3 DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION (DSS) COALESCER AND PRE-FILTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    SRNL analyzed the pre-filter and Decontamination Salt Solution (DSS) coalescer from MCU by several analytical methods. The results of these analyses indicate that overall there is light to moderate solids fouling of both the coalescer and pre-filter elements. The majority of the solids contain aluminum, sodium, silicon, and titanium, in oxide and/or hydroxide forms that we have noted before. The titanium is presumably precipitated from leached, dissolved monosodium titanate (MST) or fines from MST at ARP, and the quantity we find is significantly greater than in the past. A parallel report discusses potential causes for the increased leaching rate of MST, showing that increases in free hydroxide concentration of the feed solutions and of chemical cleaning solutions lead to faster leaching of titanium.

  4. Formation and distribution of benzene on Titan V. Vuitton,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yelle, Roger V.

    Formation and distribution of benzene on Titan V. Vuitton,1 R. V. Yelle,1 and J. Cui1 Received 29 a study of the formation and distribution of benzene (C6H6) on Titan. Analysis of the Cassini Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements of benzene densities on 12 Titan passes shows that the benzene signal exhibits

  5. The mean molecular mass of Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    , Mars, Mars #12;Science Questions · Mean molecular mass (µ) -> Chemical composition · How did Titan form? · Current reservoirs of volatiles · Ethane/methane puddles/ocean · Thermal structure of atmosphere #12, delicate, etc ­ T/p sensors are simple, cheap, reliable · Is it possible to know µ based on simple

  6. Plasma research in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). Annual technical progress report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prager, S.C.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present physics results divided into the four categories (confinement optimization, transport measurements, fluctuations and fluctuation-induced transport, and fluctuation suppression). For simplicity, we highlight a subset of original MST results which are presented as 13 specific conclusions (not listed in order of importance), each followed by a brief elaboration. Within each of the four categories we also present other progress.

  7. MST 1: Proceedings of a conference on the integration of mathematics, science and technology in precollege education

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swyler, K. [ed.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Example MST activities examined here show: (1) an inquiry-driven learning stimulus, involving (2) the synthesis of concepts in math, science and technology, through (3) the application of the scientific method and engineering problem solving/test protocols, and provoking (4) a stimulus for further exploration. A semi-exploratory learning approach offered background aimed at enabling participants to take meaningful courses of investigation; this approach must be balanced by maintaining contact with framework content standards. On the whole, the philosophy underlying the MST learning approach--as envisioned in the draft NYS Framework, and embodied in the example activities--is strongly endorsed. This endorsement is broad-based: those represented include teachers of mathematics, science, and technology, and school district administrators--in roughly equal numbers. Discussion centers not on whether the MST approach should be pursued, but on what is involved in doing it. Teams of conference participants were given time to plan or extend MST initiatives in their own districts. Outlines of the initiatives proposed by ten of the teams are disseminated herein.

  8. A green synthesis of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate; lower temperature solid-state reaction and improved materials performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Makoto, E-mail: waseda.ogawa@gmail.com [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Department of Earth Sciences, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Morita, Masashi, E-mail: m-masashi@y.akane.waseda.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Igarashi, Shota, E-mail: uxei_yoshi_yoshi@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Sato, Soh, E-mail: rookie_so_sleepy@yahoo.co.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, with the size range from 0.1 to 30 µm was prepared to show the effects of the particle size on the materials performance. The potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction as reported previously, where the reaction temperature was varied. The reported temperature for the titanate preparation was higher than 800 °C, though 600 °C is good enough to obtain single-phase potassium lithium titanate. The lower temperature synthesis is cost effective and the product exhibit better performance as photocatalysts due to surface reactivity. - Graphical abstract: Finite particle of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, was prepared by solid-state reaction at lower temperature to show modified materials performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction. • Lower temperature reaction resulted in smaller sized particles of titanate. • 600 °C was good enough to obtain single phased potassium lithium titanate. • The product exhibited better performance as photocatalyst.

  9. Development of Improved Sorbents for Radiochemical Separations at the SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOBBS, DAVID

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove Cs-137, Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal. Separation processes planned at SRS include caustic side solvent extraction, for Cs-137 removal, and ion exchange/sorption of Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides with monosodium titanate (MST). The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes Pu-238, Pu-239 and Pu-240. This paper describes results from a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technology to produce sorbents that exhibit increased removal kinetics and capacity for Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides versus that of the baseline MST material. Testing indicated that MST samples prepared in the presence of organic-based templating reagents showed limited improvements in performance compared to the baseline MST. We observed significantly improved plutonium and neptunium removal performance with MST samples prepared upon the addition of a proprietary reagent. The modified MST offers the possibility of increased throughput and reduced solids handling in waste processing facilities at the SRS.

  10. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate CoatedCarb...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate CoatedCarbon Nanotube Matrices With Low Emission Thresholds. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate...

  11. Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sulata Kumari

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Lead Titanate2007. A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Solid Electrolytesand Y. Fei, “The Thermodynamics of Ordered Perovskites on

  12. Titan propels GE wind turbine research into new territory | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Titan propels GE wind turbine research into new territory January 17, 2014 The amount of global electricity supplied by wind, the world's fastest growing energy source, is expected...

  13. DETECTION OF PROPENE IN TITAN'S STRATOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M. [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Planetary Systems Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jennings, D. E. [Detector Systems Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Detector Systems Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bézard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France)] [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom)] [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Sung, K. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, CA 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, CA 91109 (United States); Ansty, T. M. [Department of Space Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Department of Space Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)] [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Gorius, N. [IACS, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)] [IACS, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Cottini, V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voyager 1 flyby of Titan in 1980 gave a first glimpse of the chemical complexity of Titan's atmosphere, detecting many new molecules with the infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS). These included propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) and propyne (CH{sub 3}C{sub 2}H), while the intermediate-sized C{sub 3}H {sub x} hydrocarbon (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) was curiously absent. Using spectra from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on Cassini, we show the first positive detection of propene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) in Titan's stratosphere (5? significance), finally filling the three-decade gap in the chemical sequence. We retrieve a vertical abundance profile from 100-250 km, that varies slowly with altitude from 2.0 ± 0.8 ppbv at 125 km, to 4.6 ± 1.5 ppbv at 200 km. The abundance of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} is less than both C{sub 3}H{sub 8} and CH{sub 3}C{sub 2}H, and we remark on an emerging paradigm in Titan's hydrocarbon abundances whereby alkanes > alkynes > alkenes within the C{sub 2}H {sub x} and C{sub 3}H {sub x} chemical families in the lower stratosphere. More generally, there appears to be much greater ubiquity and relative abundance of triple-bonded species than double-bonded, likely due to the greater resistance of triple bonds to photolysis and chemical attack.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rodriguez, Sebastien [Laboratoire AIM, Universite Paris 7/CNRS/CEA-Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp (France); Le Mouelic, Stephane [Laboratoire de Planetologie et Geodynamique, CNRS, UMR-6112, Universite de Nantes, 44000 Nantes (France); Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clark, Roger [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Nicholson, Phil [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Jaumann, Ralf [Institute of Planetary Exploration, Deutsche Zentrum, fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (Germany)

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  15. 34 McCormick / spring Lead mechanical engineer, Titan Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    and solar panels. Anyway, I learned about the job through a solar car listserv. I contacted him and becameCormick: What does Titan Aerospace do? Cornew: Titan Aerospace is a startup that designs and builds solar-powered unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones. Our long-term goal is to build solar-powered UAVs that could stay

  16. Scalable k-means statistics with Titan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, David C.; Bennett, Janine C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes existing statistical engines in VTK/Titan and presents both the serial and parallel k-means statistics engines. It is a sequel to [PT08], [BPRT09], and [PT09] which studied the parallel descriptive, correlative, multi-correlative, principal component analysis, and contingency engines. The ease of use of the new parallel k-means engine is illustrated by the means of C++ code snippets and algorithm verification is provided. This report justifies the design of the statistics engines with parallel scalability in mind, and provides scalability and speed-up analysis results for the k-means engine.

  17. Polar state in freestanding strontium titanate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, Trevor A., E-mail: tyson@njit.edu, E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov, E-mail: Stanislaus.wong@stonybrook.edu; Yu, Tian [Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); Croft, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Scofield, Megan E.; Bobb-Semple, Dara [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Tao, Jing [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S., E-mail: tyson@njit.edu, E-mail: sswong@bnl.gov, E-mail: Stanislaus.wong@stonybrook.edu [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodispersed strontium titanate nanoparticles were prepared and studied in detail. It is found that ?10?nm as-prepared stoichiometric nanoparticles are in a polar structural state (possibly with ferroelectric properties) over a broad temperature range. A tetragonal structure, with possible reduction of the electronic hybridization, is found as the particle size is reduced. In the 10?nm particles, no change in the local Ti-off centering is seen between 20 and 300?K. The results indicate that nanoscale motifs of SrTiO{sub 3} may be utilized in data storage as assembled nano-particle arrays in applications where chemical stability, temperature stability, and low toxicity are critical issues.

  18. Titan Energy Systems Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson EthanolTillson, New5661°, -86.0529604° ShowEnergyTitan

  19. Titan Omsk Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station Jump to:Tioga Energy Jump to:TippahTitan

  20. Morphologic and computational fluid dynamic analysis of sand dune-topographic obstacle interactions on Earth and Titan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Julia

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth and Titan have vastly different physical environments, but similar landscapes. Sand dunes, like those found in Earth’s deserts, cover large areas of Titan’s equatorial region and are important records of climate. Titan’s linear dunes...

  1. Density fluctuation measurements by far-forward collective scattering in the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Duff, J. R.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The multichannel polarimeter-interferometer system on the MST reversed-field pinch can be utilized to measure far-forward collective scattering from electron density fluctuations. The collective scattering system has 11 viewing chords with {approx}8 cm spacing. The source is a 432 {mu}m (694 GHz) far infrared laser and the scattered power is measured using a heterodyne detection scheme. Collective scattering provides a line-integrated measurement of fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering wavenumber range: k{sub Up-Tack} < 1.3 cm{sup -1}, corresponding k{sub Up-Tack }{rho}{sub s} < 1.3 ({rho}{sub s} is the ion-sound Larmor radius), the region of primary interest for turbulent fluctuation-induced transport. The perpendicular wavenumber consists of toroidal, poloidal, and radial contributions, which vary with chord position. Coherent modes associated with tearing instabilities and neutral-beam driven fast particles are observed along with broadband turbulence at frequencies up to 500 kHz. Changes in frequency are consistent with a Doppler shift due to parallel plasma flow.

  2. Identification And Characterization Of The Solids Found In Extraction Contactor SEP-401 In June 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) recently conducted an outage that included maintenance on the centrifugal contactors. Operations personnel observed solids or deposits in two contactors and attempted to collect samples for analyses by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The residues found in Extraction Contactor SEP-401 are a mixture of amorphous silica, aluminosilicate, titanium, and debris from low alloy steel. The solids contain low concentrations of plutonium and strontium. These isotopes are associated with the titanium that came from the monosodium titanate (MST) added in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) most likely as leached Ti from the MST that precipitated subsequently in MCU. An attempt was also made to obtain samples from the contents of Wash Contactor SEP-702. However, sampling provide ineffective.

  3. DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

    2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

  4. Determination of the Impact of Glycolate on ARP and MCU Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.; Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.; Shehee, T. C.; Washington, A. L.

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating an alternate flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) using glycolic acid as a reductant. An important aspect of the development of the glycolic acid flowsheet is determining if glycolate has any detrimental downstream impacts. Testing was performed to determine if there is any impact to the strontium and actinide sorption by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) or if there is an impact to the cesium removal, phase separation, or coalescer performance at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU). Sorption testing was performed using both MST and modified MST (mMST) in the presence of 5000 and 10,000 ppm (mass basis) glycolate. 10,000 ppm is the estimated bounding concentration expected in the DWPF recycle stream based on DWPF melter flammable gas model results. The presence of glycolate was found to slow the removal of Sr and Pu by MST, while increasing the removal rate of Np. Results indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. There was no measurable effect on U removal at either glycolate concentration. The slower removal rates for Sr and Pu at 5000 and 10,000 ppm glycolate could result in lower DF values for these sorbates in ARP based on the current (12 hours) and proposed (8 hours) contact times. For the highest glycolate concentration used in this study, the percentage of Sr removed at 6 hours of contact decreased by 1% and the percentage of Pu removed decreased by nearly 7%. The impact may prove insignificant if the concentration of glycolate that is returned to the tank farm is well below the concentrations tested in this study. The presence of glycolate also decreased the removal rates for all three sorbates (Sr, Pu, and Np) by mMST. Similar to MST, the results for mMST indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. The presence of glycolate did not change the lack of affinity of mMST for U. Pre-contacting the MST or mMST with glycolate did not have a significant effect on the performance of the materials when compared to tests having the same concentration of glycolate present in the simulant. These findings suggest that the glycolate is likely influencing removal by sorbate complexation and not by depositing onto or forming a film on the surface of the MST solids. Since the DF values are salt batch dependent, it is not possible to a priori quantify the impacts of glycolate on future processing campaigns. However, we recommend that the impacts of glycolate be evaluated during each salt batch qualification when a final processing concentration is defined, and recommendations can then be made on how to mitigate negative impacts, if needed. Impacts to the performance of the MST or mMST could be mitigated by increasing contact time or increasing sorbent concentrations. Testing was performed to determine if there is an impact to the cesium removal at Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU). An Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) test routine was used to simulate cesium removal at the MCU. For this, SRNL performed three ESS tests, using the same basic aqueous waste simulant and solvent. For one test, SRNL added 5000 ppm (mass basis) of glycolate and added 10,000 ppm of glycolate to a second test. A control test contained no glycolate. The results of all three tests were virtually identical for all the extraction, scrub and strip tests.

  5. Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electrons in the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Cudzinovic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Dexter, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fonck, R.; Henry, J.; Holly, D.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Sprott, C.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electron populations have been studied in the MST reversed-field pinch. The ion heating is much stronger than that given by classical electron-ion friction, and is particularly strong during dynamo bursts. The heating displays a marked density dependence: in a 350-kA discharge with a maximum {bar n} = 0.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus} 3}, T{sub i} rises sharply as {bar n} drops below 0.4 {times} 10{sub 13} cm{sup {minus}3} late in the discharge. Superthermal electrons are produced in the core, with temperatures of T{sub eh}, = 350--700 eV while the bulk core temperature is T{sub e}o = 130--230 eV. The fraction of superthermal electrons decreases with increasing density, from 40% at {bar n} = 0.5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} to 8% at {bar n} = 1.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} at I = 350 kA. However, data with similar plasma parameters but higher oxygen impurity content had a lower T{sub eh} and higher hot fraction. The edge superthermal electron distribution is well fit by a drifted bi-Maxwellian distribution with T{sub {parallel}} {approximately} T{sub e0} and relative drift speed v{sub d}/v{sub th} = 0.4. With the assumption that the parallel heat flux measured with a pyroelectric probe is carried by superthermal electrons, the measured electron current is consistent with T{sub {perpendicular}} {approximately} T{sub ea} {approximately} T{sub e0}/3 and accounts for over half of the total edge parallel current measured with magnetic probes.

  6. Improved-confinement plasmas at high temperature and high beta in the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, B. E. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ahn, J. W. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Almagri, A. F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Anderson, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Foust, Charles R [ORNL; Kaufman, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have increased substantially the electron and ion temperatures, the electron density, and the total beta in plasmas with improved energy confinement in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). The improved confinement is achieved with a well-established current profile control technique for reduction of magnetic tearing and reconnection. A sustained ion temperature > 1 keV is achieved with intensified reconnection-based ion heating followed immediately by current profile control. In the same plasmas, the electron temperature reaches 2 keV, and the electron thermal diffusivity drops to about 2 m(2) s(-1). The global energy confinement time is 12 ms. This and the reported temperatures are the largest values yet achieved in the reversed-field pinch (RFP). These results were attained at a density similar to 10(19) m(-3). By combining pellet injection with current profile control, the density has been quadrupled, and total beta has nearly doubled to a record value of about 26%. The Mercier criterion is exceeded in the plasma core, and both pressure-driven interchange and pressure-driven tearing modes are calculated to be linearly unstable, yet energy confinement is still improved. Transient momentum injection with biased probes reveals that global momentum transport is reduced with current profile control. Magnetic reconnection events drive rapid momentum transport related to large Maxwell and Reynolds stresses. Ion heating during reconnection events occurs globally, locally, or not at all, depending on which tearing modes are involved in the reconnection. To potentially augment inductive current profile control, we are conducting initial tests of current drive with lower-hybrid and electron-Bernstein waves.

  7. Performance of Kepler GTX Titan GPUs and Xeon Phi System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwancheol Jeong; Weonjong Lee; Jeonghwan Pak; Kwang-jong Choi; Sang-Hyun Park; Jun-sik Yoo; Joo Hwan Kim; Joungjin Lee; Young Woo Lee

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    NVIDIA's new architecture, Kepler improves GPU's performance significantly with the new streaming multiprocessor SMX. Along with the performance, NVIDIA has also introduced many new technologies such as direct parallelism, hyper-Q and GPU Direct with RDMA. Apart from other usual GPUs, NVIDIA also released another Kepler 'GeForce' GPU named GTX Titan. GeForce GTX Titan is not only good for gaming but also good for high performance computing with CUDA. Nevertheless, it is remarkably cheaper than Kepler Tesla GPUs. We investigate the performance of GTX Titan and find out how to optimize a CUDA code appropriately for it. Meanwhile, Intel has launched its new many integrated core (MIC) system, Xeon Phi. A Xeon Phi coprocessor could provide similar performance with NVIDIA Kepler GPUs theoretically but, in reality, it turns out that its performance is significantly inferior to GTX Titan.

  8. Performance of Kepler GTX Titan GPUs and Xeon Phi System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Hwancheol; Pak, Jeonghwan; Choi, Kwang-jong; Park, Sang-Hyun; Yoo, Jun-sik; Kim, Joo Hwan; Lee, Joungjin; Lee, Young Woo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NVIDIA's new architecture, Kepler improves GPU's performance significantly with the new streaming multiprocessor SMX. Along with the performance, NVIDIA has also introduced many new technologies such as direct parallelism, hyper-Q and GPU Direct with RDMA. Apart from other usual GPUs, NVIDIA also released another Kepler 'GeForce' GPU named GTX Titan. GeForce GTX Titan is not only good for gaming but also good for high performance computing with CUDA. Nevertheless, it is remarkably cheaper than Kepler Tesla GPUs. We investigate the performance of GTX Titan and find out how to optimize a CUDA code appropriately for it. Meanwhile, Intel has launched its new many integrated core (MIC) system, Xeon Phi. A Xeon Phi coprocessor could provide similar performance with NVIDIA Kepler GPUs theoretically but, in reality, it turns out that its performance is significantly inferior to GTX Titan.

  9. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  10. Titan Simulates Earthquake Physics Necessary for Safer Building...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations took 24 hours to run on Jaguar, but the higher frequency, higher resolution simulations took only five and a half hours on Titan. And considering the "big one" could...

  11. Direct printing of lead zirconate titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bathurst, Stephen, 1980-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thus far, use of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) in MEMS has been limited due to the lack of process compatibility with existing MEMS manufacturing techniques. Direct printing of thin films eliminates the need for photolithographic ...

  12. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattering of the Al film. Citation: Alvine KJ, V Shutthanandan, BW Arey, CM Wang, WD Bennett, and SG Pitman.2012."Pb nanowire formation on Allead zirconate titanate surfaces in...

  13. Estimating erosional exhumation on Titan from drainage network morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perron, Taylor

    , to estimate cumulative erosion into an initially rough surface. We calibrate this method with a numerical the Cassini spacecraft. While Titan does not host a global surface ocean, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR

  14. Tuesday, March 24, 2009 POSTER SESSION I: TANTALIZING TITAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Reflectance from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer [#1863] Using a ground calibration. Paillou P. Radar-Bright Channels on Titan [#1533] The Cassini SAR observed channels in the Xanadu region

  15. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m{sup 2} and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings.

  16. Estimates of fluvial erosion on Titan from sinuosity of lake shorelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tewelde, Yodit

    Titan has few impact craters, suggesting that its surface is geologically young. Titan's surface also has abundant landforms interpreted to be fluvial networks. Here we evaluate whether fluvial erosion has caused significant ...

  17. Nuclear criticality safety bounding analysis for the in-tank-precipitation (ITP) process, impacted by fissile isotopic weight fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bess, C.E.

    1994-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The In-Tank Precipitation process (ITP) receives High Level Waste (HLW) supernatant liquid containing radionuclides in waste processing tank 48H. Sodium tetraphenylborate, NaTPB, and monosodium titanate (MST), NaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}H, are added for removal of radioactive Cs and Sr, respectively. In addition to removal of radio-strontium, MST will also remove plutonium and uranium. The majority of the feed solutions to ITP will come from the dissolution of supernate that had been concentrated by evaporation to a crystallized salt form, commonly referred to as saltcake. The concern for criticality safety arises from the adsorption of U and Pt onto MST. If sufficient mass and optimum conditions are achieved then criticality is credible. The concentration of u and Pt from solution into the smaller volume of precipitate represents a concern for criticality. This report supplements WSRC-TR-93-171, Nuclear Criticality Safety Bounding Analysis For The In-Tank-Precipitation (ITP) Process. Criticality safety in ITP can be analyzed by two bounding conditions: (1) the minimum safe ratio of MST to fissionable material and (2) the maximum fissionable material adsorption capacity of the MST. Calculations have provided the first bounding condition and experimental analysis has established the second. This report combines these conditions with canyon facility data to evaluate the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to the adsorption of the fissionable material from solution. In addition, this report analyzes the potential impact of increased U loading onto MST. Results of this analysis demonstrate a greater safety margin for ITP operations than the previous analysis. This report further demonstrates that the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to adsorption of fissionable material by MST is not credible.

  18. HCN ice in Titan's high-altitude southern polar cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Kok, Remco J; Maltagliati, Luca; Irwin, Patrick G J; Vinatier, Sandrine

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan's middle atmosphere is currently experiencing a rapid change of season after northern spring arrived in 2009. A large cloud was observed for the first time above Titan's southern pole in May 2012, at an altitude of 300 km. This altitude previously showed a temperature maximum and condensation was not expected for any of Titan's atmospheric gases. Here we show that this cloud is composed of micron-sized hydrogen cyanide (HCN) ice particles. The presence of HCN particles at this altitude, together with new temperature determinations from mid-infrared observations, indicate a very dramatic cooling of Titan's atmosphere inside the winter polar vortex in early 2012. Such a cooling is completely contrary to previously measured high-altitude warming in the polar vortex, and temperatures are a hundred degrees colder than predicted by circulation models. Besides elucidating the nature of Titan's mysterious polar cloud, these results thus show that post-equinox cooling at the winter pole is much more efficient th...

  19. Titan's Prolific Propane: The Cassini CIRS Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, C A; Flaud, J -M; Bezard, B; Teanby, N A; Irwin, P G J; Ansty, T M; Coustenis, A; Vinatier, S; Flasar, F M; 10.1016/j.pss.2009.06.021

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we select large spectral averages of data from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) obtained in limb-viewing mode at low latitudes (30S--30N), greatly increasing the path length and hence signal-to-noise ratio for optically thin trace species such as propane. By modeling and subtracting the emissions of other gas species, we demonstrate that at least six infrared bands of propane are detected by CIRS, including two not previously identified in Titan spectra. Using a new line list for the range 1300-1400cm -1, along with an existing GEISA list, we retrieve propane abundances from two bands at 748 and 1376 cm-1. At 748 cm-1 we retrieve 4.2 +/- 0.5 x 10(-7) (1-sigma error) at 2 mbar, in good agreement with previous studies, although lack of hotbands in the present spectral atlas remains a problem. We also determine 5.7 +/- 0.8 x 10(-7) at 2 mbar from the 1376 cm-1 band - a value that is probably affected by systematic errors including continuum gradients due to haze and also an imperf...

  20. On the photoluminescence of semiconducting titanates applied in photoelectrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHaart, L.G.J.; Blasse, G.; DeVries, A.J.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the photoluminescence of the semiconducting titanates TiO/sub 2/ (rutile), SrTiO/sub 3/, MgTiO/sub 3/, K /SUB 1.8/ Mg /SUB 0.9/ Ti /SUB 7.1/ O/sub 16/, and La/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/, which are known to act as photoanodes in a photoelectrochemical cell. For all materials, except TiO/sub 2/ (rutile), self-trapped exciton emission from a titanate group is observed at LHeT. The importance of the self-trapped excited state is discussed and related to the photoelectrochemical behavior of these semiconducting titanates.

  1. Methane storms as a driver of Titan's dune orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charnay, Benjamin; Rafkin, Scot; Narteau, Clément; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Pont, Sylvain Courrech du; Lucas, Antoine

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan's equatorial regions are covered by eastward propagating linear dunes. This direction is opposite to mean surface winds simulated by Global Climate Models (GCMs), which are oriented westward at these latitudes, similar to trade winds on Earth. Different hypotheses have been proposed to address this apparent contradiction, involving Saturn's gravitational tides, large scale topography or wind statistics, but none of them can explain a global eastward dune propagation in the equatorial band. Here we analyse the impact of equinoctial tropical methane storms developing in the superrotating atmosphere (i.e. the eastward winds at high altitude) on Titan's dune orientation. Using mesoscale simulations of convective methane clouds with a GCM wind profile featuring superrotation, we show that Titan's storms should produce fast eastward gust fronts above the surface. Such gusts dominate the aeolian transport, allowing dunes to extend eastward. This analysis therefore suggests a coupling between superrotation, tro...

  2. Network algorithms for information analysis using the Titan Toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLendon, William Clarence, III; Baumes, Jeffrey (Kitware Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Wilson, Andrew T.; Wylie, Brian Neil; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of networked activities is dramatically more challenging than many traditional kinds of analysis. A network is defined by a set of entities (people, organizations, banks, computers, etc.) linked by various types of relationships. These entities and relationships are often uninteresting alone, and only become significant in aggregate. The analysis and visualization of these networks is one of the driving factors behind the creation of the Titan Toolkit. Given the broad set of problem domains and the wide ranging databases in use by the information analysis community, the Titan Toolkit's flexible, component based pipeline provides an excellent platform for constructing specific combinations of network algorithms and visualizations.

  3. Methods for producing monodispersed particles of barium titanate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a low-temperature controlled method for producing high-quality, ultrafine monodispersed nanocrystalline microsphere powders of barium titanate and other pure or composite oxide materials having particles ranging from nanosized to micronsized particles. The method of the subject invention comprises a two-stage process. The first stage produces high quality monodispersed hydrous titania microsphere particles prepared by homogeneous precipitation via dielectric tuning in alcohol-water mixed solutions of inorganic salts. Titanium tetrachloride is used as an inorganic salt precursor material. The second stage converts the pure hydrous titania microsphere particles into crystalline barium titanate microsphere powders via low-temperature, hydrothermal reactions.

  4. Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: TITAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    . Griffith C. Hirtzig M. Barnes J. W. Buratti B. J. Brown R. H. Nicholson P. D. Baines K. H. VIMS Team models. Campbell D. B. Black G. J. Carter L. M. Nolan M. C. Titan: 13 cm Arecibo Radar Observations. M. Brown R. H. Barnes J. W. Baines K. Clark R. Jaumann R. Nicholson P. Sotin C. Exploring Methods

  5. Ion transport in Titan's upper atmosphere M. Galand,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yelle, Roger V.

    ] The Voyager 1 radio occultation experiment revealed the presence of a substantial ionosphere on Titan [Bird et et al., 2008]. PreCassini investigations con- sidered both photoionization by solar radiation considerations alone. [3] Cassini data has shown quite definitively that solar radiation is the dominant

  6. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  7. Decontamination of 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide using titanate nanoscrolls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    Decontamination of 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide using titanate nanoscrolls Alfred Kleinhammes a of TiO2 nanocrystals, are tested as reactive sorbent for chemical warfare agent (CWA) decontamination as a decontaminant for CWAs. Ó 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Hydrolysis reactions have shown promising

  8. Barium Titanate and Bismuth Oxide Nanocomposites Barium titanate, BaTiO3, and bismuth oxide Bi2O3 are transparent materials with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    Barium Titanate and Bismuth Oxide Nanocomposites Barium titanate, BaTiO3, and bismuth oxide Bi2O3 that are lead-free. If we cannot shield effectively at nanofiller levels where transparency is maintained, we, Condensed Matter, Vol. 15, 8927 (2003). 21. "Highly Nonlinear Bismuth-Oxide Fiber for Smooth Supercontinuun

  9. How to Turn a Jaguar into a Titan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Three years later though, the petascale is long in the rearview mirror as high-performance computing advances to the next big milestone, the exascale. Looking under Titan's...

  10. Chinese supercomputer stays No. 1, Titan at ORNL still No. 2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chinese supercomputer stays No. 1, Titan at ORNL still No. 2 November 18, 2014 For the fourth consecutive time, Tianhe-2, a supercomputer developed by China's National University...

  11. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosko, Robert J.; Loughin, Stephen [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space P.O. Box 8555 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed.

  12. Equilibrium composition between liquid and clathrate reservoirs on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I; Sotin, Christophe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundreds of lakes and a few seas of liquid hydrocarbons have been observed by the Cassini spacecraft to cover the polar regions of Titan. A significant fraction of these lakes or seas could possibly be interconnected with subsurface liquid reservoirs of alkanes. In this paper, we investigate the interplay that would happen between a reservoir of liquid hydrocarbons located in Titan's subsurface and a hypothetical clathrate reservoir that progressively forms if the liquid mixture diffuses throughout a preexisting porous icy layer. To do so, we use a statistical-thermodynamic model in order to compute the composition of the clathrate reservoir that forms as a result of the progressive entrapping of the liquid mixture. This study shows that clathrate formation strongly fractionates the molecules between the liquid and the solid phases. Depending on whether the structure I or structure II clathrate forms, the present model predicts that the liquid reservoirs would be mainly composed of either propane or ethane, r...

  13. SEASONAL DISAPPEARANCE OF FAR-INFRARED HAZE IN TITAN'S STRATOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Cottini, V. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Samuelson, R. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Kunde, V. G.; Achterberg, R. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); De Kok, R. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Calcutt, S. B., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A far-infrared emission band attributed to volatile or refractory haze in Titan's stratosphere has been decreasing in intensity since Cassini's arrival in 2004. The 220 cm{sup -1} feature, first seen by the Voyager Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer, has only been found in Titan's winter polar region. The emission peaks at about 140 km altitude near the winter stratospheric temperature minimum. Observations recorded over the period 2004-2012 by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on Cassini show a decrease in the intensity of this feature by about a factor of four. Possible seasonal causes of this decline are an increase in photolytic destruction of source chemicals at high altitude, a lessening of condensation as solar heating increased, or a weakening of downwelling of vapors. As of early 2012, the 220 cm{sup -1} haze has not yet been detected in the south. The haze composition is unknown, but its decrease is similar to that of HC{sub 3}N gas in Titan's polar stratosphere, pointing to a nitrile origin.

  14. Midterm Summary of Japan-US Fusion Cooperation Program TITAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sze, Dai-Kai [University of California, San Diego; Sokolov, Mikhail [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan-US cooperation program TITAN (Tritium, Irradiation and Thermofluid for America and Nippon) started in April 2007 as 6-year project. This is the summary report at the midterm of the project. Historical overview of the Japan-US cooperation programs and direction of the TITAN project in its second half are presented in addition to the technical highlights. Blankets are component systems whose principal functions are extraction of heat and tritium. Thus it is crucial to clarify the potentiality for controlling heat and tritium flow throughout the first wall, blanket and out-of-vessel recovery systems. The TITAN project continues the JUPITER-II activity but extends its scope including the first wall and the recovery systems with the title of 'Tritium and thermofluid control for magnetic and inertial confinement systems'. The objective of the program is to clarify the mechanisms of tritium and heat transfer throughout the first-wall, the blanket and the heat/tritium recovery systems under specific conditions to fusion such as irradiation, high heat flux, circulation and high magnetic fields. Based on integrated models, the breeding, transfer, inventory of tritium and heat extraction properties will be evaluated for some representative liquid breeder blankets and the necessary database will be obtained for focused research in the future.

  15. Sequestration of ethane in the cryovolcanic subsurface of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Bernard Schmitt

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, has a thick atmosphere dominated by nitrogen and methane. The dense orange-brown smog hiding the satellite's surface is produced by photochemical reactions of methane, nitrogen and their dissociation products with solar ultraviolet, which lead primarily to the formation of ethane and heavier hydrocarbons. In the years prior to the exploration of Titan's surface by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, the production and condensation of ethane was expected to have formed a satellite-wide ocean one kilometer in depth, assuming that it was generated over the Solar system's lifetime. However, Cassini-Huygens observations failed to find any evidence of such an ocean. Here we describe the main cause of the ethane deficiency on Titan: cryovolcanic lavas regularly cover its surface, leading to the percolation of the liquid hydrocarbons through this porous material and its accumulation in subsurface layers built up during successive methane outgassing events. The liquid stored in the pores may, combined with the ice layers, form a stable ethane-rich clathrate reservoir, potentially isolated from the surface. Even with a low open porosity of 10% for the subsurface layers, a cryovolcanic icy crust less than 2300 m thick is required to bury all the liquid hydrocarbons generated over the Solar system's lifetime.

  16. Planning for post-Cassini/HuygensPlanning for post-Cassini/Huygens Exploration of Titan:Exploration of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauchamp, Jack

    , with an admixture (2-10%) of methane · Temperatures are very low (95 K surface, 70 K @ 50 km), so that methane the Sun; makes C2 and higher hydrocarbons Pressure, bars #12;July 1, 2004 "T0" A spectrum of Titan distribution of the compounds in regularly spaced clusters 1 2 1 C11H18N3 192.1501 u 2 C9H14N5 192.1249 u

  17. Near-infrared spectral mapping of Titan's mountains and channels Jason W. Barnes,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    Near-infrared spectral mapping of Titan's mountains and channels Jason W. Barnes,1,2 Jani Radebaugh ranges on Titan using data from Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) obtained during bright spectral units based on our findings. Citation: Barnes, J. W., et al. (2007), Near-infrared

  18. Plasma environment in the wake of Titan from hybrid simulation: A case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Plasma environment in the wake of Titan from hybrid simulation: A case study R. Modolo,1 G. M] On 26 December 2005, the Cassini spacecraft flew through Titan's plasma wake and revealed a complex position of the wake. Two distinct plasma regions are identified with a significant difference

  19. Mechanisms for the formation of benzene in the atmosphere of Titan E. H. Wilson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    Mechanisms for the formation of benzene in the atmosphere of Titan E. H. Wilson1 and S. K. Atreya (PAHs) are important interstellar species, and their precursor benzene (C6H6) has been detected in our solar system. In this study the possibility of benzene formation in the atmosphere of Titan

  20. PROCESSING ALTERNATIVES FOR DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Two processes were chosen in the 1980's at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to decontaminate the soluble High Level Waste (HLW). The In Tank Precipitation (ITP) process (1,2) was developed at SRS for the removal of radioactive cesium and actinides from the soluble HLW. Sodium tetraphenylborate was added to the waste to precipitate cesium and monosodium titanate (MST) was added to adsorb actinides, primarily uranium and plutonium. Two products of this process were a low activity waste stream and a concentrated organic stream containing cesium tetraphenylborate and actinides adsorbed on monosodium titanate (MST). A copper catalyzed acid hydrolysis process was built to process (3, 4) the Tank 48H cesium tetraphenylborate waste in the SRS's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Operation of the DWPF would have resulted in the production of benzene for incineration in SRS's Consolidated Incineration Facility. This process was abandoned together with the ITP process in 1998 due to high benzene in ITP caused by decomposition of excess sodium tetraphenylborate. Processing in ITP resulted in the production of approximately 1.0 million liters of HLW. SRS has chosen a solvent extraction process combined with adsorption of the actinides to decontaminate the soluble HLW stream (5). However, the waste in Tank 48H is incompatible with existing waste processing facilities. As a result, a processing facility is needed to disposition the HLW in Tank 48H. This paper will describe the process for searching for processing options by SRS task teams for the disposition of the waste in Tank 48H. In addition, attempts to develop a caustic hydrolysis process for in tank destruction of tetraphenylborate will be presented. Lastly, the development of both a caustic and acidic copper catalyzed peroxide oxidation process will be discussed.

  1. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Sun, F. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S. [Structured Materials Industries, Inc., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Kalkur, T. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States); Alpay, S. P., E-mail: p.alpay@ims.uconn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  2. Sensitivity Increases for the TITAN Decay Spectroscopy Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Leach; A. Lennarz; A. Grossheim; C. Andreoiu; J. Dilling; D. Frekers; M. Good; S. Seeraji

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The TITAN facility at TRIUMF has recently initiated a program of performing decay spectroscopy measurements in an electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT). The unique environment of the EBIT provides backing-free storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles from the trap centre via the strong magnetic field. This measurement technique is able to provide a significant increase in detection sensitivity for photons which result from radioactive decay. A brief overview of this device is presented, along with methods of improving the signal-to-background ratio for photon detection by reducing Compton scattered events, and eliminating vibrational noise.

  3. China Titans Energy Technology Group Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower International New Energy Holding LtdTitans Energy

  4. Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

  5. Photolytically generated aerosols in the mesosphere and thermosphere of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao-Chang Liang; Yuk L. Yung; Donald E. Shemansky

    2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) stellar and solar occultations at Titan to date include 12 species: N$_{2}$ (nitrogen), CH$_{4}$ (methane), C$_{2}$H$_{2}$ (acetylene), C$_{2}$H$_{4}$ (ethylene), C$_{2}$H$_{6}$ (ethane), C$_{4}$H$_{2}$ (diacetylene), C$_{6}$H$_{6}$ (benzene), C$_{6}$N$_{2}$ (dicyanodiacetylene), C$_{2}$N$_{2}$ (cyanogen), HCN (hydrogen cyanide), HC$_{3}$N (cyanoacetylene), and aerosols distinguished by a structureless continuum extinction (absorption plus scattering) of photons in the EUV. The introduction of aerosol particles, retaining the same refractive index properties as tholin with radius $\\sim$125 \\AA and using Mie theory, provides a satisfactory fit to the spectra. The derived vertical profile of aerosol density shows distinct structure, implying a reactive generation process reaching altitudes more than 1000 km above the surface. A photochemical model presented here provides a reference basis for examining the chemical and physical processes leading to the distinctive atmospheric opacity at Titan. We find that dicyanodiacetylene is condensable at $\\sim$650 km, where the atmospheric temperature minimum is located. This species is the simplest molecule identified to be condensable. Observations are needed to confirm the existence and production rates of dicyanodiacetylene.

  6. Evidence of Titan's Climate History from Evaporite Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Shannon M; Sotin, Christophe; Soderblom, Jason M; Mouélic, Stéphane Le; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H; Buratti, Bonnie J; Clark, Roger N; Nicholson, Phillip D; McCord, Thomas B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-ice-poor, 5-$\\mu$m-bright material on Saturn's moon Titan has previously been geomorphologically identified as evaporitic. Here we present a global distribution of the occurrences of the 5-$\\mu$m-bright spectral unit, identified with Cassini's Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and examined with RADAR when possible. We explore the possibility that each of these occurrences are evaporite deposits. The 5-$\\mu$m-bright material covers 1\\% of Titan's surface and is not limited to the poles (the only regions with extensive, long-lived surface liquid). We find the greatest areal concentration to be in the equatorial basins Tui Regio and Hotei Regio. Our interpretations, based on the correlation between 5-$\\mu$m-bright material and lakebeds, imply that there was enough liquid present at some time to create the observed 5-$\\mu$m-bright material. We address the climate implications surrounding a lack of evaporitic material at the south polar basins: if the south pole basins were filled at some point in ...

  7. MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are hereNews item$alt

  8. Constraining the average fill densities of Mars' lowlands and fluvial erosion of Titan's polar regions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tewelde, Yodit

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Other than Earth, Mars and Titan are the only bodies in our Solar System where we have observed widespread fluvial activity. In this thesis I present two approaches for constraining the extent of multiple resurfacing ...

  9. A TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF TITAN'S NORTH POLAR ATMOSPHERE FROM A SPECULAR REFLECTION OF THE SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Jason W.

    Cassini/VIMS T85 observations of a solar specular reflection off of Kivu Lacus (87[° over .]4N 241[° over .]1E) provide an empirical transmission spectrum of Titan's atmosphere. Because this observation was acquired from ...

  10. Evaluation of a heated-air airship for the environment of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Richard, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future exploration of Saturn's moon Titan can be carried out by airships, which have the capability to study the atmosphere as well as the capability to land and study the surface at multiple locations. Several lighter-than-air ...

  11. Barium Titanate Nanoparticles as Exogenous Contrast Agents in Second Harmonic Optical Coherence Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Jeremy T

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose and demonstrate a method by which barium titanate nanoparticle clusters can be used as exogenous contrast agents in Second Harmonic Optical Coherence Tomography imaging systems to localize and highlight desired regions of tissue. SH...

  12. Damage evolution in Au-implanted Ho2Ti2O7 titanate pyrochlore...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhang Y, J Jagielski, IT Bae, X Xiang, L Thome, G Balakrishnan, DM Paul, and WJ Weber.2010."Damage evolution in Au-implanted Ho2Ti2O7 titanate pyrochlore."Nuclear...

  13. Pyroelectric properties of barium strontium titanate films: Effect of thermal M. W. Cole,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Pyroelectric properties of barium strontium titanate films: Effect of thermal stresses J. Zhang,1 M.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

  14. On the chemical composition of Titan's dry lakebed evaporites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordier, Daniel; Ferreira, Abel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan, the main satellite of Saturn, has an active cycle of methane in its troposphere. Among other evidence for a mechanism of evaporation at work on the ground, dry lakebeds have been discovered. Recent Cassini infrared observations of these empty lakes have revealed a surface composition poor in water ice compared to that of the surrounding terrains --- suggesting the existence of organic evaporites deposits. The chemical composition of these possible evaporites is unknown. In this paper, we study evaporite composition using a model that treats both organic solids dissolution and solvent evaporation. Our results suggest the possibility of large abundances of butane and acetylene in the lake evaporites. However, due to uncertainties of the employed theory, these determinations have to be confirmed by laboratory experiments.

  15. High-frequency fluctuation measurements by far-infrared laser Faraday-effect polarimetry-interferometry and forward scattering system on MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, W. X., E-mail: wding@ucla.edu; Lin, L.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Duff, J. R. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced transport driven by global tearing modes has been measured by Faraday-effect polarimetry and interferometry (phase measurements) in the MST reversed field pinch. However, the role of small-scale broadband magnetic and density turbulence in transport remains unknown. In order to investigate broadband magnetic turbulence, we plan to upgrade the existing detector system by using planar-diode fundamental waveguide mixers optimized for high sensitivity. Initial tests indicate these mixers have ×10 sensitivity improvement compared to currently employed corner-cube Schottky-diode mixers and ×5 lower noise. Compact mixer design will allow us to resolve the wavenumbers up to k ? 1–2 cm{sup ?1} for beam width w = 1.5 cm and 15 cm{sup ?1} for beam width w = 2 mm. The system can also be used to measure the scattered signal (amplitude measurement) induced by both plasma density and magnetic fluctuations.

  16. R.M.S. Titanic Maritime Memorial Act of 1986 To encourage international efforts to designate the shipwreck of the R.M.S. Titanic as an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the shipwreck of the R.M.S. Titanic as an international maritime memorial and to provide for reasonable research as an international maritime memorial to the men,' women, and children who perished aboard her; (2) The recent. The Congress declares that the purposes of this Act are: (1) To encourage international efforts to designate

  17. DETERMINATION OF THE IMPACT OF GLYCOLATE ON ARP AND MCU OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Peters, T.; Shehee, T.

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating an alternate flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) using glycolic acid as a reductant. An important aspect of the development of the glycolic acid flowsheet is determining if glycolate has any detrimental downstream impacts. Testing was performed to determine if there is any impact to the strontium and actinide sorption by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) or if there is an impact to the cesium removal at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU). Sorption testing was performed using both MST and modified MST (mMST) in the presence of 5,000 and 10,000 ppm (mass basis) glycolate. 10,000 ppm is the estimated bounding concentration expected in the DWPF recycle stream based on DWPF melter flammable gas model results. The presence of glycolate was found to slow the removal of Sr and Pu by MST, while increasing the removal rate of Np. Results indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. There was no measurable effect on U removal at either glycolate concentration. The slower removal rates for Sr and Pu at 5,000 and 10,000 ppm glycolate could result in lower DF values for these sorbates in ARP based on the current (12 hours) and proposed (8 hours) contact times. For the highest glycolate concentration used in this study, the percentage of Sr removed at 6 hours of contact decreased by 1% and the percentage of Pu removed decreased by nearly 7%. The impact may prove insignificant if the concentration of glycolate that is returned to the tank farm is well below the concentrations tested in this study. The presence of glycolate also decreased the removal rates for all three sorbates (Sr, Pu, and Np) by mMST. Similarly to MST, the results for mMST indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. The presence of glycolate did not change the lack of affinity of mMST for U. Pre-contacting the MST or mMST with glycolate did not have a significant effect on the performance of the materials when compared to tests having the same concentration of glycolate present in the simulant. These findings suggest that the glycolate is likely influencing removal by sorbate complexation and not by depositing onto or forming a film on the surface of the MST solids. Since the DF values are salt batch dependent, it is not possible to a priori quantify the impacts of glycolate on future processing campaigns. However, we recommend that the impacts of glycolate be evaluated during each salt batch qualification when a final processing concentration is defined, and recommendations can then be made on how to mitigate negative impacts, if needed. Impacts to the performance of the MST or mMST could be mitigated by increasing contact time or increasing sorbent concentrations. In addition to the MST and mMST testing, testing was performed to determine if there is an impact to the cesium removal at Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU). An Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) test routine was used to simulate cesium removal at the MCU. For this, SRNL performed three ESS tests, using the same basic aqueous waste simulant and solvent. For one test, SRNL added 5,000 ppm (mass basis) of glycolate and added 10,000 ppm of glycolate to a second test. A control test contained no glycolate. The results of all three tests were virtually identical for all the extraction, scrub and strip tests. (A single data point in the 5,000 ppm test is physically impossible and SRNL is currently resolving this obvious error.) At this time, SRNL concludes that the presence of up to 10,000 ppm of glycolate does not affect cesium removal by the current solvent system used in the MCU. Although not tested, the impact of glycolate for the Next Generation Solvent - that replaces BOBCalixC6 with MaxCalix - is expected to be very similar to that for the baseline solvent. Testing is needed to confirm. Additional testing is recommended to both further

  18. The TITAN in-trap decay spectroscopy facility at TRIUMF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Leach; A. Grossheim; A. Lennarz; T. Brunner; J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia; A. T. Gallant; M. Good; R. Klawitter; A. A. Kwiatkowski; T. Ma; T. D. Macdonald; S. Seeraji; M. C. Simon; C. Andreoiu; J. Dilling; D. Frekers

    2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents an upgraded in-trap decay spectroscopy apparatus which has been developed and constructed for use with TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN). This device consists of an open-access electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT), which is surrounded radially by seven low-energy planar Si(Li) detectors. The environment of the EBIT allows for the detection of low-energy photons by providing backing-free storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles away from the trap centre via the strong (up to 6 T) magnetic field. In addition to excellent ion confinement and storage, the EBIT also provides a venue for performing decay spectroscopy on highly-charged radioactive ions. Recent technical advancements have been able to provide a significant increase in sensitivity for low-energy photon detection, towards the goal of measuring weak electron-capture branching ratios of the intermediate nuclei in the two-neutrino double beta ($2\

  19. In Situ Type Study of Hydrothermally Prepared Titanates and Silicotitanates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearfield,A.; Tripathi, A.; Medvedev, D.; Celestian, A.; Parise, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most vexing problems facing the nuclear industry and countries with nuclear weapons is the safe disposal of the generated nuclear waste. Huge quantities of nuclear waste arising from weapons manufacture are stored at the Hanford and Savannah River sites in the USA. The general method of remediation involves the removal of Cs-137, Sr-90 and actinides from a huge quantity of salts, principally NaNO{sub 3}, organics and complexing agents. It has been found that a sodium silicotitanate is able to remove Cs{sup +} selectively from the waste and certain sodium titanates remove Sr{sup 2+} and actinides. These compounds have been prepared by ex-situ hydrothermal methods. We have studied the In situ growth of these materials at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. In addition we will describe the mechanism of ion exchange in the titanosilicate as observed by In situ methods and how the combination of these techniques coupled with an intimate knowledge of the structure of the solids is helping to solve the remediation process. In general, the In situ method allows the investigator to follow the nucleation and crystal growth or phase transformations occurring in hydrothermal reactions.

  20. Clathrate hydrates as a sink of noble gases in Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, C; Ballenegger, V; Picaud, Sylvain

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a statistical thermodynamic approach to determine the composition of clathrate hydrates which may form from a multiple compound gas whose composition is similar to that of Titan's atmosphere. Assuming that noble gases are initially present in this gas phase, we calculate the ratios of xenon, krypton and argon to species trapped in clathrate hydrates. We find that these ratios calculated for xenon and krypton are several orders of magnitude higher than in the coexisting gas at temperature and pressure conditions close to those of Titan's present atmosphere at ground level. Furthermore we show that, by contrast, argon is poorly trapped in these ices. This trapping mechanism implies that the gas-phase is progressively depleted in xenon and krypton when the coexisting clathrate hydrates form whereas the initial abundance of argon remains almost constant. Our results are thus compatible with the deficiency of Titan's atmosphere in xenon and krypton measured by the {\\it Huygens} probe during its descent on J...

  1. COSMIC-RAY-MEDIATED FORMATION OF BENZENE ON THE SURFACE OF SATURN'S MOON TITAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Li; Zheng Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States); Landera, Alexander; Mebel, Alexander M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Liang, Mao-Chang [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yung, Yuk L. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aromatic benzene molecule (C{sub 6}H{sub 6})-a central building block of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules-is of crucial importance for the understanding of the organic chemistry of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. Here, we show via laboratory experiments and electronic structure calculations that the benzene molecule can be formed on Titan's surface in situ via non-equilibrium chemistry by cosmic-ray processing of low-temperature acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) ices. The actual yield of benzene depends strongly on the surface coverage. We suggest that the cosmic-ray-mediated chemistry on Titan's surface could be the dominant source of benzene, i.e., a factor of at least two orders of magnitude higher compared to previously modeled precipitation rates, in those regions of the surface which have a high surface coverage of acetylene.

  2. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE FILTER MEDIA FOR THE ROTARY MICROFILTER, PHASE 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowley, M.

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate filter membrane performance in an effort to increase rotary microfilter (RMF) throughput. Membranes were tested in the SpinTek Filtration, Inc. Static Test Cell (STC), which permitted quick and easy testing of several different membranes. Testing consisted of 100 hours tests with two different slurry feeds, based on recommendations from the phase 1 testing. One feed contained Monosodium Titanate (MST) solids in a simulated salt solution. The other feed contained simulated sludge batch 6 (SB6) solids in a simulated salt solution. Five membranes were tested, one each from filter manufactures Pall and Porvair and three from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The membrane from Pall is the current membrane used on the latest generation RMF. The Porvair membrane performed well in previous STC tests as well as one of the ORNL membranes. The other two membranes from ORNL were recently developed and not available for the previous STC test. The results indicate that the Porvair filter performed best with the MST slurry and the ORNL SVB6-1B filter performed best with the SB6 slurry. Difficulty was encountered with the ORNL filters due to their dimensional thickness, which was greater than the recommended filter thickness for the STC. The STC equipment was modified to complete the testing of the ORNL filters.

  3. IMPACT OF URANIUM AND THORIUM ON HIGH TIO2 CONCENTRATION NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on the potential impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The KT08-series of glasses was designed to evaluate any impacts of the inclusion of uranium and thorium in glasses containing the SCIX components. All but one of the study glasses were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction (XRD). One of the slowly cooled glasses contained a small amount of trevorite, which is typically found in DWPF-type glasses and had no practical impact on the durability of the glass. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses for the study glasses and the viscosities of the glasses were well predicted by the current DWPF models. No unexpected issues were encountered when uranium and thorium were added to the glasses with SCIX components.

  4. Polymerization of acetaldehyde using tetraiso-Propyl titanate as a catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makita, Muneharu

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the polymerization reactions of acetaldehyde in the presence of tetraiso-propyl titanate at 280'C, 200'C, 50'C, 20'C, 5'C and -20'C. The polymerization reaction of acetaldehyde, employing tetraiso- propyl titanate as a catalyst at 280'C for 24 hrs, may proceed.... The polymerization reaction at 200'C yield a poly- meric product similar to that obtained at 280'C. A product containing titanium, which could be the initial inter- mediate in the polymerization reactions at 200'C and 280'C, was ob- tained when the reaction...

  5. Paper AAS 02-141 Navigation of Aerial Platforms on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    -shrouded moon Titan may involve aerial platforms such as airships or helicopters. A significant challenge Cassini-Huygens mission may involve mobile aerial platforms such as airships or helicopters. Such vehicles (these may not be the same thing ­ sample acquisition systems may be deployable from an airship

  6. Titan's ionosphere: Model comparisons with Cassini Ta data T. E. Cravens,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and measured electron densities along the spacecraft track. Ionization both by solar radiation and by incoming technique [Bird et al., 1997]. Many models of Titan's ionosphere have been constructed over the past decade below the exobase [Waite et al., 2005]. The solar zenith angle (SZA) and latitude at CA were 91

  7. Neutron irradiation effects on domain wall mobility and reversibility in lead zirconate titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Paulo J.

    changes.1 Damage accumulates when fast neutrons undergo scattering collisions with atomic nuclei resultingNeutron irradiation effects on domain wall mobility and reversibility in lead zirconate titanate://scitation.aip.org/termsconditions. Downloaded to ] IP: 146.6.84.63 On: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 17:34:29 #12;Neutron irradiation effects on domain wall

  8. TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L. Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L Monopulse Amplitude Comparison method [3]. This technique estimates surface heights by comparing of good radar return where topography varies within the measurement width, and insufficient in areas

  9. Attrition resistant, zinc titanate-containing, reduced sulfur sorbents and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vierheilig, Albert A.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced sulfur gas species (e.g., H.sub.2S, COS and CS.sub.2) are removed from a gas stream by compositions wherein a zinc titanate ingredient is associated with a metal oxide-aluminate phase material in the same particle species. Nonlimiting examples of metal oxides comprising the compositions include magnesium oxide, zinc oxide, calcium oxide, nickel oxide, etc.

  10. Influence of stoichiometry on the dielectric properties of sputtered strontium titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    Influence of stoichiometry on the dielectric properties of sputtered strontium titanate thin films.1063/1.1598274 INTRODUCTION SrTiO3 thin films have been widely studied for their high dielectric constants and potential temperature superconductors. The dielectric permittivity of SrTiO3 thin films is significantly smaller than

  11. Effects of thickness on the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of lead zirconate titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    Lead zirconate titanate PZT thin films with a Zr/Ti ratio of 52/48 were deposited on platinized silicon. Both the piezoelectric properties and the dielectric constants of the PZT thin films were found thin films. The measured changes in properties with thickness were correlated with the residual stress

  12. The role of photochemistry in Titans atmospheric chemistry James Ferris a,*, Buu Tran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferris, James P.

    performed to simulate the action of long wavelength solar UV light on TitanÕs atmosphere. The exper- iments of solar ultraviolet (UV) light and SaturnÕs magnetospheric electrons on the methane and nitrogen in its of Life and Department of Chemistry, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA

  13. Dielectric tunability of graded barium strontium titanate multilayers: Effect of thermal strains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Dielectric tunability of graded barium strontium titanate multilayers: Effect of thermal strains M Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 A thermodynamic model was developed to analyze the effect of the difference in the thermal expansion coefficient

  14. In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM A. Faes1, Denmark antonin.faes@epfl.ch Keywords: In situ ETEM, nickel oxide, reduction, RedOx, SOFC Solid Oxide Fuel. C. Singhal, K. Kendall, High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell - Fundamentals, Design

  15. CMENTATION DU NIOBIUM PAR DES SILICIURES DE TITANE ET DE CHROME EN VUE DE RALISER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    551 CÉMENTATION DU NIOBIUM PAR DES SILICIURES DE TITANE ET DE CHROME EN VUE DE RÉALISER DES of titanium 2014 and chromium modified silicide coatings suitable for oxidation protection of niobium. One, susceptibles de protéger le niobium et ses alliages contre l'oxydation. Le disiliciure de niobium pur n

  16. Titan's bright spots: Multiband spectroscopic measurement of surface diversity and hazes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamkovics, Mate

    in a methane- based meteorological cycle that is similar to the Earth's hydrological cycle [Toon et al., 1988 initiates a series of chemical reactions that result in the formation of condensible hydrocarbons aerosols settle into the tropo- sphere, they can serve as condensation nuclei for Titan's methane

  17. No oceans on Titan from the absence of a near-infrared specular reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    No oceans on Titan from the absence of a near-infrared specular reflection R. A. West1 , M. E shown specular reflection are shown in Fig. 2. To understand how sensitive the near-infrared images-based observations (at near-infrared wavelengths) and calculations showing that there is no evidence thus far

  18. Clathrate hydrates as a sink of noble gases in Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Thomas; O. Mousis; V. Ballenegger; S. Picaud

    2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a statistical thermodynamic approach to determine the composition of clathrate hydrates which may form from a multiple compound gas whose composition is similar to that of Titan's atmosphere. Assuming that noble gases are initially present in this gas phase, we calculate the ratios of xenon, krypton and argon to species trapped in clathrate hydrates. We find that these ratios calculated for xenon and krypton are several orders of magnitude higher than in the coexisting gas at temperature and pressure conditions close to those of Titan's present atmosphere at ground level. Furthermore we show that, by contrast, argon is poorly trapped in these ices. This trapping mechanism implies that the gas-phase is progressively depleted in xenon and krypton when the coexisting clathrate hydrates form whereas the initial abundance of argon remains almost constant. Our results are thus compatible with the deficiency of Titan's atmosphere in xenon and krypton measured by the {\\it Huygens} probe during its descent on January 14, 2005. However, in order to interpret the subsolar abundance of primordial Ar also revealed by {\\it Huygens}, other processes that occurred either during the formation of Titan or during its evolution must be also invoked.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF BENZENE AS A TRACE REACTANT IN TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainer, Melissa G. [Planetary Environments Laboratory, Code 699, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sebree, Joshua A. [NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow, Code 699, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Heidi Yoon, Y.; Tolbert, Margaret A., E-mail: melissa.trainer@nasa.gov [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Box 216 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene has been detected in Titan's atmosphere by Cassini instruments, with concentrations ranging from sub-ppb in the stratosphere to ppm in the ionosphere. Sustained levels of benzene in the haze formation region could signify that it is an important reactant in the formation of Titan's organic aerosol. To date, there have not been laboratory investigations to assess the influence of benzene on aerosol properties. We report a laboratory study on the chemical composition of organic aerosol formed from C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} via far ultraviolet irradiation (120-200 nm). The compositional results are compared to those from aerosol generated by a more ''traditional Titan'' mixture of CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2}. Our results show that even a trace amount of C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (10 ppm) has significant impact on the chemical composition and production rates of organic aerosol. There are several pathways by which photolyzed benzene may react to form larger molecules, both with and without the presence of CH{sub 4}, but many of these reaction mechanisms are only beginning to be explored for the conditions at Titan. Continued work investigating the influence of benzene in aerosol growth will advance understanding of this previously unstudied reaction system.

  20. Convective plumes and the scarcity of Titan's clouds Ralph D. Lorenz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    dynamical models and with the relative tropospheric cloud cover, which is only $1% on Titan. Rainstorms is significantly opaque to thermal infrared radiation, leading to a strong greenhouse effect. The equivalent grey is absorbed by methane in the troposphere. Only around 10% of the incident solar radiation reaches the surface

  1. Titan's rotational state : The effects of a forced "free" resonant wobble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Noyelles

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In Noyelles et al. (2008, Astron. Astrophys., 478, 959-970), a resonance involving the wobble of Titan is hinted. This paper studies this scenario and its consequences. The first step is to build an accurate analytical model that would help to find the likely resonances in the rotation of every synchronous body. In this model, I take the orbital eccentricity of the body into account, as well as its variable inclination with respect to Saturn's equator. Then an analytical study using the second fundamental model of the resonance is performed to study the resonance of interest. Finally, I study the dissipative consequences of this resonance. I find that this resonance may have increased the wobble of Titan by several degrees. For instance, if Titan's polar momentum C is equal to 0.355MR_T^2 (M and R_T being respectively Titan's mass and radius), the wobble might be forced to 41 degrees. Thanks to an original formula, I find that the dissipation associated with the forced wobble might not be negligible compared to the contribution of the eccentricity. I also suspect that, due to the forced wobble, Titan's period of rotation may be somewhat underestimated by observers. Finally, I use the analytical model presented in this paper to compute the periods of the free librations of the four Galilean satellites as well as the Saturnian satellite Rhea. For Io and Europa, the results are consistent with previous studies. For the other satellites, the periods of the free librations are respectively 186.37 d, 23.38 y and 30.08 y for Ganymede, 2.44 y, 209.32 y and 356.54 y for Callisto, and 51.84 d, 2.60 y and 3.59 y for Rhea.

  2. Clathration of Volatiles in the Solar Nebula and Implications for the Origin of Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Jonathan I. Lunine; Caroline Thomas; Matthew Pasek; Ulysse Marboeuf; Yann Alibert; Vincent Ballenegger; Daniel Cordier; Yves Ellinger; Francoise Pauzat; Sylvain Picaud

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a scenario of Titan's formation matching the constraints imposed by its current atmospheric composition. Assuming that the abundances of all elements, including oxygen, are solar in the outer nebula, we show that the icy planetesimals were agglomerated in the feeding zone of Saturn from a mixture of clathrates with multiple guest species, so-called stochiometric hydrates such as ammonia hydrate, and pure condensates. We also use a statistical thermodynamic approach to constrain the composition of multiple guest clathrates formed in the solar nebula. We then infer that krypton and xenon, that are expected to condense in the 20-30 K temperature range in the solar nebula, are trapped in clathrates at higher temperatures than 50 K. Once formed, these ices either were accreted by Saturn or remained embedded in its surrounding subnebula until they found their way into the regular satellites growing around Saturn. In order to explain the carbon monoxide and primordial argon deficiencies of Titan's atmosphere, we suggest that the satellite was formed from icy planetesimals initially produced in the solar nebula and that were partially devolatilized at a temperature not exceeding 50 K during their migration within Saturn's subnebula. The observed deficiencies of Titan's atmosphere in krypton and xenon could result from other processes that may have occurred both prior or after the completion of Titan. Thus, krypton and xenon may have been sequestrated in the form of XH3+ complexes in the solar nebula gas phase, causing the formation of noble gas-poor planetesimals ultimately accreted by Titan. Alternatively, krypton and xenon may have also been trapped efficiently in clathrates located on the satellite's surface or in its atmospheric haze.

  3. Demonstration of Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation Process Using Savannah River Site High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.B.

    2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the experimental effort to demonstrate the continuous precipitation of cesium from Savannah River Site High Level Waste using sodium tetraphenylborate. In addition, the experiments examined the removal of strontium and various actinides through addition of monosodium titanate.

  4. TITAN code development for application to a PWR steam line break accident : final report 1983-1984

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chon-Kwo

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of the TITAN computer code which enables it to be applied to a PWR steam line break accident has been accomplished. The code now has the capability of simulating an asymmetric inlet coolant temperature transient ...

  5. RADIAL TRANSPORT EFFECTS ON ECCD IN THE TCV AND DIII-D TOKAMAKS AND ON OHMIC DISCHARGES IN THE MST RFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARVEY, R.W.; SAUTER, O.; PRATER, R.; NIKKOLA, P.; O'CONNELL, R.; FOREST, C.B.

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The comprehensive CQL3D Fokker-Planck/Quasilinear simulation code has been benchmarked against experiment over a wide range of electron cyclotron conditions in the DIII-D tokamak (C.C. Petty et al., 14th Topical Conf. on RF Power in Plasmas, 2002). The same code, in disagreement with experiment, gives 560 kA of ECCD for a well documented, completely ECCD-driven, 100 kA TCV shot [O. Sauter et al, PRL, 2000]. Recent work (R.W. Harvey et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2002) has resolved the differences as due to radial transport at a level closely consistent with ITER scaling. Transport does not substantially affect DIII-D ECCD, but at similar ECH power has an overwhelming effect on the much smaller TCV. The transport is consistent with electrostatic-type diffusion (D{sub {rho}{rho}} constant in velocity-space) and not with a magnetic-type diffusion (D{sub {rho}{rho}} {proportional_to} |v{parallel}|). Fokker-Planck simulation of Ohmic reversed field pinch (RFP) discharges in the MST device reveals transport velocity dependence stronger than |v{parallel}| will give agreement with current and soft X-ray spectra in standard discharges, but in the higher confinement, current profile controlled PPCD discharges, transport is again electrostatic-like. This is consistent with the object of PPCD, which is to replace magnetic turbulence driven current with auxiliary CD to improve transport. The tokamak and high-confinement RFP results mutually reinforce the constant-in-velocity-space ''electrostatic-type turbulence'' conclusion. The steady-state energy and toroidal current are governed by the same radial transport equation.

  6. ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

  7. SCALING SOLID RESUSPENSION AND SORPTION FOR THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing 1.3 million gallon waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending and resuspending Monosodium Titanate (MST), Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. In addition, SRNL will also be conducting pilot-scale tests to determine the mixing requirements for the strontium and actinide sorption. As part of this task, the results from the pilot-scale tests must be scaled up to a full-scale waste tank. This document describes the scaling approach. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scale model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX Program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). MST additions are through Riser E1, the proposed MST addition riser in Tank 41H. To determine the approach to scaling the results from the pilot-scale tank to Tank 41H, the authors took the following approach. They reviewed the technical literature for methods to scale mixing with jets and suspension of solid particles with jets, and the technical literature on mass transfer from a liquid to a solid particle to develop approaches to scaling the test data. SRNL assembled a team of internal experts to review the scaling approach and to identify alternative approaches that should be considered.

  8. Global circulation as the main source of cloud activity on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Sébastien; Rannou, Pascal; Tobie, Gabriel; Baines, Kevin H; Barnes, Jason W; Griffith, Caitlin A; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Pitman, Karly M; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, Robert H; Buratti, Bonnie J; Clark, Roger N; Nicholson, Phil D; 10.1038/NATURE08014

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds on Titan result from the condensation of methane and ethane and, as on other planets, are primarily structured by circulation of the atmosphere. At present, cloud activity mainly occurs in the southern (summer) hemisphere, arising near the pole and at mid-latitudes from cumulus updrafts triggered by surface heating and/or local methane sources, and at the north (winter) pole, resulting from the subsidence and condensation of ethane-rich air into the colder troposphere. General circulation models predict that this distribution should change with the seasons on a 15-year timescale, and that clouds should develop under certain circumstances at temperate latitudes (~40\\degree) in the winter hemisphere. The models, however, have hitherto been poorly constrained and their long-term predictions have not yet been observationally verified. Here we report that the global spatial cloud coverage on Titan is in general agreement with the models, confirming that cloud activity is mainly controlled by the global circ...

  9. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces in high-pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of Al on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) annealed in high-pressure hydrogen at 100C exhibit surface Pb nanowire growth. Wire diameter is approximately 80 nm and length can exceed 100 microns. Based on microstructural analysis using electron microscopy and ion scattering, a vapor-solid scheme with hydrogen as a carrier gas was proposed as a growth mechanism. We expect that these observations may lead to controlled Pb nanowires growth through pattering of the Al film.

  10. Upper limits for PH3 and H2S in Titan's Atmosphere from Cassini CIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Conor A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Horst, Sarah M; 10.1016/j.icarus.2013.02.024

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for the presence of simple P and S-bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere, by looking for the characteristic signatures of phosphine and hydrogen sulfide in infrared spectra obtained by Cassini CIRS. As a result we have placed the first upper limits on the stratospheric abundances, which are 1 ppb (PH3) and 330 ppb (H2S), at the 2-sigma significance level.

  11. Infrared Spectroscopic, X-ray and Nanoscale Characterization of Strontium Titanate Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, J. D.; Moutinho, H. R.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Mueller, C. H.; Rivkin, T. V.; Treece, R. E.; Dalberth, M.; Rogers, C. T.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) measurements were performed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in the ATR mode with a thallium iodobromide (KRS-5) crystal to measure the frequencies of the v{sub 3} and v{sub 4} phonon absorption bands in thin strontium titanate films deposited on single-crystal yttrium-barium copper oxide (YBCO), lanthanum aluminate, magnesium oxide, and strontium titanate substrates. The KRS-5 crystal enabled FTIR-ATR measurements to be made at frequencies above 400 cm-1. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were also made to further characterize the films. The measurements were repeated on single-crystal specimens of strontium titanate and the substrates for comparison. Softening in the frequency of the v{sub 4} transverse optical phonon in the lattice-mismatched films below the established value of 544 cm-1 is indicative of the highly textured, polycrystalline ceramic nature of the films and is consistent with the XRD and AFM results.

  12. Rapid synthesis of barium titanate microcubes using composite-hydroxides-mediated avenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Xi; Ouyang, Jing, E-mail: jingouyang@csu.edu.cn; Jin, Jiao; Yang, Huaming, E-mail: hmyang@csu.edu.cn

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Barium titanate oxides microcubes can be synthesized within 1 min. • Composite-hydroxides-mediated strategy provided a possible large scale production. • BST obtained in the strategy showed fairly good crystallinity and tetragonality. - Abstract: This paper reports the rapid synthesis of barium titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}, BTO) microcubes via composite-hydroxides-mediated reaction within 1 min. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) results confirmed both cubic and tetragonal lattices in the sample and the uniform microcubes with an average size of 1 ?m. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrum indicated that the band gap of the BTO powder was 3.05 eV. Ferroelectric polarization vs. electric field (P–E) tests showed that the ferroelectric domains had formed in the as-synthesized BTO microcubes and sintered ceramics. BTO ceramics sintered at 1100 °C for 3 h showed fairly good tetragonality and possessed a maximum polarization of 0.21 ?C/cm{sup 2}, indicating that the sintering temperature for the BTO powders prepared via this method was relatively low. The process and equipment reported herein provided a potential method for the rapid synthesis of titanate based perovskites.

  13. Integration of PanDA workload management system with Titan supercomputer at OLCF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panitkin, Sergey; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, Alexei; Oleynik, Danila; Petrosyan, Artem; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Wenaus, Torre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) workload management system (WMS) was developed to meet the scale and complexity of LHC distributed computing for the ATLAS experiment. While PanDA currently uses more than 100,000 cores at well over 100 Grid sites with a peak performance of 0.3 petaFLOPS, next LHC data taking run will require more resources than Grid computing can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, ATLAS is engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). Current approach utilizes modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to Titan's batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run single threaded workloads in parallel on Titan's multi-core worker nodes. It also gives PanDA new capability to collect, in real tim...

  14. I/O Router Placement and Fine-Grained Routing on Titan to Support Spider II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezell, Matthew A [ORNL] [ORNL; Dillow, David [None] [None; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Feiyi [ORNL] [ORNL; Tiwari, Devesh [ORNL] [ORNL; Maxwell, Don E [ORNL] [ORNL; Leverman, Dustin B [ORNL] [ORNL; Hill, Jason J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) introduced the concept of Fine-Grained Routing in 2008 to improve I/O performance between the Jaguar supercomputer and Spider, OLCF s center-wide Lustre file system. Fine-grained routing organizes I/O paths to minimize congestion. Jaguar has since been upgraded to Titan, providing more than a ten-fold improvement in peak performance. To support the center s increased computational capacity and I/O demand, the Spider file system has been replaced with Spider II. Building on the lessons learned from Spider, an improved method for placing LNET routers was developed and implemented for Spider II. The fine-grained routing scripts and configuration have been updated to provide additional optimizations and better match the system setup. This paper presents a brief history of fine-grained routing at OLCF, an introduction to the architectures of Titan and Spider II, methods for placing routers in Titan, and details about the fine-grained routing configuration.

  15. Composite solid oxide fuel cell anode based on ceria and strontium titanate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marina, Olga A. (Richland, WA); Pederson, Larry R. (Richland, WA)

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An anode and method of making the same wherein the anode consists of two separate phases, one consisting of a doped strontium titanate phase and one consisting of a doped cerium oxide phase. The strontium titanate phase consists of Sr.sub.1-xM.sub.xTiO.sub.3-.delta., where M is either yttrium (Y), scandium (Sc), or lanthanum (La), where "x" may vary typically from about 0.01 to about 0.5, and where .delta. is indicative of some degree of oxygen non-stoichiometry. A small quantity of cerium may also substitute for titanium in the strontium titanate lattice. The cerium oxide consists of N.sub.yCe.sub.1-yO.sub.2-.delta., where N is either niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), antimony (Sb) or tantalum (Ta) and where "y" may vary typically from about 0.001 to about 0.1 and wherein the ratio of Ti in said first phase to the sum of Ce and N in the second phase is between about 0.2 to about 0.75. Small quantities of strontium, yttrium, and/or lanthanum may additionally substitute into the cerium oxide lattice. The combination of these two phases results in better performance than either phase used separately as an anode for solid oxide fuel cell or other electrochemical device.

  16. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30 Environmental

  17. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30

  18. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30Tecnai F30

  19. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30Tecnai F30840 EPMA

  20. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30Tecnai F30840

  1. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30Tecnai F30840XL30

  2. David Teter, MST Deputy Division Leader, MST: Los Alamos National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OFSupplementalC. L. Martin

  3. Device - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date: Contact: Shelley Martin, DOE National

  4. Links - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC) - CenterLinks Berkeley Lab Links:

  5. Tour - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPointsThrust 1: StructureToday

  6. MST Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation,LushuiLyme,MDLMP

  7. Synthesis and electrical analysis of nano-crystalline barium titanate nanocomposites for use in high-energy density applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Yang, Pin; Chavez, Tom P.; Huber, Dale L.; Winter, Michael R.; Monson, Todd C.; Roesler, Alexander William

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic based nanocomposites have recently demonstrated the ability to provide enhanced permittivity, increased dielectric breakdown strength, and reduced electromechanical strain making them potential materials systems for high energy density applications. A systematic characterization and optimization of barium titanate and PLZT based nanoparticle composites employing a glass or polymer matrix to yield a high energy density component will be presented. This work will present the systematic characterization and optimization of barium titanate and lead lanthanum zirconate titanate nanoparticle based ceramics. The nanoparticles have been synthesized using solution and pH-based synthesis processing routes and employed to fabricate polycrystalline ceramic and nanocomposite based components. The dielectric/ferroelectric properties of these various components have been gauged by impedance analysis and electromechanical response and will be discussed.

  8. Titanate nanotube thin films with enhanced thermal stability and high-transparency prepared from additive-free sols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koroesi, Laszlo, E-mail: korosi@enviroinvest.hu [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertvaros utca 2, H-7632 Pecs (Hungary); Papp, Szilvia [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertvaros utca 2, H-7632 Pecs (Hungary); Hornok, Viktoria [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Oszko, Albert [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Petrik, Peter; Patko, Daniel; Horvath, Robert [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science MFA, Research Center for Natural Sciences, Konkoly-Thege ut 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dekany, Imre [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanate nanotubes were synthesized from TiO{sub 2} in alkaline medium by a conventional hydrothermal method (150 Degree-Sign C, 4.7 bar). To obtain hydrogen titanates, the as-prepared sodium titanates were treated with either HCl or H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} aqueous solutions. A simple synthesis procedure was devised for stable titanate nanotube sols without using any additives. These highly stable ethanolic sols can readily be used to prepare transparent titanate nanotube thin films of high quality. The resulting samples were studied by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2}-sorption measurements, Raman spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The comparative results of using two kinds of acids shed light on the superior thermal stability of the H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated titanate nanotubes (P-TNTs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that P-TNTs contains P in the near-surface region and the thermal stability was enhanced even at a low ({approx}0.5 at%) concentration of P. After calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C, the specific surface areas of the HCl- and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated samples were 153 and 244 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, respectively. The effects of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment on the structure, morphology and porosity of titanate nanotubes are discussed. - Graphical Abstract: TEM picture (left) shows P-TNTs with diameters about 5-6 nm. Inset shows a stable titanate nanotube sol illuminated by a 532 nm laser beam. Due to the presence of the nanoparticles the way of the light is visible in the sol. Cross sectional SEM picture (right) as well as ellipsometry revealed the formation of optical quality P-TNT films with thicknesses below 50 nm. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment led to TNTs with high surface area even after calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated TNTs preserved their nanotube morphology up to 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable TNT sols can be prepared by the peptization of TNT gels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-transparency TNT thin films of high quality were fabricated.

  9. THE ROLE OF METHANOL IN THE CRYSTALLIZATION OF TITAN'S PRIMORDIAL OCEAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschamps, Frederic [Institute of Geophysics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Mousis, Olivier [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France); Sanchez-Valle, Carmen [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lunine, Jonathan I., E-mail: frederic.deschamps@erdw.ethz.c [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key parameter that controls the crystallization of primordial oceans in large icy moons is the presence of anti-freeze compounds, which may have maintained primordial oceans over the age of the solar system. Here we investigate the influence of methanol, a possible anti-freeze candidate, on the crystallization of Titan's primordial ocean. Using a thermodynamic model of the solar nebula and assuming a plausible composition of its initial gas phase, we first calculate the condensation sequence of ices in Saturn's feeding zone, and show that in Titan's building blocks methanol can have a mass fraction of {approx}4 wt% relative to water, i.e., methanol can be up to four times more abundant than ammonia. We then combine available data on the phase diagram of the water-methanol system and scaling laws derived from thermal convection to estimate the influence of methanol on the dynamics of the outer ice I shell and on the heat transfer through this layer. For a fraction of methanol consistent with the building blocks composition we determined, the vigor of convection in the ice I shell is strongly reduced. The effect of 5 wt% methanol is equivalent to that of 3 wt% ammonia. Thus, if methanol is present in the primordial ocean of Titan, the crystallization may stop, and a sub-surface ocean may be maintained between the ice I and high-pressure ice layers. A preliminary estimate indicates that the presence of 4 wt% methanol and 1 wt% ammonia may result in an ocean of thickness at least 90 km.

  10. Structural and crystal chemical properties of rare-earth titanate pyrochlores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, James Matthew [ORNL] [ORNL; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL] [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL] [ORNL; Du, Mao-Hua [ORNL] [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bryan, Jeff C. [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare-earth titanates, RE2Ti2O7 (where RE = a rare-earth) with the pyrochlore structure continue to be investigated for use as potential stable host materials for nuclear and actinide-rich wastes. Accordingly, the present work is directed towards the elucidation of the fundamental structural, physical, and thermochemical properties of this class of compounds. Single-crystals of the rare earth pyrochlores were synthesized using a high-temperature flux technique and were subsequently characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The cubic lattice parameters display an approximately linear correlation with the RE-site cation radius. Theoretical calculations of the lattice constants and bond lengths of the subject materials were carried out using density functional theory, and the results are compared to the experimental values. The Sm and Eu titanates exhibit a covalency increase between the REO8 and TiO6 polyhedra resulting in a deviation from the increasing linear lattice parameter through the transition series. Gd2Ti2O7 with the 4f7 half-filled f-orbital Gd3+ sub-shell exhibits the lowest 48f oxygen positional parameter. The coefficient of thermal expansion for the rare-earth titanate series is approximately linear, and it has a range of 10.1 11.2 x 10-6 C-1. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the ~530 cm-1 peak associated with the Ti-O stretching mode follows a general trend of decreasing frequency with increasing RE reduced mass.

  11. Detection of high-energy heavy ions using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takechi, Seiji; Morinaga, Shin-ya; Kurozumi, Atsuma [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Murakami, Takeshi; Uchihori, Yukio [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Okada, Nagaya [Honda Electronics Co., Ltd., Aichi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of a radiation detector fabricated with stacks of piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) elements were studied by irradiating it with a 400 MeV/n xenon (Xe) beam for various beam pulse durations. This detector is referred to as the multilayered detector (MD). To understand the production mechanism behind the output voltage obtained from the MD, measurement of the spatial distribution of the output signals generated in the MD was attempted. It was found that the amplitude observed was dependent on the number of Xe ions per unit time and the amount of ionization loss energy of Xe ions in PZT.

  12. Measurement of incident position of hypervelocity particles on piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takechi, Seiji; Onishi, Toshiyuki; Minami, Shigeyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nogami, Ken-ichi [Department of Physics, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Ohashi, Hideo [Faculty of Marine Science, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 108-8477 (Japan); Sasaki, Sho [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Iwate 023-0861 (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo [Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Gruen, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Okada, Nagaya [Honda Electronics Co., Ltd., Aichi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cosmic dust detector for use onboard a satellite is currently being developed by using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT). The characteristics of the PZT detector have been studied by bombarding it with hypervelocity iron (Fe) particles supplied by a Van de Graaff accelerator. One central electrode and four peripheral electrodes were placed on the front surface of the PZT detector to measure the impact positions of the incident Fe particles. It was demonstrated that the point of impact on the PZT detector could be identified by using information on the time at which the first peak of the output signal obtained from each electrode appeared.

  13. Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania for visible-light driven phenol degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu Hua; Subramaniam, Vishnu P.; Gong, Dangguo; Tang, Yuxin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Highfield, James, E-mail: James_Highfield@ices.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore)] [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Pehkonen, Simo O. [Chemical Engineering Program, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)] [Chemical Engineering Program, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Pichat, Pierre [Photocatalyse et Environnement, CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon (STMS), 69134 Ecully Cedex (France)] [Photocatalyse et Environnement, CNRS/Ecole Centrale de Lyon (STMS), 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Schreyer, Martin K. [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore)] [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Chen, Zhong, E-mail: aszchen@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual-phase material (DP-160) comprising hydrated titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O) and anatase (TiO{sub 2}) was synthesized in a low-temperature one-pot process in the presence of triethylamine (TEA) as the N-source. The unique structure exhibits strong visible light absorption. The chromophore is linked to Ti-N bonds derived from both surface sensitization and sub-surface (bulk) doping. From transmission electron microscope (TEM) and textural studies by N{sub 2} physisorption, the composite exists as mesoporous particles with a grain size of {approx}20 nm and mean pore diameter of 3.5 nm, responsible for the high surface area ({approx}180 m{sup 2}/g). DP-160 demonstrated photocatalytic activity in the degradation of phenol under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). The activity of the composite was further enhanced by a small addition (0.001 M) of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which also gave rise to some visible light activity in the control samples. This effect is believed to be associated with the surface peroxo-titanate complex. GC-MS analyses showed that the intermediate products of phenol degradation induced by visible light irradiation of DP-160 did not differ from those obtained by UV (band-gap) irradiation of TiO{sub 2}. The overall performance of the composite is attributed to efficient excitation via inter-band states (due to N-doping), surface sensitization, improved adsorptive properties of aromatic compounds due to the N-carbonaceous overlayer, and the presence of heterojunctions that are known to promote directional charge transfer in other mixed-phase titanias like Degussa P25. - graphical abstract: Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania photocatalyst showing extended visible light absorption and efficient photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature one-pot synthesis of visible light active dual phase photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dual phase consists of nanoscale titanate and anatase titania phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst displays high activity in degrading phenol under visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanisms for the sensitization to visible light are considered.

  14. Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 [mu]m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO[sub 3]; and then indurating it at 800 to 900 C for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

  15. Relationship between orientation factor of lead zirconate titanate nanowires and dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Haixiong, E-mail: htang15@ufl.edu, E-mail: hsodano@ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Malakooti, Mohammad H. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Sodano, Henry A., E-mail: htang15@ufl.edu, E-mail: hsodano@ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the orientation of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) nanowires dispersed in nanocomposites and the resulting dielectric constants are quantified. The orientation of the PZT nanowires embedded in a polymer matrix is controlled by varying the draw ratio and subsequently quantified using Herman's Orientation Factor. Consequently, it is demonstrated that the dielectric constants of nanocomposites are improved by increasing the orientation factor of the PZT nanowires. This technique is proposed to improve the dielectric constant of the nanocomposites without the need for additional filler volume fraction since the nanocomposites are utilized in a wide range of high dielectric permittivity electronic components.

  16. Titan propels GE wind turbine research into new territory | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study91 to TipsTitan

  17. Formation and structural characterization of potassium titanates and the potassium ion exchange property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Qiang, E-mail: wulihe@postech.ac.kr [Department of Catalysis Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150001 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, POSTECH, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Guo Zhanhu [Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 (United States); Chung, Jong Shik [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, POSTECH, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering, POSTECH, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}, K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and K{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} are synthesized by solid state method. Their structures and morphologies are characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and scanning electron microscopy. The binding energies of K, Ti and O in potassium titanates were then evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared with those in K/TiO{sub 2}. Finally the corresponding K ion exchange properties are investigated by synthesizing NO oxidation catalysts with Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} precursor. It is found that the binding energy of K in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5} is much higher than those in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} and K{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13}, and because of which, it shows quite different catalytic performances. Compared with other potassium titanates, the K in K{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5} is much easier to be exchanged out.

  18. TITAN's Digital RFQ Ion Beam Cooler and Buncher, Operation and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Brunner; M. J. Smith; M. Brodeur; S. Ettenauer; A. T. Gallant; V. V. Simon; A. Chaudhuri A. Lapierre; E. Mané; R. Ringle; M. C. Simon; J. A. Vaz; P. Delheij; M. Good; M. R. Pearson; J. Dilling

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) ion trap built as part of the TITAN facility. It consists of a gas-filled, segmented, linear Paul trap and is the first stage of the TITAN setup with the purpose of cooling and bunching radioactive ion beams delivered from ISAC-TRIUMF. This is the first such device to be driven digitally, i.e., using a high voltage ($V_{pp} = \\rm{400 \\, V}$), wide bandwidth ($0.2 < f < 1.2 \\, \\rm{MHz}$) square-wave as compared to the typical sinusoidal wave form. Results from the commissioning of the device as well as systematic studies with stable and radioactive ions are presented including efficiency measurements with stable $^{133}$Cs and radioactive $^{124, 126}$Cs. A novel and unique mode of operation of this device is also demonstrated where the cooled ion bunches are extracted in reverse mode, i.e., in the same direction as previously injected.

  19. INFRARED SPECTRA AND OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NITRILE ICES RELEVANT TO TITAN's ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ferrante, Robert F. [Chemistry Department, US Naval Academy, 572 Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States); James Moore, W., E-mail: Marla.h.moore@nasa.go [USRA NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan's atmosphere are presented from 2.0 to 333.3 {mu}m ({approx}5000-30 cm{sup -1}). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan's winter pole. Ices studied are: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, cyanogen; CH{sub 3}CN, acetonitrile; C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN, propionitrile; and HC{sub 3}N, cyanoacetylene. For each of these molecules, we also report new cryogenic measurements of the real refractive index, n, determined in both the amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. These new values have been incorporated into our optical constant calculations. Spectra were measured and optical constants were calculated for each nitrile at a variety of temperatures, including, but not limited to, 20, 35, 50, 75, 95, and 110 K, in both the amorphous phase and the crystalline phase. This laboratory effort used a dedicated FTIR spectrometer to record transmission spectra of thin-film ice samples. Laser interference was used to measure film thickness during condensation onto a transparent cold window attached to the tail section of a closed-cycle helium cryostat. Optical constants, real (n) and imaginary (k) refractive indices, were determined using Kramers-Kronig analysis. Our calculation reproduces the complete spectrum, including all interference effects.

  20. Photochemical enrichment of deuterium in Titan's atmosphere: new insights from Cassini-Huygens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Cordier; O. Mousis; I. J. Lunine; A. Moudens; V. Vuitton

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Cassini-Huygens data are used to re-examine the potential sources of the D/H enhancement over solar, measured in methane, in Titan's atmosphere. Assuming that the system is closed with respect to carbon, the use of constraints from the Huygens probe for the determination of the current mass of atmospheric methane and the most up-to-date determination of D/H from Cassini/CIRS infrared spectra allow us to show that photochemical enrichment of deuterium is not sufficient to be the sole mechanism yielding the measured D/H value. A possible fractionation between CH3D and CH4 during the escape process may slightly enhance the deuterium enrichment, but is not sufficient to explain the observed D/H value over the range of escape values proposed in the literature. Hence, alternative mechanisms such as a primordial deuterium enrichment must be combined with the photochemical enrichment in Titan's atmosphere in order to explain its current D/H value.

  1. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A new 1.6-micron map of Titan's surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael E.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, A new 1.6-micron map of Titan's surface are likely craters. Accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters. Copyright 2004 American Geophysical Union. Further re- production or electronic distribution is not permitted. 1. Introduction

  2. Method for making fine and ultrafine spherical particles of zirconium titanate and other mixed metal oxide systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Michael Z.

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for making amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate and crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate comprising the steps of mixing an aqueous solution of zirconium salt and an aqueous solution of titanium salt into a mixed solution having equal moles of zirconium and titanium and having a total salt concentration in the range from 0.01 M to about 0.5 M. A stearic dispersant and an organic solvent is added to the mixed salt solution, subjecting the zirconium salt and the titanium salt in the mixed solution to a coprecipitation reaction forming a solution containing amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate wherein the volume ratio of the organic solvent to aqueous part is in the range from 1 to 5. The solution of amorphous spherical particles is incubated in an oven at a temperature .ltoreq.100.degree. C. for a period of time .ltoreq.24 hours converting the amorphous particles to fine or ultrafine crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate.

  3. SCIX IMPACT ON DWPF CPC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A program was conducted to systematically evaluate potential impacts of the proposed Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The program involved a series of interrelated tasks. Past studies of the impact of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and monosodium titanate (MST) on DWPF were reviewed. Paper studies and material balance calculations were used to establish reasonable bounding levels of CST and MST in sludge. Following the paper studies, Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulant was modified to have both bounding and intermediate levels of MST and ground CST. The SCIX flow sheet includes grinding of the CST which is larger than DWPF frit when not ground. Nominal ground CST was not yet available, therefore a similar CST ground previously in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was used. It was believed that this CST was over ground and that it would bound the impact of nominal CST on sludge slurry properties. Lab-scale simulations of the DWPF CPC were conducted using SB10 simulants with no, intermediate, and bounding levels of CST and MST. Tests included both the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. Simulations were performed at high and low acid stoichiometry. A demonstration of the extended CPC flowsheet was made that included streams from the site interim salt processing operations. A simulation using irradiated CST and MST was also completed. An extensive set of rheological measurements was made to search for potential adverse consequences of CST and MST and slurry rheology in the CPC. The SCIX CPC impact program was conducted in parallel with a program to evaluate the impact of SCIX on the final DWPF glass waste form and on the DWPF melter throughput. The studies must be considered together when evaluating the full impact of SCIX on DWPF. Due to the fact that the alternant flowsheet for DWPF has not been selected, this study did not consider the impact of proposed future alternative DWPF CPC flowsheets. The impact of the SCIX streams on DWPF processing using the selected flowsheet need to be considered as part of the technical baseline studies for coupled processing with the selected flowsheet. In addition, the downstream impact of aluminum dissolution on waste containing CST and MST has not yet been evaluated. The current baseline would not subject CST to the aluminum dissolution process and technical concerns with performing the dissolution with CST have been expressed. Should this option become feasible, the downstream impact should be considered. The main area of concern for DWPF from aluminum dissolution is an impact on rheology. The SCIX project is planning for SRNL to complete MST, CST, and sludge rheology testing to evaluate any expected changes. The impact of ground CST transport and flush water on the DWPF CPC feed tank (and potential need for decanting) has not been defined or studied.

  4. IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT01, KT02, KT03, AND KT04-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four series of glass compositions were selected, fabricated, and characterized as part of a study to determine the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. The KT01 and KT02-series of glasses were chosen to allow for the identification of the influence of the concentrations of major components of the glass on the retention of TiO{sub 2}. The KT03 series of glasses was chosen to allow for the identification of these influences when higher Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and ZrO{sub 2} concentrations are included along with TiO2. The KT04 series of glasses was chosen to investigate the properties and performance of glasses based on the best available projections of actual compositions to be processed at the DWPF (i.e., future sludge batches including the SCIX streams).

  5. IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

  6. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 4 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H to qualify them for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 4 processing. All sample results agree with expectations based on prior analyses where available. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 4 strategy are identified. This revision includes additional data points that were not available in the original issue of the document, such as additional plutonium results, the results of the monosodium titanate (MST) sorption test and the extraction, scrub strip (ESS) test. This report covers the revision to the Tank 21H qualification sample results for Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 4 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). A previous document covers initial characterization which includes results for a number of non-radiological analytes. These results were used to perform aluminum solubility modeling to determine the hydroxide needs for Salt Batch 4 to prevent the precipitation of solids. Sodium hydroxide was then added to Tank 21 and additional samples were pulled for the analyses discussed in this report. This work was specified by Task Technical Request and by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP).

  7. Preparation of Lead Zirconate Titanate (Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3) by Homogeneous Precipitation and Calcination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    Preparation of Lead Zirconate Titanate (Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3) by Homogeneous Precipitation-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). I. Introduction LEAD ZIRCONATE TITANATE (PbZrxTi1-xO3) ceramics are of great technological, and TiO2). However, because of intermediate reactions which lead to the formation of PbTiO3 (PT) and Pb

  8. Substrate Clamping Effects on Irreversible Domain Wall Dynamics in Lead Zirconate Titanate Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggio, Flavio [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Ovchinnikov, Oleg S [ORNL; Kim, H. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Jackson, T. N. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Damjanovic, Dragan [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Trolier-Mckinstry, Susan E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of long-range strain interactions on domain wall dynamics is explored through macroscopic and local measurements of nonlinear behavior in mechanically clamped and released polycrystalline lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) films. Released films show a dramatic change in the global dielectric nonlinearity and its frequency dependence as a function of mechanical clamping. Furthermore, we observe a transition from strong clustering of the nonlinear response for the clamped case to almost uniform nonlinearity for the released film. This behavior is ascribed to increased mobility of domain walls. These results suggest the dominant role of collective strain interactions mediated by the local and global mechanical boundary conditions on the domain wall dynamics. The work presented in this Letter demonstrates that measurements on clamped films may considerably underestimate the piezoelectric coefficients and coupling constants of released structures used in microelectromechanical systems, energy harvesting systems, and microrobots.

  9. Near-field resonance shifts of ferroelectric barium titanate domains upon low-temperature phase transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Döring, Jonathan; Ribbeck, Hans-Georg von; Kehr, Susanne C.; Eng, Lukas M. [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Fehrenbacher, Markus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) has been established as an excellent tool to probe domains in ferroelectric crystals at room temperature. Here, we apply the s-SNOM possibilities to quantify low-temperature phase transitions in barium titanate single crystals by both temperature-dependent resonance spectroscopy and domain distribution imaging. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal structural phase transition at 263?K manifests in a change of the spatial arrangement of ferroelectric domains as probed with a tunable free-electron laser. More intriguingly, the domain distribution unravels non-favored domain configurations upon sample recovery to room temperature as explainable by increased sample disorder. Ferroelectric domains and topographic influences are clearly deconvolved even at low temperatures, since complementing our s-SNOM nano-spectroscopy with piezoresponse force microscopy and topographic imaging using one and the same atomic force microscope and tip.

  10. Upper limits for undetected trace species in the stratosphere of Titan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, Connor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick G.; Flaud, Jean Marie; Kleiner, I.; Dehayem-kamadjeu, A.; Brown, Linda R.; Sams, Robert L.; Bezard, Bruno; Coustenis, Athena; Ansty, Todd M.; Mamoutkine, Andrei; Vinatier, Sandrine; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.; Romani, Paul N.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe a first quantitative search for several molecules in Titans stratosphere ni Cassini CIRS infrared spectra. These are: ammonia (NH3), methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (H2CO), and acetonitrile (CH3CN), all of which are predicted by photochemical models but only the last of which observed, and not in the infrared,. We find non-detections in all cases, but derive upper limits on the abundances from low-noise observations at 25 degreesS and 75 degreesN. Comparing these constraints to model predictions, we conclude that CIRS is highly unlikely to see NH3 or CH3OH emissions. However, CH3CN and H2CO are closer to CIRS detectability, and we suggest ways in which the sensitivity threshold may be lowered towards this goal.

  11. Blocking effect of crystal–glass interface in lanthanum doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiangrong [Beijing Fine Ceramics Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: yzhang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing Fine Ceramics Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Baturin, Ivan [Ferroelectric Laboratory, Institute of Natural Science, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg 620000 (Russian Federation); Liang, Tongxiang [Beijing Fine Ceramics Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The blocking effect of the crystal–glass interface on the carrier transport behavior in the lanthanum doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics: preparation and characterization. - Highlights: • La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition promotes the crystallization of the major crystalline phase. • The Z? and M? peaks exist a significant mismatch for 0.5 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. • The Z? and M? peaks separate obviously for 1.0 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. • Crystallite impedance decreases while crystal–glass interface impedance increases. • La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition increases blocking factor of the crystal–glass interface. - Abstract: The microstructures and dielectric properties in La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and impedance spectroscopy. SEM analysis indicated that La{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive decreases the average crystallite size. Impedance spectroscopy revealed that the positions of Z? and M? peaks are close for undoped samples. When La{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration is 0.5 mol%, the Z? and M? peaks show a significant mismatch. Furthermore, these peaks separate obviously for 1.0 mol% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. With increasing La{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration, the contribution of the crystallite impedance becomes smaller, while the contribution of the crystal–glass interface impedance becomes larger. More interestingly, it was found that La{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive increases blocking factor of the crystal–glass interface in the temperature range of 250–450 °C. This may be attributed to a decrease of activation energy of the crystallite and an increase of the crystal–glass interface area.

  12. Initial evaluation of Sandia National Laboratory-prepared crystalline silico-titanates for cesium recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a study of a new class of inorganic ion exchange materials that selectively extracts cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and plutonium (Pu) from alkaline radioactive waste solutions. These materials, identified as crystalline silico-titanates (CST), were developed by scientists at the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Texas A&M. This report summarizes preliminary results for the measurement of batch distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) values for the powdered CST materials compared to previously tested ion exchange materials: IONSIV IE-96 (a zeolite produced by UOP), CS-100 (an organic resin produced by Rohm and Haas), and BIB-DJ (a new resorcinol-formaldehyde organic resin produced by Boulder Scientific). Excellent results were obtained for CST inorganic exchangers that could be significant in the development of processes for the near-term pretreatment of Hanford alkaline wastes. The following observations and conclusions resulted from this study: (1) Several CST samples prepared at SNL had a higher capacity to remove Cs from solution as compared to BIB-DJ, IE-96, and CS-100. (2) Cesium distribution results showed that CST samples TAM-40, -42, -43, -70, and -74 had {lambda} values of {approximately}2,200 ({lambda} = Cs K{sub d} {times} {rho}{sub b}; where {lambda} represents the number of exchanger bed volumes of feed that can be loaded on an ion exchange column) at a pH value >14. (3) Cesium distribution values for CST exchangers doubled as the aqueous temperature decreased from 40{degrees} to 10{degrees}C. (4) Crystalline silico-titanates have the capacity to remove Cs as well as Sr and Pu from alkaline wastes unless organic complexants are present. Experimental results indicated that complexed Sr was not removed, and Pu is not expected to be removed.

  13. On the sol-gel synthesis of strontium-titanate thin films and the prospects of their use in electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohrabi Anaraki, H.; Gaponenko, N. V., E-mail: nik@nano.bsuir.edu.by; Rudenko, M. V.; Guk, A. F.; Zavadskij, S. M.; Golosov, D. A.; Kolosnitsyn, B. S. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (Belarus); Kolos, V. V.; Pyatlitskij, A. N.; Turtsevich, A. S. [Integral Enterprise (Belarus)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium-titanate films obtained by the sol-gel technique are deposited onto silicon and silicon/oxide titanium/platinum substrates. The strontium-titanate phase is detected by the method of X-ray diffraction analysis after heat treatment at temperatures of 750 and 800°C. The thickness of the films obtained by the spin-on method increases from 50 to 250 nm as the number of deposited layers is increased and is accompanied with an increase in the grain size in the films. Prospects of the development of the sol-gel technique for the formation of film components of electronic devices based on SrTiO{sub 3} xerogels are discussed.

  14. Cerium-modified doped strontium titanate compositions for solid oxide fuel cell anodes and electrodes for other electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marina, Olga A [Richland, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells and electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, pumps and the like, the compositions comprising cerium-modified doped strontium titanate. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using anode material compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having anodes comprising the compositions.

  15. Cerium-modified doped strontium titanate compositions for solid oxide fuel cell anodes and electrodes for other electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marina, Olga A [Richland, WA; Stevenson, Jeffry W [Richland, WA

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells and electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, electrolyzers, sensors, pumps and the like, the compositions comprising cerium-modified doped strontium titanate. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using anode material compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having anodes comprising the compositions.

  16. FIRST STEP IN THEORETICAL APPROACH IN STUDY OF MARS AND TITAN ATMOSPHERES WITH AN INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA TORCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the titan atmosphere (CH4-N2) unlike the Mars atmosphere (CO2-N2). We observe the creation of solid], one can obtain the molar fraction versus temperature. The composition of Mars is assumed to be 97% CO22, CO2 - , N2O, N2O3, N2O4, N2O5, N2O+, N3, NCN, NO2, NO2 - , NO3, O3 and the electrons

  17. Fatigue of extracted lead zirconate titanate multilayer actuators under unipolar high field electric cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Lee, Sung Min [ORNL; Wang, James L [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of large prototype lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stacks presents substantial technical challenges to electronic testing systems, so an alternative approach that uses subunits extracted from prototypes has been pursued. Extracted 10-layer and 20-layer plate specimens were subjected to an electric cycle test under an electric field of 3.0/0.0 kV/mm, 100 Hz to 10^8 cycles. The effects of measurement field level and stack size (number of PZT layers) on the fatigue responses of piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients were observed. On-line monitoring permitted examination of the fatigue response of the PZT stacks. The fatigue rate (based on on-line monitoring) and the fatigue index (based on the conductance spectrum from impedance measurement or small signal measurement) were developed to quantify the fatigue status of the PZT stacks. The controlling fatigue mechanism was analyzed against the fatigue observations. The data presented can serve as input to design optimization of PZT stacks and to operation optimization in critical applications such as piezoelectric fuel injectors in heavy-duty diesel engines.

  18. Amorphization and recrystallization of single-crystalline hydrogen titanate nanowires by N{sup +} ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Akshaya K.; Bandyopadyay, Malay K.; Chatterjee, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar 751007 (India); Facsko, Stefan [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Das, Siddhartha [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the phase transformation of hydrogen titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}) nanowires induced by 50?keV N{sup +} ion irradiation at room temperature with fluences of 1?×?10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} and 1?×?10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Using transmission electron microscopy, the internal structure of the ion irradiated nanowires is analyzed. At low fluence, a transformation from crystalline H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} to amorphous TiO{sub 2} is observed. However, at higher fluence, a remarkable crystalline-amorphous TiO{sub 2} core-shell structure is formed. At this higher fluence, the recrystallization occurs in the core of the nanowire and the outer layer remains amorphous. The phase transformation and formation of core-shell structure are explained using the thermal spike model, radiation enhanced diffusion, and classical theory of nucleation and growth under non-equilibrium thermodynamics. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman scattering reveal further insight into the structure of the nanowires before and after ion irradiation.

  19. Microstrain in tetragonal lead-zirconate-titanate: The effect of pressure on the ionic displacements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantti, J., E-mail: Johannes.Frantti@fre.fi; Fujioka, Y. [Finnish Research and Engineering, Jaalaranta 9 B 42, 00180 Helsinki (Finland); Zhang, J.; Zhu, J.; Vogel, S. C.; Zhao, Y. [Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Piezoelectric materials respond to external stimuli by adjusting atomic positions. In solid-solutions, the changes occurring in atomic scale are very complex since the short- and long-range order are different. Standard methods used in diffraction data analysis fail to model the short-range order accurately. Pressure-induced cation displacements in ferroelectric Pb(Zr{sub 0.45}Ti{sub 0.55})O{sub 3} perovskite oxide are modeled by starting from a short-range order. We show that the model gives the average structure correctly and properly describes the local structure. The origin of the microstrain in lead zirconate titanate is the spatially varying Zr and Ti concentration and atomic distances, which is taken into account in the simulation. High-pressure neutron powder diffraction and simulation techniques are applied for the determination of atomic positions and bond-valences as a function of pressure. Under hydrostatic pressure, the material loses its piezoelectric properties far before the transition to the cubic phase takes place. The total cation valence +6 is preserved up to 3.31 GPa by compensating the increasing B-cation valence by decreasing Pb-displacement from the high-symmetry position. At 3.31 GPa, Pb-displacement is zero and the material is no more ferroelectric. This is also the pressure at which the Pb-valence is minimized. The average structure is still tetragonal. The model for microstrain predicts that the transition occurs over a finite pressure range: Pb-displacements are spatially varying and follow the distribution of Zr and Ti ions.

  20. RHEOLOGY OF SETTLED SOLIDS IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, C.; Prior, M.; Koopman, D.; Edwards, T.

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank as process housing. This method includes the addition of monosodium titanate (MST) to a waste tank containing salt solution and entrained sludge solids, followed by tank mixing and filtration. The filtrate is then processed through in-tank ion exchange columns containing crystalline silicotitanate (CST) media. While the process is operating, it is known that solid particles begin to settle in the tank and temperatures may reach beyond 45 C. Previous testing has shown that sludge-MST slurries that sit for extended periods at elevated temperatures can develop large shear strengths, making them difficult to resuspend and remove from the tank. The authors conducted rheological testing of mixtures containing various concentrations of sludge simulant, MST, and CST (three preparations) that were aged at different times (i.e., 0 to 13 weeks) and isothermally maintained to 30, 45, or 60 C. Two types of grinding methodologies were employed to prepare CST for this testing, herein called Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) ground materials. Unground CST particles were also tested. A small number of samples were irradiated prior to 4 week settling and 60 C temperature treatment, with exposures ranging from 0 to 100 MRad. Additional tests are also being conducted that will allow the solid particles to settle at 45 C for 6, 12, and 24 months. The objectives of this task are to determine the impact of feed composition, settling time, and temperature on the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency of the slurries and to determine the impact of radiation on slurry rheology. The testing will determine the relative impact of these parameters rather than predict the shear strength, yield stress, and consistency as a function of feed and operating conditions. This document describes the rheology of slurries containing MST, CST, and simulated sludge that sat at indicated temperatures for up to 13 weeks. A previous SRNL report described preliminary rheology data of slurries containing MST and sludge. Preliminary results of the irradiation tests are also presented in this report, though additional data are still being collected. Rheology of the long term settling samples (6, 12, and 24 months) and additional irradiation test results will be reported at a later date. Conclusions from this analysis are as follows: (1) Slurries containing MST and unground CST have the largest shear strength. Due to the high shear strengths measured in slurries containing unground CST, evaluations of specific tank contents and mixing capability should be performed prior to any addition of this material into a waste tank. Experimentally determined shear strengths indicate mixing could be problematic in mixtures containing unground CST. (2) Increasing the ground CST fraction in the slurry increases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (3) Increasing the sludge fraction in the slurry decreases the slurry shear strength, yield stress, and consistency. (4) Slurries containing VSL ground CST have larger shear strength, yield stress, and consistency than slurries containing SRNL ground CST. (5) The effects of settling time and temperature on slurry shear strength are slurry dependent. (6) No effects of settling time and temperature on slurry yield stress or consistency were observed. (7) Radiation up to 100 MRad does not appear to affect properties of shear strength, yield stress, or consistency of process feeds.

  1. A statistical model approximation for perovskite solid-solutions: a Raman study of lead-zirconate- titanate single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantti, Johannes [Aalto University, Finland; Fujioka, Y [Aalto University, Finland; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Xie, Y [Simon Fraser University, Canada; Glazer, A [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead titanate (PbTiO3) is a classical example of a ferroelectric perovskite oxide illustrating a displacive phase transition accompanied by a softening of a symmetry-breaking mode. The underlying assumption justifying the soft-mode theory is that the crystal is macroscopically sufficiently uniform so that a meaningful free energy function can be formed. In contrast to PbTiO3, experimental studies show that the phase transition behaviour of lead-zirconate-titanate solid solution (PZT) is far more subtle. Most of the studies on the PZT system have been dedicated to ceramic or powder samples, in which case an unambiguous soft-mode study is not possible, as modes with different symmetries appear together. Our Raman scattering study on titanium-rich PZT single crystal shows that the phase transitions in PZT cannot be described by a simple soft-mode theory. In strong contrast to PbTiO3, splitting of transverse E-symmetry modes reveals that there are different locally-ordered regions. The role of crystal defects, random distribution of Ti and Zr at the B- cation site and Pb ions shifted away from their ideal positions, dictates the phase transition mechanism. A statistical model explaining the observed peak splitting and phase transformation to a complex state with spatially varying local order in the vicinity of the morphotropic phase boundary is given.

  2. Radiocarbon on Titan RALPH D. LORENZ1*, A. J. TIMOTHY JULL2, TIMOTHY D. SWINDLE1 AND JONATHAN I. LUNINE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    's atmosphere is thick enough that cosmic-ray flux limits the production of 14C: absence of a strong magnetic will be measured by the Huygens probe. Measurements with simple detectors on future missions could place useful as a measure of age. Titan, to be the object of close scrutiny of the NASA­ESA Cassini­Huygens mission

  3. Diagnosis of Lower Hybrid on MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, D. R.; Goetz, J. A.; Kaufman, M. C.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Prager, S. C. [University of Wisconsin--Madison, Madison WI 53706 (United States)

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    RF driven current has never been demonstrated in a Reversed Field Pinch. Recently the lower hybrid system on the Madison Symmetric Torus reached a new operating regime. This upgrade allows RF powers of up to 5% of the Ohmic input power to be injected. It is therefore anticipated that the lower hybrid system is on the threshold of producing meaningful changes to the RFP equilibrium. A diagnostic set is under development to facilitate the study of such changes and lay the foundation for near megawatt operations. Many measurements are being studied for viability. These include electron cyclotron emission, examinations of bulk ion and electron heating, surface perturbation pickup coils, magnetic probe measurements, and Langmuir probe measurements. In addition, several x-ray diagnostics are in operation: pulse height analysis is performed on detector arrays to determine the 5-200 keV spectrum. An insertable target probe is available to create x-rays from fast electrons. Tomographic inversion of 2-D Soft x-ray detectors yields equilibrium information through island structure. Results from experiments with source power up to 225 kW will be presented. Preliminary results from CQL3D Fokker-Planck simulations will also be presented.

  4. Graduate Student Information - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged In You mustGlossary AGraduate

  5. LANL: Mechanical testing and modeling in MST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 6157Bioenergy » CPO:mission of the

  6. Los Alamos Lab: MST: Focus on Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking down theElectrodynamics,Focus on

  7. Los Alamos Lab: MST: Materials Research Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking down theElectrodynamics,Focus

  8. Physics Topics - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,

  9. Research Mission - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014ReferencesStereoEnergy

  10. Programmable Power Supply for MST'S Poloidal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35Information &ProgramProgramDOE IEEEINPSS

  11. Study of the characteristics of a piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate radiation detector using a pulsed xenon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyachi, Takashi [Research Institute of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Okudaira, Osamu [Research Institute of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Takechi, Seiji; Kurozumi, Atsuma; Morinaga, Shinya; Uno, Takefumi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka-City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto-University, Kyoto-606-8501 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masanori [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Murakami, Takeshi; Uchihori, Yukio [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Okada, Nagaya [Honda Electronics Co. Ltd., Toyohashi, Aichi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The detector characteristics of piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) were studied by directly irradiating a multilayered PZT detector with 400 MeV/n xenon ions. An extracted beam was processed with a rotating slit. Thus, passed through {approx}10{sup 3} xenon ions were available for 50 to 250 {mu}s. The effect of polarization on the output signal was discussed, and the optimal electrode configuration was determined. The output signal appeared as an isolated pulse whose amplitude was qualitatively understood by the Bethe-Bloch formula. However, the calculated and the observed values differed depending on the rotation speed of the slit. A process that can explain the differences is presented here. The output signal appearing beyond the range of 400 MeV/n xenon ion beam was discussed. The sensitivity was compared with that obtained with hypervelocity collision of dust.

  12. Physical properties and electronic structure of a new barium titanate suboxide Ba1+?Ti13-?O?? (? = 0.11)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rotundu, Costel R.; Jiang, Shan; Deng, Xiaoyu; Qian, Yiting; Khan, Saeed; Hawthorn, David G.; Kotliar, Gabriel; Ni, Ni

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure, transport, thermodynamic properties, x-ray absorption spectra (XAS), and electronic structure of a new barium titanate suboxide, Ba1+?Ti13-?O?? (? = 0.11), are reported. It is a paramagnetic poor metal with hole carriers dominating the transport. Fermi liquid behavior appears at low temperature. The oxidization state of Ti obtained by the XAS is consistent with the metallic Ti²? state. Local density approximation band structure calculations reveal the material is near the Van Hove singularity. The pseudogap behavior in the Ti-d band and the strong hybridization between the Ti-d and O-p orbitals reflect the characteristics of the building blocks of themore »Ti?? semi-cluster and the TiO? quasi-squares, respectively.« less

  13. Physical properties and electronic structure of a new barium titanate suboxide Ba1+?Ti13-?O?? (? = 0.11)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rotundu, Costel R. [Univ. of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jiang, Shan [Univ. of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Deng, Xiaoyu [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)] (ORCID:0000000178020966); Qian, Yiting [Univ. of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)] (ORCID:0000000250175517); Khan, Saeed [Univ. of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hawthorn, David G. [Univ. of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)] (ORCID:0000000270020416); Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Ni, Ni [Univ. of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure, transport, thermodynamic properties, x-ray absorption spectra (XAS), and electronic structure of a new barium titanate suboxide, Ba1+?Ti13-?O?? (? = 0.11), are reported. It is a paramagnetic poor metal with hole carriers dominating the transport. Fermi liquid behavior appears at low temperature. The oxidization state of Ti obtained by the XAS is consistent with the metallic Ti²? state. Local density approximation band structure calculations reveal the material is near the Van Hove singularity. The pseudogap behavior in the Ti-d band and the strong hybridization between the Ti-d and O-p orbitals reflect the characteristics of the building blocks of the Ti?? semi-cluster and the TiO? quasi-squares, respectively.

  14. One-pot solvothermal synthesis of dual-phase titanate/titania Nanoparticles and their adsorption and photocatalytic Performances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu Hua; Gong, Dangguo; Tang, Yuxin; Ho, Jeffery Weng Chye; Tay, Yee Yan; Lau, Wei Siew; Wijaya, Olivia; Lim, Jiexiang; Chen, Zhong, E-mail: aszchen@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual phase titanate/titania nanoparticles undergo phase transformation gradually with the increase of solvothermal synthesis temperature from 100 °C to 200 °C, and eventually are fully transformed into anatase TiO{sub 2}. The crystal structure change results in the changes of optical absorption, sensitizer/dopant formation and surface area of the materials which finally affect the overall dye removal ability. Reactions under dark and light have been conducted to distinguish the contributions of surface adsorption from photocatalytic degradation. The sample synthesized at 160 °C (S160) shows the best performances for both adsorption under dark and photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. The adsorption mechanism for S160 is determined as monolayer adsorption based on the adsorption isotherm test under dark condition, and an impressive adsorption capacity of 162.19 mg/g is achieved. For the photocatalytic application, this sample at 0.1 g/L loading is also able to degrade 20 ppm MB within 6 hours under the visible light (>420 nm) condition. - Graphical abstract: The effect of solvothermal synthesis temperature on the formation and dye removal performance of dual phase titanate/titania nanoparticles was unveiled and optimized. - Highlights: • Low temperature one-pot solvothermal synthesis of dual-phase photocatalysts. • Correlation of the synthesis temperature is made with the phase composition. • Adsorption isotherm, kinetics, photocatalytic degradation were studied. • Synthesis at 160 °C yields the best material for adsorption of MB in dark. • The same sample also shows the best visible light degradation of MB.

  15. IMPACT OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION MELT RATE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Koopman, D.

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential impacts of the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) streams - particularly the addition of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) - on the melt rate of simulated feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Additional MST was added to account for contributions from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) was used to evaluate four melter feed compositions: two with simulated SCIX and SWPF material and two without. The Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF) was then used to compare two different feeds: one with and one without bounding concentrations of simulated SCIX and SWPF material. Analyses of the melter feed materials confirmed that they met their targeted compositions. Four feeds were tested in triplicate in the MRF. The linear melt rates were determined by using X-ray computed tomography to measure the height of the glass formed along the bottom of the beakers. The addition of the SCIX and SWPF material reduced the average measured melt rate by about 10% in MRF testing, although there was significant scatter in the data. Two feeds were tested in the SMRF. It was noted that the ground CST alone (ground CST with liquid in a bucket) was extremely difficult to resuspend during preparation of the feed with material from SCIX and SWPF. This feed was also more difficult to pump than the material without MST and CST due to settling occurring in the melter feed line, although the yield stress of both feeds was high relative to the DWPF design basis. Steady state feeding conditions were maintained for about five hours for each feed. There was a reduction in the feed and pour rates of approximately 15% when CST and MST were added to the feed, although there was significant scatter in the data. Analysis of samples collected from the SMRF pour stream showed that the composition of the glass changed as expected when MST and CST were added to the feed. These reductions in melt rate are consistent with previous studies that showed a negative impact of increased TiO{sub 2} concentrations on the rate of melting. The impact of agitating the melt pool via bubbling was not studied as part of this work, but may be of interest for further testing. It is recommended that additional melt rate testing be performed should a potential reduction in melt rate of 10-15% be considered an issue of concern, or should the anticipated composition of the glass with the addition of material from salt waste processing be modified significantly from the current projections, either due to changes in sludge batch preparation or changes in the composition or volume of SCIX and SWPF material.

  16. Rotary Microfilter Media Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received funding from DOE EM-21, Office of Cleanup Technologies, to develop the rotary microfilter for high level radioactive service. One aspect of this project evaluated alternative filter media to select one for the 2nd generation rotary microfilter being procured as a prefilter to a small column ion exchange process. The authors conducted screening tests on a variety of filter media and pore sizes using a stirred cell followed by pilot-scale testing on a more limited number of filter media and pore sizes with a three disk rotary microfilter. These tests used 5.6 molar sodium supernate, and sludge plus monosodium titanate (MST) solids. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The 0.1 {micro} nominal TruMem{reg_sign} ceramic and the Pall PMM M050 (0.5 {micro} nominal) stainless steel filter media produced the highest flux in rotary filter testing. (2) The Pall PMM M050 media produced the highest flux of the stainless steel media tested in rotary filter testing. (3) The Pall PMM M050 media met filtrate quality requirements for the rotary filter. (4) The 0.1 {micro} TruMem{reg_sign} and 0.1 {micro} Pall PMM media met filtrate quality requirements as well. (5) The Pall PMM M050 media produced comparable flux to the 0.1 {micro} TruMem{reg_sign} media, and proved more durable and easier to weld. Based on these test results, the authors recommend Pall PMM M050 filter media for the 2nd generation rotary microfilter.

  17. acid monosodium salt: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and spot selling price of various carboxylic acids. 1-3 Names used for biomass feedstocks. . 1-4 2-1 Sample processing. Rinsing scheme for precipitated solids. 12 3-1...

  18. The impact of brannerite on the release of plutonium and gadolinium during the corrosion of zirconolite-rich titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlain, D. B.; Hash, M. C.; Basco, J. K.; Bakel, A. J.; Metz, C. J.; Wolf, S. F.; Buck, E. C.; Nole, M. K.

    2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanate ceramics have been selected as the preferred waste form for the immobilization of excess plutonium. Corrosion tests are underway to try to understand the long-term behavior of this material. In this paper, results from PCT-B static dissolution tests are used to provide an explanation of the observed corrosion behavior of a zirconolite-based ceramic. Two important observations are made. First, Ca is released at a constant rate [7 x 10{sup {minus}5} g/(m{sup 2} day)] in PCT-B tests for up to two years. Second, the release rates for Pu and Gd increase with time (up to two years) in PCT-B tests. The first observation suggests that the ceramics continue to corrode at a low rate for at least two years in PCT-B tests. The second observation suggests that the release rates of Pu and Gd are controlled by some process or processes that do not affect the release rate of other elements. Evidence indicates that this is due to the preferential dissolution of brannerite from the ceramic.

  19. Symmetries and multiferroic properties of novel room-temperature magnetoelectrics: Lead iron tantalate – lead zirconate titanate (PFT/PZT)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sanchez, Dilsom A.; Ortega, N.; Kumar, Ashok; Roque-Malherbe, R.; Polanco, R.; Scott, J. F.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixing 60-70% lead zirconate titanate with 40-30% lead iron tantalate produces a single-phase, low-loss, room-temperature multiferroic with magnetoelectric coupling: (PbZr?.??Ti?.??O?) (1-x)- (PbFe?.?Ta?.?O?)x. The present study combines x-ray scattering, magnetic and polarization hysteresis in both phases, plus a second-order dielectric divergence (to epsilon = 6000 at 475 K for 0.4 PFT; to 4000 at 520 K for 0.3 PFT) for an unambiguous assignment as a C2v-C4v (Pmm2-P4mm) transition. The material exhibits square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops with 0.1 emu/g at 295 K and saturation polarization Pr = 25 ?C/cm², which actually increases (to 40 ?C/cm²) in the high-T tetragonal phase, representing an exciting new room temperature oxide multiferroic to compete with BiFeO?. Additional transitions at high temperatures (cubic at T>1300 K) and low temperatures (rhombohedral or monoclinic at T<250 K) are found. These are the lowest-loss room-temperature multiferroics known, which is a great advantage for magnetoelectric devices.

  20. High temperature dielectric relaxation anomaly of Y{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} doped barium strontium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Shiguang; Mao, Chaoliang, E-mail: maochaoliang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn; Wang, Genshui; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin, E-mail: maochaoliang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Relaxation like dielectric anomaly is observed in Y{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} doped barium strontium titanate ceramics when the temperature is over 450?K. Apart from the conventional dielectric relaxation analysis method with Debye or modified Debye equations, which is hard to give exact temperature dependence of the relaxation process, dielectric response in the form of complex impedance, assisted with Cole-Cole impedance model corrected equivalent circuits, is adopted to solve this problem and chase the polarization mechanism in this paper. Through this method, an excellent description to temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation anomaly and its dominated factors are achieved. Further analysis reveals that the exponential decay of the Cole distribution parameter n with temperature is confirmed to be induced by the microscopic lattice distortion due to ions doping and the interaction between the defects. At last, a clear sight to polarization mechanism containing both the intrinsic dipolar polarization and extrinsic distributed oxygen vacancies hopping response under different temperature is obtained.

  1. ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

  2. Small Column Ion Exchange Design and Safety Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, T.; Rios-Armstrong, M.; Edwards, R.; Herman, D.

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) is a transformational technology originally developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM-30) office and is now being deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to significantly increase overall salt processing capacity and accelerate the Liquid Waste System life-cycle. The process combines strontium and actinide removal using Monosodium Titanate (MST), Rotary Microfiltration, and cesium removal using Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST, specifically UOP IONSIV{reg_sign}IE-911 ion exchanger) to create a low level waste stream to be disposed in grout and a high level waste stream to be vitrified. The process also includes preparation of the streams for disposal, e.g., grinding of the loaded CST material. These waste processing components are technically mature and flowsheet integration studies are being performed including glass formulations studies, application specific thermal modeling, and mixing studies. The deployment program includes design and fabrication of the Rotary Microfilter (RMF) assembly, ion-exchange columns (IXCs), and grinder module, utilizing an integrated system safety design approach. The design concept is to install the process inside an existing waste tank, Tank 41H. The process consists of a feed pump with a set of four RMFs, two IXCs, a media grinder, three Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), and all supporting infrastructure including media receipt and preparation facilities. The design addresses MST mixing to achieve the required strontium and actinide removal and to prevent future retrieval problems. CST achieves very high cesium loadings (up to 1,100 curies per gallon (Ci/gal) bed volume). The design addresses the hazards associated with this material including heat management (in column and in-tank), as detailed in the thermal modeling. The CST must be size reduced for compatibility with downstream processes. The design addresses material transport into and out of the grinder and includes provisions for equipment maintenance including remote handling. The design includes a robust set of nuclear safety controls compliant with DOE Standard (STD)-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process. The controls cover explosions, spills, boiling, aerosolization, and criticality. Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) including seismic event, tornado/high wind, and wildland fire are considered. In addition, the SCIX process equipment was evaluated for impact to existing facility safety equipment including the waste tank itself. SCIX is an innovative program which leverages DOE's technology development capabilities to provide a basis for a successful field deployment.

  3. Stabilization of ordered zirconium titanates through the chemical substitution of Ti[sup 4+] by Al[sup 3+]/Ta[sup 5+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yan; Davies, P.K. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have investigated the ZrO[sub 2]-AlTaO[sub 4] system to understand how selected chemical substitutions can be used to control cation-ordering transformations in zirconium titanate based dielectric ceramics. The complete replacement of the Ti content of Zr[sub x]Ti[sub 2[minus]x]O[sub 4] by a coupled Al[sup 3+]/Ta[sup 5+] substitution permits the synthesis of a wide range of isostructural Zr[sub x](Al[sub 0.5]Ta[sub 0.5])[sub 2[minus]x] solid solutions. At high temperatures a disordered [alpha]-PbO[sub 2] type of structure is formed for 0.375 [le] x [le] 1.03. Samples with 0.67 [le] x [le] 1.03 undergo a cation-ordering reaction to a structure in which the a and b axes of the parent disordered cell are doubled. The stabilities of these cation-ordered derivative structures are significantly greater than those of the ordered zirconium titanates. The ordering temperatures are composition dependent with a maximum of 1,393 C occurring for Zr[sub 0.86](Al[sub 0.5]Ta[sub 0.5])[sub 1.14]O[sub 4]. The higher transition temperatures also enhance the kinetics of the ordering transition; whereas the pure zirconium titanates require extended annealing to produce complete cation order, fully ordered Zr[sub x](Al[sub 0.5]Ta[sub 0.5])[sub 2[minus]x]O[sub 4] solid solutions are produced during a normal furnace cool.

  4. A photoactive titanate with a stereochemically active Sn lone pair: Electronic and crystal structure of Sn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} from computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Lee A. [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath (United Kingdom); Walsh, Aron, E-mail: a.walsh@bath.ac.uk [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    TiO{sub 2} remains the most widely studied metal oxide for photocatalytic reactions. The standard approach to reduce the band gap of titania, for increasing the absorption of visible light, is anion modification. For example the formation of an oxynitride compound, where the nitrogen 2p states decrease the binding energy of the valence band. We demonstrate that cation modification can produce a similar effect through the formation of a ternary oxide combining Ti and an ns{sup 2} cation, Sn(II). In Sn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}, the underlying Ti 3d conduction states remain largely unmodified and an electronic band gap of 2.1 eV (590 nm) is predicted by hybrid density functional theory. Our analysis indicates a strong potential for Sn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} in visible-light driven photocatalysis, which should prove superior to the alternative (SnO{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(TiO{sub 2}){sub x} solid-solution. - Graphical abstract: Sn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} is predicted to be a semiconductor with potential for bipolar conductivity and visible-light photocatalysis. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tin titanate adopts the Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4} crystal structure with a sterically active Sn(II) lone pair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tin titanate is thermodynamically stable with respect to TiO{sub 2} and SnO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tin titanate is predicted have a band gap of 590 nm, ideal for photocatalytic applications.

  5. Characterizing Titan's Upper Atmosphere Using the Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    methane chemical losses. INMS Data T-GITM Bell et al. [2010b] #12;Constraints on Escape · Parameter Sweep-Thermosphere Model (GITM) · 3-D, non-hydrostatic, altitude-based atmospheric model ­ Compressible Navier (TVD) MUSCL Scheme. ­ Block-based Massively Parallel Framework ­ Updating with 4th order Runge

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ARP PRODUCT SIMULANT AND SB4 TANK 40 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D; John Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Kim Crapse, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive startup of two new SRS processing facilities, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side-Solvent-Extraction Unit (MCU) will add two new waste streams to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The ARP will remove actinides from the 5.6 M salt solution resulting in a sludge-like product that is roughly half monosodium titanate (MST) insoluble solids and half sludge insoluble solids. The ARP product will be added to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) at boiling and dewatered prior to pulling a SRAT receipt sample. The cesium rich MCU stream will be added to the SRAT at boiling after both formic and nitric acid have been added and the SRAT contents concentrated to the appropriate endpoint. A concern was raised by an external hydrogen review panel that the actinide loaded MST could act as a catalyst for hydrogen generation (Mar 15, 2007 report, Recommendation 9). Hydrogen generation, and it's potential to form a flammable mixture in the off-gas, under SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processing conditions has been a concern since the discovery that noble metals catalyze the decomposition of formic acid. Radiolysis of water also generates hydrogen, but the radiolysis rate is orders of magnitude lower than the noble metal catalyzed generation. As a result of the concern raised by the external hydrogen review panel, hydrogen generation was a prime consideration in this experiment. Testing was designed to determine whether the presence of the irradiated ARP simulant containing MST caused uncontrolled or unexpected hydrogen production during experiments simulating the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) due to activation of titanium. A Shielded Cells experiment, SC-5, was completed using SB4 sludge from Tank 405 combined with an ARP product produced from simulants by SRNL researchers. The blend of sludge and MST was designed to be prototypic of planned DWPF SRAT and SME cycles. As glass quality was not an objective in this experiment, no vitrification of the SME product was completed. The results from this experiment were compared to the results from experiment SC-1, a similar experiment with SB4 sludge without added ARP product. This report documents: (1) The preparation and subsequent composition of the ARP product. (2) The preparation and subsequent compositional characterization of the SRAT Receipt sample. Additional details will be presented concerning the noble metal concentration of the ARP product and the SRAT receipt sample. Also, calculations related to the amount of formic and nitric acid added during SRAT processing will be presented as excess formic acid will lead to additional hydrogen generation. (3) Highlights from processing during the SRAT cycle and SME cycle (CPC processing). Hydrogen generation will be discussed since this was the prime objective for this experiment. (4) A comparison of CPC processing between SC-1 (without ARP simulant) and SC-5. This work was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP)6, and analyses were guided by an Analytical Sample Support Matrix (ASSM)7. This Research and Development (R&D) was completed to support operation of DWPF.

  7. THE IMPLANTATION AND INTERACTIONS OF O{sup +} IN TITAN'S ATMOSPHERE: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS OF COLLISION-INDUCED DISSOCIATION OF N{sub 2} AND MODELING OF POSITIVE ION FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, M. B.; Latimer, C. J. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Montenegro, E. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970, RJ (Brazil); Tucker, O. J.; Johnson, R. E. [Engineering Physics and Astronomy, University of Virginia, Thornton Hall B102, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Smith, H. T. [Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energetic oxygen ions are an important component of the plasma incident onto Titan's atmosphere. Therefore, we report measurements of electron capture and ionization collisions of N{sub 2} with incident O{sup +} over the energy range 10-100 keV. Using time of flight coincidence counting techniques we also measured the collision-induced dissociation of N{sub 2} following ionization and electron capture. The electron capture and ionization cross sections were found to have comparable magnitudes. Capture collisions are dominated by non-dissociative processes with the dissociative processes providing contributions that are only slightly smaller. In contrast, ionization is entirely dominated by the dissociative processes. The energy distributions of the N{sup +} and N atom fragments ejected by 20, 50, and 100 keV incident O{sup +} projectiles have also been determined. These fragments carry considerable amounts of energy and if produce in the exobase region can readily escape. The cross sections measured here have been used with Cassini energetic ion and atmospheric density data to determine the ionization by and neutralization of energetic O{sup +} penetrating Titan's N{sub 2} rich atmosphere. Neutralization by charge exchange is found not to occur efficiently above Titan's exobase, so energetic particles with large gyroradii penetrate the atmosphere primarily as ions. When the energetic O{sup +} flux is large, we also show it is an important source of ionization and heating at depth into Titan's atmosphere and the fragments contribute to the net atmospheric loss rate.

  8. Low leakage Ru-strontium titanate-Ru metal-insulator-metal capacitors for sub-20?nm technology node in dynamic random access memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovici, M., E-mail: Mihaela.Ioana.Popovici@imec.be; Swerts, J.; Redolfi, A.; Kaczer, B.; Aoulaiche, M.; Radu, I.; Clima, S.; Everaert, J.-L.; Van Elshocht, S.; Jurczak, M. [Imec, Leuven 3001 (Belgium)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved metal-insulator-metal capacitor (MIMCAP) stacks with strontium titanate (STO) as dielectric sandwiched between Ru as top and bottom electrode are shown. The Ru/STO/Ru stack demonstrates clearly its potential to reach sub-20?nm technology nodes for dynamic random access memory. Downscaling of the equivalent oxide thickness, leakage current density (J{sub g}) of the MIMCAPs, and physical thickness of the STO have been realized by control of the Sr/Ti ratio and grain size using a heterogeneous TiO{sub 2}/STO based nanolaminate stack deposition and a two-step crystallization anneal. Replacement of TiN with Ru as both top and bottom electrodes reduces the amount of electrically active defects and is essential to achieve a low leakage current in the MIM capacitor.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR STRONTIUM TITANATE IN SWSA 7 AND ADJACENT PARCELS IN SUPPORT OF THE NATIONAL PRIORITIES LIST SITE BOUNDARY DEFINITION PROGRAM OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. King

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office requested support from the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract to delineate the extent of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) contamination in and around Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7 as part of the Oak Ridge National Priorities List Site boundary definition program. The study area is presented in Fig. 1.1 relative to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The investigation was executed according to Sampling and Analysis Plan/Quality Assurance Project Plan (SAP/QAPP) (DOE 2011) to supplement previous investigations noted below and to determine what areas, if any, have been adversely impacted by site operations.

  10. OPERATIONS REVIEW OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS - 11327

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Poirier, M.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.; Brown, S.; Geeting, M.

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is removing liquid radioactive waste from its Tank Farm. To treat waste streams that are low in Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides, SRS developed the Actinide Removal Process and implemented the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The Actinide Removal Process contacts salt solution with monosodium titanate to sorb strontium and select actinides. After monosodium titanate contact, the resulting slurry is filtered to remove the monosodium titanate (and sorbed strontium and actinides) and entrained sludge. The filtrate is transferred to the MCU for further treatment to remove cesium. The solid particulates removed by the filter are concentrated to {approx} 5 wt %, washed to reduce the sodium concentration, and transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. The CSSX process extracts the cesium from the radioactive waste using a customized solvent to produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS), and strips and concentrates the cesium from the solvent with dilute nitric acid. The DSS is incorporated in grout while the strip acid solution is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. The facilities began radiological processing in April 2008 and started processing of the third campaign ('MarcoBatch 3') of waste in June 2010. Campaigns to date have processed {approx}1.2 million gallons of dissolved saltcake. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel performed tests using actual radioactive samples for each waste batch prior to processing. Testing included monosodium titanate sorption of strontium and actinides followed by CSSX batch contact tests to verify expected cesium mass transfer. This paper describes the tests conducted and compares results from facility operations. The results include strontium, plutonium, and cesium removal, cesium concentration, and organic entrainment and recovery data. Additionally, the poster describes lessons learned during operation of the facility.

  11. Radio frequency wave experiments on the MST reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, C.B.; Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Nornberg, M.D.; Prager, S.C.; Thomas, M.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.; Uchimoto, E. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Smirnov, A.P. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); Harvey, R.W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA (United States); Ram, A.K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments, simulations, and theory all indicate that the magnetic fluctuations responsible for the poor confinement in the reversed field pinch (RFP) can be controlled by altering the radial profile of the current density. The magnetic fluctuations in the RFP are due to resistive MHD instabilities caused by current profile peaking; thus confinement in the RFP is ultimately the result of a misalignment between inductively driven current profiles and the stable current profiles characteristic of the Taylor state. If a technique such as rf current drive can be developed to non-inductively sustain a Taylor state (a current profile linearly stable to all tearing modes), the confinement of the RFP and its potential as a reactor concept are likely to increase. Whether there is a self-consistent path from poor confinement to greatly improved confinement through current profile modification is an issue for future experiments to address if and only if near term experiments can demonstrate: (1) coupling to and the propagation of rf waves in RFP plasmas, (2) efficient current drive, and (3) control of the power deposition which will make it possible to control the current profile. In this paper, modeling results and experimental plans are presented for two rf experiments which have the potential of satisfying these three goals: high-n{sub {parallel}} lower hybrid (LH) waves and electron Bernstein waves (EBWs).

  12. Port hole perturbations to the magnetic field in MST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38Polaron BehaviorPolymer-likeStudy COAL2 (2010)

  13. LANL: Facility Focus, MST-6 Materials Surface Science Investigations Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 6157Bioenergy » CPO: Los

  14. Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8, 2014addsAlamos,3000F

  15. Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,

  16. Microsoft Word - eMST report - for signature.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamicsAspen Aerogels, Inc.Use

  17. Topics: Determining the Beta Limit - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliances » Top Innovative Science ofDetermining

  18. Control and Auxiliary Systems - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGas SeparationsRelevant toSite MapContact UsP-27Control and

  19. Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is YourAwardspublicexceedsScientistsdiseaseLosElectron

  20. About Materials Science Technology:MST: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In the design ThisLPO About LPO

  1. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversight Board The

  2. ANALYSES OF HTF-48-12-20/24 (FEBRUARY, 2012) AND ARCHIVED HTF-E-05-021 TANK 48H SLURRY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Peters, T.

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Personnel characterized a Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) archived sample of Tank 48H slurry (HTF-E-05-021) in addition to the composite of samples HTF-48-12-20 and HTF-48-12-24, which were both retrieved in February 2012. The combined February 2012 sample is referred to as HTF-48-12-20/24 in this report. The results from these analyses are compared with Tank 48H samples analyzed in 2003, 2004, and 2005. This work supports the effort to demonstrate copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) of organic content in this material. The principal findings with respect to the chemical and physical characteristics of the most recent sample are: (1) The measured potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) solid concentration is 1.76 wt %; (2) Titanium was in line with 2004 and 2005 slurry measurements at 897 mg/L, it represents 0.1535 {+-} 0.0012 wt % monosodium titanate (MST); (3) The measured insoluble solids content was 1.467 wt %; (4) The free hydroxide concentration in the Tank 48H filtrate sample (1.02 {+-} 0.02 M) is close to the Tank 48H limit (1.0 M); (5) Carbonate reported by total inorganic carbon (TIC, 1.39 {+-} 0.03 M) is more than double the concentrations measured in past (2003-2005) samples; (6) The soluble potassium content (measured at 286 {+-} 23 mg/L) in the filtrate is in line with all past measurements; and (7) The measured {sup 137}Cs concentration is 7.81E + 08 {+-} 3.9E + 07 dpm/mL of slurry (1.33 {+-} 5% Ci/gallon or 3.18E + 05 {+-} 5% curies of {sup 137}Cs in the tank) in the slurry which is in agreement with the 2005 report of 3.14E + 05 {+-} 1.5% curies of {sup 137}Cs in the tank. The filtrate {sup 137}Cs concentration is 2.57E + 07 {+-} 2.6E + 05 dpm/mL. This result is consistent with previous results. Significant analytical data are summarized in Table 1.

  3. JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline pump orientations are chosen by the previous work [Lee et. al, 2008] and the initial engineering judgement for the conservative flow estimate since the modeling results for the other pump orientations are compared with the baseline results. As shown in Table 1, the present study assumes that each slurry pump has 900 gpm flowrate for the tank mixing analysis, although the Standard Operating Procedure for Tank 48 currently limits the actual pump speed and flowrate to a value less than 900 gpm for a 29 inch liquid level. Table 2 shows material properties and weight distributions for the solids to be modeled for the mixing analysis in Tank 48.

  4. Characterization Of Supernate Samples From High Level Waste Tanks 13H, 30H, 37H, 39H, 45F, 46F and 49H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stallings, M. E.; Barnes, M. J.; Peters, T. B.; Diprete, D. P.; Hobbs, D. T.; Fink, S. D.

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents work conducted in support of technical needs expressed, in part, by the Engineering, Procurement, and Construction Contractor for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyze and characterize supernate waste from seven selected High Level Waste (HLW) tanks to allow: classification of feed to be sent to the SWPF; verification that SWPF processes will be able to meet Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC); and updating of the Waste Characterization System (WCS) database. This document provides characterization data of samples obtained from Tanks 13H, 30H, 37H, 39H, 45F, 46F, and 49H and discusses results. Characterization of the waste tank samples involved several treatments and analysis at various stages of sample processing. These analytical stages included as-received liquid, post-dilution to 6.44 M sodium (target), post-acid digestion, post-filtration (at 3 filtration pore sizes), and after cesium removal using ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP). All tanks will require cesium removal as well as treatment with Monosodium Titanate (MST) for {sup 90}Sr (Strontium) decontamination. A small filtration effect for 90Sr was observed for six of the seven tank wastes. No filtration effects were observed for Pu (Plutonium), Np (Neptunium), U (Uranium), or Tc (Technetium); {sup 137}Cs (Cesium) concentration is ~E+09 pCi/mL for all the tank wastes. Tank 37H is significantly higher in {sup 90}Sr than the other six tanks. {sup 237}Np in the F-area tanks (45F and 46F) are at least 1 order of magnitude less than the H-Area tank wastes. The data indicate a constant ratio of {sup 99}Tc to Cs in the seven tank wastes. This indicates the Tc remains largely soluble in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste and partitions similarly with Cs. {sup 241}Am (Americium) concentration was low in the seven tank wastes. The majority of data were detection limit values, the largest being < 1.0E+04 pCi/mL. Measured values for Pu and U were generally well below solubility model predictions.

  5. On the crystal energy and structure of A{sub 2}Ti{sub n}O{sub 2n+1} (A=Li, Na, K) titanates by DFT calculations and neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catti, Michele, E-mail: catti@mater.unimib.it [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Pinus, Ilya [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Scherillo, Antonella [ISIS Facility, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    First-principles quantum-mechanical calculations (CRYSTAL09 code, B3LYP functional) were performed on alkali titanates A{sub 2}Ti{sub n}O{sub 2n+1} with layered structure (n=3,4,6). Monoclinic structural types with unshifted (P2{sub 1}/m) and with shifted (C2/m) layers were considered. Crystal energies and full structural details were obtained for all Li, Na, and K phases. Neutron diffraction data were collected on powder samples of P2{sub 1}/m-Li{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} (a=9.3146(3), b=3.7522(1), c=7.5447(3) Å, ?=97.611(4)°) and C2/m-K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} (a=18.2578(8), b=3.79160(9), c=12.0242(4) Å, ?=106.459(4)°) and their structures were Rietveld-refined. Computed energies show the P2{sub 1}/m arrangement as favoured over the C2/m one for n=3, and the opposite holds for n=6. In the n=4 case the P2{sub 1}/m configuration is predicted to be more stable for Li and Na, and the C2/m one for K titanates. Analysis of Li–O and K–O crystal-chemical environments from experiment and theory shows that the alkali atom bonding is stabilized/destabilized in the different phases consistently with the energy trend. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The P2{sub 1}/m structure-type is found to be more stable for A{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} layer titanates. • The C2/m structure-type is found to be more stable for A{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} layer titanates. • Tetratitanates are predicted to prefer the P2{sub 1}/m (Li and Na) or C2/m (K) structure. • Li–O and K–O bond distances follow a trend consistent with computed phase energies.

  6. Impact of composition and crystallization behavior of atomic layer deposited strontium titanate films on the resistive switching of Pt/STO/TiN devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslam, N.; Rodenbücher, C.; Szot, K.; Waser, R.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S., E-mail: su.hoffmann@fz-juelich.de [Peter-Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), Forschungszentrum Jülich and JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Longo, V.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The resistive switching (RS) properties of strontium titanate (Sr{sub 1+x}Ti{sub 1+y}O{sub 3+(x+2y)}, STO) based metal-oxide-metal structures prepared from industrial compatible processes have been investigated focusing on the effects of composition, microstructure, and device size. Metastable perovskite STO films were prepared on Pt-coated Si substrates utilizing plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) from cyclopentadienyl-based metal precursors and oxygen plasma at 350?°C, and a subsequent annealing at 600?°C in nitrogen. Films of 15?nm and 12?nm thickness with three different compositions [Sr]/([Sr]?+?[Ti]) of 0.57 (Sr-rich STO), 0.50 (stoichiometric STO), and 0.46 (Ti-rich STO) were integrated into Pt/STO/TiN crossbar structures with sizes ranging from 100??m{sup 2} to 0.01??m{sup 2}. Nano-structural characterizations revealed a clear effect of the composition of the as-deposited STO films on their crystallization behavior and thus on the final microstructures. Local current maps obtained by local-conductivity atomic force microscopy were in good agreement with local changes of the films' microstructures. Correspondingly, also the initial leakage currents of the Pt/STO/TiN devices were affected by the STO compositions and by the films' microstructures. An electroforming process set the Pt/STO/TiN devices into the ON-state, while the forming voltage decreased with increasing initial leakage current. After a RESET process under opposite voltage has been performed, the Pt/STO/TiN devices showed a stable bipolar RS behavior with non-linear current-voltage characteristics for the high (HRS) and the low (LRS) resistance states. The obtained switching polarity and nearly area independent LRS values agree with a filamentary character of the RS behavior according to the valence change mechanism. The devices of 0.01??m{sup 2} size with a 12?nm polycrystalline stoichiometric STO film were switched at a current compliance of 50??A with voltages of about ±1.0?V between resistance states of about 40?k? (LRS) and 1 M? (HRS). After identification of the influences of the films' microstructures, i.e., grain boundaries and small cracks, the remaining RS properties could be ascribed to the effect of the [Sr]/([Sr]?+?[Ti]) composition of the ALD STO thin films.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRECIPITATE REACTOR FEED TANK (PRFT) SAMPLE FROM THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) was pulled and sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in June of 2013. The PRFT in DWPF receives Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/ Monosodium Titanate (MST) material from the 512-S Facility via the 511-S Facility. This 2.2 L sample was to be used in small-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing in the Shielded Cells Facility of SRNL. A 1L sub-sample portion was characterized to determine the physical properties such as weight percent solids, density, particle size distribution and crystalline phase identification. Further chemical analysis of the PRFT filtrate and dissolved slurry included metals and anions as well as carbon and base analysis. This technical report describes the characterization and analysis of the PRFT sample from DWPF. At SRNL, the 2.2 L PRFT sample was composited from eleven separate samples received from DWPF. The visible solids were observed to be relatively quick settling which allowed for the rinsing of the original shipping vials with PRFT supernate on the same day as compositing. Most analyses were performed in triplicate except for particle size distribution (PSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PRFT slurry samples were dissolved using a mixed HNO3/HF acid for subsequent Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analyses performed by SRNL Analytical Development (AD). Per the task request for this work, analysis of the PRFT slurry and filtrate for metals, anions, carbon and base were primarily performed to support the planned chemical process cell testing and to provide additional component concentrations in addition to the limited data available from DWPF. Analysis of the insoluble solids portion of the PRFT slurry was aimed at detailed characterization of these solids (TGA, PSD, XRD and SEM) in support of the Salt IPT chemistry team. The overall conclusions from analyses performed in this study are that the PRFT slurry consists of 0.61 Wt.% insoluble MST solids suspended in a 0.77 M [Na+] caustic solution containing various anions such as nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, carbonate and oxalate. The corresponding measured sulfur level in the PRFT slurry, a critical element for determining how much of the PRFT slurry gets blended into the SRAT, is 0.437 Wt.% TS. The PRFT slurry does not contain insoluble oxalates nor significant quantities of high activity sludge solids. The lack of sludge solids has been alluded to by the Salt IPT chemistry team in citing that the mixing pump has been removed from Tank 49H, the feed tank to ARP-MCU, thus allowing the sludge solids to settle out. ? The PRFT aqueous slurry from DWPF was found to contain 5.96 Wt.% total dried solids. Of these total dried solids, relatively low levels of insoluble solids (0.61 Wt.%) were measured. The densities of both the filtrate and slurry were 1.05 g/mL. ? Particle size distribution of the PRFT solids in filtered caustic simulant and XRD analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids indicate that the PRFT slurry contains a bimodal distribution of particles in the range of 1 and 6 ?m and that the particles contain sodium titanium oxide hydroxide Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 crystalline material as determined by XRD. These data are in excellent agreement with similar data obtained from laboratory sampling of vendor supplied MST. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) combined with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids shows the particles to be like previous MST analyses consisting of irregular shaped micron-sized solids consisting primarily of Na and Ti. ? Thermogravimetric analysis of the washed and unwashed PRFT solids shows that the washed solids are very similar to MST solids. The TGA mass loss signal for the unwashed solids shows similar features to TGA performed on cellulose nitrate filter paper indicating significant presence of the deteriorated filter

  8. IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION: KT08, KT09, AND KT10-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the fourth in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The KT08-series of glasses was designed to evaluate any impacts of the inclusion of uranium and thorium in glasses containing the SCIX components. The KT09-series of glasses was designed to study the effect of increasing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and K{sub 2}O concentrations on the propensity for crystallization of titanium containing phases in high TiO{sub 2} concentration glasses. Earlier work on the KT05-series glasses recommended that the impact of these two components be studied further. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations have been shown to improve the properties and performance of high waste loading glasses, and K{sub 2}O has been reported to improve the retention of TiO{sub 2} in silicate glasses. The KT10-series of compositions was designed to evaluate any impacts of the SCIX components at concentrations 50% higher than currently projected.a The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized to identify crystallization, to verify chemical compositions, to measure viscosity, and to measure durability. Liquidus temperature measurements for the KT10-series glasses are underway and will be reported separately. All but one of the KT08-series glasses were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction (XRD). One of the slowly cooled glasses contained a small amount of trevorite, which had no practical impact on the durability of the glass and is typically found in DWPF-type glasses. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses for the KT08-series glasses are well predicted by the DWPF models. The viscosities of the KT08-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. No unexpected issues were encountered when uranium and thorium were added to the glasses with SCIX components. Increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations were not successful in preventing the formation of iron titanate crystals in the KT09-series glasses. Increased K{sub 2}O concentrations were successful in hindering the formation of iron titanates in some of the glasses after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. However, this result did not apply to all of the CCC versions of the glasses, indicating a compositional dependence of this effect. In addition, high concentrations of K{sub 2}O have been shown to hinder the ability of the DWPF durability and viscosity models to predict the performance of these glasses. The usefulness of increased K{sub 2}O concentrations in preventing the formation of iron titanates may therefore be limited. Further characterization was not performed for the KT09-series glasses since the type of crystallization formed was the characteristic of interest for these compositions. All of the KT10-series glasses were XRD amorphous, regardless of heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements showed that the glasses met the targeted concentrations for each oxide. In general, the measured PCT responses of the KT10-series glasses were well predicted by the DWPF models. The measured, normalized release values for silicon for some of the glasses fell above the 95% confidence interval for the predicted values; however, the PCT responses for these glasses remain considerably lower than that of the benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The viscosities of the KT10-series glasses were generally well predicted by the DWPF model. The next step in this study will be to compile all of the data developed and further compare the measured properties and performance with those predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. Recommendations will then be made as to which models, if any, may need to be modified in order to accommodate the material from SCIX into DWPF

  9. Plasma Interactions in Titan's Ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard, Matthew

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , that more accurately reflect the varied ionospheric environment. The impacts of these cases on ion production and electron temperature are discussed in Chapter 7. Figure 1.2 Superthermal electron fluxes plotted against energy for the four...

  10. Campus Contacts Titan Bookstore Cafe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    will receive them in a timely fashion. Thanks! We thank the Irvine Valley Faculty for their presence for a relaxing and happy holiday vacation. After all your hard work this semester, you deserve it! We look

  11. Titan Platform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePty Ltd Jump to:OffshoreOpenI Wind

  12. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank And Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 5 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 5 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 4 samples indicate generally consistent operations. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in the Actinide Removal process (ARP).

  13. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed (a primary heat transfer mechanism), inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The calculation results showed that for a wet CST column with active cooling through one central and four outer tubes and 35 C ambient external air, the peak temperature for the fully-loaded column is about 63 C under the loss of fluid flow accident, which is well below the supernate boiling point. The peak temperature for the naturally-cooled (no active, engineered cooling) wet column is 156 C under fully-loaded conditions, exceeding the 130 C boiling point. Under these conditions, supernate boiling would maintain the column temperature near 130 C until all supernate was vaporized. Without active engineered cooling and assuming a dry column suspended in unventilated air at 35 C, the fully-loaded column is expected to rise to a maximum of about 258 C due to the combined loss-of coolant and column drainage accidents. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. Results for the in-tank modeling calculations clearly indicate that when realistic heat transfer boundary conditions are imposed on the bottom surface of the tank wall, as much as 450 gallons of ground CST (a volume equivalent to two ion exchange processing cycles) in an ideal hemispherical shape (the most conservative geometry) can be placed in the tank without exceeding the 100 C wall temperature limit. Furthermore, in the case of an evenly-distributed flat layer, the tank wall reaches the temperature limit after the ground CST material reaches a height of approximately 8 inches.

  14. The effect of postnatal exposure to ethanol and/or Monosodium-L-glutamate on plasma luteinizing hormone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Robert William

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for teaching me the art of RIA assays. I also sincerely appreciate the guidance and support of Dr . George G. Stott for being on my graduate committee and for his friendship, encouragement and especially the invaluable assistance in reviewing my thesis... were analyzed utilizing analysis of variance (ANOVA). The LH concentrations were determined for all samples collected utilizing NIDDK r adiolmmunoassay (RIA) kit for rats, with the RP-2 LH reference standard. The data from the LH RIA...

  15. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkwood, Sheila

    , Neil F. Arnold2 , Sheila Kirkwood3 , Nozomu Nishitani1 , and Mark Lester2 1 Solar Ogawa1 , Neil F. Arnold2 , Sheila Kirkwood3 , Nozomu Nishitani1 , and Mark Lester2 1 Solar et al., 1997; Jenk- ins and Jarvis, 1999; Arnold et al., 2002). The first HF radar observations

  16. An integrated data analysis tool for improving measurements on the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reusch, L. M., E-mail: lmmcguire@wisc.edu; Galante, M. E.; Johnson, J. R.; McGarry, M. B.; Den Hartog, D. J. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Franz, P. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy); Stephens, H. D. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Pierce College Fort Steilacoom, Lakewood, Washington 98498 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many plasma diagnostics contain complementary information. For example, the double-foil soft x-ray system (SXR) and the Thomson Scattering diagnostic (TS) on the Madison Symmetric Torus both measure electron temperature. The complementary information from these diagnostics can be combined using a systematic method based on integrated data analysis techniques, leading to more accurate and sensitive results. An integrated data analysis tool based on Bayesian probability theory was able to estimate electron temperatures that are consistent with both the SXR and TS diagnostics and more precise than either. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to increase the flexibility of the tool was implemented and benchmarked against a grid search method.

  17. Molecular Science and Technology (MST) Program The Taiwan International Graduate Program (TIGP), Academia Sinica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initio calculation of electronic and molecular structures, quantum dynamical calculations of atomic: This topic currently focuses on studies of structures and dynamics of molecules, ions, radicals) applications have promise prominent prospect. (3) Biomolecular structures and dynamics: This subject presently

  18. Charge-to-mass-ratio-dependent ion heating during magnetic reconnection in the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Almagri, A. F.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Terry, P. W. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Craig, D. [Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States)] [Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature evolution during magnetic reconnection has been spectroscopically measured for various ion species in a toroidal magnetized plasma. Measurements are made predominantly in the direction parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field. It is found that the increase in parallel ion temperature during magnetic reconnection events increases with the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion species. This trend can be understood if the heating mechanism is anisotropic, favoring heating in the perpendicular degree of freedom, with collisional relaxation of multiple ion species. The charge-to-mass ratio trend for the parallel temperature derives from collisional isotropization. This result emphasizes that collisional isotropization and energy transfer must be carefully modeled when analyzing ion heating measurements and comparing to theoretical predictions.

  19. Classical confinement and outward convection of impurity ions in the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Caspary, K. J.; Chapman, B. E.; Parke, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Magee, R. M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Craig, D. [Physics Department, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impurity ion dynamics measured with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolution reveal classical ion transport in the reversed-field pinch. The boron, carbon, oxygen, and aluminum impurity ion density profiles are obtained in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] using a fast, active charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy diagnostic. Measurements are made during improved-confinement plasmas obtained using inductive control of tearing instability to mitigate stochastic transport. At the onset of the transition to improved confinement, the impurity ion density profile becomes hollow, with a slow decay in the core region concurrent with an increase in the outer region, implying an outward convection of impurities. Impurity transport from Coulomb collisions in the reversed-field pinch is classical for all collisionality regimes, and analysis shows that the observed hollow profile and outward convection can be explained by the classical temperature screening mechanism. The profile agrees well with classical expectations. Experiments performed with impurity pellet injection provide further evidence for classical impurity ion confinement.

  20. 2011 Summer Lecture Series Organized by MPA and MST Divisions and LANL Institutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOCATION AUTHOR AND TITLE Wed. June 1 Rosen Aud. Rajan Gupta: Emergent China and impacts of its development please contact Debbie Wilke, dwilke@lanl.gov To sign up for tours, please contact Kelli Ingram, kingram@lanl.gov

  1. Plasma Flow in MST: Effects of Edge Biasing and Momentum Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum

  2. Plasma Velocity Profile During The Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive In The MST RFP Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996) A213-A225. Printed in

  3. Polymers and Coatings:Materials Science & Technology, MST-7: Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38Polaron BehaviorPolymer-like Nanowires

  4. Nuclear Materials Science:Materials Science Technology:MST-16:LANL:Los

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal Register /7 ThisNuclearResearchers inAlamos

  5. Topics: Discovering the lower limit to magnetic transport - MST - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliances » Top Innovative Science

  6. Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes:MST-8:LANL:Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMARSecurityMaterials ScienceNational

  7. Metallurgy:Metallurgical Science:Materials Science & Technology:MST: Los

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRodMIT-Harvard Center forMetallic glass

  8. Improved-confinement plasmas at high temperature and high beta in the MST RFP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |HotImpactControlInnovationVehicles

  9. Internal magnetic field structure and parallel electric field profile evolution during the sawtooth cycle in MST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpinInteragency1 01/01/2013Internal Sitemagnetic

  10. Global confinement and discrete dynamo activity in the MST reversed-field pinch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics31/2007

  11. Microsoft Word - JMatyas_The Effects of Glass Doping _MST'13_112613.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Project0 FOIAneutron rich1 -

  12. Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Company-v3832/Lithium-Ion-Batteries- Outlook-Alternative-Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries Marca M. Doeff * , Jordirechargeable sodium ion batteries, particularly for large-

  13. Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries Identification of a suitabledevelopment of sodium ion batteries, because graphite, theanode for lithium ion batteries, does not undergo sodium

  14. Sodium Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for  Sodium  Ion  Batteries   One   of   the   challenges  of   sodium   ion   batteries   is   identification   of  for   use   in   batteries.   Our   recent   work   has  

  15. Sodium Titanate Anodes for Dual Intercalation Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Dual Intercalation Batteries Lithium supply securityinterest in sodium-ion batteries. These devices operate muchsodium-ion or lithium-ion batteries that utilize them as

  16. Titan Gets Computational Company | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    memory. Rhea offers a full suite of post-processing software, including ParaView and iPython. "We are excited about bringing Rhea online so we can offer our users a dedicated...

  17. Synthesis and characterization of new cystalline titanates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nge, Renita

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    objective of this research. The synthesis of these layered materials had been reported previously by Anthony and Dosch (1 990) and Anthony et al. (I 992). Prior to scaling the synthesis from 3 grams to 100 grams batches for characterization purposes...

  18. Graph algorithms in the titan toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLendon, William Clarence, III; Wylie, Brian Neil

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graph algorithms are a key component in a wide variety of intelligence analysis activities. The Graph-Based Informatics for Non-Proliferation and Counter-Terrorism project addresses the critical need of making these graph algorithms accessible to Sandia analysts in a manner that is both intuitive and effective. Specifically we describe the design and implementation of an open source toolkit for doing graph analysis, informatics, and visualization that provides Sandia with novel analysis capability for non-proliferation and counter-terrorism.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: crystalline silico-titanate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia and ... ECIS and UOP (a Honewell Company): CSTs Clean Radioactive Waste in Fukushima and Worldwide On February 14, 2013, in Energy, Materials Science, Nuclear Energy,...

  20. Synthesis and characterization of new crystalline titanates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Edwin Sabath

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the material. Elemental analysis to determine the titanium, aluminum and sodium contents in weight percentages, was accomplished by atomic adsorption. A Varian AA-30 spectrophtometer with four lamp turrent was used to perform elemental analysis. Aluminum..., sodium and titanium atomic adsorption standard solutions were purchased from Aldrich Chemical Company. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was performed on the catalysts in order to have a qualitative measure of the relative amounts of aluminum...

  1. Titanate Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13. D. A. Stevens, J. R. Dahn, J. Electrochem. Soc. 147,Xia, M. N. Obravac, J. R. Dahn, Electrochem. and Sol. State

  2. Titan Electric Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shrenik IndustriesStateTagsTexasWind

  3. Titan I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePty Ltd Jump to:OffshoreOpenI Wind Farm

  4. Enhanced dielectric properties from barium strontium titanate films with strontium titanate buffer layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    . Zhang,3 and S. P. Alpay3 1 U. S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate film overgrowth was developed using affordable industry standard processes and materials. The effect major factors: (i) the template-effect of the thin STO buffer layer on the thicker Mg-BST over

  5. Characterization of sputtered barium strontium titanate and strontium titanate-thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumert, B.A.; Chang, L.; Matsuda, A.T.; Tsai, T.; Tracy, C.J.; Gregory, R.B.; Fejes, P.L.; Cave, N.G.; Chen, W. [Materials Research and Strategic Technologies, Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector, 2200 W. Broadway Road, Mail Drop M360, Mesa, Arizona 85202 (United States)] [Materials Research and Strategic Technologies, Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector, 2200 W. Broadway Road, Mail Drop M360, Mesa, Arizona 85202 (United States); Taylor, D.J. [Advanced Materials Group, Materials Research and Strategic Technologies, 3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard, Mail Drop K10, Austin, Texas 78721 (United States)] [Advanced Materials Group, Materials Research and Strategic Technologies, 3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard, Mail Drop K10, Austin, Texas 78721 (United States); Otsuki, T.; Fujii, E.; Hayashi, S. [Matsushita Electronics Corporation, Electronics Research Laboratory, Corporate Technology Center, Takatsuki, Osaka, 569 (Japan)] [Matsushita Electronics Corporation, Electronics Research Laboratory, Corporate Technology Center, Takatsuki, Osaka, 569 (Japan); Suu, K. [Chiba Institute for Super Materials, Ulvac Japan, 523 Yokota Sanbu-Machi Sanbu-Gun, Chiba Prefecture, 289-12 (Japan)] [Chiba Institute for Super Materials, Ulvac Japan, 523 Yokota Sanbu-Machi Sanbu-Gun, Chiba Prefecture, 289-12 (Japan)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sputtered Ba{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) and SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) films and capacitors made with these dielectrics have been characterized with respect to physical and electrical properties. Specific capacitance values included a high of 96fF/{mu}m{sup 2} for BST films deposited of 600{degree}C and a high of 26fF/{mu}m{sup 2} for STO films deposited at 400{degree}C. Leakage current densities at 3.3 V for the most part varied from mid 10{sup {minus}8} to mid 10{sup {minus}6}A/cm{sup 2}. All of the dielectrics are polycrystalline, although the lowest temperature STO films have a nearly amorphous layer which impacts their capacitance. Grain size increases with deposition temperature, which correlates to higher dielectric constants. The lattice parameter of the BST films is larger than that of bulk samples. Capacitance, leakage, breakdown, and lifetime results are reported. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Development of Dodecaniobate Keggin Chain Materials as Alternative Sorbents for SR and Actinide Removal from High-Level Nuclear Waste Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, May; Bonhomme, Francois

    2004-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The current baseline sorbent (monosodium titanate) for Sr and actinide removal from Savannah River Site's high level wastes has excellent adsorption capabilities for Sr but poor performance for the actinides. We are currently investigating the development of alternative materials that sorb radionuclides based on chemical affinity and/or size selectivity. The polyoxometalates, negatively-charged metal oxo clusters, have known metal binding properties and are of interest for radionuclide sequestration. We have developed a class of Keggin-ion based materials, where the Keggin ions are linked in 1- dimensional chains separated by hydrated, charge-balancing cations. These Nb-based materials are stable in the highly basic nuclear waste solutions and show good selectivity for Sr and Pu. Synthesis, characterization and structure of these materials in their native forms and Sr-exchanged forms will be presented.

  7. Dear Colleagues, On behalf of the local organizing committee and the international steering committee we toke the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /iMST1) web site. Also, since the last deadline for both early and pre registration had expired, weMST1 web portal (http://www2.inpe.br/climaespacial/MST14/participate.php#registration_fee) and when of MST Radar (MST14/iMST1) web site. Also, since the last deadline for both early and pre registration

  8. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 5 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION MST, ESS AND PODD SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 5 processing. This qualification material was a composite created from recent samples from Tank 21H and archived samples from Tank 49H to match the projected blend from these two tanks. Additionally, samples of the composite were used in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and extraction-scrub-strip (ESS) tests. ARP and ESS test results met expectations. A sample from Tank 21H was also analyzed for the Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) requirements. SRNL was able to meet all of the requirements, including the desired detection limits for all the PODD analytes. This report details the results of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP), Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) and Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) samples of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 5 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP).

  9. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove {sup 90}Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc, and zeolites for {sup 137}Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of {sup 99}Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl{sub 2} as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination Factor (DF) >577 in two hours. It was less effective at alkaline pH. Conversely, removal of the cesium was more effective at alka

  10. advanced lithium titanate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEMS has been limited due to the lack of process compatibility with existing MEMS manufacturing techniques. Direct printing of thin films eliminates the need for...

  11. Researchers recruit Titan to study key molecular switch that...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    problem on Anton-as long as there involved only 140,000 atoms. If the next step requires building a simulation system with 10 times as many time steps as conventional molecular...

  12. Magnetoresistive Conductive Polyaniline-Barium Titanate Nanocomposites with Negative Permittivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    , and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710, United States § Department

  13. Ralph D. Lorenz Post-Cassini Exploration of Titan: Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    challenges. Airships and helicopters appear to be quite feasible, given several advantageous aspects

  14. Energetic ion precipitation at Titan T. E. Cravens,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    species [Waite et al., 2005]. Solar radiation and energetic plasma from Saturn's magnetosphere ionize the neutral atmosphere and create an ionosphere at altitudes above about 800 km [Bird et al., 1997; Wahlund et an iono- sphere at very low altitudes [Bird et al., 1997]. The creation of an ionosphere below 1000 km

  15. Sodium Titanates as Anodes for Sodium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anodes  for  Sodium  Ion  Batteries   Marca  M.  Doeff,  dual   intercalation   batteries   based   on   sodium  future   of   sodium  ion  batteries  will  be  discussed  

  16. Electronic structure basis for the titanic magnetoresistance in WTe?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pletikosic, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance inmore »WTe? was identified.« less

  17. 9--Titan Invitational Newark, OH Result Pool A Pool B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marion Newark, OH 1:00 W 3-2 13-- Ohio University Zanesville © Newark, OH 6:00 W 3-0 17-- Ashland University Ashland, OH 1:00 W 3-0 20-- Ohio University Lancaster © Lancaster, OH 6:00 W 3-0 23-- Lorain University Newark, OH 6:00 W 3-2 30-- Wayne College © Orrville, OH 1:00 W 3-0 OCTOBER 1-- Ashland University

  18. The Chemical Origin and Evolution of Titan's Volatiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    billions of years of supply ­ no energy crisis! Life as we don't know it can't be ruled out, but perhaps; Atreya 1986; Adams and Atreya 2006; Adams 2006) #12;10 1 2 3 6 4 5 7 8 9 15 N/14 N(X10-3 ) PRIMARY) #12;loss rate ~ 1.3 × 1010 (in C atoms cm-2 s-1 normalized to the surface. 15% of total CH4 destroyed

  19. Electronic structure basis for the titanic magnetoresistance in WTe?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletikosic, I. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ali, Mazhar N. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fedorov, A. V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cava, R. J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Valla, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe? was identified.

  20. Phonon thermal transport through tilt grain boundaries in strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zexi; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Shengfeng; Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Deng, Bowen; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we perform nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study phonon scattering at two tilt grain boundaries (GBs) in SrTiO{sub 3}. Mode-wise energy transmission coefficients are obtained based on phonon wave-packet dynamics simulations. The Kapitza conductance is then quantified using a lattice dynamics approach. The obtained results of the Kapitza conductance of both GBs compare well with those obtained by the direct method, except for the temperature dependence. Contrary to common belief, the results of this work show that the optical modes in SrTiO{sub 3} contribute significantly to phonon thermal transport, accounting for over 50% of the Kapitza conductance. To understand the effect of the GB structural disorder on phonon transport, we compare the local phonon density of states of the atoms in the GB region with that in the single crystalline grain region. Our results show that the excess vibrational modes introduced by the structural disorder do not have a significant effect on phonon scattering at the GBs, but the absence of certain modes in the GB region appears to be responsible for phonon reflections at GBs. This work has also demonstrated phonon mode conversion and simultaneous generation of new modes. Some of the new modes have the same frequency as the initial wave packet, while some have the same wave vector but lower frequencies.

  1. MEN'S AND WOMEN'S INDOOR SOCCER RULES Titan Recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    . Under no circumstances will a player wearing a cast or splint be permitted to play. If eyeglasses are worn, they must be unbreakable. Each player is responsible for the safety of his/her own eyeglasses

  2. Response of Strontium Titanate to Ion and Electron Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interface under electron irradiation. Citation: Zhang Y, J Lian, Z Zhu, WD Bennett, LV Saraf, JL Rausch, CA Hendricks, RC Ewing, and WJ Weber.2009."Response of...

  3. Titan Propels GE Wind Turbine Research into New Territory | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    corporation that runs the gamut of industrial, energy, aviation, and consumer products-wind turbines represent a lot of potential in a market that could attract almost 100...

  4. Northern Virginia Technology Council Titans' Breakfast | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthB O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A

  5. Northern Virginia Technology Council Titans' Breakfast | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIREofNewsletterEnergy Heating Oil Reserve »Boost

  6. MHK Technologies/Titan Platform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHKDUCK <TidalStar <

  7. Titan Simulates Earthquake Physics Necessary for Safer Building Design |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study91 to Tips

  8. NVIDIA Highlights GPU Progress on Titan Supercomputer | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck PlatooningJefferson Labteleconference5 thNVIDIA

  9. Titan Energy Systems Enfinity JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson EthanolTillson, New5661°, -86.0529604° ShowEnergy

  10. Flipping the switch on magnetism in strontium titanate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path°

  11. Lait 83 (2003) 203210 INRA, EDP Sciences, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protective effect of sorbitol and monosodium glutamate during storage of freeze-dried lactic acid bacteria (Received 4 July 2002; accepted 6 January 2003) Abstract ­ The effects of sorbitol and monosodium glutamate differences in survival during freeze-drying after addition of sorbitol or monosodium glutamate. However

  12. LES POINTS RETENIR Avant leur entre en MST ou en IUP Tourisme, les tudiants ont essentiellement suivi un BTS Tourisme et Loisirs (43,5%)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sart, Remi

    personnes réellement contac- tées) s'élevant à 57,8%, le taux de réponse brut (nombre de réponses sur l

  13. Evaluation of Alternative Filter Media for the Rotary Microfilter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M. R.; Herman, D. T.; Bhave, R.

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site is currently developing and testing several processes to treat high level radioactive liquid waste. Each of these processes has a solid-liquid separation process that limits its throughput. Savannah River National Laboratory researchers identified and tested the rotary microfilter as a technology to increase solid-liquid separation throughput. The authors believe the rotary microfilter throughput can be improved by using a better filter membrane. Previous testing showed that asymmetric filters composed of a ceramic membrane on top of a stainless steel support produced higher filter flux than 100% stainless steel symmetric filters in crossflow filter tests. Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working together to develop asymmetric ceramic ? stainless steel composite filters and asymmetric 100% stainless steel filters to improve the throughput of the rotary microfilter. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Inorganic Membrane Group fabricated samples of alternative filter membranes. In addition, Savannah River National Laboratory obtained samples of filter membranes from Pall, Porvair, and SpinTek. They tested these samples in a static test cell with feed slurries containing monosodium titanate and simulated sludge.

  14. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

  15. POLING EFFECT ON PIEZOELECTRIC BEHAVIOR OF PZT CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Shu-Sheng

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solution Series Lead Titanate - Lead Zirconate Lead Oxide:Tin Oxide and Lead Titanate - Lead Hafnate," J. Res. Nat.Lead Titanate Piezoelectric Ceramics \\vith Iron Oxide

  16. A Guidebook for Low-Carbon Development at the Local Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal mining (production) Cement Iron-making Steel-making Electricity Pulp & paper Alcohol Monosodium glutamate Electrolytic aluminum Citric acid Coking

  17. INL Portal Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Planned Monthly Maintenance The INL Portal may temporarily be down between 6:00 PM MST and 10:00 PM MST on the third Thursday of each month for server maintenance....

  18. Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop February 3, 2015 12:00PM MST to February 4, 2015 2:15PM MST National Renewable Energy...

  19. Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X December 2, 2014 8:00AM MST to December 4, 2014 5:00PM MST Broomfield, Colorado The biennial Wind Wildlife...

  20. 2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop 2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop January 14, 2015 8:00AM MST to January 15, 2015 3:00PM MST University of Colorado...

  1. attrition-resistant zinc titanate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEMS has been limited due to the lack of process compatibility with existing MEMS manufacturing techniques. Direct printing of thin films eliminates the need for...

  2. Pit distribution in the equatorial region of Titan Kimberly A. Adams n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurdy, Donna M.

    distribution and size to characterize these features and understand their formation. Chi-square analysis. However, analysis of the densest cluster of pits, a group of 50, shows a more random distribution. Fractal analysis and comparison with a same-sized random set find only a hint of linearity. A Poisson distribution

  3. Rduction et oxydation in situ de cellules de pile combustible oxyde solide dans un Titan ETEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Réduction et oxydation in situ de cellules de pile à combustible à oxyde of Denmark (DTU), DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark La technologie commune des piles à combustible à'opération de la pile à haute température (550°C à 1000°C), conduisant à une

  4. Fabrication, characterization and microwave properties of polyurethane nanocomposites reinforced with iron oxide and barium titanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    . Current address: Chemical Engineering Department, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA. Tel.: +1 4098807654. E-mail address: zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu (Z. Guo). www.elsevier.com/locate/actamat Availabl

  5. Strain effect on coercive field of epitaxial barium titanate thin films S. Choudhury,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    reduced to zero and coercive field electric field re- quired to reduce the net polarization to zero . From of magnitude higher compared to a thin film under zero substrate strain.11 However, some reports show

  6. Effect of Sulfur and Hydrocarbon Fuels on Titanate/Ceria SOFC Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marina, O.A.; Pedersen, L.R.; Stevenson, J.W.

    2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project is to develop low-cost, high-performance anodes that offer low polarization resistance as well as improved tolerance for nonidealities in anode environment such as redox cycles, sulfur and other poisons, and hydrocarbons.

  7. Solvothermal synthesis of designed nonstoichiometric strontium titanate for efficient visible-light photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaeman, Uyi; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    SrTiO{sub 3} powders with various Sr/Ti atomic ratios were synthesized by microwave-assisted solvothermal reactions of SrCl{sub 2} and Ti(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4} in KOH aqueous solutions. The nanoparticles of perovskite type SrTiO{sub 3} structure with the particle size of 30-40 nm were synthesized. The photocatalytic activity was determined by deNO{sub x} ability using light emitting diode lamps of various wavelengths such as 627 nm (red), 530 nm (green), 445 nm (blue), and 390 nm (UV). The photocatalytic activity significantly changed depending on the Sr/Ti atomic ratio, i.e., the strontium rich sample (Sr/Ti atomic ratio>1) showed excellent visible light responsive photocatalytic activity for the oxidative destruction of NO.

  8. Polymerization of acetaldehyde using tetraiso-Propyl titanate as a catalyst 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makita, Muneharu

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distilla- tion under an argon stream just before use (21'C). n-Hexane, n-he tane, benzene and dichloromethane n-Hexane, n-heptane, benzene and dichloromethane were distilled after ref luxing over lithium aluminum hydride (LiA1H4) under an argon.... Argon tank 2. Pressure gauge 3. Two-way stop cock 4. Three-way stop cock 5. Vent line 6. Direct vent line from the reactor 7. Magnetically driven stirrer 8. Thermo couple 9. Mantle heater 10. Thermo control circuits 11. Autoclave 2 3 05 07...

  9. Ionization sources in Titan's deep ionosphere Marina Galand,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yelle, Roger V.

    occultation [Bird et al., 1997] but whether it is produced primarily by solar radiation or electron and suprathermal electrons. A model describing the solar and electron energy deposition is used as an organizing conditions in the deep ionosphere (solar zenith angle and flyby. Its

  10. Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voigt, James A. (Corrales, NM); Sipola, Diana L. (Albuquerque, NM); Tuttle, Bruce A. (Albuquerque, NM); Anderson, Mark T. (Woodbury, MN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications.

  11. Titan ATEP Alum List 2012-13 LAST FIRST YR AFFILIATION SITE E-MAIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Orthopedic Institute Newport Beach, CA kirkules_1999@yahoo.com Cool Carrie 94 Patuxent River, MD cacool12

  12. Synthesis and Electric Field-Manipulation of High Aspect Ratio Barium Titanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Junjia

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    requirements for a minimum effective dielectric constant. Thus, to achieve the goals above, we synthesized high aspect ratio BaTiO3 nanowires with BaC2O4 and TiO2 powders as precursors using a molten salt method. The as-synthesized BaTiO3 nanowires were...

  13. A layered sodium titanate as promising anode material for sodium ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Di, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium ion batteries have recently received great attention for large-scale energy applications because of the abundance and low cost of sodium source. Although some cathode materials with desirable electrochemical properties ...

  14. Correlation between number of ferroelectric variants and coercive field of lead ziconate titanate single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Understanding the magnitude of coercive fields, the external electric field that results in zero net field is defined as the magnitude of an external electric field, which results in zero net polarization Alamos, New Mexico 87545 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Penn State University

  15. Polyaniline stabilized barium titanate nanoparticles reinforced epoxy nanocomposites with high dielectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    nanoparticle surface can promote the network formation of the epoxy resin. The introduction of the PANI layer was found to reduce the heat release rate and to increase the char residue of the epoxy resin. The dynamic nanober­epoxy resin has been fabricated to obtain enhanced tensile strength and electrical conductivity,5

  16. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Mao, Yuanbing

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to nanomaterials and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  17. A kinetic model for ion exchange between cesium and sodium using silico-titanates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Luan Thanh

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    28 tanks are double-shell tanks built between 1968 and 1986 for storage of liquid waste with a capacity of 28, 000, 000 gallons. Leaking problems, tank age and integrity, and potentially dangerous chemical reactions occurring in some tanks.... . . , . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 93 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Radioactive waste remediation problems exist at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U. S. Department of Defense (DOD), and many commercial nuclear power reactor sites. For example, at the DOE Hanford Site...

  18. Structural and dielectric properties of Gd doped bismuth ferrite-lead titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, N. K., E-mail: Banarjibehera@gmail.com; Behera, A. K., E-mail: Banarjibehera@gmail.com; Satpathy, S. K., E-mail: Banarjibehera@gmail.com; Behera, B., E-mail: Banarjibehera@gmail.com; Nayak, P., E-mail: Banarjibehera@gmail.com [School of Physics, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla-768019, Odisha (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    0.5BiGd{sub x}Fe{sub 1?x}O{sub 3}?0.5PbTiO{sub 3} with x=0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 composite was prepared by mixed oxide method. Structural characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction and studied that the materials show tetragonal structure at room temperature for all concentration of Gd. Studies of dielectric properties (?{sub r} and tan?) of the above compound at different frequencies in a wide range of temperature (25°-500°C) with an impedance analyser revealed that the dielectric constant increases with increase in Gd concentration as well temperature and the compound do not have any dielectric anomaly in the studied frequency and temperature range.

  19. Searching Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Wide Gap Semiconductors Fe-doped Strontium Titanate and Zinc Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, LMC; Wahl, U

    Scientic findings in the very beginning of the millennium are taking us a step further in the new paradigm of technology: spintronics. Upgrading charge-based electronics with the additional degree of freedom of the carriers spin-state, spintronics opens a path to the birth of a new generation of devices with the potential advantages of non-volatility and higher processing speed, integration densities and power efficiency. A decisive step towards this new age lies on the attribution of magnetic properties to semiconductors, the building block of today's electronics, that is, the realization of ferromagnetic semiconductors (FS) with critical temperatures above room temperature. Unfruitful search for intrinsic RT FS lead to the concept of Dilute(d) Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS): ordinary semiconductor materials where 3 d transition metals randomly substitute a few percent of the matrix cations and, by some long-range mechanism, order ferromagnetically. The times are of intense research activity and the last few ...

  20. Impact of thermal strain on the dielectric constant of sputtered barium strontium titanate thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    thin films were deposited by sputtering on Pt/SiO2 structures using five different host substrates.1063/1.1459482 Oxide thin films remain very attractive to researchers due to their wide range of useful physical properties. Most groups have focused on the fabrication of thin films for op- tical and dielectric

  1. Numerical and Experimental Modeling of Natural Convection for a Cryogenic Prototype of a Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colonius, Tim

    in Sutherland's law D = diameter g = gravitation acceleration h = convection coefficient k = thermal

  2. Student Organization Resource Center Titan Student Union 247 (657) 278-7622

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    : Attachments and/or links to web sites are acceptable. Contact: Include the name of the individual with the event details. Must be less than 350 pixels wide and the file size must be less than 80K BRIEF (less than 10 words) description of photo ­ THIS FIELD IS MANDATORY for images Attachment (Optional

  3. Titan's Carbon Budget and the Case of the Missing Ethane Eric H. Wilson*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    -8099, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, UniVersity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 water ice and dark tholin material with the possibility of some condensed hydrocarbons and nitriles.13

  4. Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    infrared spectrum of the irradiated propane ice after heatinginfrared spectrum obtained for irradiated propane ices after controlled heatingsubstrate after heating to 300 K. The infrared spectrum

  5. Millimeter-wave magnetoelectric effects in bilayers of barium hexaferrite and lead zirconate titanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Gopalan

    in the ferrite. Reflected power versus frequency profiles at 40­55 GHz for a series of bias magnetic field and E at the BaM-PZT interface acted as a classical short load of the waveguide. The measurement cell was placed

  6. Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications. 4 figs.

  7. Giant magnetoelectric effect in Nilead zirconium titanate cylindrical D. A. Pan,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    was protected by sili- cone rubber, it was bathed in nickel aminosulfonate plating solution to electrodeposit Ni synthesized by electrodeposition was studied in this paper. The ME voltage coefficient was measured. Electrodeposition can be used to make layered magnetoelectric composites, eliminating the need for the interfacial

  8. Barium Titanate Nanoparticles as Exogenous Contrast Agents in Second Harmonic Optical Coherence Tomography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Jeremy T

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    generating nanoparticle clusters exhibit high scattering properties, which can give them the advantage of backscattering a large quantity of second harmonic light while attenuating the forward scattered light. In this research project, a mathematical model...

  9. Seasonal change in Titan's haze 19922002 from Hubble Space Telescope observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    at 889 nm has inverted, becoming north-bright, a variation consistent with haze transport towards.g., haze particle number densities requires assumptions on haze scattering function, optical properties from STIS data. Data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) will be reported elsewhere. [6

  10. Simulation and Cryogenic Experiments of Natural Convection for the Titan Montgolfiere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    = gap width M = molar mass Nu = Nusselt number Pr = Prandtl number _Q = heat input ~Q = nondimensional heat input R = universal gas constant Ra = Rayleigh number Ra = modified Rayleigh number by a double-walled design is simple and effective means of increasing the buoyancy for a given heat input [2

  11. Computational Modeling and Experiments of Natural Convection for a Titan Montgolfiere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    viscosity cp Specific heat k Conductivity h Heat transfer coefficient Q Total heat input s(x) Distribution-seventh that of Earth, requires a significantly reduced heat input for a given balloon mass, compared to Earth. The smaller heat input also implies that natural convection, rather than radiation, will dominate the heat

  12. Photo of the Week: Cold as Ice - Using Titan to Build More Efficient...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    materials for wind turbines, researchers can increase turbine efficiency and reduce potential downtime for wind turbines in cold climates. The teams use Oak Ridge National...

  13. Chinese supercomputer stays No. 1, Titan at ORNL still No. 2 | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization ofChemistry and Figure 1.Chin

  14. November 12, 2012: "Titan" named world's most powerful supercomputer |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal Register /7 This is a preprint of a

  15. New Titan Supercomputer Named Fastest in the World | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011R -ElectrodesDepartment

  16. New Titan Supercomputer Named Fastest in the World | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011R -ElectrodesDepartment4:37pm

  17. Researchers recruit Titan to study key molecular switch that controls cell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s Overview ExperimentalAdministrationNationalbehavior |

  18. Solvable problems - Titan expands the realm of the possible | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology|Solar wind samples Solar windAboutCenter

  19. Inpatient Treatment of Children and Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barfield, Sharon T.; Petr, Chris

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -based multisystemic therapy (MST) as an alternative to the hospitalization of youth in psychiatric crisis: clinical ` outcomes. Journal of Quasi-experimental design with random assignment to two treatment groups: inpatient hospitalization and home- based MST..., with symptomatology assessments and consumer satisfaction taken three times: within 24 hours or recruitment, shortly after the hospitalized youth was released and at completion of MST home-based services. (n = 113), MST (n = 57), psychiatric inpatient (n = 56...

  20. El Paso Electric Company- Solar PV Pilot Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''El Paso Electric's 2013 Solar PV Rebate program will reopen at 12:00 pm MST on February 1, 2013.'''''

  1. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

  2. Impact of Two Water Management Systems on Arsenic Speciation and Microbial Populations in Rice Rhizosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somenahally, Anil Kumar C.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 2003). In the South-Central USA, arsenic in the form of sodium hydroxymethylarsinate (commonly known as monosodium methane-arsonate (MSMA)) and disodium methyl-dioxido- oxoarsorane (commonly known as disodium methane-arsonate (DSMA)), which were...

  3. Impact of Two Water Management Systems on Arsenic Speciation and Microbial Populations in Rice Rhizosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somenahally, Anil Kumar C.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 2003). In the South-Central USA, arsenic in the form of sodium hydroxymethylarsinate (commonly known as monosodium methane-arsonate (MSMA)) and disodium methyl-dioxido- oxoarsorane (commonly known as disodium methane-arsonate (DSMA)), which were...

  4. Electrically and magnetically tunable phase shifters based on a barium strontium titanate-yttrium iron garnet layered structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to rapidly change the dielectric constant of a ferroelectric material under the application of a dc electric, by incorporating a ferrite material into a device, one gains the ability to change both the dielectric constant, a phase shifter will have changing characteris- tic impedance as it changes its phase. In this work, we em

  5. Ion exchange columns for selective removal of cesium from aqueous radioactive waste using hydrous crystalline silico-titanates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, David Michael

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conscious society. In Hanford, WA, hundreds of underground storage tanks hold tens of millions of gallons of aqueous radioactive waste. This liquid waste, which has a very high sodium content, contains trace amounts of radioactive cesium 137. Since... the material for batch ion exchange of the nuclear waste solution. More research was needed to investigate the material's effectiveness in a column operation. An ion exchange column system was developed to study column performance. The column design...

  6. The structure of titanate nanobelts used as seeds for the nucleation of hydroxyapatite at the surface of titanium implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at the surface of titanium implants E. Conforto1* , D. Caillard2 , L. Müller3 , F.A. Müller3 1 Centre Commun d to induce the nucleation and growth of hydroxyl carbonated apatite (HCA) at the surface of titanium implants etching forms a rough titanium hydride layer, which remains unchanged after subsequent treatments

  7. RACTION (p, 2p) SUR QUELQUES ISOTOPES DU TITANE Par J. P. COHEN, G. ALBOUY et N. POFF,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    errors. Using Benioff's formalism, we tried to localize the 1 d 5/2 subshell energy levels in titanium. - By measuring the radioactivity of the residual nucleus we have investigated the p, 2p reaction on titanium nuclei. It seems that the excitation energy of the 1 d 5/2 proton hole state in Sc47 could be estimated

  8. Response of intergrown microstructure to an electric field and its consequences in the lead-free piezoelectric bismuth sodium titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yun, E-mail: yliu@rsc.anu.edu.au [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Noren, Lasse [Research School of Chemistry, the Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Studer, Andrew J. [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC NSW 2232 (Australia); Withers, Ray L.; Guo Yiping [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Li Yongxiang [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Yang Hui [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); College of Life Science and Technology, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Wang Jian [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the R3c average structure and micro-structure of the ceramic Bi{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} (BNT) in situ under applied electric fields using diffraction techniques. Electron diffraction implies the presence of significant octahedral tilt twin disorder, corresponding to the existence of a fine scale intergrown microstructural (IGMS) 'phase' within the R3c rhombohedral average structure matrix. A careful neutron refinement suggests not only that the off-centre displacements of the cations relative to the oxygens in the R3c regions increases systematically on application of an electric field but also that the phase fraction of the IGMS regions increases systematically. The latter change in phase fraction on application of the electric field enhances the polar displacement of the cations relative to the oxygen anions and affects the overall strain response. These IGMS regions form local polar nano regions that are not correlated with one another, resulting in polarisation relaxation and strain behaviour observed in BNT-containing materials. - Graphical abstract: The intergrown microstructure at very fine scales within the R3c rhombohedral phase matrix of BNT, originating from octahedral tilt twinning disorder, will increase with respect to an external field. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The existence of an intergrown microstructural 'phase' within the average structure matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This phase fraction of the intergrown microstructural regions changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such regions form local polar nano regions that are not correlated with one another.

  9. Received 8 Mar 2014 | Accepted 24 Jun 2014 | Published 5 Aug 2014 Conformable amplified lead zirconate titanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    -emitting diodes, solar cells and transistors have received much attention, application requirements often demand on soft supports as well as engineering behaviours of the associated devices. Calibrated measurements

  10. Planetary and Space Science 54 (2006) 15521562 On the discovery of CO nighttime emissions on Titan by Cassini/VIMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    followed by Fischer­Tropsch catalysis. The time-averaged predicted emission rate of methane-rich surface

  11. AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure field-effect transistors using barium strontium titanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure field-effect transistors using barium strontium; published 13 October 2004) Use of high-k gate dielectrics in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field transconductance and pinchoff voltage. To achieve this, AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure field

  12. TITAN : an advanced three dimensional coupled neutronicthermal-hydraulics code for light water nuclear reactor core analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, D. P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate analysis of nuclear reactor transients frequently requires that neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and feedback be included. A number of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics codes have been developed for this ...

  13. Family Centered Home-Based Models for Placement Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaim, Tara; Petr, Chris

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    goal of maintaining children in the family home. They also avoid pathologizing the client, family, and surrounding systems. MST and Wraparound have the most saliently developed theoretical frameworks. Guidelines for MST provider credentials, caseload... saliently developed structure in reference to caseload size and duration/frequency of service, but lacks specificity of provider credentials. Case Management is the least clearly defined in the literature. Finally, MST has the most well- developed...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric turbulence Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: by dissipation of the turbulent energy and tur- bulent eddies will transport heat to different atmospheric re... ., MST radar studies of wind and turbulence in the...

  15. Editor's Comments On Eating Shrimp, and Some Other Matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - eem les What i the m\\.)st expen i\\e edible fisheries product tn the \\\\ orld'! t 111) supermarket

  16. Call issued for Proton Radiography Facility proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into FY17. January 5, 2015 Amy Clarke and Seth Imhoff of Materials Technology-Metallurgy (MST-6) align a copper density calibration object for a proton radiography...

  17. Neutrons used to study model vascular systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    personnel working at the plant. Amy Clarke and Seth Imhoff of Materials Technology-Metallurgy (MST-6) align a copper density calibration object for a proton radiography...

  18. IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 47 (2007) 14491457 doi:10.1088/0029-5515/47/11/006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    -D; and electron heat diffusivities in non-tokamak experiments (NSTX/ST, MST/RFP, SSPX/spheromak). The radial

  19. New Composite Membranes for High Throughput Solid-Liquid Separations at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhave, Ramesh R [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Composite Membranes for High Throughput Solid-Liquid Separations at the Savannah River Site R. Bhave (Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oak Ridge, TN) and M. R. Poirier* (Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken SC) Solid-liquid separation is the limiting step for many waste treatment processes at the Savannah River Site. SRNL researchers have identified the rotary microfilter as a technology to improve the rate of solid-liquid separation processes. SRNL is currently developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service and plans to deploy the technology as part of the small column ion exchange process. The rotary microfilter can utilize any filter media that is available as a flat sheet. The current baseline membrane is a 0.5 micron (nominal) porous metal filter (Pall PMM050). Previous testing with tubular filters showed that filters composed of a ceramic membrane on top of a stainless steel support produce higher flux than filters composed only of porous metal. The authors are working to develop flat sheet filter media composed of a ceramic membrane and/or ceramic-metal composite on top of a porous stainless steel support that can be used with the rotary microfilter to substantially increase filter flux resulting in a more compact, energy efficient and cost-effective high level radioactive waste treatment system. Composite membranes with precisely controlled pore size distribution were fabricated on porous metal supports. High quality uniform porous metal (316SS) supports were fabricated to achieve high water permeability. Separative layers of several different materials such as ultrafine metal particles and ceramic oxides were used to fabricate composite membranes. The fabrication process involved several high temperature heat treatments followed by characterization of gas and liquid permeability measurements and membrane integrity analysis. The fabricated composite membrane samples were evaluated in a static test cell manufactured by SpinTek. The composite membranes were evaluated on several feed slurries: 1 wt. % strontium carbonate in deionized water, 1 wt. % monosodium titanate in simulated salt solution, and 1 wt. % simulated sludge in simulated salt solution and deionized water. Flux as a function of feed flow rate and transmembrane pressure was measured for each of the above described feed slurries. The authors will discuss the new membrane development efforts, waste slurry filtration performance evaluations and scale-up considerations.

  20. Life extension program for the modular caustic side solvent extraction unit at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samadi-Dezfouli, Azadeh

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU accomplishes two objectives. MCU serves as a demonstration facility for improved flowsheet deployment at SWPF; operating with NGS and boric acid validates improved cesium removal performance and increased throughput as well as confirms Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) ability to vitrify waste streams containing boron. NGS implementation at MCU also aids the ARP/MCU LE operation, mitigating the impacts of delays and sustaining operations until other technology is able to come on-line.

  1. Centauri Dreams Imagining and Planning Interstellar Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    and steep terrain to explore them. Airships would be particularly useful in environments like Titan, where

  2. Icarus 156, 176183 (2002) doi:10.1006/icar.2001.6779, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    on both Earth and Titan. While eruption velocities on Earth are usu- ally limited by the low sound speed in water­steam mixtures, sound speeds in Titan fluids are higher and the Titan limit is imposed: Titan; geological processes; volcanism. 1. INTRODUCTION The motion of liquid water on the Earth

  3. Einfuhrung Matroid-Probleme in Graphen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Tobias

    Einf¨uhrung Matroid-Probleme in Graphen Graphen-Algorithmen Matroide und Greedy-Algorithmen Dr. Tobias Baumann 14. Juni 2011 Dr. Tobias Baumann Matroide #12;Einf¨uhrung Matroid-Probleme in Graphen MST. Tobias Baumann Matroide #12;Einf¨uhrung Matroid-Probleme in Graphen MST Matroide Greedy-Algorithmen Wir

  4. Powder River 0 20 40 KILOMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. coal basins. The Powder River Basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana (fig. 1 tons (MST), some 42 percent of the total coal pro- duction in the United States, making the PRB the single most important coal-producing basin in the Nation. About 426 MST (92 percent of total PRB coal

  5. Decisions in Economics and Finance manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohner, Martin

    Bohner and Gregory M. Gelles Received: date / Accepted: date Abstract This paper discusses utility that in portfolios of one risky and Martin Bohner and Gregory M. Gelles Missouri University of Science and Technology Department of Economics Rolla, Missouri 65409-0020, USA E-mail: bohner@mst.edu, gelles@mst.edu #12;2 one

  6. Cration d'une interface de visualisation des sorties du modle de circulation gnrale de Titan et comparaison aux donnes de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    ) et d'apercevoir une surface de glace sale où coule des rivières de méthane et d'hydrocarbures sous des nuages de méthane, de nitriles et d'hydrocarbures condensés, le tout par des température de l

  7. BIRTH WAILS AND DEATH THROES of celestial titans--such as the black holes (spheres) colliding in this supercomputer simulation--rumble through the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millis, Andrew

    engine noise from jets passing over- head can work its way in," Raab says. Down in the control room, we to his eyes, on a mound near the center of the LIGO Hanford Observatory. He runs his gaze northward down GRAVITATIONAL WAVES. BUT WILL IT WORK? A TRIAL RUN PUT IT TO THE TEST BY W. WAYT GIBBS COPYRIGHT 2002 SCIENTIFIC

  8. Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon/activated F carbon Power battery Lithium titanate 50various ranges and motor power Battery energy density 300

  9. CESM Tutorial NCAR Earth System Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannay, Cécile

    ­ NCAR IBM - titan ­ ORNL Cray XK6 - hopper ­ NERSC Cray XE6 - edison ­ NERSC Cray Cascade - bluewaters

  10. CoverSheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    overseen by MST-6, that is available for use by qualified users. In FY12 the EML service contract costs were covered by funds from LDRD, BES, NE and other programs. Users...

  11. Persistence in Discrete Optimization under Data Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    problems, say for instance the spanning tree and route guidance problems, persistency ... is expressed as a (random) solution to another 0-1 stochastic optimization ...... In this section, we study the minimum spanning tree (MST) problem under ...

  12. SIAM J. COMPUT. c 2005 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Vol. 34, No. 6, pp. 13701379

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chazelle, Bernard

    ­1379 APPROXIMATING THE MINIMUM SPANNING TREE WEIGHT IN SUBLINEAR TIME BERNARD CHAZELLE, RONITT RUBINFELD, AND LUCA minimum spanning tree (MST) of G "local spanning trees" whose sizes are specified by a stochastic process. From the local information

  13. Transport of phage P22 DNA into the cytoplasm of salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Gerardo Legrama

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the pi (?) protein (encoded by the pir genes). Introductionthe Tn5-RL27 plasmid into a pir recipient cell followed byto Salmonella. MST 3848 [LT2 pir + /pRL27e] was the source

  14. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Forensics team in the Polymers and Coatings Group, MST-7. He graduated from the University of Toledo, aerogels, carbon fiber composites, damaged materials, and low density materials examining defects

  15. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING MEASUREMENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Meas. Sci. Technol. 13 (2002) 8491 PII: S0957-0233(02)28495-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    .iop.org/MST/13/84 Abstract An inexpensive and portable pulsed light emitting diode (LED) source with variable availableintheformofindiumgalliumnitridebasedcompound semiconductors [5] used to fabricate laser diodes and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The dc output

  16. Los Alamos Lab: MPA: Materials Research Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (MPA-CINT); R.G. Hoagland (MST-8); A. Misra (MPA-CINT) Frontiers in thermoacoustic refrigeration and mixture separation (pdf) S. Backhaus (MPA-10); D. Geller (AET-3); B. Ward...

  17. Coalitional Choices and Strategic Challenges: The Landless Movement in Brazil, 1970–2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinek, Wendy M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Socio-Religious Origins of Brazil’s Landless Rural WorkersOrdinary Revolution: Brazil’s Landless Workers’ Movement. ”2000. “Breaking New Ground: Brazil’s MST. ” NACLA Report on

  18. Microsoft Word - 2012 Research Day Winners.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C-IIAC Adam Manzanares, HPC-5 Xiaoying Pang, AOT-ABS Samrat Choudhury, MST-8 Anirban Chaudhuri, MPA-11 Ryan Baumbach, MPA-CMMS David Fredenburg, WX-9 Honorable Mentions Ramesh...

  19. List of Accepted Summer Interns (2011) Program Mentor's Name Intern's name (Nationality or special condition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muthusamy (India) PeiWen Hsiao Kind Leng Tong (Malaysia) SuMay Yu Ding Hua Lee (Malaysia) Paul siong Yeo (Malaysia) TehYing Chou Yvonne Fong Ling Yong (Malaysia) MST HuanCheng Chang nguyen

  20. ZERH Training: Albuquerque, NM | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6, 2014 1:00PM to 5:00PM MST Doc Savage Supply 600 Candelaria Rd. NE Albuquerque, New Mexico The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home is a high performance home which is so energy...

  1. Filiramoporina kretaphilia-a new genus and species of bifoliate tubulobryozoan (Ectoprocta) from the Lower Permian Wreford Megacyclothem of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, H. C.; Cuffey, Roger J.

    1976-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and TZAD, longitudinal and transverse zooecial aperture diameters; MST, mesotheca thickness; MWZ/ and MWZN, major and minor transverse axes of zoarial branch; NCD, minimum cystopore diameter in tangential section; RN, number of zooecial ranges; TP, exozone..., 1964, p. 934), similar to endozonal zooecial walls in microstructure, relatively thin (0.01-0.02 mm, MST, m of Karklins, 1969). tangential sections (Pl. 1, fig. 3,5,8). All zooecia of similar size and shape (no heterozooecia such as mesopores...

  2. Characterization of Tank 48H Samples for Alpha Activity and Actinide Isotopics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Coleman, C.J.; Hay, M.S.

    1995-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the total alpha activity and actinide isotopic results for samples taken from Tank 48H prior to the addition of sodium tetraphenylborate and MST in Batch {number_sign}1 of the ITP process. This information used to determine the quantity of MST for Batch {number_sign}1 of the ITP process and the total actinide content in the tank for dose calculations.

  3. 405-744-WELL (9355) I wellness@okstate.edu I wellness.okstate.edu Ticket Booth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    be prepared without MSG (monosodium glutamate) and less oil if possible. Tofu dishes are often fried; ask for fresh tofu when ordering an entrée. All Pad Thai dishes are stir fried and contain large amounts of oil. Aspen Coffee Company All hot espresso drinks (except Caffe Breve) request skim milk or soy milk. Hot

  4. The Secret is MSG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William; Ashworth, William

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    , bitter, and salty--but also a fifth, which he called umami and which gets turned on with a buzz by monosodium glutamate. So when you enjoy some KFC, remember that the secret might just be MSG. #ashworth #ceas #japan #tsutsui...

  5. CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48H RADIOACTIVEWASTE SAMPLE USING FLUIDIZED BED STEAMREFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANICDESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

  6. CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

    2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

  7. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Paul R. (Knoxville, TN); Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  8. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Paul R. (Knoxville, TN); Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  9. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water. [NaMnO/sub 2/ and TiO/sub 2/

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, P.R.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1980-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO/sub 2/) and titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) to form sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO/sub 3/) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  10. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  11. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  12. Electrode materials and lithium battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Belharouak, Ilias (Westmont, IL); Liu, Jun (Naperville, IL)

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A material comprising a lithium titanate comprising a plurality of primary particles and secondary particles, wherein the average primary particle size is about 1 nm to about 500 nm and the average secondary particle size is about 1 .mu.m to about 4 .mu.m. In some embodiments the lithium titanate is carbon-coated. Also provided are methods of preparing lithium titanates, and devices using such materials.

  13. Bounds on the thermodynamical properties of the fluid envelope of a planet based upon its radiative budget at the top of the atmosphere: theory and results for Earth, Mars, Titan, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucarini, Valerio

    1 Bounds on the thermodynamical properties of the fluid envelope of a planet based upon its in the atmospheric masses. The possibility of providing constraints to the 3D dynamics of the fluid envelope based into mechanical energy like a thermal engine and generates entropy by irreversible processes. When the external

  14. Chongmin Wang | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study wet environments, this time scientists have applied it successfully to rechargeable battery research. Instruments Scanning TEM EMSL's aberration-corrected Titan 80-300(tm)...

  15. Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    equivalent US Tier 2, Bin 2 emissions levels Commercially Viable Solutions - High quality, Great Performance, Low Total Cost of Ownership Program Targets 2010 Nissan Titan...

  16. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fred Strohl Communications 865.574.4165 Energy efficient video game technology in Titan supercomputer Listen to the audio OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 27, 2012 - Oak Ridge National...

  17. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    team, led by ORNL's Ho Nyung Lee, demonstrated that a single unit cell layer of lanthanum aluminate grown on a strontium titanate substrate is sufficient to stabilize a...

  18. Scott Chambers | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    realm Scientists are studying strontium titanate to turn sunlight into fuel through solar hydrolysis, splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen molecules with visible light....

  19. Powder XRD | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bringing oxides into the visible realm Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 - 10:32 Strontium titanate and other titanium oxides hold the promise of turning sunlight into fuel....

  20. CY15 Proposal Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email address Telephone number Tentative Research Team: Names and affiliations Requested Laser Platform and Experiment Time (default is 4 weeks): Titan, Janus or COMET Special...

  1. Schriftenreihe ,,Studium Generale" In Vorbereitung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    Schriftenreihe ,,Studium Generale" In Vorbereitung SS 2013 Evolution WS 2012/13 Arm und Reich Katastrophen (Wintersemester 2011/12) Gerhard Paul: Titanic ­ Hindenburg ­ Tschernobyl ­ Tsunami: Visuelle

  2. atmosphere revitalization system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars, Venus and Titan. Atmospheric electricity has controversially been implicated in climate on Earth; here, a comparative approach is employed to review the role of...

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kermeli, Katerina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy management: energy audits/assessments, energyto Titan America, energy audits conducted in concrete plantsmanagement programs Energy audit Energy teams Employee

  4. Ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. (Livermore, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Vance, Eric R. (Kirrawee, AU); Stewart, Martin W. (Barden Ridge, AU); Jostsons, Adam (Eastwood, AU); Allender, Jeffrey S. (North Augusta, SC); Rankin, David Thomas (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile.

  5. aluminium oxide substrates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Huang, Shih-Yu 2009-01-01 99 Fabrication And Characterization Of Barium Titanate Thin Film On Polycrystalline Nickel Substrate. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  6. Photo Galleries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2013: Let the Building Begin Arizona State University and The University of New Mexico Solar Decathlon 2013: Meet the Teams Titan The Five Fastest Supercomputers at the...

  7. Mass accretion rates in self-regulated disks of T Tauri stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Vorobyov; Shantanu Basu

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied numerically the evolution of protostellar disks around intermediate and upper mass T Tauri stars (0.25 M_sun < M_st < 3.0 M_sun) that have formed self-consistently from the collapse of molecular cloud cores. In the T Tauri phase, disks settle into a self-regulated state, with low-amplitude nonaxisymmetric density perturbations persisting for at least several million years. Our main finding is that the global effect of gravitational torques due to these perturbations is to produce disk accretion rates that are of the correct magnitude to explain observed accretion onto T Tauri stars. Our models yield a correlation between accretion rate M_dot and stellar mass M_st that has a best fit M_dot \\propto M_st^{1.7}, in good agreement with recent observations. We also predict a near-linear correlation between the disk accretion rate and the disk mass.

  8. Multifunctional Graphene/Platinum/Nafion Hybrids via Ice Templating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estevez, Luis; Kelarakis, Antonios; Gong, Qianming; Da’as, Eman Husni; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the synthesis of multifunctional hybrids in both films and bulk form, combining electrical and ionic conductivity with porosity and catalytic activity. The hybrids are synthesized by a two-step process: (a) ice templation of an aqueous suspension comprised of Nafion, graphite oxide, and chloroplatinic acid to form a microcellular porous network and (b) mild reduction in hydrazine or monosodium citrate which leads to graphene-supported Pt nanoparticles on a Nafion scaffold

  9. Neutral Particle Analyzer for Studies of Fast Ion Population in Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polosatkin, S; Davydenko, V; Clary, R; Fiksel, G; Ivanov, A; Kapitonov, V; Liu, D; Mishagin, V; Tiunov, M; Voskoboynikov, R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced neutral particles analyzer for plasma diagnostic with possibility of simultaneous measurements of energy distributions of D and H ions has developed in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The analyzer was used in two plasma facilities with injection of fast neutrals - on the MST reversed field pinch (University of Wisconsin) and the field reversed configuration C-2 (Tri Alpha Energy). In this paper, the design of the analyzer, calculation of efficiency of registration, results of analyzer calibration and experimental results from MST and C-2 experiments are presented

  10. Simulations of LH coupling in the Madison Symmetric Torus Reversed Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsson, J.; Smithe, D. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder USA (United States); Cartert, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Burke, D.; Kaufman, M.; Goetz, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations using several codes are being performed in support of the LH experiment in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Due to the special requirements of the MST RFP configuration (tight-fitting conducting shell in which only minimal portholes can be tolerated), a novel interdigital line slow-wave launch structure is used, mounted below the mid plane on the inboard side. The unusual configuration made it necessary to modify the main RF coupling code, RANT3D/AORSA1D-H, which was primarily developed for tokamak simulations. Preliminary results will be presented.

  11. Low temperature aqueous desulfurization of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slegeir, W.A.; Healy, F.E.; Sapienza, R.S.

    1985-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention describes a chemical process for desulfurizing coal, especially adaptable to the treatment of coal-water slurries, at temperatures as low as ambient, comprising treating the coal with aqueous titanous chloride whereby hydrogen sulfide is liberated and the desulfurized coal is separated with the conversion of titanous chloride to titanium oxides.

  12. NASA Launches ATREX Space Network to Begin New Design Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Design Phase - 8 Dual Frequency Radar Arrives at Goddard - 9 Goddard Community Visitor Center Hosts TitanNASA Launches ATREX Pg 3 Space Network to Begin New Design Phase Pg 8 Visitor Center Hosts Titan://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/news/goddard-view.html Managing Editor: Trusilla Steele Editor: John M. Putman News items for publication in Goddard View must

  13. SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING US EPA Project Meeting April 7 2011April 7, 2011/Titan Uranium, VP Development · Deborah LebowAal/EPA Region 8 Air Program Introduction to Titan Uranium USA;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C

  14. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Gopalan

    ). Here we report investigations on ME effects in bilayers and trilayers of nickel electrodeposited onto samples of lead zirconium titanate and nickel films D.V. Chashina , Y.K. Fetisova , E.V. Tafintsevaa , G and radial modes are reported in structures consisting of nickel films deposited onto lead zirconate titanate

  15. TSU Space Program Student Engagement Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    TSU Space Program Student Engagement Report FY 2012-2013 Mission Statement The Titan Student Centers Governing Board allocates space in the Titan Student Union each semester to give recognized clubs and organizations space to plan events, conduct small meetings and store club/organization property. Program

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds for photovoltaic applications and solar energy conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Murugesan, Sankaran

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to formation of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds, such as bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, via a hydrothermal synthesis process, with the resulting compound(s) having multifunctional properties such as being useful in solar energy conversion, environmental remediation, and/or energy storage, for example. In one embodiment, a hydrothermal method is disclosed that transforms nanoparticles of TiO.sub.2 to bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, optionally loaded with palladium nanoparticles. The method includes reacting titanium dioxide nanotubes with a bismuth salt in an acidic bath at a temperature sufficient and for a time sufficient to form bismuth titanate crystals, which are subsequently annealed to form bismuth titanate nanocubes. After annealing, the bismuth titanate nanocubes may be optionally loaded with nano-sized metal particles, e.g., nanosized palladium particles.

  17. Graphene oxide based CdSe photocatalysts: Synthesis, characterization and comparative photocatalytic efficiency of rhodamine B and industrial dye

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Trisha [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Hanseo University, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Ho [Dasan Linc Educational Development Institute, Dankook University, Cheonan, Chungnam, 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Meng, Ze-Da; Ullah, Kefayat; Park, Chong-Yeon; Nikam, Vikram [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Hanseo University, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Won-Chun, E-mail: wc_oh@hanseo.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Hanseo University, Chungnam, 356-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? CdSe–graphene is synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? Three molar solutions of CdSe were used making three different composites. ? RhB and Texbrite MST-L were used as sample dye solutions. ? Texbrite MST-L is photo degraded in visible light. ? UV-spectroscopic analysis was done to measure degradation. - Abstract: CdSe–graphene composites were prepared using simple “hydrothermal method” where the graphene surface was modified using different molar solutions of cadmium selenide (CdSe) in aqueous media. The characterization of CdSe–graphene composites were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and with transmission electron microscope (TEM). The catalytic activities of CdSe-composites were evaluated by degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) and commercial industrial dye “Texbrite MST-L (TXT-MST)” with fixed concentration. The degradation was observed by the decrease in the absorbance peak studied by UV spectrophotometer. The decrease in the dye concentration indicated catalytic degradation effect by CdSe–graphene composites.

  18. Deformation and Forming of Joined Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carsley, John; Hovanski, Yuri; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Introductory article to a set of invited papers from the TMS committee on shaping and forming. This paper introduces a set of papers that were prepared to discussing the deformation and forming of joined materials, and to announce an upcoming symposium at the 2015 MS&T meeting in Columbus Ohio.

  19. Molecular Resolution and Fragmentation of Fulvic Acid by Electrospray Ionization/Multistage Tandem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    investigated by electrospray ionization/ion trap multistage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MST/ MS). ESI% water mobile phase found that negative ion detection gave the optimum generation of parent ions that can and specific high molecular weight standards found multiply charged negative ions that gave a low bias

  20. Multiobjective EA Approach for Improved Quality of Solutions for Spanning Tree Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    results are available for MOST, we consider three well known diameter-constrained minimum spanning tree a minimum spanning tree (MST) from a connected graph is a well-studied problem and many fast algorithms the spanning tree to satisfy additional constraints along with minimum edge-cost. For example, communication

  1. Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Events...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 2014 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 USDA Rural Small Business Connection Event 8:30AM to 4:00PM MST 2014 National Small...

  2. Investigation of plasma velocity field solar flare footpoints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrozek, Tomasz

    of Wroclaw NCN Grant 2011/01/M/ST9/06096 #12;The Solar Flare - observations #12;chromosphere corona photosphere The Solar Flare - cartoon - conversion of magnetic energy into other forms - transport of energyInvestigation of plasma velocity field in solar flare footpoints from RHESSI observations T. Mrozek

  3. Design of a creep resistant nickel base superalloy for power plant applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Design of a creep resistant nickel base superalloy for power plant applications Part 3­Experimental, and results in a promising new alloy for power plant applications. MST/5391 Dr Tancret is in the Laboratoire.1Ti ± 5Fe ± 0.4Si ± 0.07C ± 0.005B (wt-%)) for use in future fossil fuel power plant with steam

  4. Winners of the Postdoctoral Distinguished Performance Award postdoc:Postdoc Program:PDPA_Postdoc Dist Perf Award:Summary PDPA Award.xlsx 4/4/14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to Study Geological Materials for Space Exploration Covalency in Thorium, Uranium, and the Trans-Uranic Elements Individual Jian Wang MST-8 Atomistic Modeling Systematic Preparation, Isolation, and Characterization of Pentavalent Uranium Complexes Team B-8 Neutron

  5. A CROSS-HOLE INVESTIGATION OF A ROCK MASS SUBJECTED TO HEATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulsson, B.N.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF A ROCK MASS SUBJECTED TO HEATING B.N.P. Paulsson and M.S.A ROCK MASS SUBJECTED TO HEATING B.N.P. Paulsson* and M.S.t o sus­ tained heating i s reported. Compressional and

  6. Pattern Recognition 40 (2007) 34303451 www.elsevier.com/locate/pr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SBKM, its modified version, and the well-known K-means algorithm. Sixteen data sets with widely varying methods are the well-known K-means algorithm, single linkage and the minimal spanning tree (MST)-based algorithms, respectively [2­6]. In order to improve the perfor- mance of the K-means algorithm, several

  7. Accelerated Dynamics Methods for Infrequent Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen (Ohio State) Roger Smith (U. Loughborough) Robin Grimes (Imperial College) Kurt Sickafus (LANL, MST-8) Jacques Amar (U. Toledo) DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences Motorola Intel Los Alamos #12;Outline

  8. IOP PUBLISHING MEASUREMENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 (2007) 13151320 doi:10.1088/0957-0233/18/5/017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, WJ "Chris"

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Published 13 March 2007 Online at stacks.iop.org/MST/18/1315 Abstract To measure hydrogen sulfide (H2S for advancing our understanding of the biological role of H2S. Traditional H2S measurements usually need large tissue samples and complex procedures. However, H2S concentration is very low in human bodies

  9. Implications of the FESAC Fusion Development Path Study for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Study The goal of the plan is operation of a US demonstration power plant (Demo), which will enable electric power production, and ultimately it will demonstrate the commercial practicality of fusion power Studies 47 MFE Detail and Dependencies Theory, Simulation and Basic Plasma Science MST & NSTX 2nd New MFE

  10. Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: End of Year Report, FY '96

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: End of Year Report, FY '96 R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory MST-6, Metallurgy Los Alamos accomplishment in FY '96 was the design and fabrication of the corrosion probes to be used "In Beam" during

  11. Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report: I. Inconel 718 In-Beam Corrosion Rates from the '97 A6 Irradiation R. Scott Lillard, Donald L. Pile, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Lab MST-6, Metallurgy Group Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM

  12. Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: Using Solution Resistivity as an Estimate of Tungsten Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: Using Solution Resistivity as an Estimate of Tungsten Corrosion in Spallation Neutron Target Cooling Loops R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory MST-6, Metallurgy Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos

  13. Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, Weapons Neutron Research Facility Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, Weapons Neutron Research Facility Experiments: The Effects of 800 MeV Proton Irradiation on the Corrosion of Tungsten, Tantalum, Stainless Steel, and Gold R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Laboratory MST-6

  14. The Susceptibility of Materials in Spallation Neutron Source Target and Blanket Cooling Loops to Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Corrosion R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Lab MST-6 cooling loops to corrosion. To simulate the environment that materials may be exposed to in a target of exposing corrosion samples to an 800 MeV proton beam at currents upwards of 1 mA was constructed. This loop

  15. Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report: II. Out-of-Beam Corrosion Rates and Water Analysis from the '97 A6 Irradiation R. Scott Lillard, Donald L. Pile, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Lab MST-6, Metallurgy Group Los Alamos National

  16. The Corrosion of Materials in Water Irradiated by 800 MeV Protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Corrosion of Materials in Water Irradiated by 800 MeV Protons R.S. Lillard, D.L. PileW , D.P. Butt* Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Lab Materials Science and Technology Division, MST the real-time corrosion rates for Alloy 718, stainless steels 304L and 316L nuclear grade, aluminum alloys

  17. Calibration of an advanced neutral particle analyzer for the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Eilerman, S. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Belykh, V.; Polosatkin, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Liu, D. [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Fiksel, G. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new E Parallel-To B neutral particle analyzer, which has recently been installed on Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch (RFP), has now been calibrated, allowing the measurement of the fast ion density and energy distribution. This diagnostic, dubbed the advanced neutral particle analyzer (ANPA), can simultaneously produce time resolved measurements of the efflux of both hydrogen and deuterium ions from the plasma over a 35 keV energy range with an energy resolution of 2-4 keV and a time resolution of 10 {mu}s. These capabilities are needed to measure both majority ion heating that occurs during magnetic reconnection events in MST and the behavior of the fast ions from the 1 MW hydrogen neutral beam injector on MST. Calibration of the ANPA was performed using a custom ion source that resides in the flight tube between the MST and the ANPA. In this work, the ANPA will be described, the calibration procedure and results will be discussed, and initial measurements of the time evolution of 25 keV neutral beam injection-born fast ions will be presented.

  18. Quantitative linear and nonlinear Resonance Inspection Techniques and Analysis for material characterization: Application to concrete thermal damage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    characterization: Application to concrete thermal damage. C. Payan1 , T.J. Ulrich2 , P.Y. Le Bas2 , T. Saleh3 , M-17, Los Alamos NM USA 3 Los Alamos National Laboratory, MST-16, Los Alamos NM USA 4 Electrical Power assume the measured amplitude to be proportional to the strain amplitude which drives nonlinear phenomena

  19. Smart Deployment/Movement of Unmanned Air Vehicle to Improve Connectivity in MANET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, K. J. Ray

    be utilized with polynomial time. MSTs are widely used in wired networks to minimize the cost of transmission- mitted to all users in the network under the unlimited energy but limited power condition, then the MST Swindlehurst, and K. J. Ray Liu Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College

  20. Enhancing Building Performance Through More Responsive Maintenance System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsudairi, A. A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forth). For example, installing a water heater needs a plumber and electrician to complete the job in a traditional maintenance system. With MST principle, this work order can be done by one technician instead of two. In this way work orders...

  1. Quantum dynamics and macroscopic quantum tunneling of two weakly coupled condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    René John Kerkdyk; S. Sinha

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum dynamics of a Bose Josephson junction(BJJ) made up of two coupled Bose-Einstein condensates. Apart from the usual ac Josephson oscillations, two different dynamical states of BJJ can be observed by tuning the inter-particle interaction strength, which are known as '$\\pi$-oscillation' with relative phase $\\pi$ between the condensates and 'macroscopic self-trapped' (MST) state with finite number imbalance. By choosing appropiate intial state we study above dynamical branches quantum mechanically and compare with classical dynamics. The stability region of the '$\\pi$-oscillation' is separated from that of 'MST' state at a critical coupling strength. Also a significant change in the energy spectrum takes place above the critical coupling strength, and pairs of (quasi)-degenerate excited states appear. The original model of BJJ can be mapped on to a simple Hamiltonian describing quantum particle in an 'effective potential' with an effective Planck constant. Different dynamical states and degenerate excited states in the energy spectrum can be understood in this 'effective potential' approach. Also possible novel quantum phenomena like 'macroscopic quantum tunneling'(MQT) become evident from the simple picture of 'effective potential'. We study decay of metastable '$\\pi$-oscillation' by MQT through potential barrier. The doubly degenerate excited states in the energy spectrum are associated with the classically degenerate MST states with equal and opposite number imbalance. We calculate the energy splitting between these quasi-degenerate excited states due to MQT of the condensate between classically degenerate MST states.

  2. Oxidative stress suppresses the cellular bioenergetic effect of the 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase/hydrogen sulfide pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Módis, Katalin [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)] [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Asimakopoulou, Antonia [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)] [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Coletta, Ciro [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)] [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Papapetropoulos, Andreas [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States) [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Szabo, Csaba, E-mail: szabocsaba@aol.com [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)] [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Oxidative stress impairs 3-MST-derived H{sub 2}S production in isolated enzyme and in isolated mitochondria. •This impairs the stimulatory bioenergetic effects of H{sub 2}S in hepatocytes. •This has implications for the pathophysiology of diseases with oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Recent data show that lower concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), as well as endogenous, intramitochondrial production of H{sub 2}S by the 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP)/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) pathway serves as an electron donor and inorganic source of energy to support mitochondrial electron transport and ATP generation in mammalian cells by donating electrons to Complex II. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress on the activity of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, 100–500 ?M) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the activity of recombinant mouse 3-MST enzyme. In mitochondria isolated from murine hepatoma cells, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50–500 ?M) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in production of H{sub 2}S from 3-MP. In cultured murine hepatoma cells H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (3–100 ?M), did not result in overall cytotoxicity, but caused a partial decrease in basal oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve rapacity. The positive bioenergetic effect of 3-MP (100–300 nM) was completely abolished by pre-treatment of the cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 ?M). The current findings demonstrate that oxidative stress inhibits 3-MST activity and interferes with the positive bioenergetic role of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway. These findings may have implications for the pathophysiology of various conditions associated with increased oxidative stress, such as various forms of critical illness, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or physiological aging.

  3. Advanced methods development for LWR trsansient analysis, final report : 1981-1982

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, D. P.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial development of TITAN, a three-dimensional coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics code for LWR safety analysis, has been completed. The transient neutronics code QUANDRY has been joined to the two-fluid ...

  4. Please read the information on the bottom of this form before you fill it out in its entirety. Return the completed form to the ASI Marketing Office located in the TSU, Room 7, at least 10 business days before you want your message to be displayed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    days before you want your message to be displayed. For questions regarding the status of your message: _____________________________________________________ Contact Telephone: __________________________ Message Telephone: __________________________ Display time Green Yellow Type of Message: Announcement Event Special Recruitment Other: _____________ Titan Student

  5. Planetary and Space Science 50 (2002) 685692 www.elsevier.com/locate/pss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    observed thus far pro- vide a fundament with further chemical and exobiological implications in Titan), propane (7), and the cyano-hydrocarbons hydrogen cyanide (8), cyanogen (9), acetonitrile (10

  6. Self-powered wireless sensor system using MEMS piezoelectric micro power generator (PMPG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, YuXin, M.B.A. Sloan School of Management.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin-film lead zirconate titanate, Pb(Zr,Ti)03, MEMS Piezoelectric Micro Power Generator (PMPG) has been integrated with a commercial wireless sensor node (Telos), to demonstrate a self-powered RF temperature sensor ...

  7. Bringing oxides into the visible realm | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of strontium titanate thin films This is a model of the growth process showing one lanthanum and one chromium ion on the film surface during growth and an image showing the...

  8. Ink jet printing of PZT thin films for MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bathurst, Stephen, 1980-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of the readily available piezoelectric engineering materials perovskite phase lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has the strongest mechanical to electrical coupling. PZT based devices have the potential to have the highest ...

  9. High-pressure studies of ammonia hydrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Craig W.

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia and water are major components of many planetary bodies, from comets and icy moons such as Saturn's Titan to the interiors of the planets Neptune and Uranus. Under a range of high pressures and/or low temperatures known ...

  10. Process for making whiskers, fibers and flakes of transition metal compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making titanium and chromium nitrides of known morphology by reacting potassium titanate and chromium oxide in the gas phase with NH[sub 3]. The products exhibit the same morphology as the starting material.

  11. Process for making whiskers, fibers and flakes of transition metal compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making titanium and chromium nitrides of known morphology by reacting potassium titanate and chromium oxide in the gas phase with NH.sub.3. The products exhibit the same morphology as the starting material.

  12. Use of titanium-based materials as bactericides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, David T; Elvington, Mark C; Wataha, John; Chung, Whasun O; Rutherford, R. Bruce; Chan, Daniel C

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions containing metal ions bound into a titanate are described which have demonstrated an ability to suppress bacterial growth of a number of organisms associated with periodontal disease and caries.

  13. Chemical and Charge Imbalance Induced by Radionuclide Decay: Effects on Waste Form Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jaffe, John E.; Jiang, Weilin; Strachan, Denis M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a milestone document covering the activities to validate theoretical calculations with experimental data for the effect of the decay of 90Sr to 90Zr on materials properties. This was done for a surragate waste form strontium titanate.

  14. Supercomputing | Facilities | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GB of memory. Each of the 18,688 Titan compute nodes is paired with an NVIDIA Kepler graphics processing unit (GPU) designed to accelerate calculations. With a peak performance...

  15. Mixed ionic and electronic conducting electrode studies for an alkali metal thermal to electric converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yuyan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on preparation, kinetics, and performance studies of mixed ionic and electronic conducting electrodes (MIEE) applied in an alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC). Two types of MIEE, metal/sodium titanate and metal...

  16. Lithium Diffusion in Li4Ti5O12 at High Temperatures. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium Diffusion in Li4Ti5O12 at High Temperatures. Lithium Diffusion in Li4Ti5O12 at High Temperatures. Abstract: Synthesis of the spinel lithium titanate Li4Ti5O12 by an...

  17. Distributed Phase Shifter with PyrochloreBismuth Zinc Niobate Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jaehoon; Lu, Jiwei; Boesch, Damien; Stemmer, Susanne; York, Robert A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bandpass Filter Using Thin-Film Barium-Strontium-Titanate (using Ba x Sr 1 - x TiO 3 thin films," IEEE Microwave GuidedBismuth Zinc Niobate Thin Films," J. Appl. Phys. 97,

  18. Coated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Stan, Liliana; Usov, Igor O.; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Articles are provided including a base substrate having a layer of an IBAD oriented material thereon, and, a layer of barium-containing material selected from the group consisting of barium zirconate, barium hafnate, barium titanate, barium strontium titanate, barium dysprosium zirconate, barium neodymium zirconate and barium samarium zirconate, or a cubic metal oxide material selected from the group consisting of rare earth zirconates and rare earth hafnates upon the layer of an IBAD oriented material. Such articles can further include thin films of high temperature superconductive oxides such as YBCO upon the layer of barium-containing material selected from the group consisting of barium zirconate, barium hafnate, barium titanate, barium strontium titanate, barium dysprosium zirconate, barium neodymium zirconate and barium samarium zirconate, or a cubic metal oxide material selected from the group consisting of rare earth zirconates and rare earth hafnates.

  19. Experimental investigations of photochemically-generated organic aerosols and applications to early Earth and Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Emily Faye

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    faint early Sun, Aust. J. Earth Sci. , 59(2), 167–176, doi:the atmosphere of early Earth, J. Geophys. Res. , 105(E5),haze on Titan and the early Earth, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.

  20. Recap: Advancing Scientific Innovation at the National Labs ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lab Fri, Mar 07 2014 18:19:31 OLCF Industry User Named Person to Watch in High-Performance Computing for 2014 http:t.copXTjgsn0XJ Titan Industry @ORNL @GEResearch - OLCF ...