National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for monitoring systems laboratory

  1. Optimiziing the laboratory monitoring of biological wastewater-purification systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.V. Gerasimov

    2009-05-15

    Optimization of the laboratory monitoring of biochemical wastewater-treatment systems at coke plants is considered, for the example of OAO Koks. By adopting a methodological approach to determine the necessary data from chemical analysis, it is possible to reduce the time, labor, and materials required for monitoring, without impairing the purification process or compromising the plant's environmental policies.

  2. United States Environmental Monitoring EPAJ60014-901016 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-062

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EPAJ60014-901016 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-062 Agency P.O. Box 93478 May 1990 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development - Offsite Environmental lcrgw Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring d ,& Around United States Nuclear Test Areas Calendar Year 1989 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90/016 DOEIDP100539-062 May 1990 Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1989

  3. Sandia National Laboratories' Structural Health Monitoring and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prognostics Management System Reduces Offshore Wind O&M Costs | Department of Energy Laboratories' Structural Health Monitoring and Prognostics Management System Reduces Offshore Wind O&M Costs Sandia National Laboratories' Structural Health Monitoring and Prognostics Management System Reduces Offshore Wind O&M Costs September 16, 2015 - 11:53am Addthis Offshore wind energy could potentially play a significant role in helping the United States obtain an energy portfolio composed

  4. United States Environmental Monitoring EPA-600/4-81-047 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-043

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EPA-600/4-81-047 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-043 Agency P.O. Box 15027 June 1981 Las Vegas NV 891 14 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1980 prepared for the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank EPA-60014-81-047 DOE/DP/00539-043 June 1981 OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT Radiation moni t o r i ng around U n

  5. Safety system status monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  6. Real-time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deceglie, M. G.; Silverman, T. J.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2015-06-14

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting IV curves or constructing full series-resistance-free IV curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting IV curves or constructing full series-resistance-free IV curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on micro-inverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. Automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  10. Testing of Continuous Sampling Air-ICP and Mercury Systems as Continuous Emission Monitors at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Baldwin; S.J. Bajic; D.E. Eckels; D.S. Zamzow; G.P. Miller; S. Tao; C.A. Waggoner

    2001-03-15

    This report has been prepared to document the performance of the continuous sampling reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy) and mercury-monitor systems developed by Ames Laboratory for use as continuous emission monitors (CEM). This work was funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology, through the Mixed Waste Focus Area. The purpose of the project is to develop instrumentation and methods for spectroscopic field monitoring applications. During FY00 this included continued work on the development of the continuous sample introduction system and the multi-frequency AOTF-echelle spectrometer, used in conjunction with the reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES system as a multi-metal CEM. The assembly, development, and testing of an echelle spectrometer system for the detection of mercury (Hg) by atomic absorption was also completed during FY00. The continuous sampling system and the multi-metal air-ICP and mercury-monitor CEM systems were tested at Mississippi State University at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at the end of FY00. This report describes the characteristics and performance of these systems, and the results of the field tests performed at DIAL.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Cooperative Monitoring Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cooperative Monitoring Center IPB Building "Achieving International Security Through Technical Collaborations" Established at Sandia National Laboratories in 1994, the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) provides a venue in which experts on technology and policy from around the world can explore the use of shareable, unclassified technology and research to: Implement Confidence Building Measures (CBMs) Monitor compliance with treaties or other agreements As part of Sandia's Global

  12. Quality assurance plan for the data acquisition and management system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peerenboom, J.P.; Leser, C.C.; Ramsey, G.M.; Widing, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    In February 1975, the accidental puncture of an underground transfer line buried about 4 ft below the ground surface at the SNL installation in Livermore, California, resulted in the release of approximately 225.5 m{sup 3} of No. 2 diesel fuel. This report describes the formal quality assurance plan that will be used for the data acquisition and management system developed to monitor a bioremediation pilot study by Argonne National Laboratory in association with Sandia National Laboratories. The data acquisition and management system will record the site data during the bioremediation effort and assist users in site analysis. The designs of the three major subsystems of this system are described in this report. Quality assurance criteria are defined for the management, performance, and assessment of the system. Finally, the roles and responsibilities for configuration management of this system are defined for the entire life cycle of the project.

  13. Monitoring Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  14. Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.;

    2013-05-28

    INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2014-02-01

    This plan provides a high-level summary of environmental monitoring performed by various organizations within and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Guide DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, and in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The purpose of these orders is to 1) implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations, and 2) to establish standards and requirements for the operations of DOE and DOE contractors with respect to protection of the environment and members of the public against undue risk from radiation. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL Site, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. Detailed monitoring procedures, program plans, or other governing documents used by contractors or agencies to implement requirements are referenced in this plan. This plan covers all planned monitoring and environmental surveillance. Nonroutine activities such as special research studies and characterization of individual sites for environmental restoration are outside the scope of this plan.

  16. Post-rehabilitation flow monitoring and analysis of the sanitary sewer system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandstetter, E.R.; Littlefield, D.C.; Villegas, M.

    1996-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is operated by the University of California under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Livermore site, approximately 50 miles southeast of San Francisco, occupies 819 acres. So far, there have been three phases in an assessment and rehabilitation of the LLNL sanitary sewer system. A 1989 study that used data collected from December 1, 1988, to January 6, 1989, to determine the adequacy of the LLNL sewer system to accommodate present and future peak flows. A Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation (SSR) project, from October of 1991 to March of 1996, in which the system was assessed and rehabilitated. The third study is the post-rehabilitation assessment study that is reported in this document. In this report, the sanitary sewer system is described, and the goals and results of the 1989 study and the SSR project are summarized. The goals of the post-rehabilitation study are given and the analytical procedures and simulation model are described. Results, conclusions, and recommendations for further work or study are given. Field operations are summarized in Appendix A. References are provided in Appendix B.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories' Structural Health Monitoring and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prognostics Management System Reduces Offshore Wind O&M Costs Sandia National Laboratories' ... (O&M) costs of offshore wind farms between 2 to 5 times the current average ...

  18. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  19. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  20. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  1. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, B.S.; Wetherington, G.R. Jr.

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  2. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  3. GTA Beamloss-Monitor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, C.R.; Fortgang, C.M.; Power, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The GTA Beamless-Monitor System at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been designed to detect high-energy particle loss in the accelerator beamline and shut down the accelerator before any damage can occur. To do this, the Beamless-Monitor System measures the induced gamma radiation, from (p, {gamma}) reactions, at 15 selected points along the beamline, converts this measured radiation to electrical signals integrates and compares them to preset limits, and, in the event of an over-limit condition causes the Fast-Protect System to shut down the entire accelerator. The system dynamic range exceeds 70 dB which will enable experimenters to use the Beamless-Monitor System to help steer the beam as well as provide signals for a Fast-Protect System. The system response time is less than 7 {mu}s assuming a step-function, worst-case beam spill of 50 mA. The system resolution, based on the noise floor of the electronics is about 1.3 mRads/s. Production units have been built and meet the above specifications. The remainder of the system will be installed and tested later in 1992/1993 with the GTA accelerator. The ionization chamber sensitivity and response time are described in the paper.

  4. GTA Beamloss-Monitor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, C.R.; Fortgang, C.M.; Power, J.P.

    1992-09-01

    The GTA Beamless-Monitor System at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been designed to detect high-energy particle loss in the accelerator beamline and shut down the accelerator before any damage can occur. To do this, the Beamless-Monitor System measures the induced gamma radiation, from (p, {gamma}) reactions, at 15 selected points along the beamline, converts this measured radiation to electrical signals integrates and compares them to preset limits, and, in the event of an over-limit condition causes the Fast-Protect System to shut down the entire accelerator. The system dynamic range exceeds 70 dB which will enable experimenters to use the Beamless-Monitor System to help steer the beam as well as provide signals for a Fast-Protect System. The system response time is less than 7 {mu}s assuming a step-function, worst-case beam spill of 50 mA. The system resolution, based on the noise floor of the electronics is about 1.3 mRads/s. Production units have been built and meet the above specifications. The remainder of the system will be installed and tested later in 1992/1993 with the GTA accelerator. The ionization chamber sensitivity and response time are described in the paper.

  5. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-01-09

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program entails modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. The project continues to advance, but is behind the revised (14-month) schedule. Tasks 1-3 (Modeling, Specification and Design) are all essentially complete. The test bench for the Test and Evaluation (Tasks 4 & 5) has been designed and constructed. The design of the full-scale laboratory prototype and associated test equipment is complete and the components are out for manufacture. Barring any unforeseen difficulties, laboratory testing should be complete by the end of March, as currently scheduled. We anticipate the expenses through March to be approximately equal to those budgeted for Phase I.

  6. Monitoring cable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samm, R.; Garcia, F.; Rodenbaugh, T.; Shimshock, J.

    1990-12-01

    The existing underground transmission system in the United States is worth about $5 billion. To optimize the return on that investment and on further investment in the growing system, EPRI has sponsored research to develop periodic and continuous diagnostic procedures and methodologies for evaluating underground cables. By using monitoring results to support maintenance and cable management decisions, utilities will be able to improve maintenance planning, reduce unscheduled outages, increase system reliability, and extend cable life. At the same time, they will be able to operate systems more efficiently and closer to true ratings. The scope of this paper are the following projects: application of dissolved-gas analysis to the periodic monitoring of liquid-filled, paper-wrapped cables (RP7895-1) and also cables insulated with a laminate of cellulose paper, polypropylene film, and cellulose paper, or PPP-insulated cables (RP7910-1); development of a transmission cable diagnostic system based on periodic power factor measurements (RP7910-5); development of an integrated, multifaceted online diagnostic monitoring system known as the Dynamic Rating and Underground Monitoring System (DRUMS) (RP7900); development of a protocol for using perfluorocarbon tracers to locate leaks in high-pressure, liquid-filled cables (RP7905-1); and a long-term cable life evaluation and management project, comprising 10 research areas (RP7914).

  7. Environmental Monitoring Data System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-04-21

    A set of database management tools, data processing tools, and auxiliary support functionality for processing and handling semi-structured environmental monitoring data. The system provides a flexible description language for describing the data, allowing the database to store disparate data from many different sources without changes to the configuration. The system employs XML to support unlimited named allribute/value pairs for each object defined in the system.

  8. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-01-17

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the testing of the rebuilt laboratory prototype and its conversion into a version that will be operable in the drilling tests at TerraTek Laboratories. In addition, formations for use in these tests were designed and constructed, and a test protocol was developed. The change in scope and no-cost extension of Phase II to January, 2006, described in our last report, were approved. The tests are scheduled to be run during the week of January 23, and should be completed before the end of the month.

  9. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-10-31

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the Jan-March report1. Most of the components have been received and assembly was nearly complete at the end of the period. Testing started in October and results will be submitted in the next report. The field testing component of this Phase has been rethought. The current plan is to adapt the laboratory prototype for use in a drilling laboratory and run a series of controlled drilling tests with and without the DVMCS. This should give a more quantitative evaluation of its value, which will help us sign a commercialization partner. While this testing is underway, we will order and begin machining parts for full field prototypes to be use in Phase III. A modification application is being submitted in October to reflect these changes.

  10. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAUM,M.; DORSCH,WM.; FRY,J.; GREEN,T.; LEE,R.; NAIDU,J.; PAQUETTE,D.; SCARPITTA,S.; SCHROEDER,G.

    1999-09-22

    Triennial update that describes the BNL Environmental Monitoring Program for all media (air, surface water, ground water, etc.) in accordance with DOE ORDER 5400.5

  11. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-10-29

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Phase II began on June 1, and the first month's effort were reported in the seventh quarterly report on the project.1 The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. The redesign and upgrade of the laboratory prototype was completed on schedule during this period, and assembly was complete at the end of this period. Testing will begin during the first week of October. This aspect of the project is thus approximately six weeks behind schedule. Design of the field prototype is progressing per schedule.

  12. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-01-28

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. The redesign and upgrade of the laboratory prototype was completed on schedule and it was assembled during the last period. Testing was begin during the first week of October. Initial results indicated that the dynamic range of the damping was less than predicted and that the maximum damping was also less than required. A number of possible explanations for these results were posited, and test equipment was acquired to evaluate the various hypotheses. Testing was just underway at the end of this period.

  13. ARG-US Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM) | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARG-US Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM) ARG-US Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM) Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have developed a technology to make nuclear and radiological facilities safer by better monitoring both plant conditions as well as the most sensitive materials onsite. The patent-pending system, called ARG-US Remote Area Modular Monitoring, or RAMM, uses hig- tech sensors paired with redundant, self-healing communications platforms that can work even in the most

  14. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Buddemeir, R.W.

    1980-04-25

    Information on monitoring activities is reported in two sections for EDB/ERA/INIS. The first section covers all information reported except Appendix D, which gives details of sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring used at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A separate abstract was prepared for Appendix D. (JGB)

  15. Energy Systems | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Systems Research to strengthen the economy, protect the environment and enable energy independence and national security The Energy Systems (ES) division conducts applied energy research to strengthen the economy, protect the environment and enable energy independence and national security. From invention through demonstration, ES actively forms critical alliances with industrial partners, universities, other national laboratories and other Argonne divisions to conduct research,

  16. Milliwave melter monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, William E.; Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, Shanmugavelayutham K.

    2011-08-16

    A milliwave melter monitoring system is presented that has a waveguide with a portion capable of contacting a molten material in a melter for use in measuring one or more properties of the molten material in a furnace under extreme environments. A receiver is configured for use in obtaining signals from the melt/material transmitted to appropriate electronics through the waveguide. The receiver is configured for receiving signals from the waveguide when contacting the molten material for use in determining the viscosity of the molten material. Other embodiments exist in which the temperature, emissivity, viscosity and other properties of the molten material are measured.

  17. Computers and Monitors | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System CAIRS Database The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE operations. CAIRS is a Government computer system and, as such, has security requirements that must be followed. Access to the database is open to DOE and DOE contractors. Additional information

  18. Photonic Systems | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photonic Systems Photonic Systems Ames Laboratory physicists were the first to design and demonstrate the existence of photonic band gap crystals, a discovery that led to the development of the rapidly expanding field of photonic crystals. Photonic crystals are expected to have revolutionary applications in optical communication and other areas of light technology. Image Photonic Cube For additional information on Photonic Systems, please visit https://www.ameslab.gov/dmse/fwp/photonic-s

  19. Groundwater monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ames, Kenneth R.; Doesburg, James M.; Eschbach, Eugene A.; Kelley, Roy C.; Myers, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

  20. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Energy Systems Integration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This brochure describes the Energy Systems Integration Facility at National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Download the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's energy systems ...

  1. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006. The month of January was devoted to the final preparations for, and conducting of testing of the DVMCS at TerraTek laboratories in Salt Lake City. This testing was concluded on January 27, 2006. Much of the effort in this period was then devoted to the analysis of the data and the preparation of the Phase II final report. The report was issued after the close of the period. Work on Phase III of the project began during this quarter. It has consisted of making some modifications in the prototype design to make it more suitable for field testing an more practical for commercial use. This work is continuing. The redesign effort, coupled with the current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The precommercial prototypes are being developed in parallel, so the project should be completed per the current schedule.

  2. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-04-27

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. As a result of the lower than expected performance of the MR damper noted last quarter, several additional tests were conducted. These dealt with possible causes of the lack of dynamic range observed in the testing: additional damping from the oil in the Belleville springs; changes in properties of the MR fluid; and, residual magnetization of the valve components. Of these, only the last was found to be significant. By using a laboratory demagnetization apparatus between runs, a dynamic range of 10:1 was achieved for the damper, more than adequate to produce the needed improvements in drilling. Additional modeling was also performed to identify a method of increasing the magnetic field in the damper. As a result of the above, several changes were made in the design. Additional circuitry was added to demagnetize the valve as the field is lowered. The valve was located to above the Belleville springs to reduce the load placed upon it and offer a greater range of materials for its construction. In addition, to further increase the field strength, the coils were relocated from the mandrel to the outer housing. At the end of the quarter, the redesign was complete and new parts were on order. The project is approximately three months behind schedule at this time.

  3. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-08-31

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.

  4. Ignition system monitoring assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brushwood, John Samuel

    2003-11-04

    An ignition system monitoring assembly for use in a combustion engine is disclosed. The assembly includes an igniter having at least one positioning guide with at least one transmittal member being maintained in a preferred orientation by one of the positioning guides. The transmittal member is in optical communication with a corresponding target region, and optical information about the target region is conveyed to the reception member via the transmittal member. The device allows real-time observation of optical characteristics of the target region. The target region may be the spark gap between the igniter electrodes, or other predetermined locations in optical communication with the transmittal member. The reception member may send an output signal to a processing member which, in turn, may produce a response to the output signal.

  5. Photonic Systems | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photonic Systems Research Personnel Updates Publications Dramatic Efficiency Improvements for Organic Light Emitting Diodes Read More Standing Ribbons on Edge Leads to Transparent Triumph Read More Illuminating the Deep-Blue UV Read More Previous Pause Next Synthesis Since ~1990, the Ames Laboratory has conducted pioneering development and studies of 3D photonic crystals (PCs), developed forefront organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and procedures for characterizing them, and conducted

  6. Energy Systems | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us For ES Employees Staff Directory Argonne National Laboratory Energy Systems Research Facilities Publications News Heavy-duty partnership Argonne working with China to research technology for efficient vehicles More Self-healing surprise Revolutionary film regenerates itself as it lubricates engines and other moving parts More Argonne to lead CERC-TRUCK consortium Program aims to improve on-road freight efficiency of medium- and heavy-duty trucks More Idle hands New improved tool to aid

  7. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-04-17

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program entails modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. The project continues to advance, but is behind the revised (14-month) schedule. Tasks 1-3 (Modeling, Specification and Design) are all essentially complete. The test bench for the Test and Evaluation (Tasks 4 & 5) and the laboratory prototype were constructed by the end of the period. During assembly, however, several of the key subassemblies became galled together, and had to be cut apart. These parts are being remachined with harder surfaces to prevent recurrence of this problem. One key component, the MR damper mandrel, has been redesigned into a three-piece assembly which will facilitate assembly and reduce the cost of replacement of worn components. The remade parts will be delivered by April 19, and the prototype assembled. Testing will begin during the first week of May and is anticipated to be completed before the revised end date for Phase I, May 31, 2004.

  8. Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

  9. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  10. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, David

    1997-01-01

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system.

  11. OpenSM Monitoring System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-04-17

    The OpenSM Monitoring System includes a collection of diagnostic and monitoring tools for use on Infiniband networks. The information this system gathers is obtained from a service, which in turn is obtained directly from the OpenSM subnet manager.

  12. 1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

    1993-09-01

    This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  13. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  14. ORISE: Argonne National Laboratory Electonic Medical Records System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    designed to manage worker health data Argonne Electronic Medical Records System ORISE collaborates to successfully design electronic medical records system for Argonne National Laboratory Health worker accessing electronic medical records Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provides occupational health examinations and monitors exposures to workplace hazards for its employees. ANL has been operating since 1946 and, in ANL's legacy system, worker health and occupational exposure records were

  15. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  16. Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Radiation Budget Measurement Networks, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory and Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division *...

  17. Turbomachine monitoring system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delvaux, John McConnell

    2016-02-23

    In an embodiment, a system includes a turbomachine having a first turbomachine component including a first mechanoluminescent material. The first turbomachine component is configured to produce a first light emission upon exposure to a mechanical stimulus sufficient to cause mechanoluminescence by the first mechanoluminescent material. The system also includes a turbomachine monitoring system configured to monitor the structural health of the first component based on detection of the first light emission.

  18. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 222-S Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.; Warwick, G.J.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable Federal, State, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  19. Monitoring and Benchmarking for Energy Information Systems |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monitoring and Benchmarking for Energy Information Systems Monitoring and Benchmarking for Energy Information Systems Figure 1: Features of a sample CBERD energy information system ...

  20. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  1. Monitoring System Performance (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, K.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01

    Requirements for a standard test to rate the durability of photovoltaic (PV) modules at system voltage are discussed.

  2. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000.

  3. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2007-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2006 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  5. Downhole Vibration Monitoring and Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. The key feature of this system is its use of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) to allow the damping coefficient to be changed extensively, rapidly and reversibly without the use of mechanical valves, but only by the application of a current. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Much of the effort was devoted to the design and testing of the MRF damper, itself. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and a final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006, with the objectives of building precommercial prototypes, testing them in a drilling laboratory and the field; developing and implementing a commercialization plan. All of these have been accomplished. The Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) prototypes have been successfully proven in testing at the TerraTek drilling facility and at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC.) Based on the results of these tests, we have signed a definitive development and distribution agreement with Smith, and commercial deployment is underway. This current version of the DVMCS monitors and controls axial vibrations. Due to time and budget constraints of this program, it was not possible to complete a system that would also deal with lateral and torsional (stick-slip) vibrations as originally planned; however, this effort is continuing without DOE

  6. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The principal function at KAPL sites (Knolls, Kesselring, and Windsor) is research and development in the design and operation of Naval nuclear propulsion plants. The Kesselring Site is also used for the training of personnel in the operation of these plants. The Naval nuclear propulsion plant at the Windsor Site is currently being dismantled. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  7. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems - Other Related Sites ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems - Other Related Sites Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems - Other Related Sites Other Related Sites DOE - Main Home Page - the home page for ...

  8. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide December 17, 2015 Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System ...

  9. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  10. Monitoring systems for large hydrogenerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruzzone, N.; Gandolfi, P.; Mencaroni, R.; Trotello, E.

    1998-07-01

    Yacyret is the largest hydroelectric power plant, at present under construction, in the world: it is located on an island on the Rio Paran, in Paraguay, near the Argentina border. The power plant has twenty 172.5 MVA, 84-pole hydrogenerators (units 1-10 supplied by Mitsubishi, units 11-20 manufactured by Siemens and Ansaldo). The last ten are equipped with a special monitoring system supplied by Ansaldo. The MONTRA system makes possible on-line control of the air-gap, by means of 8 special sensors, Air Gap Monitoring System (AGMS) commercialized by VibroSystem (Canada); installation and commissioning of the system were by Ansaldo. On the same ten units a system for on-line monitoring and analysis of partial discharges (commercially named SCAPAR) developed by Ansaldo is provided too. At present the tenth unit is under commissioning and all the ten eventual units supplied by Siemens and Ansaldo will be equipped with the above mentioned monitoring system

  11. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities - Remote Systems Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Systems Laboratory Remote Systems Laboratory Working with SRNL Our Facilities - Remote Systems Laboratory The Remote Systems Laboratory is used for the design, development, fabrication, and testing of unique equipment systems for use in radioactive, hazardous or inaccessible environments

  12. Energy Systems Laboratory ESL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ESL specializes in the research fields of metering, modeling and data analysis of energy use in buildings. References: Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL)1 This article is a...

  13. National Laboratories' Energy Technologies and System Solutions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories' Energy Technologies and System Solutions Center Director - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs ...

  14. Power Systems Integration Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Power Systems Integration Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Power Systems Integration Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on developing and testing large-scale distributed energy systems for grid-connected, stand-alone, and microgrid applications. The laboratory can accommodate large power system components such as inverters for photovoltaic (PV) and wind systems, diesel and natural gas generators, battery packs, microgrid interconnection switchgear, and vehicles. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at the ESIF, the Power Systems Integration Laboratory will offer power testing capability of megawatt-scale DC and AC power systems, as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Thermal heating and cooling loops and fuel also allow testing of combined heating/cooling and power systems (CHP).

  15. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

  16. Contact Information Systems | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information Systems Questions about Ames Laboratory network issues, contact networks@ameslab.gov Questions about Ames Laboratory websites, contact webrequest@ameslab.gov To report spam and other suspicious email, contact abuse@ameslab.gov For questions about Ames Laboratory cyber security issues, or to report suspicious computer activity, contact cybersec@ameslab.gov For all other questions, contact the Information Systems Help Desk, During normal business hours, and for non-urgent

  17. Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-08-01

    This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  18. Data Sampling and Filtering inPV System Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    137 Unlimited Release Printed October 2014 Sampling and Filtering in Photovoltaic System Performance Monitoring Anton Driesse, Joshua S. Stein, Daniel Riley, Craig Carmignani Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

  19. 1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D. ); Goodrich, M. )

    1991-05-01

    This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs.

  20. 1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

    1992-11-01

    This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  1. 1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

    1990-05-01

    This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

  2. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1982-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  3. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1985-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1984 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 20 refs., 8 figs., 46 tabs.

  4. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1983-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  5. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1984-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables.

  6. Corral Monitoring System assessment results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filby, E.E.; Haskel, K.J.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the results of a functional and operational assessment of the Corral Monitoring Systems (CMS), which was designed to detect and document accountable items entering or leaving a monitored site. Its development was motivated by the possibility that multiple sites in the nuclear weapons states of the former Soviet Union might be opened to such monitoring under the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The assessment was performed at three levels. One level evaluated how well the planned approach addressed the target application, and which involved tracking sensitive items moving into and around a site being monitored as part of an international treaty or other agreement. The second level examined the overall design and development approach, while the third focused on individual subsystems within the total package. Unfortunately, the system was delivered as disassembled parts and pieces, with very poor documentation. Thus, the assessment was based on fragmentary operating data coupled with an analysis of what documents were provided with the system. The system design seemed to be a reasonable match to the requirements of the target application; however, important questions about site manning and top level administrative control were left unanswered. Four weaknesses in the overall design and development approach were detected: (1) poor configuration control and management, (2) inadequate adherence to a well defined architectural standard, (3) no apparent provision for improving top level error tolerance, and (4) weaknesses in the object oriented programming approach. The individual subsystems were found to offer few features or capabilities that were new or unique, even at the conceptual level. The CMS might possibly have offered a unique combination of features, but this level of integration was never realized, and it had no unique capabilities that could be readily extracted for use in another system.

  7. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  8. Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-12-02

    A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

  9. Energy Systems Fabrication Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems Fabrication Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Energy Systems Fabrication Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) manufactures components for fuel cells and electrochemical cells using a variety of manufacturing techniques. Fabricated components include catalysts, thin-film and gas diffusion electrodes, and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The laboratory supports NREL's fuel cell and electrochemical cell related research. The main focus of the laboratory is to provide support for fuel cell research that is performed in adjacent laboratories. The laboratory enables NREL to manufacture fuel cells in-house using, for example, experimental catalyst developed at NREL. It further enables the creation of MEAs containing artificial defects required for the systematic study of performance and lifetime effects and the evaluation of in-house and externally developed quality control diagnostics for high volume production of fuel cell. Experiments performed in the laboratory focus mainly on the development of alternative fuel cell manufacturing methods.

  10. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria during the quarter. The results for fourth quarter 1992 are fairly consistent with the rest of the year's data. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS in well AMB 4D only two of the four quarters; in the other three wells in which it was elevated, it was present at similar levels throughout the year. Trichloroethylene consistently exceeded its PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 4B, 4D, 5, and 7A during the year. Trichloroethylene was elevated in well AMB 6 only during third and fourth quarters and in well AMB 7 only during fourth quarter. Total alpha-emitting radium was above the final PDWS for total radium in well AMB 5 at similar levels throughout the year and exceeded the PDWS during one of the three quarters it was analyzed for (third quarter 1992) in well AMB 10B.

  11. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-25

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  12. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-15

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Quantum Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Systems Sensors Sandia leverages quantum mechanics to enable exquisite metrology devices, such as inertial sensors and frequency standards that go beyond the capabilities of conventional methods Custom Solutions Quantum Sensing We are leveraging quantum mechanics to enable sensors that go beyond the capabilities of conventional methods. Using the quantized states of matter, it is possible to build exquisite metrology devices such as frequency standards and inertial sensors. Our efforts

  14. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are

  15. Sandia National Laboratories, California Quality Assurance Project Plan for Environmental Monitoring Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2005-09-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) applies to the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Sandia National Laboratories/California. This QAPP follows DOE Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE G 414.1-2A June 17, 2005). The Environmental Monitoring Program is located within the Environmental Operations Department. The Environmental Operations Department is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA operations have minimal impact on the environment. The Department provides guidance to line organizations to help them comply with applicable environmental regulations and DOE orders. To fulfill its mission, the department has groups responsible for waste management; pollution prevention, air quality; environmental planning; hazardous materials management; and environmental monitoring. The Environmental Monitoring Program is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA complies with all Federal, State, and local regulations and with DOE orders regarding the quality of wastewater and stormwater discharges. The Program monitors these discharges both visually and through effluent sampling. The Program ensures that activities at the SNL/CA site do not negatively impact the quality of surface waters in the vicinity, or those of the San Francisco Bay. The Program verifies that wastewater and stormwater discharges are in compliance with established standards and requirements. The Program is also responsible for compliance with groundwater monitoring, and underground and above ground storage tanks regulatory compliance. The Program prepares numerous reports, plans, permit applications, and other documents that demonstrate compliance.

  16. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory June 17, 2014 Unclassified 'Wolf' system to advance many fields of science LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 17, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory recently installed a new high-performance computer system, called Wolf, which will be used for unclassified research. "This machine modernizes our mid-tier resources available to Laboratory scientists," said Bob Tomlinson, of the Laboratory's High Performance Computing group.

  17. Experimental Validation of a Resilient Monitoring and Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Kris R. E. Villez; Humberto E. Garcia

    2014-05-01

    Complex, high performance, engineering systems have to be closely monitored and controlled to ensure safe operation and protect public from potential hazards. One of the main challenges in designing monitoring and control algorithms for these systems is that sensors and actuators may be malfunctioning due to malicious or natural causes. To address this challenge, this paper addresses a resilient monitoring and control (ReMAC) system by expanding previously developed resilient condition assessment monitoring systems and Kalman filter-based diagnostic methods and integrating them with a supervisory controller developed here. While the monitoring and diagnostic algorithms assess plant cyber and physical health conditions, the supervisory controller selects, from a set of candidates, the best controller based on the current plant health assessments. To experimentally demonstrate its enhanced performance, the developed ReMAC system is then used for monitoring and control of a chemical reactor with a water cooling system in a hardware-in-the-loop setting, where the reactor is computer simulated and the water cooling system is implemented by a machine condition monitoring testbed at Idaho National Laboratory. Results show that the ReMAC system is able to make correct plant health assessments despite sensor malfunctioning due to cyber attacks and make decisions that achieve best control actions despite possible actuator malfunctioning. Monitoring challenges caused by mismatches between assumed system component models and actual measurements are also identified for future work.

  18. Monitoring Sensitive Bat Species at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenberg, Kari M.

    2014-01-15

    Bats play a critical role in ecosystems and are vulnerable to disturbance and disruption by human activities. In recent decades, bat populations in the United States and elsewhere have decreased tremendously. There are 47 different species of bat in the United States and 28 of these occur in New Mexico with 15 different species documented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and surrounding areas. Euderma maculatum(the spotted bat) is listed as threatened by the state of New Mexico and is known to occur at LANL. Four other species of bats are listed as sensitive and also occur here. In 1995, a four year study was initiated at LANL to assess the status of bat species of concern, elucidate distribution and relative abundance, and obtain information on roosting sites. There have been no definitive studies since then. Biologists in the Environmental Protection Division at LANL initiated a multi-year monitoring program for bats in May 2013 to implement the Biological Resources Management Plan. The objective of this ongoing study is to monitor bat species diversity and seasonal activity over time at LANL. Bat species diversity and seasonal activity were measured using an acoustic bat detector, the Pettersson D500X. This ultrasound recording unit is intended for long-term, unattended recording of bat and other high frequency animal calls. During 2013, the detector was deployed at two locations around LANL. Study sites were selected based on proximity to water where bats may be foraging. Recorded bat calls were analyzed using Sonobat, software that can help determine specific species of bat through their calls. A list of bat species at the two sites was developed and compared to lists from previous studies. Species diversity and seasonal activity, measured as the number of call sequences recorded each month, were compared between sites and among months. A total of 17,923 bat calls were recorded representing 15 species. Results indicate that there is a

  19. OMEGA Experimental Systems - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Systems - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE Building Map Partnerships Careers Education Undergraduate Program Graduate Program High School Program Faculty Contacts Computational Astrophysics H-E-D Physics Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser-Plasma Interaction Radiative Hydrodynamics Plasma Astrophysics Organization Director's Office Laser

  20. Structural Monitoring System (SMS) and Visual System (VS) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Structural Monitoring System (SMS) and Visual System (VS) Structural Monitoring System (SMS) and Visual System (VS) Axis Communications, Inc. has developed network ready, environmentally tolerant, low-light level camera-visual systems (VS) with built-in pan and tilt mechanisms that permit remote monitoring of facilities that are in standby mode. Structural Monitoring System (SMS) and Visual System (VS) (188.51 KB) More Documents & Publications GammaCam Technology Demonstration at

  1. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells Title: Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells The present invention relates to a system for monitoring and ...

  2. Internationally monitored retrievable storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafele, W.

    1996-12-31

    The proposed internationally monitored retrievable storage system (IMRSS) is intended to provide an orderly and secure alternative to continuation of the current individualistic spent-fuel management trends in nuclear-power countries. The IMRSS concept, in its broadest terms, proposes that an international entity undertake the management responsibility for spent fuel after its discharge from power plant cooling ponds. The IMRSS envisages international management of a small number of surface (or near-surface) storage facilities distributed globally (in major nuclear countries and elsewhere) and a transportation system between nuclear plants and the storage facilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) would maintain responsibility for adherence to safeguards criteria. The IMRSS operation would be similar to that of an international bank, with each nation maintaining title to its spent fuel and able to withdraw it for peaceful purposes. The system would provide transparency, accountability, and security. The IMRSS would be a step to establishing an inter- national regime for the prudent management of spent fuel and excess civilian plutonium. The IMRSS concept has been studied in three international workshops. Among the major issues that have been addressed are the global distribution of spent fuel if current trends continue, the need for international criteria and management to ensure public health and nonproliferation, the value of spent-fuel retrievability, the future role of a plutonium resource in the fuel cycle, the operating format of a practical IMRSS, and the integration of an IMRSS with existing geopolitical agreements and arrangements.

  3. Safety System Oversight Assessment, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons ... National Laboratory's Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility tritium gas handling system. ...

  4. Project W-420 stack monitoring system upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARPENTER, K.E.

    1999-02-25

    This project will execute the design, procurement, construction, startup, and turnover activities for upgrades to the stack monitoring system on selected Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) ventilation systems. In this plan, the technical, schedule, and cost baselines are identified, and the roles and responsibilities of project participants are defined for managing the Stack Monitoring System Upgrades, Project W-420.

  5. First annual report on the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Frank, M.L.; Garten, C.T.; Houston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Berry, J.B.; Talmage, S.S. ); Amano, H. ); Jimenez, B.D. ); Kitchings, J.T.

    1992-08-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the first of a series of annual reports presenting the results of BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from March through December 1986.

  6. Laboratory information management system at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, W.; Barth, D.; Ibsen, T.; Newman, B.

    1994-03-01

    In January of 1994 an important new technology was brought on line to help in the monumental waste management and environmental restoration work at the Hanford Site. Cleanup at the Hanford Site depends on analytical chemistry information to identify contaminates, design and monitor cleanup processes, assure worker safety, evaluate progress, and prove completion. The new technology, a laboratory information management system (LIMS) called ``LABCORE,`` provides the latest systems to organize and communicate the analytical tasks: track work and samples; collect and process data, prepare reports, and store data in readily accessible electronic form.

  7. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

  8. Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-29

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System provides supervisory control, monitoring, and selected remote control of primary and secondary repository operations. Primary repository operations consist of both surface and subsurface activities relating to high-level waste receipt, preparation, and emplacement. Secondary repository operations consist of support operations for waste handling and treatment, utilities, subsurface construction, and other selected ancillary activities. Remote control of the subsurface emplacement operations, as well as, repository performance confirmation operations are the direct responsibility of the system. In addition, the system monitors parameters such as radiological data, air quality data, fire detection status, meteorological conditions, unauthorized access, and abnormal operating conditions, to ensure a safe workplace for personnel. Parameters are displayed in a real-time manner to human operators regarding surface and subsurface conditions. The system performs supervisory monitoring and control for both important to safety and non-safety systems. The system provides repository operational information, alarm capability, and human operator response messages during emergency response situations. The system also includes logic control to place equipment, systems, and utilities in a safe operational mode or complete shutdown during emergency response situations. The system initiates alarms and provides operational data to enable appropriate actions at the local level in support of emergency response, radiological protection response, evacuation, and underground rescue. The system provides data communications, data processing, managerial reports, data storage, and data analysis. This system's primary surface and subsurface operator consoles, for both supervisory and remote control activities, will be located in a Central Control Center (CCC) inside one of the surface facility buildings. The system

  9. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-12-31

    The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Braun

    2009-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2009 (FY 2009). Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-two prehistoric archaeological sites, six historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, two historic trails, and two nuclear resources, including Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2009 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations and monitor the effects of ongoing project activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and trespassing citations were issued in one instance, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  11. Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... What Were the Benefits? boilercombustionchart.jpg The boiler combustion control and monitoring system was installed on a 25 MMBtuhr steam boiler located at the Watervliet ...

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie B. Williams; Brenda Pace

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during 2013. Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is also a cave; fourteen additional caves; seven prehistoric archaeological sites ; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; one nuclear resource (Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a designated National Historic Landmark); and nine historic structures located at the Central Facilities Area. Of the monitored resources, thirty-three were routinely monitored, and five were monitored to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations along with the effects of ongoing project activities. On six occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. In addition, two resources were visited more than once as part of the routine monitoring schedule or to monitor for additional damage. Throughout the year, most of the cultural resources monitored had no visual adverse changes resulting in Type 1determinations. However, Type 2 impacts were noted at eight sites, indicating that although impacts were noted or that a project was operating outside of culturally cleared limitations, cultural resources retained integrity and noted impacts did not threaten National Register eligibility. No new Type 3 or any Type 4 impacts that adversely impacted cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were observed at cultural resources monitored in 2013.

  13. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

  14. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Energy Systems Integration Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview | Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview This brochure describes the Energy Systems Integration Facility at National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Download the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's energy systems integration facility overview. (4.91 MB) More Documents & Publications Facilities and Infrastructure Program FY 2016

  15. PERFORMACE OF MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEMS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAROTHERS KD; BOOMER KD; ANDA VS; DAHL MM; EDGEMON GL

    2010-01-14

    Between 2007 and 2009, several different multi-probe corrosion monitoring systems were designed and installed in high-level nuclear waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in WaShington State. The probe systems are being monitored to ensure waste tanks operate in regions that minimize localized corrosion (i.e., pitting) and stress corrosion cracking. The corrosion monitoring systems have been installed in wastes with different chemistry types. An ongoing effort during the same time period has generated non-radioactive simulants that are tested in the laboratory to establish baseline corrosion monitoring system performance and characterize data to allow interpretation of readings from the multiple corrosion monitoring systems. Data collection from these monitoring systems has reached the point where the results allow comparison with the laboratory testing. This paper presents analytical results from the corrosion monitoring system development program.

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL Cultural Resource Management Office

    2010-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2010 (FY 2010). Throughout the year, thirty-three cultural resource localities were revisited, including somethat were visited more than once, including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-six prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. The resources that were monitored included seventeen that are routinely visited and sixteen that are located in INL project areas. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and one trespassing incident (albeit sans formal charges) was discovered, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  17. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Submittal Notification |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Submittal Notification Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Submittal Notification December 17, 2015 Monitoring records are required to be reported to the Department of Energy (DOE) Radiation Records Repository by March 31 under DOE Order 231.1B and in accordance with the REMS Reporting Guide. These records form the basis for the analysis presented in the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure annual report. In July of 2007,

  18. CB-EMIS MAINTENANCE MONITORING SYSTEM

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-10-01

    This system continuously monitors all components of a CB-EMIS (ANL-02-078)installation such as signals for video cameras, detector, train data, meteorological data, computer and network equipment and reports exceptions to maintenance staff so that corrections can be made as soon as possible. This monitoring system is built within Nagios (www.nagios.org), a free open source host service and network monitoring program.

  19. ORISE: DOE's Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring System (REMS) ORISE maintains large database of radition exposure records for the U.S. Department of Energy ORISE staff monitoring radiation data for DOE Rule 10 CFR 835 establishes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational protection rule and requires assessment and recording of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or contamination. The Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) database is the radiation exposure data repository for all

  20. Power Monitoring for Connected Lighting Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Monitoring for Connected Lighting Systems by Jefferay Lawton Senior Product Marketing Engineer Mixed-Signal and Linear Division Microchip Technology Inc. 2 Agenda  Metrology Evolution  Power-Monitoring Implementations  System Characterization  Software  Hardware  Zero-Cal  Distributive Scheme  Power-Monitoring Examples & Uses 3 Metrology Evolution Electric Utility Meters * Strict/high-end requirements * Government regulation * Standards (e.g., IEC62053-21/22) *

  1. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, Mark Alexander; Grot, Stephen Andreas

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for monitoring the performance of H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H.sub.2 sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken.

  2. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, M.A.; Grot, S.A.

    1998-06-09

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring the performance of H{sub 2}--O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H{sub 2} sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken. 2 figs.

  3. HSI Prototypes for Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jokstad, Håkon; McDonald, Rob

    2015-09-01

    This report describes in detail the design and features of three Human System Interface (HSI) prototypes developed by the Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program under Contract 128420 through Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The prototypes are implemented for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator and installed in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL. The three prototypes are: 1) Power Ramp display 2) RCS Heat-up and Cool-down display 3) Estimated time to limit display The power ramp display and the RCS heat-up/cool-down display are designed to provide good visual indications to the operators on how well they are performing their task compared to their target ramp/heat-up/cool-down rate. The estimated time to limit display is designed to help operators restore levels or pressures before automatic or required manual actions are activated.

  4. Safety System Oversight Assessment, Los Alamos National Laboratory- May 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System

  5. PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) (118.86 KB) More Documents & Publications PIA - WEB iPASS System DOE PIA Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Advanced Test Reactor

  6. Tritium Irrigation Facility & Automated Vadose Zone Monitoring System |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Tritium Irrigation Facility and Automated Vadose Monitoring System The opportunity to study tritium movement in a natural system presents a rare opportunity for both physical and biological research. Researchers may take advantage of tritium's properties as a conservative tracer for modeling contaminant transport, as a radioactive tracer for examining biological processes involving water, or as an example of radionuclide contaminant behavior in natural

  7. Dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume at Mound Laboratory, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.J.; Carpenter, M.V.

    1995-12-01

    A dig-face monitoring system consists of onsite hardware for collecting information on changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface soil during the hazardous site excavation. A prototype dig-face system was take to Mount Laboratory for a first trial. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of {sup 232}Th, {sup 227}Ac, and assorted debris. The system was used to monitor a deep excavation aimed at removing {sup 227}Ac-contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were used to scan across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed. A 3-D image of the contamination plumes was developed; the radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the {sup 227}Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate {sup 232}Th plume.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2008 (FY 2008). Throughout the year, 45 cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, one butte, twenty-eight prehistoric archaeological sites, three historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, one historic canal construction camp, three historic trails, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2008 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations, confirm the locations of previously recorded cultural resources in relation to project activities, to assess the damage caused by fire-fighting efforts, and to watch for cultural materials during ground disturbing activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources

  9. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

  10. System for autonomous monitoring of bioagents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langlois, Richard G.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Colston, Jr, Billy W.; Brown, Steve B.; Masquelier, Don A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Venkateswaran, Kodomudi

    2015-06-09

    An autonomous monitoring system for monitoring for bioagents. A collector gathers the air, water, soil, or substance being monitored. A sample preparation means for preparing a sample is operatively connected to the collector. A detector for detecting the bioagents in the sample is operatively connected to the sample preparation means. One embodiment of the present invention includes confirmation means for confirming the bioagents in the sample.

  11. Solar Radiation Research Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Since 1981, NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar radiation components, ...

  12. Metrology Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory ensure their measurements are traceable and their instruments are calibrated according to national or international standards. ...

  13. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for ...

  14. APS Technical Systems Monitoring Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gap Status Insertion Device Gap Values. 24 hour plot of each. Updated every minute. Liquid Nitrogen Distribution System Status Liquid Nitrogen Distribution System...

  15. 1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends.

  16. Energy Systems Integration Facility at National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Energy Systems Integration Facility at National Renewable Energy Laboratory Energy Systems Integration Facility at National Renewable Energy Laboratory Addthis Energy Systems Integration Facility 1 of 7 Energy Systems Integration Facility The Energy Department's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The 182,500-square-foot facility houses 15 experimental laboratories and several outdoor test beds.

  17. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

  18. Well Monitoring Systems for EGS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Our system can stay in the well and operate unmanned for days or years. This reduces cost ... - Once in place, the system can run unmanned (no logging truck) 3 | US DOE ...

  19. Monitoring a petabyte scale storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakken, Jon; Berman, Eileen; Huang, Chih-Hao; Moibenko, Alexander; Petravick, Don; Zalokar, Michael; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Fermilab operates a petabyte scale storage system, Enstore, which is the primary data store for experiments' large data sets. The Enstore system regularly transfers greater than 15 Terabytes of data each day. It is designed using a client-server architecture providing sufficient modularity to allow easy addition and replacement of hardware and software components. Monitoring of this system is essential to insure the integrity of the data that is stored in it and to maintain the high volume access that this system supports. The monitoring of this distributed system is accomplished using a variety of tools and techniques that present information for use by a variety of roles (operator, storage system administrator, storage software developer, user). Essential elements of the system are monitored: performance, hardware, firmware, software, network, data integrity. We will present details of the deployed monitoring tools with an emphasis on the different techniques that have proved useful to each role. Experience with the monitoring tools and techniques, what worked and what did not will be presented.

  20. Tritium monitor and collection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourne, G.L.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Ely, W.E.; Tuggle, D.G.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Wickham, K.L.; Maltrud, H.R.; Baker, J.D.

    1992-01-14

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter. 7 figs.

  1. Tritium monitor and collection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ely, Walter E. (Los Alamos, NM); Tuggle, Dale G. (Los Alamos, NM); Grafwallner, Ervin G. (Arco, ID); Wickham, Keith L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Maltrud, Herman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    1992-01-01

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter.

  2. Aerial Monitoring System | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Aerial Monitoring System NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey Over Philadelphia July 18-20 Philadelphia - On July 18 through July 20, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) will conduct low-altitude helicopter flights around Philadelphia to measure naturally occurring background radiation in support of the Democratic National... NNSA to Participate in Aerial Radiation Training Exercise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - On

  3. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Policy for Submitting of PII information Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems ... Guide. PDF icon Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting ...

  4. Web-Accessible Scientific Workflow System for Performance Monitoring...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Web-Accessible Scientific Workflow System for Performance Monitoring Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Web-Accessible Scientific Workflow System for Performance Monitoring ...

  5. Understanding large scale HPC systems through scalable monitoring...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    HPC systems through scalable monitoring and analysis. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Understanding large scale HPC systems through scalable monitoring and analysis. ...

  6. An automated neutron monitor maintenance system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, F.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Odell, D.M.C.

    1996-09-01

    Neutron detectors are commonly used by the nuclear materials processing industry to monitor fissile materials in process vessels and tanks. The proper functioning of these neutron monitors must be periodically evaluated. We have developed and placed in routine use a PC-based multichannel analyzer (MCA) system for on-line BF3 and He-3 gas-filled detector function testing. The automated system: 1) acquires spectral data from the monitor system, 2) analyzes the spectrum to determine the detector`s functionality, 3) makes suggestions for maintenance or repair, as required, and 4) saves the spectrum and results to disk for review. The operator interface has been designed to be user-friendly and to minimize the training requirements of the user. The system may also be easily customized for various applications

  7. Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2012-07-24

    A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU comprises: a plurality of performance counters each for counting signals representing occurrences of events from one or more the plurality of processor units in the multiprocessor system; and, a plurality of input devices for receiving the event signals from one or more processor devices of the plurality of processor units, the plurality of input devices programmable to select event signals for receipt by one or more of the plurality of performance counters for counting, wherein the PMU is shared between multiple processing units, or within a group of processors in the multiprocessing system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

  8. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1997-12-09

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs.

  9. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Howard D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    1997-01-01

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  10. Optical Metrology Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to national or international standards to ensure the quality and traceability of data. ... range (280-2,400 nm) and pulse integration capability Optronic Laboratories OL-756 ...

  11. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    A Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, required by the California Environmental Quality Act, was developed by UC as part of the Final EIS/EIR process. This document describing the program is a companion to the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). The Final EIS/EIR analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action, which for the purposes of NEPA is: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 1 0 years) proposed projects, of LLNL and SNL, Livermore. The proposed action for the EIR is the renewal of the contract between DOE and UC for UC`s continued operation and management of LLNL. The Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program is for implementing and monitoring progress of measures taken to mitigate the significant impacts of the proposed action. A complete description of the impacts and proposed mitigations is in Section 5 of Volume I of the Final EIS/EIR. This report summarizes the mitigation measures, identifies the responsible party at the Laboratory for implementing the mitigation measure, states when monitoring will be implemented, when the mitigation measure will be in place and monitoring completed, and who will verify that the mitigation measure was implemented.

  12. The development of a monitoring system for use in Iraq

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuess, D.A.

    1996-08-12

    In April 1993, the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM), through the U.S. Department of State, requested hardware to monitor two rocket motor test stands in Iraq. The Department of Energy`s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory responded with project Dustcloud. Within two weeks of the request, LLNL delivered two video monitoring systems which were deployed to Iraq and installed at the Al Azim solid motor test site and the Al Rafah liquid engine test site, each about 75 km from Baghdad. The original request included a set of loosely defined requirements to perform remote monitoring in accordance with applicable United Nations Resolutions. The Sheraton Hotel in Baghdad was to be the site of the central monitoring station. While these first systems satisfied the original requirements, they were technically cumbersome and did not lend themselves to easy expansion, or mass production. A request for a second phase design was received in May 1994. The second phase design provided a more general solution to the monitoring requirement and extended the number of monitored facilities to a total of 25 and provided a continuous monitoring capability at a mutually agreed upon site located outside of the monitored country. The Phase II hardware was placed in service in June 1994. In both the Phase I and Phase II designs we worked against extremely tight time constraints where the schedule was driven solely by international negotiations and agreements. One result of the tight time schedules was the inability to consider a wide range of international sources for the hardware. This paper is devoted to an in depth discussion of the requirements and the hardware design.

  13. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

  14. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

  15. Monitoring system tested during LPG tanker unloading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-14

    A specially developed computer-based hazardous-materials monitoring system has been successfully field tested. The test of the portable system occurred during the unloading of 45,000 metric tons of LPG from a 740-ft tanker at the petroleum dock of a plant along the Mississippi River. The function of this system is to detect, report, alarm, and record unacceptable concentrations of hazardous vapors during marine-transfer operations.

  16. Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Jiang, Wei

    2008-03-31

    This document provides the algorithms for CHP system performance monitoring and commissioning verification (CxV). It starts by presenting system-level and component-level performance metrics, followed by descriptions of algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, using the metric presented earlier. Verification of commissioning is accomplished essentially by comparing actual measured performance to benchmarks for performance provided by the system integrator and/or component manufacturers. The results of these comparisons are then automatically interpreted to provide conclusions regarding whether the CHP system and its components have been properly commissioned and where problems are found, guidance is provided for corrections. A discussion of uncertainty handling is then provided, which is followed by a description of how simulations models can be used to generate data for testing the algorithms. A model is described for simulating a CHP system consisting of a micro-turbine, an exhaust-gas heat recovery unit that produces hot water, a absorption chiller and a cooling tower. The process for using this model for generating data for testing the algorithms for a selected set of faults is described. The next section applies the algorithms developed to CHP laboratory and field data to illustrate their use. The report then concludes with a discussion of the need for laboratory testing of the algorithms on a physical CHP systems and identification of the recommended next steps.

  17. 1997 LMITCO Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, B.; Street, L.; Wilhelmsen, R.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1997 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs and compares 1997 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standard, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends indicating a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. With the exception of one nitrogen sample in the disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond, compliance with permits and applicable regulations was achieved. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that public health and the environment were protected.

  18. Functional design criteria for standard hydrogen monitoring system portable platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-01-17

    Functional design description for a Standard-E cabinet arrangement Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System Portable Platform.

  19. International Monitoring System | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Monitoring System NNSA Contributes to International Efforts to Further Strengthen Detection of Nuclear Explosions Every day, thousands of patients worldwide undergo medical tests, diagnostics, and treatments that use radioactive materials. These vital materials, such as molybdeum-99 (Mo-99), must be produced continuously to keep up with demand. One consequence of some Mo-

  20. Use of ArcGIS in Environmental Monitoring at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    oertel; giles

    2007-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy site located in southeastern Idaho. The INL is required to perform environmental monitoring of anthropogenically introduced contaminants. One primary contaminant of interest is radioactive Cs-137 which is resident in INL soils due to past operational activities and atmospheric weapons testing. Collection of field data is performed using vehicle mounted and portable radiation detector units. All data is combined in ArcGIS and displayed over georeferenced satellite images and digital elevation models. The use of the ArcGIS geostatistical analysis package enhances the ability to look for areas of higher Cs-137 concentration. Combining current monitoring results with meteorological wind pattern maps allows for siting of new and improved monitoring locations. Use of the ArcGIS package provides an integrated analysis and mapping protocol for use in radioactive contaminant monitoring.

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

    1991-09-01

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-02-17

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell.

  3. Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, K.H.; Falter, D.D.; Falter, K.G.

    1991-04-30

    A system is described for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array of solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1[times]3[times]5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A wake-up' circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described. 4 figures.

  4. Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Falter, Diedre D.; Falter, Kelly G.

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1.times.3.times.5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A "wake-up" circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described.

  5. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reporting Guide. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII information (11.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Radiation Exposure Monitoring ...

  6. Remote System for Characterizing, Monitoring and Inspecting the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monitoring and Inspecting the Inside of Contaminated Nuclear Stacks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Remote System for Characterizing, Monitoring and ...

  7. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2005-01-25

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell. Other polarization curves may be generated and used for fuel cell stack monitoring based on different operating pressures, temperatures, hydrogen quantities.

  8. Radon monitoring and early low background counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, K.J.; Mei, D.M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

    2010-09-01

    Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

  9. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1982 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, K.S.; Gonzalez, M.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1983-03-14

    Environmental monitoring efforts spanned air, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, and radiation doses. Monitoring data collection, analysis, and evaluation are presented for air, soils, sewage, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, milk, and general environmental radioactivity. Non-radioactive monitoring addresses beryllium, chemical effluents in sewage, noise pollution, and storm runoff and liquid discharge site pollutants. Quality assurance efforts are addressed. Five appendices present tabulated data; environmental activity concentration; dose calculation method; discharge limits to sanitary sewer systems of Livermore; and sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring. (PSB)

  10. Methods, apparatus, and systems for monitoring transmission systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, Robert E; Svoboda, John M; West, Phillip B; Heath, Gail L; Scott, Clark L

    2015-01-27

    A sensing platform for monitoring a transmission system, and method therefor, may include a sensor that senses one or more conditions relating to a condition of the transmission system and/or the condition of an environment around the transmission system. A control system operatively associated with the sensor produces output data based on an output signal produced by the sensor. A transmitter operatively associated with the control system transmits the output data from the control system.

  11. Methods, apparatus, and systems for monitoring transmission systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polk, Robert E. [Idaho Falls, ID; Svoboda, John M. [Idaho Falls, ID; West, Phillip B. [Idaho Falls, ID; Heath, Gail L. [Iona, ID; Scott, Clark L. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-31

    A sensing platform for monitoring a transmission system, and method therefor, may include a sensor that senses one or more conditions relating to a condition of the transmission system and/or the condition of an environment around the transmission system. A control system operatively associated with the sensor produces output data based on an output signal produced by the sensor. A transmitter operatively associated with the control system transmits the output data from the control system.

  12. A Resilient Condition Assessment Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humberto Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Semyon M. Meerkov

    2012-08-01

    An architecture and supporting methods are presented for the implementation of a resilient condition assessment monitoring system that can adaptively accommodate both cyber and physical anomalies to a monitored system under observation. In particular, the architecture includes three layers: information, assessment, and sensor selection. The information layer estimates probability distributions of process variables based on sensor measurements and assessments of the quality of sensor data. Based on these estimates, the assessment layer then employs probabilistic reasoning methods to assess the plant health. The sensor selection layer selects sensors so that assessments of the plant condition can be made within desired time periods. Resilient features of the developed system are then illustrated by simulations of a simplified power plant model, where a large portion of the sensors are under attack.

  13. A design methodology for unattended monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH,JAMES D.; DELAND,SHARON M.

    2000-03-01

    The authors presented a high-level methodology for the design of unattended monitoring systems, focusing on a system to detect diversion of nuclear materials from a storage facility. The methodology is composed of seven, interrelated analyses: Facility Analysis, Vulnerability Analysis, Threat Assessment, Scenario Assessment, Design Analysis, Conceptual Design, and Performance Assessment. The design of the monitoring system is iteratively improved until it meets a set of pre-established performance criteria. The methodology presented here is based on other, well-established system analysis methodologies and hence they believe it can be adapted to other verification or compliance applications. In order to make this approach more generic, however, there needs to be more work on techniques for establishing evaluation criteria and associated performance metrics. They found that defining general-purpose evaluation criteria for verifying compliance with international agreements was a significant undertaking in itself. They finally focused on diversion of nuclear material in order to simplify the problem so that they could work out an overall approach for the design methodology. However, general guidelines for the development of evaluation criteria are critical for a general-purpose methodology. A poor choice in evaluation criteria could result in a monitoring system design that solves the wrong problem.

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Potential Impact Categories for Radiological Air Emission Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

    2012-06-05

    In 2002, the EPA amended 40 CFR 61 Subpart H and 40 CFR 61 Appendix B Method 114 to include requirements from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities for major emission points. Additionally, the WDOH amended the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 Radiation protection-air emissions to include ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requirements for major and minor emission points when new permitting actions are approved. A result of the amended regulations is the requirement to prepare a written technical basis for the radiological air emission sampling and monitoring program. A key component of the technical basis is the Potential Impact Category (PIC) assigned to an emission point. This paper discusses the PIC assignments for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Integrated Laboratory emission units; this revision includes five PIC categories.

  15. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) groundwater monitoring report, second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were visited for sampling. Groundwater samples were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. This report describes the results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site flagging criteria during the quarter.

  16. Environmental Management System Steering Committee | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management System Steering Committee The Environmental Management System Steering Committee (EMSSC) is a standing Ames Laboratory committee that advises the members of the Laboratory's Executive Council on environmentally-related objects and targets to help meet the Laboratory's and DOE's sustainability goals. For more information please see http://www.ameslab.gov/operations/esha/environmental EMS Charter The current members of the committee include David Byrd (Science and

  17. Nonradioactive Ambient Air Monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2001--2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Gladney; J.Dewart, C.Eberhart; J.Lochamy

    2004-09-01

    During the spring of 2000, the Cerro Grande forest fire reached Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and ignited both above-ground vegetation and disposed materials in several landfills. During and after the fire, there was concern about the potential human health impacts from chemicals emitted by the combustion of these Laboratory materials. Consequently, short-term, intensive air-monitoring studies were performed during and shortly after the fire. Unlike the radiological data from many years of AIRNET sampling, LANL did not have an adequate database of nonradiological species under baseline conditions with which to compare data collected during the fire. Therefore, during 2001 the Meteorology and Air Quality Group designed and implemented a new air-monitoring program, entitled NonRadNET, to provide nonradiological background data under normal conditions. The objectives of NonRadNET were to: (1) develop the capability for collecting nonradiological air-monitoring data, (2) conduct monitoring to develop a database of typical background levels of selected nonradiological species in the communities nearest the Laboratory, and (3) determine LANL's potential contribution to nonradiological air pollution in the surrounding communities. NonRadNET ended in late December 2002 with five quarters of data. The purpose of this paper is to organize and describe the NonRadNET data collected over 2001-2002 to use as baseline data, either for monitoring during a fire, some other abnormal event, or routine use. To achieve that purpose, in this paper we will: (1) document the NonRadNET program procedures, methods, and quality management, (2) describe the usual origins and uses of the species measured, (3) compare the species measured to LANL and other area emissions, (4) present the five quarters of data, (5) compare the data to known typical environmental values, and (6) evaluate the data against exposure standards.

  18. Database Performance Monitoring for the Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klise, Katherine A.

    2015-10-01

    The Database Performance Monitoring (DPM) software (copyright in processes) is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform quality control analysis on time series data. The software loads time indexed databases (currently csv format), performs a series of quality control tests defined by the user, and creates reports which include summary statistics, tables, and graphics. DPM can be setup to run on an automated schedule defined by the user. For example, the software can be run once per day to analyze data collected on the previous day. HTML formatted reports can be sent via email or hosted on a website. To compare performance of several databases, summary statistics and graphics can be gathered in a dashboard view which links to detailed reporting information for each database. The software can be customized for specific applications.

  19. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Measurements at the High Temperature Test Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are now available for use as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiation test capsules. Melt wires or paint spots, which are typically used as temperature sensors in ATR static capsules, are limited in that they can only detect whether a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that may have occurred during irradiation. As part of the efforts initiated by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to make SiC temperature monitors available, a capability was developed to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. As discussed in this report, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. This document describes the INL efforts to develop the capability to complete these resistance measurements. In addition, the procedure is reported that was developed to assure that high quality measurements are made in a consistent fashion.

  20. Environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG 6) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This document updates a draft monitoring plan developed in 1993. The draft plan was never finalized awaiting resolution of the mechanisms for addressing RCRA concerns at a site where the CERCLA process resulted in a decision to defer action, i.e., postpone closure indefinitely. Over the past two years the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), US Department of Energy (DOE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, have agreed that RCRA authority at the site will be maintained through a post- closure permit; ``closure`` in this case referring to deferred action. Both a Revised Closure Plan (DOE 1995a) and a Post-Closure Permit Application (DOE 1995b) have been developed to document this agreement; relevant portions of the EMP will be included in the RCRA Post-Closure Permit Application. As the RCRA issues were being negotiated, DOE initiated monitoring at WAG 6. The purpose of the monitoring activities was to (1) continue to comply with RCRA groundwater quality assessment requirements, (2) install new monitoring equipment, and (3) establish the baseline conditions at WAG 6 against which changes in contaminant releases could be measured. Baseline monitoring is scheduled to end September 30, 1995. Activities that have taken place over the past two years are summarized in this document.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Engineering Systems engineering robot Systems engineers contribute to every aspect that impacts how a product is conceived, developed, and deployed into the field. Systems engineers at Sandia have the opportunity to contribute technically and programmatically in the development of our many breakthrough products. Systems engineers have responsibilities across the entire product life cycle, giving them a unique, hands-on work experience. Systems engineers work with business development

  2. Hybrid Radiator Cooling System | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiator Cooling System Technology available for licensing: Hybrid radiator cooling system uses conventional finned air cooling under most driving conditions that would be...

  3. Aircraft wire system laboratory development : phase I progress report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinallo, Michael Anthony; Lopez, Christopher D.

    2003-08-01

    An aircraft wire systems laboratory has been developed to support technical maturation of diagnostic technologies being used in the aviation community for detection of faulty attributes of wiring systems. The design and development rationale of the laboratory is based in part on documented findings published by the aviation community. The main resource at the laboratory is a test bed enclosure that is populated with aged and newly assembled wire harnesses that have known defects. This report provides the test bed design and harness selection rationale, harness assembly and defect fabrication procedures, and descriptions of the laboratory for usage by the aviation community.

  4. Operating experience review of an INL gas monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; DeWall, K. G.; Herring, J. S.

    2015-03-12

    This article describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored in the lab room are hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and both actual and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. In addition, some simple calculations are given to estimate the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  5. Operating experience review of an INL gas monitoring system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; DeWall, K. G.; Herring, J. S.

    2015-03-01

    This article describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored in the lab room are hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and both actual and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. Some simple calculations are given to estimate the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  6. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; McKinzie, II. Billy John

    2009-08-18

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  7. Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds test systems that can provide heat transfer fluids for the evaluation of heat exchangers and thermal energy storage devices. The existing system provides molten salt at temperatures up to 800 C. This unit is charged with nitrate salt rated to 600 C, but is capable of handling other heat transfer fluid compositions. Three additional test bays are available for future deployment of alternative heat transfer fluids such as hot air, carbon dioxide, or steam systems. The Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory performs pilot-scale thermal energy storage system testing through multiple charge and discharge cycles to evaluate heat exchanger performance and storage efficiency. The laboratory equipment can also be utilized to test instrument and sensor compatibility with hot heat transfer fluids. Future applications in the laboratory may include the evaluation of thermal energy storage systems designed to operate with supercritical heat transfer fluids such as steam or carbon dioxide. These tests will require the installation of test systems capable of providing supercritical fluids at temperatures up to 700 C.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Integrated Military Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integrated Military Systems (IMS) Capabilities Facilities Projects Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Integrated Military Systems (IMS) Integrated Military Systems Missile Air Defense Demonstrates advanced technologies, delivers responsive technical solutions in anticipation of Missile Defense mission needs, and facilitates the integration and sustainment of operational capabilities across the broad Missile Defense mission Missile Air Defense Strike Systems & Aerospace Technologies Provides

  9. Well Monitoring Systems for EGS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Well Monitoring Systems for EGS Well Monitoring Systems for EGS Well Monitoring Systems for EGS presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. ht_tools_peer2013.pdf (638.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Well Monitoring System for EGS track 3: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review 300ºC DDS + 300ºC MWD

  10. Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring the US ATLAS Network Infrastructure with perfSONAR-PS For the ATLAS Collaboration, Shawn McKee 1 , Andrew Lake 2 , Philippe Laurens 3 , Horst Severini 4 , Tomasz Wlodek 5 , Stephen Wolff 6 and Jason Zurawski 6 1 University of Michigan Physics Department 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 3 Michigan State University Physics and Astronomy Department 4 University of Oklahoma, Physics/IT 5 Brookhaven National Laboratory 6 Internet2 E-mail: smckee@umich.edu, andy@es.net,

  11. Radiation portal monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Green, J. Andrew; Hogan, Gary E.; Makela, Mark F.; Priedhorsky, William C.; Saunders, Alexander; Schultz, Larry J.; Sossong, Michael J.

    2009-12-15

    A portal monitoring system has a cosmic ray charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray muons, whilst also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  12. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report. Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL sites resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations. KAPL environmental controls are subject to applicable state and federal regulations governing use, emission, treatment, storage and/or disposal of solid, liquid and gaseous materials. Some non-radiological water and air emissions are generated and treated on-site prior to discharge to the environment. Liquid effluents and air emissions are controlled and monitored in accordance with permits issued by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) for the Windsor Site and by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) for the Knolls and Kesselring Sites. The liquid effluent monitoring data show that KAPL has maintained a high degree of compliance with permit requirements. Where required, radionuclide air emission sources are authorized by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The non-radiological air emissions, with the exception of opacity for the boilers, are not required to be monitored.

  13. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  14. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Monitoring Program annual report for 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2011-03-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/California Environmental Monitoring Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/California Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2010 program report describes the activities undertaken during the previous year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/California.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories California Environmental Monitoring Program Annual Report for Calendar Year 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Robert C.

    2006-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Environmental Monitoring Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 Update program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  16. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  17. Gamma-Ray Signatures for State-Of-Health Analysis and Monitoring of Widely-Arrayed Radiation Portal Monitor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Angel, Linda K.; Wright, Ingrid H.; Eslinger, Melany A.; Pospical, A. Jill; Ellis, John E.

    2008-05-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has deployed a large array of radiation portal monitors for the Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs and Border Protection. These portal monitors scan incoming vehicles crossing the U.S. border and shipping containers leaving international ports for radioactive material via gamma-ray and neutron detection. Data produced and captured by these systems are recorded for every vehicle related to radiation signature, sensor/system status, and local background, as well as a host of other variables. Within the Radiation Portal Monitor Project at PNNL, state-of-health observation and analysis for the whole RPM system using these data to determine functionality and performance is being developed. (PIET-43741-TM-492)

  18. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system: Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, S.M.; De Avila, J.C.; Keith, V.F.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes a portable laboratory system for the analysis of soils, ground water, and surface waters for the detection and quantification of hazardous materials, organics, and radioactive contaminants. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) is a sample throughput of 20 samples per day, providing a full range of analysis on each sample within 16 hours of preparation with high accuracy.

  19. Transportation System Simulation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation System Simulation Transportation System Simulation Today's transportation systems are becoming more and more complex, with integration of communication technologies, vehicle automation and innovative mobility solutions. The advent of connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) will see no shortage of new technologies aimed at transforming transportation. While some will likely succeed and others fail, to truly understand their potential and their impacts on the larger transportation

  20. Energy Systems Modeling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Systems Modeling Argonne develops models and software packages that can assist fleet managers and technology developers in assessing the potential impacts of implementing new technologies. Proposed transformations to the nation's energy system will introduce astonishing new technologies into the market, cause widespread changes in our energy consumption patterns, and even physical changes to the power grid. The result? Our energy system will be altered in complex and interdependent ways

  1. Autonomie: Automotive System Design | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Autonomie: Automotive System Design Autonomie: Automotive System Design Argonne's Autonomie is a MATLAB©-based software environment and framework for automotive control system design, simulation and analysis. Autonomie is capable of Model-in-the-Loop (MIL), Software-in-the-Loop (SIL), Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) and Rapid-Control-Prototyping (RCP) Integrating math-based engineering activities through all stages of development Mixing and matching models of different levels of abstraction with

  2. Access Business Systems | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system (such as Windows, Mac, Linux, Apple IOS, Android) Through most browsers (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari; Chrome is not currently recommended) All access is through...

  3. Radiation Exposure Monitoring and Information Transmittal System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-06-23

    Version 01 The Radiation Exposure Monitoring and Information Transmittal (REMIT) system is designed to assist U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees in meeting the reporting requirements of the Revised 10 CFR Parts 20.1001 through 20.2401 as outlined in Regulatory Guide 8.7, Rev.1, Instructions for Recording and Reporting Occupational Exposure Data. REMIT is a PC‑based menu driven system that facilitates the manipulation of data base files to record and report radiation exposure information. REMIT is designedmore » to be user‑friendly and contains the full text of Regulatory Guide 8.7, Rev.1, on‑line as well as context‑sensitive help throughout the program. The user can enter data directly from NRC Forms 4 or 5. REMIT allows the user to view the individual's exposure in relation to regulatory or administrative limits and will alert the user to exposures in excess of these limits. The system also provides for the calculation and summation of dose from intakes and the determination of the dose to the maximally exposed extremity for the monitoring year. REMIT can produce NRC Forms 4 and 5 in paper and electronic format and can import/export data from ASCII and data base files. Additional information is available from the web page www.reirs.com.« less

  4. Energy Systems Organization Charts | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Systems Organization Charts Charts showing the organizational structure of the Energy Systems Division and the Center for Transportation Research at Argonne. PDF icon es_org_chart_08-25-14.pdf PDF icon es_ctr_orgchart_07-01-16

  5. RADIOLOGICAL EMISSIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING FOR BROOKHAV EN NATIONAL LABORATORY, 1947 - 1961.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEINHOLD,C.B.; MEINHOLD,A.F.

    2001-05-30

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has monitored its releases to the environment since its inception in 1947. From 1962 to 1966 and from 1971 to the present, annual reports,were published that recorded the emissions and releases to the environment from Laboratory operations. In 1998, a report was written to summarize the environmental data for the years 1967 to 1970. One of the purposes of the current report is to complete BNL's environmental history by covering the period from 1948 through 1961. The activities in 1947 were primarily organizational and there is no information on the use of radiation at the Laboratory before 1948. An additional objective of this report is to provide environmental data to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The report does not provide an estimate of the doses associated with BNL operations. The report is comprised of two parts. The first part is a summary of emissions, releases, and environmental monitoring information including a discussion of the uncertainties in these data. Part two contains the detailed information on the approach taken to estimate the releases from the fuel cartridge failures at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR). A series of appendices present more detailed information on these events in tabular form. The approach in this report is to be reasonable, conservative, (pessimistic), and transparent in estimating releases from fuel cartridge ruptures. Clearly, reactor stack monitoring records and more extensive records would have greatly improved this effort, but in accordance with Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Appendix 0230 Annex C-9, many of the detailed records from this time were not retained.

  6. Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

    1998-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

  7. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  8. On-line process control monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; Van Hare, David R.; Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    An on-line, fiber-optic based apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a chemical substance at a plurality of locations in a chemical processing system comprises a plurality of probes, each of which is at a different location in the system, a light source, optic fibers for carrying light to and from the probes, a multiplexer for switching light from the source from one probe to the next in series, a diode array spectrophotometer for producing a spectrum from the light received from the probes, and a computer programmed to analyze the spectra so produced. The probes allow the light to pass through the chemical substance so that a portion of the light is absorbed before being returned to the multiplexer. A standard and a reference cell are included for data validation and error checking.

  9. A Web Accessible Scientific Workflow System for Performance Monitoring...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Web Accessible Scientific Workflow System for Performance Monitoring Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Web Accessible Scientific Workflow System for Performance ...

  10. Energy Systems Analysis | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Systems Analysis All stages of energy production have inputs and outputs. Argonne researchers analyze the total production picture and develop tools for members of the public to use in conducting their own assessments. All stages of energy production have inputs and outputs. Argonne researchers analyze the total production picture and develop tools for members of the public to use in conducting their own assessments. Consumer behavior, economic conditions and market forces interact on

  11. Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K.; Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D.; Huq, M.V.; Meyers-Schone, L.J.; Mohrbacher, D.A.; Olsen, C.R.; Stout, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

  12. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-12-10

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II B Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center (>20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts.

  13. A machine protection beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medvedko, E.; Smith, S.; Fisher, A.

    1998-12-01

    Loss of the stored beam in an uncontrolled manner can cause damage to the PEP-II {ital B} Factory. We describe here a device which detects large beam position excursions or unexpected beam loss and triggers the beam abort system to extract the stored beam safely. The bad-orbit abort trigger beam position monitor (BOAT BPM) generates a trigger when the beam orbit is far off the center ({gt}20 mm), or rapid beam current loss (dI/dT) is detected. The BOAT BPM averages the input signal over one turn (136 kHz). AM demodulation is used to convert input signals at 476 MHz to baseband voltages. The detected signal goes to a filter section for suppression of the revolution frequency, then on to amplifiers, dividers, and comparators for position and current measurements and triggering. The derived current signal goes to a special filter, designed to perform dI/dT monitoring at fast, medium, and slow current loss rates. The BOAT BPM prototype test results confirm the design concepts. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1998-03-31

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer. 2 figs.

  15. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

  16. Online Monitoring System for Performance Fault Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gioiosa, Roberto; Kestor, Gokcen; Kerbyson, Darren J.

    2014-05-19

    To achieve the exaFLOPS performance within a contain power budget, next supercomputers will feature hundreds of millions of components operating at low- and near-threshold voltage. As the probability that at least one of these components fails during the execution of an application approaches certainty, it seems unrealistic to expect that any run of a scientific application will not experience some performance faults. We believe that there is need of a new generation of light-weight performance and debugging tools that can be used online even during production runs of parallel applications and that can identify performance anomalies during the application execution. In this work we propose the design and implementation of a monitoring system that continuously inspects the evolution of run

  17. A strap-on monitoring system for rail car applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, J.; Rey, D.; Mitchell, J.; Breeding, R.; McKeen, R.G.; Brogan, J.

    1996-12-01

    A joint Sandia National Laboratories, University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Engineering Research Institute project to investigate an architecture implementing real-time monitoring and tracking technologies in the railroad industry is presented. The work examines a strap-on sensor package, designed as a value-added component, integrated into existing industry systems and standards. As applied to freight trains, the sensors` primary purpose is to minimize operating costs by decreasing losses due to theft, and by reducing the number, severity, and a consequence of hazardous materials incidents. Product requirements are based on a cost-benefit analysis of operating losses. Results of a concept validation experiment conducted on a revenue generating train are reported.

  18. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

  19. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2011-11-15

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  20. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2013-03-19

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  1. System for monitoring non-coincident, nonstationary process signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.

    2005-01-04

    An improved system for monitoring non-coincident, non-stationary, process signals. The mean, variance, and length of a reference signal is defined by an automated system, followed by the identification of the leading and falling edges of a monitored signal and the length of the monitored signal. The monitored signal is compared to the reference signal, and the monitored signal is resampled in accordance with the reference signal. The reference signal is then correlated with the resampled monitored signal such that the reference signal and the resampled monitored signal are coincident in time with each other. The resampled monitored signal is then compared to the reference signal to determine whether the resampled monitored signal is within a set of predesignated operating conditions.

  2. Real-time performance monitoring and management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2007-06-19

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  3. OMEGA EP Experimental Systems - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Systems - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE Building Map Partnerships Careers Education Undergraduate Program Graduate Program High School Program Faculty Contacts Computational Astrophysics H-E-D Physics Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser-Plasma Interaction Radiative Hydrodynamics Plasma Astrophysics Organization Director's Office Laser

  4. APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - Monitoring System Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Dimitri Hochard

    2005-07-01

    plant capacity factor has been increasing, with a recent one-month high of 49%. If a plant capacity factor of 70% can be achieved with the present equipment, the cost of electricity would drop to $2.39 per kg of hydrogen. In this report, the power conversion (76.7%), cell stack (53.1%), and reverse osmosis system (7.14%) efficiencies are also calculated, as is the water cost per kg of hydrogen produced ($0.10 per kg). The monitoring system has identified several areas having the potential to lower costs, including using an reverse osmosis system with a higher efficiency, improving the electrolysis power conversion efficiency, and using air cooling to replace some or all chiller cooling. These activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory for the AVTA, which is part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2014-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2013-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  7. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for AP-40 exhauster stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Davis, W.E.; Bussell, J.H.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as applied to the AP-40 exhauster stack, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/AP-40 system meets all applicable performance criteria. The contaminant mixing tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the wind tunnel facility, 331-H Building, using a mockup of the actual stack. The particle sample transport tests were conducted by PNNL at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The AP-40 stack is typical of several 10-in. diameter stacks that discharge the filtered ventilation air from tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles. Unrelated to the performance criteria, it was found that the record sample filter holder exhibited symptoms of sample bypass around the particle collection filter. This filter holder should either be modified or replaced with a different type. 10 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Continuous remote unattended monitoring for safeguards data collection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klosterbuer, S.F.; Halbig, J.K.; Harker, W.C.; Menlove, H.O.; Painter, J.A.; Stewart, J.E.

    1994-02-01

    To meet increased inspection requirements, unattended and remote monitoring systems have been developed and installed in several large facilities to perform safeguards functions. These unattended monitoring systems are based on instruments originally developed for traditional safeguards and the domestic nuclear industry to nondestructively assay nuclear materials. Through specialized measurement procedures, these instruments have been adapted to be unattended monitors. This paper defines the parts of these unattended monitoring systems, describes the systems that have been installed in the field and their status, and discusses future trends for unattended systems.

  9. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1986 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Brekke, D.D.

    1987-04-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental monitoring program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1986. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, milk, foodstuff, and sewage effluents were made at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. This report was prepared to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5484.1. Evaluations are made of LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicate that no releases in excess of the applicable standards were made during 1986, and that LLNL operations had no adverse environmental impact.

  10. Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

  11. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    information | Department of Energy Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII information Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII information ‎December 17, ‎2015 The REMS Program Policy for submitting of PII information in accordance with the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) under DOE Order 231.1B and the REMS Reporting Guide. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII

  12. Mitigation Monitoring Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY00 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguff, R R

    2003-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed eight years of implementing the mitigation measures from the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of LLNL and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore. This eighth annual report documents LLNL's implementation of the mitigation measures during the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000 (FY00). It provides background information on the mitigation measures, describes activities undertaken during FY00, and documents changes in the monitoring program. Table 1 on page 12, provides a numerical listing of each mitigation measure, the department responsible for implementing it, and the location within this report where the status is discussed. The discussion of the mitigation measures is organized by the University of California (UC)'s three categories of approaches to implementation: project-specific, service-level and administrative. Table 2 on page 19, Table 6 on page 55, and Table 7 on page 63 provide a detailed discussion of each mitigation measure, including LLNL's implementation strategy and the status as of the end of the fiscal year. Table 3 on page 37, Table 4 on page 46, and Table 5 on page 47 list each construction project undertaken in FY00 and the mitigation measures implemented.

  13. 1996 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The 1996 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The primary mission of the Bettis Laboratory has been directed toward the design, development, testing, and operation of nuclear reactor propulsion plants for naval surface and submarine vessels. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 1996 were in accordance with applicable federal, state, county, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicated that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrated that these residues do not pose any significant health risk.

  14. Laboratory Information Management Systems for Forensic Laboratories: A White Paper for Directors and Decision Makers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Hendrickson; Brian Mennecke; Kevin Scheibe; Anthony Townsend; ,

    2005-10-01

    Modern, forensics laboratories need Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) implementations that allow the lab to track evidentiary items through their examination lifecycle and also serve all pertinent laboratory personnel. The research presented here presents LIMS core requirements as viewed by respondents serving in different forensic laboratory capacities as well as different forensic laboratory environments. A product-development methodology was employed to evaluate the relative value of the key features that constitute a LIMS, in order to develop a set of relative values for these features and the specifics of their implementation. In addition to the results of the product development analysis, this paper also provides an extensive review of LIMS and provides an overview of the preparation and planning process for the successful upgrade or implementation of a LIMS. Analysis of the data indicate that the relative value of LIMS components are viewed differently depending upon respondents' job roles (i.e., evidence technicians, scientists, and lab management), as well as by laboratory size. Specifically, the data show that: (1) Evidence technicians place the most value on chain of evidence capabilities and on chain of custody tracking; (2) Scientists generally place greatest value on report writing and generation, and on tracking daughter evidence that develops during their analyses; (3) Lab. Managers place the greatest value on chain of custody, daughter evidence, and not surprisingly, management reporting capabilities; and (4) Lab size affects LIMS preference in that, while all labs place daughter evidence tracking, chain of custody, and management and analyst report generation as their top three priorities, the order of this prioritization is size dependent.

  15. Electrode-Immune System Interface Monitor through Neural Stimulation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrode-Immune System Interface Monitor through Neural Stimulation in American Cockroach ... of Science (DOE SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: CHEM

  16. A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Low-Cost Continuous Emissions Monitoring System for Mobile and Stationary Engine SCRDPF ApplicationsData-Logger for Vehicle Data Acquisition This project describes a novel ...

  17. Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS) Version Description Document (VDD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARNES, D.A.

    2000-07-06

    This document updates the Version Description Document with the changes incorporated in the Revision 12.0 software installation on the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS).

  18. Multiparameter Fiber Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Enhanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Systems | Department of Energy Multiparameter Fiber Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Enhanced Geothermal Systems Multiparameter Fiber Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objectives: Demonstrate reliability of fiber and distributed temperature; strain and vibration sensing sub-systems for EGS at 374ºC and 220 bar in the presence of hydrogen. Develop a high accuracy point pressure gauge and distributed pressure sensor to meet EGS requirements.

  19. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Safety-Significant Systems at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory – July 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Targeted Review of the Safety-Significant Systems at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

  20. Optical monitoring system for a turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemieux, Dennis H; Smed, Jan P; Williams, James P; Jonnalagadda, Vinay

    2013-05-14

    The monitoring system for a gas turbine engine including a viewing tube assembly having an inner end and an outer end. The inner end is located adjacent to a hot gas flow path within the gas turbine engine and the outer end is located adjacent to an outer casing of the gas turbine engine. An aperture wall is located at the inner end of the viewing tube assembly and an optical element is located within the viewing tube assembly adjacent to the inner end and is spaced from the aperture wall to define a cooling and purge chamber therebetween. An aperture is defined in the aperture wall for passage of light from the hot gas flow path to the optical element. Swirl passages are defined in the viewing tube assembly between the aperture wall and the optical element for passage of cooling air from a location outside the viewing tube assembly into the chamber, wherein swirl passages effect a swirling movement of air in a circumferential direction within the chamber.

  1. Real-time alkali monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goff, David R.; Romanosky, Robert R.; Hensel, Peter

    1990-01-01

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium emission line, may be detected in the presence of interfering background radiation. A combustion flame is fed by a diverted portion of a process stream and the common end of a bifurcated or quadfurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted to collect light from the flame. The light is guided through the branches of the fiber optic cable to bandpass filters, one of which is adapted to each of the branches of the fiber optic light guide. The bandpass filters are centered at wavelengths corresponding to the emission lines to be detected and two separate filters are required for each species being detected. The first filter has a bandwidth of about 3 nms and the second filter has a bandwidth of about 10 nms. Light detectors are located to view the light passing through the bandpass filters and amplifiers are connected to receive signals from the light detectors. The amplifier corresponding to the bandpass filter having the narrower bandwidth is preset to scale the signal by a factor equal to the ratio of the wide and narrow bandwidths of the bandpass filters. This scaling produces a scaled signal from which the difference between the scaled signal on the other signal can be calculated to produce a signal having an amplitude directly proportional to the concentration of the species of interest and independent of background radiation.

  2. Annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clapp, R.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of the investigations and monitoring, conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented can be used to develop a conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. Groundwater, soils, sediments, and surface water monitoring results are described.

  3. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Builders place final beam in first phase of CMRR project at Los Alamos National Laboratory July 22, 2008 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 22, 2008- Workers hoisted the final steel beam ...

  4. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory June 26, 2011 Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 26, 2011, 6:07pm-The Las Conchas fire burning in the Jemez Mountains approximately 12...

  5. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  6. A Flexible, Low Cost, Beam Loss Monitor Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyes, George Garnet; Pimol, Piti; Juthong, Nawin; Attaphibal, Malee

    2007-01-19

    A flexible, low cost, Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) Evaluation System based on Bergoz BLMs has been developed. Monitors can easily be moved to any location for beam loss investigations and/or monitor usefulness evaluations. Different PC pulse counting cards are compared and tested for this application using the display software developed based on LabVIEW. Beam problems uncovered with this system are presented.

  7. Systems engineering approach towards performance monitoring of emergency diesel generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramli, Nurhayati Yong-kwan, Lee

    2014-02-12

    Systems engineering is an interdisciplinary approach and means to enable the realization of successful systems. In this study, systems engineering approach towards the performance monitoring of Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) is presented. Performance monitoring is part and parcel of predictive maintenance where the systems and components conditions can be detected before they result into failures. In an effort to identify the proposal for addressing performance monitoring, the EDG boundary has been defined. Based on the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) results and industry operating experiences, the most critical component is identified. This paper proposed a systems engineering concept development framework towards EDG performance monitoring. The expected output of this study is that the EDG reliability can be improved by the performance monitoring alternatives through the systems engineering concept development effort.

  8. Monitoring circuit for reactor safety systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keefe, Donald J.

    1976-01-01

    The ratio between the output signals of a pair of reactor safety channels is monitored. When ratio falls outside of a predetermined range, it indicates that one or more of the safety channels has malfunctioned.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: What is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthetic Aperture Radar? What is Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)? What is Synthetic Aperture Radar? Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Often, this imagery must be acquired at night or during inclement weather. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides such a capability. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex

  10. Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off