Sample records for monitoring equipment operation

  1. Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

  2. Monitoring equipment environment during nuclear plant operation at Salem and Hope Creek generating stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, A.; Smith, R.J. [Public Service Electric and Gas Co., Hancocks Bridge, NJ (United States)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring of environmental parameters has become a significant issue for operating nuclear power plants. While the long-term benefits of plant life extension programs are being pursued with comprehensive environmental monitoring programs, the potential effect of local hot spots at various plant locations needs to be evaluated for its effect on equipment degradation and shortening of equipment qualified life. A significant benefit can be experienced from temperature monitoring when a margin exists between the design versus actual operating temperature. This margin can be translated into longer equipment qualified life and significant reduction in maintenance activities. At PSE and G, the immediate need for monitoring environmental parameters is being accomplished via the use of a Logic Beach Bitlogger. The Bitlogger is a portable data loggings system consisting of a system base, input modules and a communication software package. Thermocouples are installed on selected electrical equipment and cables are run from the thermocouples to the input module of the Bitlogger. Temperature readings are taken at selected intervals, stored in memory, and downloaded periodically to a PC software program, i.e., Lotus. The data is formatted into tabular or graphical documents. Because of their versatility, Bitloggers are being used differently at the authors Nuclear facility. At the Salem Station (2 Units-4 loop Westinghouse PWR), a battery powered, fully portable, calibrated Bitlogger is located in an accessible area inside Containment where it monitors the temperature of various electrical equipment within the Pressurizer Enclosure. It is planned that close monitoring of the local hot spot temperatures in this area will allow them to adjust and reconcile the environmental qualification of the equipment.

  3. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  4. Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Equipment lies at the heart of all operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. This equipment varies greatly across the Federal sector in age, size, type, model, condition, etc.

  5. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  6. On Storage Operators LAMA -Equipe de Logique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nour, Karim

    On Storage Operators Karim NOUR LAMA - Equipe de Logique Universit´e de Savoie 73376 Le Bourget du Lac e-mail nour@univ-savoie.fr Abstract In 1990 Krivine (1990b) introduced the notion of storage shown that there is a very simple type in the AF2 type system for storage operators using Godel

  7. Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Safe Operating Procedure (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES://ehs.unl.edu/) Introduction This SOP is intended to work in tandem with other EHS SOPs related to Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO): · Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment: Program Overview · Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment

  8. Internal dosimetry monitoring equipment: Present and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, J. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Carbaugh, E.H.; Lynch, T.P.; Strom, D.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Lardy, M.M. [International Technology Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have attempted to characterize the current and future status of in vivo and in vitro measurement programs coupled with the associated radioanalytical methods and workplace monitoring. Developments in these areas must be carefully integrated by internal dosimetrists, radiochemists and field health physicists. Their goal should be uniform improvement rather than to focus on one specific area (e.g., dose modeling) to the neglect of other areas where the measurement capabilities are substantially less sophisticated and, therefore, the potential source of error is greatest.

  9. Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Safe Operating Procedure (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: TRAINING AND INSPECTIONS during maintenance and repair operations. In these situations, a Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO) program must "Control of Hazardous Energy: Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO) for Machines and Equipment." This course is available

  10. Routine Operational Environmental Monitoring schedule, CY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.W.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides Health Physics (HP) a schedule in accordance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) Program during calendar year (CY) 1994. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of EES and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive waste sites are scheduled to be surveyed annually at a minimum. Any newly discovered waste sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995. This schedule does not discuss the manpower needs nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines.

  11. Tools and Equipment Modeling for Automobile Interactive Assembling Operating Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Dianliang; Zhu Hongmin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advance Manufacturing Environment (China)

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Tools and equipment play an important role in the simulation of virtual assembly, especially in the assembly process simulation and plan. Because of variety in function and complexity in structure and manipulation, the simulation of tools and equipments remains to be a challenge for interactive assembly operation. Based on analysis of details and characteristics of interactive operations for automobile assembly, the functional requirement for tools and equipments of automobile assembly is given. Then, a unified modeling method for information expression and function realization of general tools and equipments is represented, and the handling methods of manual, semi-automatic, automatic tools and equipments are discussed. Finally, the application in assembly simulation of rear suspension and front suspension of Roewe 750 automobile is given. The result shows that the modeling and handling methods are applicable in the interactive simulation of various tools and equipments, and can also be used for supporting assembly process planning in virtual environment.

  12. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative all modes failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  13. Autonomy and operator-assistance technologies optimize mining processes and mining equipment operation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Abhinav

    operation. Drills, miners and shearers are guided with laser precision for maximum extraction from the ore#12; Autonomy and operator-assistance technologies optimize mining processes and mining equipment

  14. Predicting the Operational Effectiveness of Aircraft Survivability Equipment Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noh, Sanguk

    , and experiment with their autonomous decision-making against threats in various electronic warfare settings. We: Autonomous Decision-Making, Electronic Warfare Settings, Aircraft Survivability Equipment Suite, Operational Effectiveness 1. Introduction In order to counter threats in electronic warfare environments, a command

  15. Southern Illinois University Watercraft & Equipment Operating Boat Operation Eligibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that a stream of water is flowing from the motor for engine cooling. 8. Click in gear hard, don't grind. D the Illinois Boaters Safety Exam. General Boating Safety Guidelines All boat operations must comply with state is in distress, a fire extinguisher and engine cut-off safety lanyard for all boats with internal combustion

  16. Incorporating Equipment Condition Assessment in Risk Monitors for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can complement the current fleet of large light-water reactors in the USA for baseload and peak demand power production and process heat applications (e.g., water desalination, shale oil extraction, hydrogen production). The day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance (O&M); however, the effect of diverse operating missions and unit modularity on O&M is not fully understood. These costs could potentially be reduced by optimized scheduling, with risk-informed scheduling of maintenance, repair, and replacement of equipment. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a living probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant and combine event probabilities with population-based probability of failure (POF) for key components. Risk monitors extend the PRA by incorporating the actual and dynamic plant configuration (equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions, etc.) into risk assessment. In fact, PRAs are more integrated into plant management in todays nuclear power plants than at any other time in the history of nuclear power. However, population-based POF curves are still used to populate fault trees; this approach neglects the time-varying condition of equipment that is relied on during standard and non-standard configurations. Equipment condition monitoring techniques can be used to estimate the component POF. Incorporating this unit-specific estimate of POF in the risk monitor can provide a more accurate estimate of risk in different operating and maintenance configurations. This enhanced risk assessment will be especially important for aSMRs that have advanced component designs, which dont have an available operating history to draw from, and often use passive design features, which present challenges to PRA. This paper presents the requirements and technical gaps for developing a framework to integrate unit-specific estimates of POF into risk monitors, resulting in enhanced risk monitors that support optimized operation and maintenance of aSMRs.

  17. An Updated Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Ivans, William J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment, as AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results on augmenting an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors that integrate real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors. Methods to propagate uncertainty through the enhanced risk monitor are evaluated. Available data to quantify the level of uncertainty and the POF of key components are examined for their relevance, and a status update of this data evaluation is described. Finally, we describe potential targets for developing new risk metrics that may be useful for studying trade-offs for economic operation while maintaining adequate safety margins.

  18. Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National REDD+ Carbon Accounting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Participatory Carbon...

  19. Advanced monitoring of machining operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teti, Roberto; Jemielniak, Krzysztof; O'Donnell, Garret; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    However, the latest modern open control systems allow accesssystems and paradigms In monitoring and control activities for modern

  20. Advanced monitoring of machining operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teti, Roberto; Jemielniak, Krzysztof; O'Donnell, Garret; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems and paradigms In monitoring and control activities for modernHowever, the latest modern open control systems allow access

  1. MULTI-SENSOR MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME 3D VISUALIZATION OF CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    to workers and equipment operators due to their dynamic and unstructured nature. Narrow haul roads, crowded with the inherent poor visibility that operators of equipment such as dump trucks, loaders and excavators deal

  2. Technical Report on Preliminary Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coles, Garill A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. AdvSMRs may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors (LWRs) and SMRs based on integral pressurized water reactor concepts currently being considered. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment. AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors. Some of this loss can be recovered through reduced capital costs through smaller size, fewer components, modular fabrication processes, and the opportunity for modular construction. However, the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments that are a step towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results from an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors by integrating real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors.

  3. Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Permit Board will issue two types of air pollution control permits, a permit to construct air emissions equipment and a State Permit to Operate such equipment. A State Permit to Operate is...

  4. Technical Needs for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Equipment Condition Assessment for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Berglin, Eric J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can provide the United States with a safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The controllable day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operation and maintenance costs. Health and condition assessment coupled with online risk monitors can potentially enhance affordability of aSMRs through optimized operational planning and maintenance scheduling. Currently deployed risk monitors are an extension of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). For complex engineered systems like nuclear power plants, PRA systematically combines event likelihoods and the probability of failure (POF) of key components, so that when combined with the magnitude of possible adverse consequences to determine risk. Traditional PRA uses population-based POF information to estimate the average plant risk over time. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a PRA that reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant; this model is updated periodically, typically once a year. Risk monitors expand on living PRA by incorporating changes in the day-by-day plant operation and configuration (e.g., changes in equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions). However, population-based POF (or population- and time-based POF) is still used to populate fault trees. Health monitoring techniques can be used to establish condition indicators and monitoring capabilities that indicate the component-specific POF at a desired point in time (or over a desired period), which can then be incorporated in the risk monitor to provide a more accurate estimate of the plant risk in different configurations. This is particularly important for active systems, structures, and components (SSCs) proposed for use in aSMR designs. These SSCs may differ significantly from those used in the operating fleet of light-water reactors (or even in LWR-based SMR designs). Additionally, the operating characteristics of aSMRs can present significantly different requirements, including the need to operate in different coolant environments, higher operating temperatures, and longer operating cycles between planned refueling and maintenance outages. These features, along with the relative lack of operating experience for some of the proposed advanced designs, may limit the ability to estimate event probability and component POF with a high degree of certainty. Incorporating real-time estimates of component POF may compensate for a relative lack of established knowledge about the long-term component behavior and improve operational and maintenance planning and optimization. The particular eccentricities of advanced reactors and small modular reactors provide unique challenges and needs for advanced instrumentation, control, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) techniques such as enhanced risk monitors (ERM) in aSMRs. Several features of aSMR designs increase the need for accurate characterization of the real-time risk during operation and maintenance activities. A number of technical gaps in realizing ERM exist, and these gaps are largely independent of the specific reactor technology. As a result, the development of a framework for ERM would enable greater situational awareness regardless of the specific class of reactor technology. A set of research tasks are identified in a preliminary research plan to enable the development, testing, and demonstration of such a framework. Although some aspects of aSMRs, such as specific operational characteristics, will vary and are not now completely defined, the proposed framework is expected to be relevant regardless of such uncertainty. The development of an ERM framework will provide one of the key technical developments necessary to ensure the economic viability of aSMRs.

  5. Power levels in office equipment: Measurements of new monitors and personal computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Brown, Richard E.; Nordman, Bruce; Webber, Carrie A.; Homan, Gregory H.; Mahajan, Akshay; McWhinney, Marla; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic office equipment has proliferated rapidly over the last twenty years and is projected to continue growing in the future. Efforts to reduce the growth in office equipment energy use have focused on power management to reduce power consumption of electronic devices when not being used for their primary purpose. The EPA ENERGY STAR[registered trademark] program has been instrumental in gaining widespread support for power management in office equipment, and accurate information about the energy used by office equipment in all power levels is important to improving program design and evaluation. This paper presents the results of a field study conducted during 2001 to measure the power levels of new monitors and personal computers. We measured off, on, and low-power levels in about 60 units manufactured since July 2000. The paper summarizes power data collected, explores differences within the sample (e.g., between CRT and LCD monitors), and discusses some issues that arise in m etering office equipment. We also present conclusions to help improve the success of future power management programs.Our findings include a trend among monitor manufacturers to provide a single very low low-power level, and the need to standardize methods for measuring monitor on power, to more accurately estimate the annual energy consumption of office equipment, as well as actual and potential energy savings from power management.

  6. Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown,...

  7. MONITORING OF GAS TURBINE OPERATING PARAMETERS USING ACOUSTIC EMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R M Douglas; S Beugn; M D Jenkins; A K Frances; J A Steel; R L Reuben; P A Kew

    In this work, Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors were mounted on several parts of a laboratory-scale gas turbine operating under various conditions, the object being to assess the value of AE for inservice condition monitoring. The turbine unit comprised a gas generator (compressor and turbine on a common shaft) and a free-power turbine for power extraction. AE was acquired from several sensor positions on the external surfaces of the equipment over a range of gas generator running speeds. Relationships between parameters derived from the acquired AE signals and the running conditions are discussed. It is shown that the compressor impeller blade passing frequency is discernible in the AE record, allowing shaft speed to be obtained, and presenting a significant blade monitoring opportunity. Further studies permit a trend to be established between the energy contained in the AE signal and the turbine running speed. In order to study the effects of damaged rotor blades a fault was simulated in opposing blades of the free-power turbine and run again under the previous conditions. Also, the effect of an additional AE source, occurring due to abnormal operation in the gas generator area (likely rubbing), is shown to produce deviations from that expected during normal operation. The findings suggest that many aspects of the machine condition can be monitored.

  8. Models, Calculation and Optimization of Gas Networks, Equipment and Contracts for Design, Operation, Booking and Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostromuhov, Leonid A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are proposed models of contracts, technological equipment and gas networks and methods of their optimization. The flow in network undergoes restrictions of contracts and equipment to be operated. The values of sources and sinks are provided by contracts. The contract models represent (sub-) networks. The simplest contracts represent either nodes or edges. Equipment is modeled by edges. More sophisticated equipment is represented by sub-networks. Examples of such equipment are multi-poles and compressor stations with many entries and exits. The edges can be of different types corresponding to equipment and contracts. On such edges, there are given systems of equation and inequalities simulating the contracts and equipment. On this base, the methods proposed that allow: calculation and control of contract values for booking on future days and for accounting of sales and purchases; simulation and optimization of design and of operation of gas networks. These models and methods are realized in software syst...

  9. Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average all modes failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment.

  10. Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    be dominant for each depth in each region. The two types of prime movers considered were electric motors and natural gas engines. Annual operating costs were estimated for daily...

  11. Topsides equipment, operating flexibility key floating LNG design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yost, K.; Lopez, R.; Mok, J. [Mobil E and P Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1998-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of a large-scale floating liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant is an economical alternative to an onshore plant for producing from an offshore field. Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, has advanced a design for such a plant that is technically feasible, economical, safe, and reliable. Presented were descriptions of the general design basis, hull modeling and testing, topsides and storage layouts, and LNG offloading. But such a design also presents challenges for designing topsides equipment in an offshore environment and for including flexibility and safety. These are covered in this second article. Mobil`s floating LNG plant design calls for a square concrete barge with a moon-pool in the center. It is designed to produce 6 million tons/year of LNG with up to 55,000 b/d of condensate from 1 bcfd of raw feed gas.

  12. Operating Experience Review of the INL HTE Gas Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; K. G. DeWall

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored at hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. Some simple statistics are given for the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  13. Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment ofOil'sEnergy 9 OperationsOperations and U.S.for

  14. Method & apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process and, more specifically, to the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates to a plasma monitoring module that may be adjusted in at least some manner so as to re-evaluate a previously monitored plasma process. For instance, optical emissions data on a plasma process that was previously monitored by the plasma monitoring module may be replayed through the plasma monitoring module after making at least one adjustment in relation to the plasma monitoring module.

  15. Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

  16. Operating experience review of an INL gas monitoring system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cadwallader, Lee C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeWall, K. G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Herring, J. S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored in the lab room are hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and both actual and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. Some simple calculations are given to estimate the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  17. Riser and wellhead monitoring for improved offshore drilling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Riser and wellhead monitoring for improved offshore drilling operations Gullik A. Jensen, Ph ­ Offshore drilling with riser ­ On the riser and the riser joints ­ On damage and consequences · Operational Page 2 #12;The KONGSBERG Riser Management Systems (RMS) Integrity of drilling riser based on monitoring

  18. Long Length Contaminated Equipment Retrieval System Receiver Trailer and Transport Trailer Operations and Maintenance Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DALE, R.N.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system to accommodate the removal of long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) from Hanford underground radioactive waste storage tanks was designed, procured, and demonstrated, via a project activity during the 1990s. The system is the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System (LLCERS). LLCERS will be maintained and operated by Tank Farms Engineering and Operations organizations and other varied projects having a need for the system. The responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the LLCERS Receiver Trailer (RT) and Transport Trailer (TT) resides with the RPP Characterization Project Operations organization. The purpose of this document is to provide vendor supplied operating and maintenance (O & M) information for the RT and TT in a readily retrievable form. This information is provided this way instead of in a vendor information (VI) file to maintain configuration control of the operations baseline as described in RPP-6085, ''Configuration Management Plan for Long Length Contaminated Equipment Receiver and Transport Trailers''. Additional Operations Baseline documents are identified in RPP-6085.

  19. CFMRI Physiological Monitoring System Operator's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    and lead wires (MRI compatible) can cause patient heating or burn if not used properly. To minimize in Figure 1) · Invivo millennia® 3155MVS remote monitor (#9 in Figure 1) · BioPac System - Respiratory Belt) Turn on the Invivo 3155MVS remote monitor located in the control room. · Invivo 3155MVS should

  20. Optimal Operation of a Wind Farm equipped with a Storage Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Optimal Operation of a Wind Farm equipped with a Storage Unit Paul Charton June 14, 2013 Keywords, viscosity solution, comparison principle. Abstract Due to the fluctuations in their production, wind farm. In particular wind energy is becoming more and more popular. Unlike other energy sources, the main drawback

  1. Air Quality: Monthly Hazardous Material Use, Fuel Consumption, and Equipment Operation Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Monthly Hazardous Material Use, Fuel Consumption, and Equipment Operation Forms Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 The conditions of SLAC's air quality permits specify that all subject hazardous

  2. Hazards and operability study for the surface moisture monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Board, B.D.

    1996-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation Tank Farms` underground waste tanks have been used to store liquid radioactive waste from defense materials production since the 1940`s. Waste in certain of the tanks may contain material in the form of ferrocyanide or various organic compounds which could potentially be susceptible to condensed phase chemical reactions. Because of the presence of oxidizing materials (nitrate compounds) and heat sources (radioactive decay and chemical reactions), the ferrocyanide or organic material could potentially fuel a propagating exothermic reaction with undesirable consequences. Analysis and experiments indicate that the reaction propagation and/or initiation may be prevented by the presence of sufficient moisture in the waste. Because the reaction would probably be initiated at the surface of the waste, evidence of sufficient moisture concentration would help provide evidence that the tank waste can continue to be safely stored. The Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) was developed to collect data on the surface moisture in the waste by inserting two types of probes (singly) into a waste tank-a neutron probe and an electromagnetic inductance (EMI) probe. The sensor probes will be placed on the surface of the waste utilizing a moveable deployment arm to lower them through an available riser. The movement of the SMMS within the tank will be monitored by a camera lowered through an adjacent riser. The SMMS equipment is the subject of this study. Hazards and Operability Analysis (HAZOP) is a systematic technique for assessing potential hazards and/or operability problems for a new activity. It utilizes a multidiscipline team of knowledgeable individuals in a systematic brainstorming effort. The results of this study will be used as input to an Unreviewed Safety Question determination.

  3. Operational monitoring of radioelectric exposure in an urban environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    stations. We present the im- plementation of the ANR Samper pre-operational monitoring system set up during to the electromagnetic field generated by mobile phone base station antennas. Hans Wackernagel Geostatistics Group months in 2011. This system couples by geostatistical means the data from monitoring stations

  4. air monitor operating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    monitor operating First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATIVE PROGRAM ON...

  5. Standard hydrogen monitoring system-B operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, R.M.

    1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide information for the operation and maintenance of the Standards Hydrogen Monitoring System-B (SHMS-B) used in the 200E and 200W area tank farms on the Hanford site. This provides information specific to the mechanical operation of the system and is not intended to take the place of a Plant Operating Procedure. The primary function of the SHMS-B is to monitor specifically for hydrogen in the waste tank vapor space which may also contain unknown quantities of other gaseous constituents.

  6. General Operational Procedure for Pedestrian Radiation Portal Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belooussov, Andrei V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the basic conduct of operation (CONOPS) for a pedestrian radiation portal monitor (RPM), provided that the CONOPS is not facility or RPM specific and that it is based on a general understanding of a pedestrian RPM operation. The described CONOPS for a pedestrian RPM is defined by: (1) RPM design and operational characteristics, (2) type of pedestrian traffic, and (3) goal for RPM installation. Pedestrian RPMs normally are deployed for the continuous monitoring of individuals passing through point of control to detect the unauthorized traffic of radioactive/nuclear materials. RPMs generally are designed to detect gamma- and neutron-emitting materials.

  7. Operator coil monitoring acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  8. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  9. Performance assessment on continuous air monitors under real operating conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monsanglant-Louvet, C.; Liatimi, N.; Gensdarmes, F. [Inst. of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety- IRSN, Saclay (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the nuclear industry, workers may be exposed to artificial radioactive aerosols. These aerosols are generally composed of particles with a diameter measuring between 0.1 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m. To protect workers in nuclear facilities, monitors that continuously measure radioactivity in the air are used. The main function of the monitor is to provide real-time measurement of activity concentration. Measurement of aerosol activity concentration can be affected by a number of factors specific to the aerosols and the instrument. The first part of the article will present the general operating principles of continuous air monitors (CAMs) and inherent measurement difficulties, as well as the main standard tests. The second section describes the experimental ICARE facility The ICARE facility generates standard artificial and natural radioactive aerosols for calibrating continuous air monitors under real operating conditions. (authors)

  10. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or fencepost) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the gases or vapors, liquids with volatility need sensors near the potential sources of release, nature and concentration of gas releases, natural and mechanical ventilation, detector installation locations not vulnerable to mechanical or water damage from normal operations, and locations that lend themselves to convenient maintenance and calibration. The guidance also states that sensors should be located in all areas where hazardous accumulations of gas may occur. Such areas might not be close to release points but might be areas with restricted air movement. Heavier than air gases are likely to accumulate in pits, trenches, drains, and other low areas. Lighter than air gases are more likely to accumulate in overhead spaces, above drop ceilings, etc. In general, sensors should be located close to any potential sources of major release of gas. The paper gives data on monitor sensitivity and expected lifetimes to support the monitor selection process. Proper selection of indoor and outdoor locations for monitors is described, accounting for the vapor densities of hydrogen and oxygen. The latest information on monitor alarm setpoint selection is presented. Typically, monitors require recalibration at least every six months, or more frequently for inhospitable locations, so ready access to the monitors is an important issue to consider in monitor siting. Gas monitors, depending on their type, can be susceptible to blockages of the detector element (i.e., dus

  11. Monitoring, safety systems for LNG and LPG operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Operators in Korea and Australia have chosen monitoring and control systems in recent contracts for LNG and LPG storage. Korea Gas Corp. (Kogas) has hired Whessoe Varec, Calais, to provide monitoring systems for four LNG storage tanks being built at Kogas` Inchon terminal. For Elgas Ltd., Port Botany, Australia, Whessoe Varec has already shipped a safety valve-shutdown system to a new LPG cavern-storage facility under construction. The paper describes the systems, terminal monitoring, dynamic approach to tank management, and meeting the growing demand for LPG.

  12. ELEVATED TEMPERATURE SENSORS FOR ON-LINE CRITICAL EQUIPMENT HEALTH MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Sebastian

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research program is to improve high temperature piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) sensor technology to make it useful for instrumentation and health monitoring of current and future electrical power generation equipment. The program will extend the temperature range of the sensor from approximately 700 C to above 1000 C, and ultrasonic coupling to objects at these temperatures will be investigated and tailored for use with the sensor. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) AlN deposition process was successfully transferred from film production on tungsten carbide substrates to titanium alloy and silicon carbide (SiC) substrates in the first year of the program, and additional substrates were evaluated. In the second year of the program, additional substrate research was performed with the goal of improving the performance of using SiC substrates. While greatly improved bandwidth was achieved, sensor survival at elevated temperature remains problematic. The elevated temperature coupling work continued with significant experimentation. Molten glasses were found to work within a limited temperature range, but metal foils applied with heat and pressure were found to have superior performance overall. The final year of the program will be dedicated to making further advances in AlN/ substrate behavior, and the design and implementation of a sensor demonstration experiment at very high temperature in a simulated industrial application.

  13. Elevated Temperature Sensors for On-Line Critical Equipment Health Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Sebastian

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the program was to improve high temperature piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) sensor technology to make it useful for instrumentation and health monitoring of current and future electrical power generation equipment. Improvements were aimed primarily at extending the useful temperature range of the sensor from approximately 700 C to above 1000 C, and investigating ultrasonic coupling to objects at these temperatures and tailoring high temperature coupling for use with the sensor. During the project, the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) AlN deposition process was successfully transferred from film production on tungsten carbide substrates to titanium alloy and silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. Film adhesion under thermal cycling was found to be poor, and additional substrate materials and surface preparations were evaluated. A new, porous SiC substrate improved the performance but not to the point of making the films useful for sensors. Near the end of the program, a new family of high temperature piezoelectric materials came to the attention of the program. Samples of langasite, the most promising member of this family, were obtained and experimental data showed promise for use up to the 1000 C target temperature. In parallel, research successfully determined that metal foil under moderate pressure provided a practical method of coupling ultrasound at high temperature. A conceptual sensor was designed based upon these methods and was tested in the laboratory.

  14. Nuclear power plant control room operator control and monitoring tasks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovell, C.R.; Beck, M.G. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Carter, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Labs., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a research project the purpose of which is to develop the technical bases for regulatory review criteria for use in evaluating the safety implications of human factors associated with the use of artificial intelligence and expert systems, and with advanced instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPP). This report documents the results from Task 8 of that project. The primary objectives of the task was to identify the scope and type of control and monitoring tasks now performed by control-room operators. Another purpose was to address the types of controls and safety systems needed to operate the nuclear plant. The final objective of Task 8 was to identify and categorize the type of information and displays/indicators required to monitor the performance of the control and safety systems. This report also discusses state-of-the-art controls and advanced display devices which will be available for use in control-room retrofits and in control room of future plants. The fundamental types of control and monitoring tasks currently conducted by operators can be divided into four classifications: function monitoring tasks, control manipulation tasks, fault diagnostic tasks, and administrative tasks. There are three general types of controls used in today`s NPPs, switches, pushbuttons, and analog controllers. Plant I and C systems include components to achieve a number of safety-related functions: measuring critical plant parameters, controlling critical plant parameters within safety limits, and automatically actuating protective devices if safe limits are exceeded. The types of information monitored by the control-room operators consist of the following parameters: pressure, fluid flow and level, neutron flux, temperature, component status, water chemistry, electrical, and process and area radiation. The basic types of monitoring devices common to nearly all NPP control rooms include: analog meters, graphic recorders, digital displays and counters, light indicators, visual and audio alarms, and cathode-ray tubes.

  15. Elevated Temperature Sensors for On-Line Critical Equipment Health Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Sebastian

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research program is to improve high temperature piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) sensor technology to make it useful for instrumentation and health monitoring of current and future electrical power generation equipment. The program will extend the temperature range of the sensor from approximately 700 C to above 1000 C, and ultrasonic coupling to objects at these temperatures will be investigated and tailored for use with the sensor. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) AlN deposition process was successfully transferred from film production on tungsten carbide substrates to titanium alloy and silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. Further evaluation of the piezoelectric films on titanium caused it to be discarded as a candidate material due to an excessive thermal expansion coefficient mismatch, causing film failure upon reheating from room temperature. Deposition on SiC is proceeding well, with a highly conductive grade of silicon carbide required for practical use. Additional substrate materials, including refractory metals and conductive ceramics, have been considered but are generally not promising in light of the experience with titanium. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was investigated as an alternate means of creating the films as an alternative to CVD. A concurrent effort has focused on investigation of means of coupling ultrasound from the sensor into the test object at high temperature. A literature search combined with preliminary experimentation has resulted in the selection of two methods for coupling: low melting point glasses and metal foil- pressure couplant. The work in the next two years of the program will include continued improvement of the CVD deposition process, experimental testing of films and coupling at high temperatures, and a laboratory demonstration of the sensor in a simulated industrial application

  16. Design and Operation of Equipment to Detect and Remove Water within Used Nuclear Fuel Storage Bottles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.C. Baker; T.M. Pfeiffer; J.C. Price

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspection and drying equipment has been implemented in a hot cell to address the inadvertent ingress of water into used nuclear fuel storage bottles. Operated with telemanipulators, the system holds up to two fuel bottles and allows their threaded openings to be connected to pressure transducers and a vacuum pump. A prescribed pressure rebound test is used to diagnose the presence of moisture. Bottles found to contain moisture are dried by vaporization. The drying process is accelerated by the application of heat and vacuum. These techniques detect and remove virtually all free water (even water contained in a debris bed) while leaving behind most, if not all, particulates. The extracted water vapour passes through a thermoelectric cooler where it is condensed back to the liquid phase for collection. Fuel bottles are verified to be dry by passing the pressure rebound test.

  17. Results from the Operational Testing of the Eaton Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brion Bennett

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Eaton smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Eaton for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INLs support of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Eaton smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  18. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

  19. Operations improvement in a semiconductor capital equipment manufacturing plant : component level and assembly level inventory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yiming, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor capital equipment is manufactured in a high-mix and low-volume environment at Varian Semiconductor Equipment business unit of Applied Materials. Due to the demand growth over the past years, Varian has been ...

  20. Reservoir Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of EGS

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Fernandez, Carlos A.

    EGS field projects have not sustained production at rates greater than of what is needed for economic viability. The primary limitation that makes commercial EGS infeasible is our current inability to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs from impermeable, igneous rock within the 3,000-10,000 ft depth range. Our goal is to develop a novel fracturing fluid technology that maximizes reservoir permeability while reducing stimulation cost and environmental impact. Laboratory equipment development to advance laboratory characterization/monitoring is also a priority of this project to study and optimize the physicochemical properties of these fracturing fluids in a range of reservoir conditions. Barrier G is the primarily intended GTO barrier to be addressed as well as support addressing barriers D, E and I.

  1. Application of a wireless sensor node to health monitoring of operational wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D [UCSD

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is a developing field of research with a variety of applications including civil structures, industrial equipment, and energy infrastructure. An SHM system requires an integrated process of sensing, data interrogation and statistical assessment. The first and most important stage of any SHM system is the sensing system, which is traditionally composed of transducers and data acquisition hardware. However, such hardware is often heavy, bulky, and difficult to install in situ. Furthermore, physical access to the structure being monitored may be limited or restricted, as is the case for rotating wind turbine blades or unmanned aerial vehicles, requiring wireless transmission of sensor readings. This study applies a previously developed compact wireless sensor node to structural health monitoring of rotating small-scale wind turbine blades. The compact sensor node collects low-frequency structural vibration measurements to estimate natural frequencies and operational deflection shapes. The sensor node also has the capability to perform high-frequency impedance measurements to detect changes in local material properties or other physical characteristics. Operational measurements were collected using the wireless sensing system for both healthy and damaged blade conditions. Damage sensitive features were extracted from the collected data, and those features were used to classify the structural condition as healthy or damaged.

  2. Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, CY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1992 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State in 1992. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sediments, soil, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and to control the impacts of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the workers and the local environment. Additionally, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although impacts from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and are slightly elevated when compared to offsite, these impacts are less than in previous years.

  3. Vendors of Supplies and Equipment Used in ReceivingWater Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    variety of equipment and supplies typically needed for field environmental investigations: · Cole-Parmer, 625 East Bunker Court, Vernon Hills, IL 60061-1844, USA. Phone: 800-323-4340, Fax: 847-247-2929. Internet: coleparmer.com Cole-Parmer is also a comprehensive laboratory supply distributor and carries many

  4. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane (Albuquerque, NM); Stevenson, Joel O'Don (Albuquerque, NM); Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discemible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  5. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane (Albuquerque, NM); Stevenson, Joel O'Don (Albuquerque, NM); Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  6. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane (Albuquerque, NM); Stevenson, Joel O'Don (Albuquerque, NM); Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  7. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane (Albuquerque, NM); Stevenson, Joel O'Don (Albuquerque, NM); Ward, Pamela Peardon Denise (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). A final aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system.

  8. Method and apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane (Albuquerque, NM); Ward, Pamela Denise Peardon (Rio Rancho, NM); Stevenson, Joel O'Don (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process, and more specifically the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates in at least some manner to calibrating or initializing a plasma monitoring assembly. This type of calibration may be used to address wavelength shifts, intensity shifts, or both associated with optical emissions data obtained on a plasma process. A calibration light may be directed at a window through which optical emissions data is being obtained to determine the effect, if any, that the inner surface of the window is having on the optical emissions data being obtained therethrough, the operation of the optical emissions data gathering device, or both. Another aspect relates in at least some manner to various types of evaluations which may be undertaken of a plasma process which was run, and more typically one which is currently being run, within the processing chamber. Plasma health evaluations and process identification through optical emissions analysis are included in this aspect. Yet another aspect associated with the present invention relates in at least some manner to the endpoint of a plasma process (e.g., plasma recipe, plasma clean, conditioning wafer operation) or discrete/discernible portion thereof (e.g., a plasma step of a multiple step plasma recipe). Another aspect associated with the present invention relates to how one or more of the above-noted aspects may be implemented into a semiconductor fabrication facility, such as the distribution of wafers to a wafer production system. A final aspect of the present invention relates to a network a plurality of plasma monitoring systems, including with remote capabilities (i.e., outside of the clean room).

  9. The operation results with the modified charging equipment and ignition furnace at Kwangyang No. 2 sinter plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.J.; Pi, Y.J.; Kim, J.R.; Lee, J.N. [POSCO, Kwangyang, Cheonnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There will be another blast furnace, the production capacity of which is 3.0 million tonnes per year in 1999 and mini mill plant, the production capacity of which is 1.8 million tonnes per year in 1996 at Kwangyang Works. Therefore, the coke oven gas and burnt lime will be deficient and more sinter will be needed. To meet with these situations, the authors modified the charging equipment and ignition furnace at Kwangyang No. 2 sinter plant in April 1995. After the modification of the charging equipment and ignition furnace, the consumption of burnt lime and coke oven gas could be decreased and the sinter productivity increased in spite of the reduction of burnt lime consumption. This report describes the operation results with the modification of the charging equipment and ignition furnace in No. 2 sinter plant Kwangyang works.

  10. Operational Performance Analysis of Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Killer Whales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzner, Shari; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Deng, Zhiqun; Sun, Yannan; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    For the planned tidal turbine site in Puget Sound, WA, the main concern is to protect Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) due to their Endangered Species Act status. A passive acoustic monitoring system is proposed because the whales emit vocalizations that can be detected by a passive system. The algorithm for detection is implemented in two stages. The first stage is an energy detector designed to detect candidate signals. The second stage is a spectral classifier that is designed to reduce false alarms. The evaluation presented here of the detection algorithm incorporates behavioral models of the species of interest, environmental models of noise levels and potential false alarm sources to provide a realistic characterization of expected operational performance.

  11. the D0 Luminosity Monitor operations and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prewitt, Michelle; /Rice U.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The D0 Luminosity Monitor (LM) plays a crucial role in D0 physics analyses by providing the normalization for many cross section measurements. The detector consists of two sets of 24 scintillator wedges read out with photomultiplier tubes. The detector is located in the forward regions surrounding the beam pipe, covering a pseudo-rapidity range of 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4. The LM is sensitive to a large fraction of the total inelastic cross section and measures the luminosity by counting the number of empty proton-antiproton bunch crossings, using Poisson statistics to extract the instantaneous luminosity. The techniques used to convert the measurements made by the LM into the assessed luminosity will be discussed, as well as the performance and operational details of the detector.

  12. Monitoring and Optimization of Building Operations of a Low-Energy School Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koenigsdorff, R.; Heinrich, S.; Baumann, O.; Reiser, C.

    consumption was almost met during the second year of operation in 2006 and finally achieved in 2007, due to well-working optimization measures, which were identified through monitoring of the building operation. Heating and cooling energy is mainly provided...

  13. AC System Equipment Specification, Installation and Operational Options for Improved Indoor Humidity Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirey, D. B.

    of 80?F (26.7?C) dry-bulb temperature and 67?F (19.4?C) wet-bulb temperature air entering the indoor unit (AHRI 2006), the equipment SHRs range from 0.67 to 0.8. Thus, the dehumidification fraction (one minus SHR) varies from 0.2 (20%) to 0.33 (33... Building Systems in Hot and Humid Climates, Plano, TX, December 15-17, 2008 Figure 3. Latent Capacity Degradation with Supply Air Fan Overrun at Reduced Air Flow compressor on cycle (Shirey et al. 2006). The plotted lines are results from a...

  14. PWR core monitoring and simulation during load follow operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, C. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Commercial Nuclear Fuel Div.); Winter, M.; Niederer, R. (Commonwealth Edison Co., Zion, IL (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new operation core support system developed for pressurized water reactors. This system provides an enhanced understanding of the operating core with significant benefits in operational flexibility. It also permits evaluation of alternatives and specific situations that allows for enhanced operation of the unit, which provides benefits in power capability and minimizes potential operational issues.

  15. Landers, Ulsoy, and Furness 1 Process Monitoring and Control of Machining Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, Robert G.

    it generates. Unmanned monitoring algorithms utilize filtered sensor measurements which, along with operator is refereed to [2,3]. Process control is the manipulation of process variables (e.g., feed, speed, depthLanders, Ulsoy, and Furness 1 Process Monitoring and Control of Machining Operations Robert G

  16. Condition monitoring of motor-operated valves in nuclear power plants Pierre Granjon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Condition monitoring of motor-operated valves in nuclear power plants Pierre Granjon Gipsa of nuclear power plants. Unfortunately, today's policies present a major drawback. Indeed, these monitoring safety constraints: nuclear power plants. Key components of such systems are motor-operated valves (MOVs

  17. ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4/3/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is monitoring emissions of radioactive materials and chemicals. The Facility Representative will verify operability of equipment...

  18. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6- Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor...

  19. Optimal monitoring and visualization of steady state power system operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Bei

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    estimation becomes more critical. Recently, due to the development of new technology in high power electronics, new control and monitoring devices are becoming more popular in power systems. It is therefore necessary to investigate their models and integrate...

  20. Results from the Operational Testing of the General Electric Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Barney Carlson; Don Scoffield; Brion Bennett

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the General Electric (GE) smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from GE for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INLs support of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the GE smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  1. Prediction, operations, and condition monitoring in wind energy Andrew Kusiak a,*, Zijun Zhang b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Review Prediction, operations, and condition monitoring in wind energy Andrew Kusiak a,*, Zijun 2013 Available online 23 August 2013 Keywords: Wind energy Wind speed prediction Wind turbine control Condition monitoring and fault detection a b s t r a c t Recent developments in wind energy research

  2. Operability test procedure for the TK-900 beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1995-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This operability test procedure will verify that the 221-B beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system, installed near the east end of the six inch chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. An off-line, skid mounted, beta/gamma radiation monitor and pH monitor was installed near stairwell three in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The skid mounted monitoring system includes two radiation detectors and a pH meter, both with local digital displays. Output signals from each monitor are also received and displayed by the Facility Process Monitor and Control System (FPMCS). Pumps, motors, gauges, valves and transport lines complement the skid monitoring system. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system.

  3. Quench monitoring and control system and method of operating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, David Thomas; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Huang, Xianrui

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating machine comprising a superconductive coil and a temperature sensor operable to provide a signal representative of superconductive coil temperature. The rotating machine may comprise a control system communicatively coupled to the temperature sensor. The control system may be operable to reduce electric current in the superconductive coil when a signal representative of a defined superconducting coil temperature is received from the temperature sensor.

  4. Optimal monitoring and visualization of steady state power system operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Bei

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Matrix conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 E. Simulation Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 1. IEEE 14-bus system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 a. Case 1: State estimation without measure- ment... errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 b. Case 2: Introducing bad data . . . . . . . . . . . 25 c. Case 3: Operating the UPFC at its capacity limit 26 d. Case 4: Controller parameter determination . . . 27 2. IEEE 57-bus system...

  5. Operational-Condition-Independent Criteria Dedicated to Monitoring Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, W.; Sheng, S.; Court, R.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date the existing wind turbine condition monitoring technologies and commercially available systems have not been fully accepted for improving wind turbine availability and reducing their operation and maintenance costs. One of the main reasons is that wind turbines are subject to constantly varying loads and operate at variable rotational speeds. As a consequence, the influences of turbine faults and the effects of varying load and speed are coupled together in wind turbine condition monitoring signals. So, there is an urgent need to either introduce some operational condition de-coupling procedures into the current wind turbine condition monitoring techniques or develop a new operational condition independent wind turbine condition monitoring technique to maintain high turbine availability and achieve the expected economic benefits from wind. The purpose of this paper is to develop such a technique. In the paper, three operational condition independent criteria are developed dedicated for monitoring the operation and health condition of wind turbine generators. All proposed criteria have been tested through both simulated and practical experiments. The experiments have shown that these criteria provide a solution for detecting both mechanical and electrical faults occurring in wind turbine generators.

  6. Reactive and voltage monitoring: The challenge for the system operators in the 1980's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, J.D.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to gain perspective on the monitoring program for PJM, background relative to the physical characteristics and operating philosophy of the pool is offered. PJM is comprised of 11 electric utilities serving approximately 48,700 square miles, encompassing about 75% of Penna, 97% of N.J., all of Del and the District of Columbia, 60% of Md, and 1% of Va. The generating capability is comprised of 532 units at 116 generating stations, and totals approximately 45,000 MW. The PJM system peak load for 1980 was 34,420 MW. PJM has 27 tie lines with its neighboring systems. Although comprised of 11 utilities, the PJM system is operated as if it were a single company. Reasons for the PJM real-time monitoring system are presented and relevant details are discussed. Topics considered include operating criteria. Reactive and Voltage Monitoring, Current Operating Restrictions off-line analysis, and future requirements are discussed.

  7. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

  8. Operational Monitoring of Weather Radar Receiving Chain Using the Sun IWAN HOLLEMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Operational Monitoring of Weather Radar Receiving Chain Using the Sun IWAN HOLLEMAN Royal, is presented. The ``online'' method is entirely based on the analysis of sun signals in the polar volume data- termining the weather radar antenna pointing at low elevations using sun signals, and it is suited

  9. A review of market monitoring activities at U.S. independent system operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Goldman, Charles; Bartholomew, Emily

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policymakers have increasingly recognized the structural impediments to effective competition in electricity markets, which has resulted in a renewed emphasis on the need for careful market design and market monitoring in wholesale and retail electricity markets. In this study, we review the market monitoring activities of four Independent System Operators in the United States, focusing on such topics as the organization of an independent market monitoring unit (MMU), the role and value of external market monitors, performance metrics and indices to aid in market analysis, issues associated with access to confidential market data, and market mitigation and investigation authority. There is consensus across the four ISOs that market monitoring must be organizationally independent from market participants and that ISOs should have authority to apply some degree of corrective actions on the market, though scope and implementation differ across the ISOs. Likewise, current practices regarding access to confidential market data by state energy regulators varies somewhat by ISO. Drawing on our interviews and research, we present five examples that illustrate the impact and potential contribution of ISO market monitoring activities to enhance functioning of wholesale electricity markets. We also discuss several key policy and implementation issues that Western state policymakers and regulators should consider as market monitoring activities evolve in the West.

  10. Online Condition Monitoring to Enable Extended Operation of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Safe, secure, and economic operation of nuclear power plants will remain of strategic significance. New and improved monitoring will likely have increased significance in the post-Fukushima world. Prior to Fukushima, many activities were already underway globally to facilitate operation of nuclear power plants beyond their initial licensing periods. Decisions to shut down a nuclear power plant are mostly driven by economic considerations. Online condition monitoring is a means to improve both the safety and economics of extending the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants, enabling adoption of proactive aging management. With regard to active components (e.g., pumps, valves, motors, etc.), significant experience in other industries has been leveraged to build the science base to support adoption for online condition-based maintenance and proactive aging management in the nuclear industry. Many of the research needs are associated with enabling proactive management of aging in passive components (e.g., pipes, vessels, cables, containment structures, etc.). This paper provides an overview of online condition monitoring for the nuclear power industry with an emphasis on passive components. Following the overview, several technology/knowledge gaps are identified, which require addressing to facilitate widespread online condition monitoring of passive components.

  11. Session: Development and application of guidelines for siting, constructing, operating and monitoring wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manville, Albert; Hueckel, Greg

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The two papers were: 'Development and Application of USFWS Guidance for Site Evaluation, Siting, Construction, Operation and Monitoring of Wind Turbines' by Albert Manville and 'Wind Power in Washington State' by Greg Hueckel. The session provided a comparison of wind project guidelines developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in May 2003 and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife in August 2003. Questions addressed included: is there a need or desire for uniform national or state criteria; can other states learn from Washington State's example, or from the USFWS voluntary guidelines; should there be uniform requirements/guidelines/check-lists for the siting, operation, monitoring, and mitigation to prevent or minimize avian, bat, and other wildlife impacts.

  12. Method and apparatus for monitoring motor operated valve motor output torque and power at valve seating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casada, Donald A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a motor operated valve during the brief period when the valve seats and the torque switch trips to deenergize the valve motor. The method uses voltage measurements on the load side of a deenergizing switch that opens to deenergize the motor to determine, among other things, final motor rotational speed and the decelerating torque at motor deenergization.

  13. Operation of the intensity monitors in beam transport lines at Fermilab during Run II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crisp, J; Fellenz, B; Fitzgerald, J; Heikkinen, D; Ibrahim, M A.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity of charged particle beams at Fermilab must be kept within pre-determined safety and operational envelopes in part by assuring all beam within a few percent has been transported from any source to destination. Beam instensity monitors with toroidial pickups provide such beam intensity measurements in the transport lines between accelerators at FNAL. During Run II, much effort was made to continually improve the resolution and accuracy of the system.

  14. Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.; Fassett, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Johnson, V.G.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Moss, K.J.; Perkins, C.J.; Richterich, L.R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1994 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

  15. Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report - calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1995 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water,groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

  16. A sensor management architecture concept for monitoring emissions from open-air demil operations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Michael M.; Robinson, Jerry D.; Stoddard, Mary Clare; Horn, Brent A.; Lipkin, Joel; Foltz, Greg W.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, CA proposed a sensor concept to detect emissions from open-burning/open-detonation (OB/OD) events. The system would serve two purposes: (1) Provide data to demilitarization operations about process efficiency, allowing process optimization for cleaner emissions and higher efficiency. (2) Provide data to regulators and neighboring communities about materials dispersing into the environment by OB/OD operations. The proposed sensor system uses instrument control hardware and data visualization software developed at Sandia National Laboratories to link together an array of sensors to monitor emissions from OB/OD events. The suite of sensors would consist of various physical and chemical detectors mounted on stationary or mobile platforms. The individual sensors would be wirelessly linked to one another and controlled through a central command center. Real-time data collection from the sensors, combined with integrated visualization of the data at the command center, would allow for feedback to the sensors to alter operational conditions to adjust for changing needs (i.e., moving plume position, increased spatial resolution, increased sensitivity). This report presents a systems study of the problem of implementing a sensor system for monitoring OB/OD emissions. The goal of this study was to gain a fuller understanding of the political, economic, and technical issues for developing and fielding this technology.

  17. MSWord/Hort Farm Documents/At the farm/Equipment/Performance Evaluation for Tractor Operators Updated 5/15/08 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FOR TRACTOR OPERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of clutch and shifting Demonstrated safe driving on level ground or slight grade Properly attached/detached hydraulic lines on implement Properly operated and shut down power take off (PTO) Properly operated front Farm Staff) __PTO Safety __Driving on roadways #12;

  18. Texas AgriLife Extension Service Procedure 21.01.08.X1.05 Farm Equipment Operation and Maintenance Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and oil filter replacement, air filter replacement, battery check) on equipment. C. Retain maintenance.6.1 by the equipment item in accordance with the System Records Retention Schedule Section 5.6. D. House equipment

  19. Applications of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: (1) diagnosing specific abnormal conditions or problems in nuclear power plants, (2) detection of the change of mode of operation of the plant, (3) validating signals coming from detectors, (4) review of noise'' data from TVA's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant, and (5) examination of the NRC's database of Letter Event Reports'' for correlation of sequences of events in the reported incidents. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this paper. This broad based program has as its objective the definition of the state-of-the-art in using neural networks to enhance the performance of commercial nuclear power plants.

  20. Proceedings: Tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  1. Proceedings: Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference IX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The ninth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  2. Monitoring Software using Sun Spots Corey Andalora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Alan

    a software application developed for demonstrating a monitoring network for air conditioning units their findings to a central data store. Air conditioning units were the equipment selected for monitoring. Air conditioning units vibrate while operating so they were an obvious choice to use with the accelerometers

  3. VEHICLES, MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT Table Of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of a license/permit for each piece of equipment, an Operator Equipment Qualification Record (DA Form 348EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 18 VEHICLES, MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT Table Of Contents Section: Page...................................................................18-16 18.G Machinery And Mechanized Equipment.........................18-16 18.H Drilling Equipment

  4. Continuous mercury monitor for thermal treatment and waste-to-energy operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlager, R.J.; Wilson, K.G.; Sappey, A.D.; Anderson, G.L.; Sagan, F.J. [ADA Technologies, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Treating wastes by thermal means offers benefits in terms of reducing waste volumes and in recovering energy values from the wastes. Thermal treatment has been an effective technology for a number of years, and is being used more in the US. Significant sources of waste in the US are municipal solid waste, hospital wastes, hazardous wastes, and wastes generated form the DOE complex. Mercury is found in these wastes and is emitted as a pollutant from sources that treat these materials thermally. Because of mercury`s toxicity, there is a considerable amount of activity aimed at its regulation and control. One of the key elements to effectively control the release of mercury is the ability to continuously monitor its concentration from emitting sources. ADA Technologies is developing a continuous monitoring system for measuring these emissions in real time. A real-time analyzer will assure that compliance limits are met and that emissions are kept as low as possible. Because mercury is emitted from sources in several different forms, such as elemental mercury and mercuric chloride, provisions have been incorporated in the analyzer that will allow for the measurement of all mercury compounds. The system will provide a number of advantages over existing test methods: (1) it will provide a real-time measure of emissions rates; (2) it will assure facility operators, regulators, and the public that emissions control systems are working at peak efficiency; and (3) it will provide information as to the nature of the emitted mercury (elemental mercury or speciated compounds).

  5. Environmental monitoring for detection of uranium enrichment operations: Comparison of LEU and HEU facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Carter, J.A.; Ross, H.H.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an ambitious program of worldwide field trials to evaluate the utility of environmental monitoring for safeguards. Part of this program involved two extensive United States field trials conducted at the large uranium enrichment facilities. The Paducah operation involves a large low-enriched uranium (LEU) gaseous diffusion plant while the Portsmouth facilities include a large gaseous diffusion plant that has produced both LEU and high-enriched uranium (HEU) as well as an LEU centrifuge facility. As a result of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, management of the uranium enrichment operations was assumed by the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The facilities are operated under contract by Martin Marietta Utility Services. Martin Marietta Energy Systems manages the environmental restoration and waste management programs at Portsmouth and Paducah for DOE. These field trials were conducted. Samples included swipes from inside and outside process buildings, vegetation and soil samples taken from locations up to 8 km from main sites, and hydrologic samples taken on the sites and at varying distances from the sites. Analytical results from bulk analysis were obtained using high abundance sensitivity thermal ionization mm spectrometers (TIMS). Uranium isotopics altered from the normal background percentages were found for all the sample types listed above, even on vegetation 5 km from one of the enrichment facilities. The results from these field trials demonstrate that dilution by natural background uranium does not remove from environmental samples the distinctive signatures that are characteristic of enrichment operations. Data from swipe samples taken within the enrichment facilities were particularly revealing. Particulate analysis of these swipes provided a detailed ``history`` of both facilities, including the assays of the end product and tails for both facilities.

  6. Integrating UF6 Cylinder RF Tracking With Continuous Load Cell Monitoring for Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Miller, Paul [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is demonstrating the integration of UF6 cylinder tracking, using RF technology, with continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) at mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) stations. CLCM and cylinder tracking are two of several continuous-monitoring technologies that show promise in providing integrated safeguards of F&W operations at enrichment plants. Integrating different monitoring technologies allows advanced, automated event processing to screen innocuous events thereby minimizing false alerts to independent inspectors. Traditionally, international inspectors rely on batch verification of material inputs and outputs derived from operator declarations and periodic on-site inspections at uranium enrichment plants or other nuclear processing facilities. Continuously monitoring F&W activities between inspections while providing filtered alerts of significant operational events will substantially increase the amount of valuable information available to inspectors thereby promising to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards and to improve efficiency in conducting on-site inspections especially at large plants for ensuring that all operations are declared.

  7. RCRA and Operational Monitoring (ROM). Multi-Year Program Plan and Fiscal Year 95 Work Plan WBS 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information concerning the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Program at Hanford Reservation. Information presented includes: Schedules for ground water monitoring activities, program cost baseline, program technical baseline, and a program milestone list.

  8. Preliminary Concept of Operations for a Global Cylinder Identification and Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, J. M. [ORNL; White-Horton, J. L. [ORNL; Morgan, J. B. [InSolves Associates

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a preliminary concept of operations for a Global Cylinder Identification and Monitoring System that could improve the efficiency of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in conducting its current inspection activities and could provide a capability to substantially increase its ability to detect credible diversion scenarios and undeclared production pathways involving UF6 cylinders. There exist concerns that a proliferant State with access to enrichment technology could obtain a cylinder containing natural or low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and produce a significant quantity (SQ)1 of highly enriched uranium in as little as 30 days. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative sponsored a multi-laboratory team to develop an integrated system that provides for detecting scenarios involving 1) diverting an entire declared cylinder for enrichment at a clandestine facility, 2) misusing a declared cylinder at a safeguarded facility, and 3) using an undeclared cylinder at a safeguarded facility. An important objective in developing this integrated system was to improve the timeliness for detecting the cylinder diversion and undeclared production scenarios. Developing this preliminary concept required in-depth analyses of current operational and safeguards practices at conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The analyses evaluated the processing, movement, and storage of cylinders at the facilities; the movement of cylinders between facilities (including cylinder fabrication); and the misuse of safeguarded facilities.

  9. MATLAB implementation of an operational modal analysis technique for vibration-based structural health monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ojeda, Alejandro P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration-based structural health monitoring (SHM) has become an attractive solution for the global monitoring and evaluation of damage in structures. Numerous damage detection schemes used in vibration-based SHM require ...

  10. Office of the Vice President for Research Policy on Anesthesia, Survival Surgery and Post-Anesthetic/Post-Operative Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Office of the Vice President for Research Policy on Anesthesia, Survival Surgery and Post-Anesthetic/Post-Operative Monitoring Approved by the UGA IACUC Effective September 16, 2010 Revised February 21, 2013 Anesthesia committee (IACUC) to review, and the institutional veterinarian to oversee, anesthesia, surgical procedures

  11. Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Hanford Reservation. Attention is focused on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. All Hanford contractors reviewed potential sources of contamination. A facility effluent monitoring plan was written for each facility with the potential to release significant quantities of hazardous materials, addressing both radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring. The environmental surveillance program assesses onsite and offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health exposures. The program monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife. In addition, independent onsite surveillance is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Hanford Site effluent controls in order to comply with applicable environmental standards and regulations.

  12. DEVELOPMENT, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF THE MPC&A OPERATIONS MONITORING (MOM) SYSTEM AT THE JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (JINR) DUBNA, RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kartashov,V.V.; Pratt,W.; Romanov, Y.A.; Samoilov, V.N.; Shestakov, B.A.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Operations Monitoring (MOM) systems handling at the International Intergovernmental Organization - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is described in this paper. Category I nuclear material (plutonium and uranium) is used in JINR research reactors, facilities and for scientific and research activities. A monitoring system (MOM) was installed at JINR in April 2003. The system design was based on a vulnerability analysis, which took into account the specifics of the Institute. The design and installation of the MOM system was a collaborative effort between JINR, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Financial support was provided by DOE through BNL. The installed MOM system provides facility management with additional assurance that operations involving nuclear material (NM) are correctly followed by the facility personnel. The MOM system also provides additional confidence that the MPC&A systems continue to perform effectively.

  13. Factorial Switching Kalman Filters for Condition Monitoring in Neonatal Intensive Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher; Quinn, J.; McIntosh, N.

    The observed physiological dynamics of an infant receiving intensive care are affected by many possible factors, including interventions to the baby, the operation of the monitoring equipment and the state of health. The Factorial Switching Kalman...

  14. GTRI Remote Monitoring System: Training and Operational Needs Assessment Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Debra E.; Fox, Sorcha

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA's) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to identify, secure, recover and facilitate the disposition of vulnerable nuclear and high-risk radioactive materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. The GTRI's unique mission to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide directly addresses recommendations of the 9/11 Commission1, and is a vital part of the President's National Security Strategy and the Global Initiative. The GTRI Remote Monitoring System (RMS) is a standalone security system that includes radiation and tamper alarms, and CCTV; which can be transmitted securely over the Internet to multiple on-site and off-site locations. Through our experiences during installation of the system at 162 sites, plus feedback received from Alarm Response Training course participants, site input to project teams and analysis of trouble calls; indications were that current system training was lacking and inconsistent. A survey was undertaken to gather information from RMS users across the nation, to evaluate the current level of training and determine what if any improvements needed to be made. Additional questions were focused on the operation of the RMS software. The training survey was initially sent electronically to 245 users at the RMS sites and achieved a 37.6% return rate. Analysis of the resulting data revealed that 34.6% of the respondents had not received training or were unsure if they had, despite the fact that vendor engineers provide training at installation of the system. Any training received was referred to as minimal, and brief, not documented, and nothing in writing. 63.7% of respondents said they were either not at all prepared or only somewhat prepared to use the RMS software required to effectively operate the system. As a result of this analysis, a formal training curriculum will be designed and implemented to include several blended learning delivery options. This training will be piloted at RMS sites; initial training will become a required element of RMS installation and refresher training will be considered for sustainability of operations.

  15. Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  16. Results of Continuous Load Cell Monitoring Field Trial for UF6 Withdrawals at an Operating Industrial Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bell, Lisa S [ORNL] [ORNL; Conchewski, Curtis A [ORNL] [ORNL; Peters, Benjamin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL] [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) has been implemented and tested for use as a safeguards tool during a 2009 field trial in an operating UF6 transfer facility. The transfer facility is part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. During the field trial, two process scales for UF{sub 6} cylinders were continuously monitored for a 6-month period as cylinders were being filled. The collected CLCM data were used in testing an event processor serving as a filter for highlighting measurements representing significant operational activities that are important in verifying declared operations. The collection of CLCM data, coupled with rules-based event processing, can provide inspectors with knowledge of a facility's feed and withdrawal activities occurring between site visits. Such process knowledge promises to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards by enabling inspectors to quantitatively compare declared activities directly with process measurements. Selected results of the field trial and event processing will be presented in the context of their value to an independent inspector and a facility operator.

  17. Techniques to Visualize and Monitor Transit Fleet Operations1 Performance in Urban Areas2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    fundamental for a transit agency to determine how well it is adhering to its service standards. Transit8) A dynamic, interactive bus monitoring visualization framework using the Google18 Maps API, demonstrating bus

  18. Post-Retrocommissioning HVAC Operations Monitoring Using Enterprise-Wide energy Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarnani, N.; Roberts, B.; Choy, H.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    components/systems to diagnose and resolve root causes of operational deficiencies. During the implementation phase, new energy efficiency measures were installed, sequence of operations were optimized and functionally tested. System-level benchmark models...

  19. Incorporating voltage security into the planning, operation and monitoring of restructured electric energy markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Nirmal-Kumar

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    As open access market principles are applied to power systems, significant changes are happening in their planning, operation and control. In the emerging marketplace, systems are operating under higher loading conditions ...

  20. Implementation of the MPC and A Operations Monitoring (MOM) System at IRT-T FSRE Nuclear Power Institute (NPI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sitdikov,I.; Zenkov, A.; Tsibulnikov, Y.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Pratt, W.T.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program has been working since 1994 with nuclear sites in Russia to upgrade the physical protection (PP) and material control and accounting (MC&A) functions at facilities containing weapons usable nuclear material. In early 2001, the MPC&A program initiated the MPC&A Operations Monitoring (MOM) Project to monitor facilities where MPC&A upgrades have been installed to provide increased confidence that personnel are present and vigilant, provide confidence that security procedures are being properly performed and provide additional assurance that nuclear materials have not been stolen. The MOM project began as a pilot project at the Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) and a MOM system was successfully installed in October 2001. Following the success of the MEPhI pilot project, the MPC&A Program expanded the installation of MOM systems to several other Russian facilities, including the Nuclear Physics Institute (NPI) in Tomsk. The MOM system was made operational at NPI in October 2004. This paper is focused on the experience gained from operation of this system and the objectives of the MOM system. The paper also describes how the MOM system is used at NPI and, in particular, how the data is analyzed. Finally, potential expansion of the MOM system at NPI is described.

  1. Transferable methods identified during the monitoring of the DOE Chicago Operations Office Weatherization Assistance Program. Final report. Task F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the outcomes of the analyses performed under this task. The first of these is the presentation of a range of materials/approaches initially found by contract monitoring teams to be potentially unique/innovative/useful to Weatherization Program operators. The second is a summary of the general categories of information eventually selected as having good transfer potential. The third is a listing of areas of information currently needed by grantees. The final step is a matching of useful information to needs cited by grantees.

  2. Operation of a Joint Utility/Industry Ambient Air Monitoring Program in the Houston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kush, J. A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commerce or any other business or industrial organization. HRM's officers and directors are employees of its participating companies. HRM does not have any paid employees it contracts for all necessary services. Radian Corporation has been contracted... participating companies. HRM does not have any paid employees it contracts for 119 all necessary services. Radian Corporation has been contracted for the ambient air monitoring and special studies for all phases of HRM thus far. All participating companies...

  3. From 08/10-09/10, BR Environmental Services processed our Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) arising from Information Systems operations. BRES recommend tonnage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    (WEEE) arising from Information Systems operations. BRES recommend tonnage calculations based on average this operation and weigh all WEEE on collection. August 2013 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Waste Management

  4. Applications of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants. Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhrig, R.E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of neural networks to monitoring and decision making in the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: (1) diagnosing specific abnormal conditions or problems in nuclear power plants, (2) detection of the change of mode of operation of the plant, (3) validating signals coming from detectors, (4) review of ``noise`` data from TVA`s Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant, and (5) examination of the NRC`s database of ``Letter Event Reports`` for correlation of sequences of events in the reported incidents. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this paper. This broad based program has as its objective the definition of the state-of-the-art in using neural networks to enhance the performance of commercial nuclear power plants.

  5. Commissioning, Operation, Real Time Monitoring and Evaluation of Pilot: Achieving Optimal Performance through Building Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang,X.; Piette, M.A.; Hao,B.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Mary Ann Piette, Bin Hao Interface Engineering, PG&E, WattWise, CABR, Xingye Presented By Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory November 11, 2014 ESL-IC-14-09-30 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing...

  6. Monitoring and Optimization of Building Operations of a Low-Energy School Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koenigsdorff, R.; Heinrich, S.; Baumann, O.; Reiser, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ambitious design and energy concept of the new Gebhard-Mller-Schule (GMS) school building in Biberach/Riss, Germany proved itself during the first three school years of operation. The intended target value of 30 kWh/(m2a) overall heating energy...

  7. Wind Farm Monitoring at Lake Benton II Wind Power Project - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-275

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term, high-resolution wind turbine and wind power plant output data are important to assess the impact of wind power on grid operations and to derive meaningful statistics for better understanding of the variability nature of wind power. These data are used for many research and analyses activities consistent with the Wind Program mission: Establish a database of long-term wind power similar to other long-term renewable energy resource databases (e.g. solar irradiance and hydrology); produce meaningful statistics about long-term variation of wind power, spatial and temporal diversity of wind power, and the correlation of wind power, other renewable energy resources, and utility load; provide high quality, realistic wind power output data for system operations impact studies and wind plant and forecasting model validation.

  8. Operation of a Joint Utility/Industry Ambient Air Monitoring Program in the Houston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kush, J. A.

    of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit and ESL-IE-91-06-28 Proceedings from the 13th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 12-13, 1991 Texas Air Control Board (TACB) construction and operating permit requirements. The objectives... member companies with representative criteria pollutant and meteorological data for industry located within a 900 square mile area encompassing east Harris and west Chambers Counties. Data from this network has been approved by the ACB and EPA Region VI...

  9. Please read this guide before operating this equipment. After you finish reading this guide, store it in a safe place for future reference. ENG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    the Machine Menu Functions and Operation Printer Settings Menu Functions and Operation Report Settings Menu the Manuals for the Machine The manuals for this machine are divided as follow. Please read them to suit yourRUNNER 3300/2800/2200 Series machine, and how to specify these functions from the touch panel display. Please

  10. Wireless Sensors for Condition Monitoring of Essential Assets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Technology Provides Cost Savings and Flexibility for Monitoring Motor-Driven Industrial Equipment

  11. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Forsythe

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

  12. Heating and Cooling Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet helps people choose the correct equipment for heating and cooling to reduce initial costs, increase homeowner comfort, increase operating efficiency, and greatly reduce utility costs.

  13. Design, development and validation of a training system for roof bolt equipment operators. Open file report, 21 September 1978-10 April 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinton, W.M. Jr.; Menzer, G.W.; Reilly, R.E.; Baker, R.M.

    1982-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the approach, procedures, and results of a program to develop training materials for roof bolter operators. The objective of the program was to design and produce a training sequence which would prepare roof bolter trainees for job performance. Data were collected and analyzed using the general procedures of Instructional Systems Development (ISD). Input data came from previous roof bolter training analysis program. These data were expanded and structured through a series of ISD steps: objectives hierarchies, media selection, syllabus, lesson specifications, and training materials development. The resulting program consisted of an ordered sequence of 15 lessons. The media mix for the 15 lessons included lectures, slide-tape lessons, and hands-on instruction using operational roof bolters. Contents of all lessons were reviewed and approved by the Bureau of Mines.

  14. Developing ''SMART'' equipment and systems through collaborative NERI research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARMON,DARYL L.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.; GOLAY,MICHAEL W.; MAYNARD,KENNETH P.; SPENCER,JOSEPH W.

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy initiated the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) to conduct research and development with the objectives of: (1) overcoming the principal technical obstacles to expanded nuclear energy use, (2) advancing the state of nuclear technology to maintain its competitive position in domestic and world markets, and (3) improving the performance, efficiency, reliability, and economics of nuclear energy. Fiscal Year 1999 program funding is $19 Million, with increased finding expected for subsequent years, emphasizing international cooperation. Among the programs selected for funding is the ``Smart Equipment and Systems to Improve Reliability and Safety in Future Nuclear Power Plant Operations''. This program is a 30 month collaborative effort bringing together the technical capabilities of ABB C-E Nuclear Power, Inc. (ABB CENP), Sandia National Laboratories, Duke Engineering and Services (DE and S), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Pennsylvania State University (PSU). The program's goal is to design, develop and evaluate an integrated set of smart equipment and predictive maintenance tools and methodologies that will significantly reduce nuclear plant construction, operation and maintenance costs. To accomplish this goal the Smart Equipment program will: (1) Identify and prioritize nuclear plant equipment that would most likely benefit from adding smart features; (2) Develop a methodology for systematically monitoring the health of individual pieces of equipment implemented with smart features (i.e. smart equipment); (3) Develop a methodology to provide plant operators with real-time information through smart equipment Man-Machine Interfaces (MMI) to support their decision making; (4) Demonstrate the methodology on a targeted component and/or system; (5) Expand the concept to system and plant levels that allow communication and integration of data among smart equipment. This paper will discuss (1) detailed subtask plans for the entire program, including expected achievements, (2) preliminary results from the early program phases and (3) the program's relationship to other NERI programs being conducted by the same team.

  15. Reducing variability in equipment availability at Intel using systems optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwong, William W. M

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment management is an important driver behind operational efficiency, since capital equipment makes up about 40% of the average semiconductor manufacturer's total assets. The main goal of this project is to reduce ...

  16. Optimal Sequencing of Central Refrigeration Equipment in an Industrial Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.; Priest, J. W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model was developed to find a viable solution to the problem of selecting the optimal sequence of refrigeration equipment (chillers, cooling towers, pumps) to operate in a Central Utility Plant. The optimal equipment sequence is that sequence...

  17. Operational Area Monitoring Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 +NewAugust 4, 1992DOC F Only'

  18. Energy Audit Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tools (equipment) needed to perform an energy audit include those items which assist the auditor in measuring the energy used by equipment or lost in inefficiency. Each tool is designed for a specific measurement. They can be inexpensive simple...

  19. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

  20. Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Toelle

    2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This simulation predicted that the CO{sub 2} injected into the reef would remain in the northern portion of the field. Two new wells, the State Charlton 4-30 and the Larsen 3-31, were drilled into the field in 2006 and 2008 respectively and supported this assessment. A second (or 'Monitor') 3D seismic survey was acquired during September 2007 over most of the field and duplicated the first (Base) survey, as much as possible. However, as the simulation and new well data available at that time indicated that the CO{sub 2} was concentrated in the northern portion of the field, the second seismic survey was not acquired over the extreme southern end of the area covered by the original (or Base) 3D survey. Basic processing was performed on the second 3D seismic survey and, finally, 4D processing methods were applied to both the Base and the Monitor surveys. In addition to this 3D data, a shear wave seismic data set was obtained at the same time. Interpretation of the 4D seismic data indicated that a significant amplitude change, not attributable to differences in acquisition or processing, existed at the locations within the reef predicted by the reservoir simulation. The reservoir simulation was based on the porosity distribution obtained from seismic attributes from the Base 3D survey. Using this validated reservoir simulation the location of oil within the reef at the time the Monitor survey was obtained and recommendations made for the drilling of additional EOR wells. The economic impact of this project has been estimated in terms of both enhanced oil recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. In the northern Michigan Basin alone, the Niagaran reef play is comprised of over 700 Niagaran reefs with reservoirs already depleted by primary production. Potentially there is over 1 billion bbls of oil (original oil in place minus primary recovery) remains in the reefs in Michigan, much of which could be more efficiently mobilized utilizing techniques similar to those employed in this study.

  1. Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 21.01.08.A1.05 Farm Equipment Operation and Maintenance Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    filter replacement, air filter replacement, battery check) on equipment. C. Retain maintenance records item in accordance with the System Records Retention Schedule Section 5.6. D. House equipment, where

  2. NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Qualification of Autonomous Crack Monitoring Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Qualification of Autonomous Crack Monitoring Systems A Thesis Submitted Term or Static Testing Equipment Setup.............................................29 Long Term Response.....................................................................33 Dynamic Testing Equipment

  3. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  4. Assessment of HYGAS mechanical equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, P.R.; Kramberger, F.E.; Recupero, R.M.; Verden, M.L.; Rees, K.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The HYGAS process, which converts coal to substitute natural gas, is being developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) using an 80 ton per day pilot plant located in Chicago, Illinois. Plant design started in 1967 and testing began in October 1971. Since then, 18,000 tons of both Eastern and Western coal have been gasified. Assessment of the mechanical equipment was made by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) in collaboration with a DOE on-site representative and a representative from IGT, the operating contractor. Data for the assessment were obtained by reviewing all available maintenance records, by interviewing key personnel from maintenance and operations, and by observing repairs and maintenance procedures where possible. While operating the plant, a variety of equipment problems were addressed, many of which are generic to HYGAS as well as other coal conversion processes. Some problems were solved completely while others were solved to suit the limited needs of the pilot plant. Accordingly, the emphasis of this study is on the degree of success in dealing with equipment failures, the unresolved problems and the implication to future coal conversion plants.

  5. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  6. Application of Diagnostic/Prognostic Methods to Critical Equipment for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Cleanup Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casazza, Lawrence O.; Jarrell, Donald B.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Meador, Richard J.; Wallace, Dale E.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project at the Hanford K-Basin in the 100 N Area has successfully restructured the preventive maintenance, spare parts inventory requirements, and the operator rounds data requirements. In this investigation, they continue to examine the different facets of the operations and maintenance (O&M) of the K-Basin cleanup project in search of additional reliability and cost savings. This report focuses on the initial findings of a team of PNNL engineers engaged to identify potential opportunities for reducing the cost of O&M through the application of advanced diagnostics (fault determination) and prognostics (residual life/reliability determination). The objective is to introduce predictive technologies to eliminate or reduce high impact equipment failures. The PNNL team in conjunction with the SNF engineers found the following major opportunities for cost reduction and/or enhancing reliability: (1) Provide data routing and automated analysis from existing detection systems to a display center that will engage the operations and engineering team. This display will be operator intuitive with system alarms and integrated diagnostic capability. (2) Change operating methods to reduce major transients induced in critical equipment. This would reduce stress levels on critical equipment. (3) Install a limited sensor set on failure prone critical equipment to allow degradation or stressor levels to be monitored and alarmed. This would provide operators and engineers with advance guidance and warning of failure events. Specific methods for implementation of the above improvement opportunities are provided in the recommendations. They include an Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) decision support system, introduction of variable frequency drives on certain pump motors, and the addition of limited diagnostic instrumentation on specified critical equipment.

  7. Baseline and Postremediation Monitoring Program Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements to present the plan for baseline and postremediation monitoring as part of the selected remedy. It provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the requirements to monitor for soil and terrestrial biota in the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain; sediment, surface water, and aquatic biota in LEFPC; wetland restoration in the LEFPC floodplain; and human use of shallow groundwater wells in the LEFPC floodplain for drinking water. This document describes the monitoring program that will ensure that actions taken under Phases I and II of the LEFPC remedial action are protective of human health and the environment.

  8. Sector 1 - Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APS detector pool has a number of additional detectors Furnaces Powder diffraction furnace Infrared furnace Plate furnace Mechanical Testing Equipment The following mechanical...

  9. Universal null DTE (data terminal equipment)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, M.; Pierson, L.G.; Wilkins, M.E.

    1987-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A communication device in the form of data terminal equipment permits two data communication equipments, each having its own master clock and operating at substantially the same nominal clock rate, to communicate with each other in a multi-segment circuit configuration of a general communication network even when phase or frequency errors exist between the two clocks. Data transmitted between communication equipments of two segments of the communication network is buffered. A variable buffer fill circuit is provided to fill the buffer to a selectable extent prior to initiation of data output clocking. Selection switches are provided to select the degree of buffer preload. A dynamic buffer fill circuit may be incorporated for automatically selecting the buffer fill level as a function of the difference in clock frequencies of the two equipments. Controllable alarm circuitry is provided for selectively generating an underflow or an overflow alarm to one or both of the communicating equipments. 5 figs.

  10. Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring & Analysis Program- Improving the Performance of Retrofits by Providing Operator Feedback from Measured Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challa, V.; Abbas, M.; Athar, A.; Claridge, D.; Haberl, J.

    pumping. Under the new system it is conditioned by four groups of air conditioning equipment consisting of eight variable volume single duct AHUs (75 hp each), twelve variable volume dual duct AHUs (two IDO hp and ten 75 hp), four variable volume hot.... The building was retrofiUed with a double-duct variable air volume HVAC system in March 1991. Under the new system the, building is served by twelve variable-volume dual-duct air handling units (40 hp each) along with len 36 hp constant volume systems. TIle...

  11. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  12. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. T. Urbon

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning site is located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (Figure 1). This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 23, 2001. Because of questionable representativeness and precision of the results, the site was resampled on June 12, 2001. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the December 1997 Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1997). If after six years the rate of degradation appears to be so slow that the greatest concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) present at the site would not decay within 30 years of the site closure, the site will be reevaluated with consideration to enriching the impacted soil at the site to enhance the degradation process. A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report, samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in TPH concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, the data results from 2000 were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2001 consisted of the following: Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2); Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]); Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs; and Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  13. field_equipment.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD EQUIPMENT INVENTORY Trucks * Five vacpressure trucks, 60-90 bbl, up to 5 bpm at 5,000 lb. * Waterfi re truck, 110 bbl * Two dump trucks: 5-yard and 12-yard * Belly dump...

  14. Utility vehicle safety Operator training program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Utility vehicle safety Operator training program #12;Permissible use Utility Vehicles may only Utility Vehicle operator When equipped with the "Required Equipment" On public roadways within Drivers" Obey all traffic regulations Trained; update training every two years Operate vehicles

  15. Permit compliance monitoring for the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macak, J.J. III [Mostardi-Platt Associates, Inc., Elmhurst, IL (United States); Platt, T.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Waukegan, IL (United States); Miller, S.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 authorized EPA to develop regulations requiring facilities to monitor the adequacy of emission control equipment and plant operations. Furthermore, under the CAAA, EPA is required to issue regulations to require owners and operators of large industrial facilities to enhance air pollution monitoring and certify compliance with air pollution regulations. The fossil-fueled power generation industry has been targeted with the promulgation of the Acid Rain Program regulations of 40 CFR 72, and the Continuous Emissions Monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 75. The Part 75 regulations, with a few exceptions, establish requirements for monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide emissions, volumetric flow, and opacity data from affected units under the Acid Rain Program. Depending upon the type of unit and location, other applicable emission limitations may apply for particulate emissions (both total and PM-10), carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and sulfuric acid mist.

  16. Generic seismic ruggedness of power plant equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merz, K.L. (Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report updates the results of a program with the overall objective of demonstrating the generic seismic adequacy of as much nuclear power plant equipment as possible by means of collecting and evaluating existing seismic qualification test data. These data are then used to construct ruggedness'' spectra below which equipment in operating plants designed to earlier earthquake criteria would be generically adequate. This document is an EPRI Tier 1 Report. The report gives the methodology for the collection and evaluation of data which are used to construct a Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectrum (GERs) for each equipment class considered. The GERS for each equipment class are included in an EPRI Tier 2 Report with the same title. Associated with each GERS are inclusion rules, cautions, and checklists for field screening of in-place equipment for GERS applicability. A GERS provides a measure of equipment seismic resistance based on available test data. As such, a GERS may also be used to judge the seismic adequacy of similar new or replacement equipment or to estimate the seismic margin of equipment re-evaluated with respect to earthquake levels greater than considered to date, resulting in fifteen finalized GERS. GERS for relays (included in the original version of this report) are now covered in a separate report (NP-7147). In addition to the presentation of GERS, the Tier 2 report addresses the applicability of GERS to equipment of older vintage, methods for estimating amplification factors for evaluating devices installed in cabinets and enclosures, and how seismic test data from related studies relate to the GERS approach. 28 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Development of a hybrid intelligent system for on-line real-time monitoring of nuclear power plant operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) has an intricate operational domain involving systems, structures and components (SSCs) that vary in scale and complexity. Many of the large scale SSCs contribute to the lost availability in the ...

  18. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Cumbria, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Cumbria, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Cumbria, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  19. A plasma process monitor/control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, J.O.; Ward, P.P.; Smith, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Markle, R.J. [Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a system to monitor plasma processes for control of industrial applications. The system is designed to act as a fully automated, sand-alone process monitor during printed wiring board and semiconductor production runs. The monitor routinely performs data collection, analysis, process identification, and error detection/correction without the need for human intervention. The monitor can also be used in research mode to allow process engineers to gather additional information about plasma processes. The plasma monitor can perform real-time control of support systems known to influence plasma behavior. The monitor can also signal personnel to modify plasma parameters when the system is operating outside of desired specifications and requires human assistance. A notification protocol can be selected for conditions detected in the plasma process. The Plasma Process Monitor/Control System consists of a computer running software developed by Sandia National Laboratories, a commercially available spectrophotometer equipped with a charge-coupled device camera, an input/output device, and a fiber optic cable.

  20. Early Equipment Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlie, Michelle

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    the quality, flexibility, reliability, safety, and life-time cost of equipment. This paper will give an introduction to the basics of TPM, discuss the major parts of EEM, and evaluate the lessons learned from the teams first effort to execute the structured...

  1. Emergency Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  2. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

  3. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

  4. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  5. HP Steam Trap Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascone, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEAM MONITORING HP Steam Trap Monitoring HP Steam Trap Monitoring ? 12-18 months payback! ? 3-5% permanent reduction in consumption ? LEED Pt.? Innovation in Operations EB O&M ? Saved clients over $1,000,000 Annual consumption... Steam Trap Monitoring ? Real-time monitoring for high-pressure critical traps (>15 PSIG) ? Average total system cost $25K - $50K ? Web-Based or Modbus/BMS Integration Basic Installation Wireless Signal Transmitter Receiver Repeater...

  6. Process monitoring in support of International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehinger, M.H.; Wachter, J.W.; Hebble, T.L.; Kerr, H.T.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of previous efforts in process monitoring for safeguards was conducted. Previous efforts touched on various concepts and a few specific applications, but none was comprehensive in addressing all aspects of a process monitoring application for safeguards. This report develops prototypical process monitoring concepts that can be incorporated into the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) general safeguards approach for fuel reprocessing plants. This effort considers existing approaches, recognizing limitations and needed improvements. Prototypical process monitoring applications are developed and proposed for implementation and demonstration in the Integrated Equipment Test facility, which is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The specific information needed to accomplish the process monitoring objectives are defined, and the mechanics for obtaining that information are described. Effort is given to the identification and assessment of potential impacts and benefits associated with process monitoring concepts, with particular attention to IAEA, state, and plant operator interests. The historical development of process monitoring is described and the implications of using process monitoring in international safeguards are discussed. Specific process process monitoring applications for demonstration in the IET facility are developed in Sects. 6 through 14. 1 fig.

  7. Improving reuse of semiconductor equipment through benchmarking, standardization, and automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silber, Jacob B. (Jacob Bradley)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 6D program at Intel Corporation was set up to improve operations around capital equipment reuse, primarily in their semiconductor manufacturing facilities. The company was faced with a number of challenges, including ...

  8. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation EquipmentHydrogen

  9. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation EquipmentHydrogenPhilips

  10. UNIRIB: Equipment Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may bedieselsummer gasoline price0 - 194Equipment

  11. Maersk Line Equipment guide

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AOU1a ComplexMaersk Line Equipment

  12. Logging Equipment and Loren Kellogg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the control is passed on Automatic inhaul starts and the control is transferred again Photo Credit: KollerLogging Equipment and Systems Loren Kellogg Forest Engineering Resources and Management Oregon Equipment and Systems Presentation Outline Overview of equipment and systems for thinning Costs

  13. Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenze, David; Greenberg, Steve; Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory equipment such as autoclaves, glass washers, refrigerators, and computers account for a significant portion of the energy use in laboratories. However, because of the general lack of measured equipment load data for laboratories, designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' rated data, or design assumptions from prior projects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequently overestimated. This results in oversized HVAC systems, increased initial construction costs, and increased energy use due to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. This best-practice guide first presents the problem of over-sizing in typical practice, and then describes how best-practice strategies obtain better estimates of equipment loads and right-size HVAC systems, saving initial construction costs as well as life-cycle energy costs. This guide is one in a series created by the Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs21') program, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. Geared towards architects, engineers, and facilities managers, these guides provide information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  14. After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Inventory of Miscellaneous Plug-load Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of ''miscellaneous'' plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from twelve commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: two health care buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees), four education buildings, and one ''small office'' that is actually an aggregate of five small businesses. Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay area of California, five are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

  15. Rack protection monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  16. Bio/Pharmaceutical Facilities, Operations and Validation Technician/Manager Open Applicant Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    maintenance, equipment installation, operation, and performance qualification. Being on call and setting upMARC's equipment. Responsible for the conforming calibration, qualification and validation status of equipment to affected departments during qualification, routine maintenance or unplanned maintenance of equipment

  17. Improving shipboard applications of non-intrusive load monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Richard A. (Richard Alan), Nav. E. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Non-Intrusive Load Monitor (NILM) measures equipment performance by measuring and analyzing the source power to the equipment at a single point in the electrical system. Previous studies have proven the usefulness of ...

  18. Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information APS Non-NRTL Electrical Equipment Inventory Spreadsheet ANL Recognized Reputable Electrical Equipment Manufacturer List as...

  19. Advanced monitoring of machining operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teti, Roberto; Jemielniak, Krzysztof; O'Donnell, Garret; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Milling of Steels and Aluminium Alloys Using a Fibre OpticMilling of Steels and Aluminium Alloys Using a Fibre Optic

  20. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Information technology equipment cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  2. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  3. Operation Poorman

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

    1981-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system.

  4. Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Application of Condition-Based Monitoring Techniques for Remote Monitoring of a Simulated Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Henkel, James J [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents research into the adaptation of monitoring techniques from maintainability and reliability (M&R) engineering for remote unattended monitoring of gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) for international safeguards. Two categories of techniques are discussed: the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for diagnostic monitoring, and sequential Monte Carlo (SMC or, more commonly, particle filtering ) for prognostic monitoring. Development and testing of the application of condition-based monitoring (CBM) techniques was performed on the Oak Ridge Mock Feed and Withdrawal (F&W) facility as a proof of principle. CBM techniques have been extensively developed for M&R assessment of physical processes, such as manufacturing and power plants. These techniques are normally used to locate and diagnose the effects of mechanical degradation of equipment to aid in planning of maintenance and repair cycles. In a safeguards environment, however, the goal is not to identify mechanical deterioration, but to detect and diagnose (and potentially predict) attempts to circumvent normal, declared facility operations, such as through protracted diversion of enriched material. The CBM techniques are first explained from the traditional perspective of maintenance and reliability engineering. The adaptation of CBM techniques to inspector monitoring is then discussed, focusing on the unique challenges of decision-based effects rather than equipment degradation effects. These techniques are then applied to the Oak Ridge Mock F&W facility a water-based physical simulation of a material feed and withdrawal process used at enrichment plants that is used to develop and test online monitoring techniques for fully information-driven safeguards of GCEPs. Advantages and limitations of the CBM approach to online monitoring are discussed, as well as the potential challenges of adapting CBM concepts to safeguards applications.

  6. Monitoring the health of power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirtley, J.L. Jr.; Hagman, W.H.; Lesieutre, B.C.; Boyd, M.J.; Warren, E.P.; Chou, H.P.; Tabors, R.D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Lab. for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems] [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Lab. for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews MIT`s model-based system which offers adaptive, intelligent surveillance of transformers, and summons attention to anomalous operation through paging devices. Failures of large power transformers are problematic for four reasons. Generally, large transformers are situated so that failures present operational problems to the system. In addition, large power transformers are encased in tanks of flammable and environmentally hazardous fluid. Failures are often accompanied by fire and/or spillage of this fluid. This presents hazards to people, other equipment and property, and the local environment. Finally, large power transformers are costly devices. There is a clear incentive for utilities to keep track of the health of their power transformers. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has developed an adaptive, intelligent, monitoring system for large power transformers. Four large transformers on the Boston Edison system are under continuous surveillance by this system, which can summon attention to anomalous operation through paging devices. The monitoring system offers two advantages over more traditional (not adaptive) methods of tracking transformer operation.

  7. COLD STORAGE DESIGN REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 1 \\ "..\\- ,,, T I Fishery Leaflet 427 Washington 25, D. C. June 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART em; COlD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT By Charles Butler (Section 1), Joseph W. Slavin (Sections 1, 2, and 3), Max Patashnik

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fewell, N.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: NSLS operations organization and administration; shift routines and operating practices; NSLS control room activities; communications; control of on-shift training; investigation of abnormal events; notifications; control of equipment and system status; lock-out tagout; independent verification; logkeeping; shift turnover; required reading; shift orders; equipment operations guides; operator aid postings; and equipment labeling.

  9. Technical Work Plan For: Meteorological Monitoring Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Green

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The meteorological monitoring and analysis program has five objectives. (1) Acquire qualified meteorological data from YMP meteorological monitoring network using appropriate controls on measuring and test equipment. Because this activity is monitoring (i.e., recording naturally occurring events) pre-test predictions are not applicable. All work will be completed in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Repository Development (ORD) administrative procedures and Bechtel SAIC Co., LLC (BSC) line procedures. The meteorological monitoring program includes measuring and test equipment calibrations, operational checks, preventive and corrective maintenance, and data collection. (2) Process the raw monitoring data collected in the field and submit technically reviewed, traceable data to the Technical Data Management System (TDMS) and the Records Processing Center. (3) Develop analyses or calculations to provide information to data requesters and provide data sets as requested. (4) Provide precipitation amounts to Site Operations to support requirements to perform inspections in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (implemented in LP-OM-050Q-BSC) following storm events of greater than 0.5 inches. The program also provides meteorological data during extreme weather conditions (e.g., high winds, rainstorms, etc.) to support decisions regarding worker safety. (5) Collect samples of precipitation for chemical and isotopic analysis by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The BSC ES&H Environmental Compliance organization is responsible for performing this work. Data from calendar-year periods are submitted to the TDMS to provide YMP users with qualified meteorological data for scientific modeling and analyses, engineering designs of surface facilities, performance assessment analyses, and operational safety issues.

  10. Importance of energy efficiency in office equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blatt, M.H.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-Efficient Office Technology 1994: An International Seminar has been organized and funded by the Office Technology Efficiency Consortium, a group of utilities, government agencies, and other energy efficiency advocates that has been aggressively championing the need for more efficient computers, displays, printers, faxes, and copiers. The Consortium, organized in late 1992, currently consists of 10 cofunders and numerous other participants. The cofunders are: The Electric Power Research Institute, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Consolidated Edison Company of New York, the Swedish National Board for Industrial and Technical Development (NUTEK), Ontario Hydro, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Wisconsin Center for Demand-Side Research. The Consortium has been striving to achieve multiple objectives. These objectives are to: (1) Improve office technology user energy efficiency end operating cost (2) Improve end-use equipment`s power quality characteristics (3) Increase equipment immunity to power line disturbances (4) Avoid the need for wiring overloads and upgrades (5) Reduce utility`s peak demand (6) Improve utility load factor. The growth in electricity use in the United States and the need for additional utility capacity has been driven to a great extent by the U.S. shift to a service economy and the coincident increase in the use of office equipment in these service establishments. The initial efforts of the Consortium, which consisted of the cofunders, included holding a workshop in June 1992 to heighten awareness of the importance of the need for more efficient office equipment. The workshop was documented in {open_quotes}Proceedings: Energy-Efficient Office Technologies,{close_quotes} TR-101945, in December 1992.

  11. Indoor Pollutants Emitted by Electronic Office Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo; Russell, Marion L.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last few decades have seen major changes in how people collect and process information at work and in their homes. More people are spending significant amounts of time in close proximity to computers, video display units, printers, fax machines and photocopiers. At the same time, efforts to improve energy efficiency in buildings by reducing leaks in building envelopes are resulting in tighter (i.e., less ventilated) indoor environments. Therefore, it is critical to understand pollutant emission rates for office equipment because even low emissions in areas that are under-ventilated or where individuals are in close proximity to the pollutant source can result in important indoor exposures. We reviewed existing literature reports on pollutant emission by office equipment, and measured emission factors of equipment with significant market share in California. We determined emission factors for a range of chemical classes including volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs), ozone and particulates. The measured SVOCs include phthalate esters, brominated and organophosphate flame retardants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Measurements were carried out in large and small exposure chambers for several different categories of office equipment. Screening experiments using specific duty cycles in a large test chamber ({approx}20 m{sup 3}) allowed for the assessment of emissions for a range of pollutants. Results from the screening experiments identified pollutants and conditions that were relevant for each category of office equipment. In the second phase of the study, we used a smaller test chamber ({approx}1 m{sup 3}) to measure pollutant specific emission factors for individual devices and explored the influence of a range of environmental and operational factors on emission rates. The measured emission factors provide a data set for estimating indoor pollutant concentrations and for exploring the importance of user proximity when estimating exposure concentrations.

  12. SAFETY REGULATION GROUP FLIGHT OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    WHEN THE ACCURACY OR RELIABILITY OF NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT IS IN DOUBT DURING THE APPROACH PHASE 1://www.caa.co.uk/publications 16/2003 IN THIS ISSUE 1 OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS WHEN THE ACCURACY OR RELIABILITY OF NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT IS IN DOUBT DURING THE APPROACH PHASE 2 RUNWAY INCURSION AWARENESS 1 OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS

  13. Operational history of Fermilab's 1500 W refrigerator used for energy saver magnet production testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianchi, A.J.; Barger, R.K.; Johnson, F.B.; McGuire, K.J.; Pinyan, K.D.; Wilson, F.W.; Cooper, W.E.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1500 W helium refrigerator system utilizes two oil-injected screw compressors staged to feed a liquid nitrogen pre-cooled cold box. Refrigeration is provided by two Sulzer TGL-22 magnetic/gas bearing turbines. The refrigerator feeds six magnet test stands via a 10,000 L dewar and subcooler equipped distribution box. The design of the controls has permitted the system to be routinely operated 24 hours/day, seven days/week with only five operators. It has operated approximately 90% of the 4-1/2 years prior to shutting down in 1984 for a period of one year to move the compressor skid. Scheduled maintenance, failures, repairs and holidays are about equal to the 10% off time. The equipment described was used to test approximately 1200 superconducting magnets for the Fermilab accelerator ring. The seven year operating experience is presented as an equipment and technique review. Compressor hours currently exceed 42,000 and turbine hours exceed 39,000 each. Failure rates, causes, preventive maintenance, monitoring practices and equipment, and modifications are examined along with notes on some of the more successful applications of technique and equipment. 4 refs.

  14. EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type Size Category (Btu/h) Size.ahridirectory.org/ceedirectory/pages/ac/cee/defaultSearch.aspx 12,000 Btu/h = 1 ton Less than 65,000 Btu/h Air Conditioners, Air Cooled Air Conditioners, Water completed by the California Energy Commission at a rate of 12,000 Btu/h per ton of air conditioning Source

  15. Techniques to Visualize and Monitor Transit Fleet Operations Performance in Urban Wei Feng, Miguel Figliozzi, Scott Price, Wu-chi Feng and Kristina Hostetler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    measures is fundamental for a transit agency to determine how well it is adhering to its service standards analysis; and 2) A dynamic, interactive bus monitoring visualization framework using the Google Maps API

  16. Commonwealth's Master Equipment Leasing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The [http://www.trs.virginia.gov/debt/MELP%20Guides.aspx Master Equipment Leasing Program] (MELP) ensures that all Commonwealth agencies, authorities and institutions obtain consistent and...

  17. Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of wind-powered electric generation, whether owned or leased, shall be registered with the Department of Aeronautics if the...

  18. The SLAC Comparator for the Calibration of Digital Leveling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassner, G.L.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    At SLAC digital levels are used for precise leveling, both for setting out and monitoring. A very high precision of 30 {micro}m is required, which can only be achieved by regularly calibrating the leveling equipment. The calibration facility is also used for detailed investigations to refine the SLAC leveling procedure. In this paper the setup of the SLAC vertical comparator is described. In order to also perform traditional staff calibration a CCD camera was integrated into the SLAC comparator. Finally an overview of further investigations of our leveling equipment is presented.

  19. UNIT DAMAGE ASSESSMENT -OFFICES & GENERAL OPERATIONS Fax completed form to EH&S at 561-297-2210, e-mail to ehs@fau.edu, or hand deliver to EH&S offices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UNIT DAMAGE ASSESSMENT - OFFICES & GENERAL OPERATIONS Fax completed form to EH&S at 561-297-2210, e: ___________________ Category Description (Brief description of damage) Condition* Electrical Equip. Computers Printers Monitors on the following: Good No Damage Fair Damage appears superficial, can be used as is Moderate Damage appears

  20. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In developing countries, there is an urgent need for access to safe, efficient, and more affordable cooking technologies. Nearly 2.5 billion people currently use an open fire or traditional cookstove to prepare their meals, and recent models predict that use of biomass for cooking will continue to be the dominant energy use in rural, resource-poor households through 2030. For these families, cooking poses serious risks to health, safety, and income. An alarming 4 million people, primarily women and children, die prematurely each year from indoor and outdoor exposure to the harmful emissions released by solid fuel combustion. Use of traditional stoves can also have a significant impact on deforestation and climate change. This dire situation creates a critical need for cookstoves that significantly and verifiably reduce fuel use and emissions in order to reach protective levels for human health and the environment. Additionally, advances in the scientific equipment needed to measure and monitor stove fuel use and emissions have not kept pace with the significant need within the industry. While several testing centers in the developed world may have hundred thousand-dollar emissions testing systems, organizations in the field have had little more than a thermometer, a scale, and subjective observations to quantify the performance of stove designs. There is an urgent need for easy-to-use, inexpensive, accurate, and robust stove testing equipment for use by laboratory and field researchers around the world. ASAT and their research partner, Aprovecho Research Center (ARC), have over thirty years of experience addressing these two needs, improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment, with expertise spanning the full spectrum of development from conceptual design to product manufacturing and dissemination. This includes: 1) research, design, and verification of clean biomass cookstove technology and emissions monitoring equipment; 2) mass production of quality-controlled stove and emissions equipment at levels scalable to meet global demand; and 3) global distribution through a variety of channels and partners. ARC has been instrumental in designing and improving more than 100 stove designs over the past thirty years. In the last four years, ASAT and ARC have played a key role in the production and sales of over 200,000 improved stoves in the developed and developing world. The ARC-designed emissions equipment is currently used by researchers in laboratories and field studies on five continents. During Phase I of the DOE STTR grant, ASAT and ARC worked together to apply their wealth of product development experience towards creating the next generation of improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment. Highlights of Phase I for the biomass cookstove project include 1) the development of several new stove technologies that reached the DOE 50/90 benchmark; 2) fabrication of new stove prototypes by ASATs manufacturing partner, Shengzhou Stove Manufacturing (SSM); 3) field testing of prototype stoves with consumers in Puerto Rico and the US; and 4) the selection of three stove prototypes for further development and commercialization during Phase II. Highlights of Phase I for the emissions monitoring equipment project include: 1) creation of a new emissions monitoring equipment product, the Laboratory Emissions Monitoring System (LEMS 2) the addition of gravimetric PM measurements to the stove testing systems to meet International Standards Organization criteria; 3) the addition of a CO{sub 2} sensor and wireless 3G capability to the IAP Meter; and 4) and the improvement of sensors and signal quality on all systems. Twelve Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers purchased this equipment during the Phase I project period.

  1. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  2. Use Lower Flammable Limit Monitoring Equipment to Improve Process...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Check Burner Air to Fuel Ratios Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating...

  3. Use Lower Flammable Limit Monitoring Equipment to Improve Process Oven

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAXFact Sheet UraniumThrough the Use4

  4. Use Lower Flammable Limit Monitoring Equipment to Improve Process Oven

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department of Energy $18UnrevisedCool Roof Infrastructure

  5. Beatty Wind Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurt, Rick

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) and Valley Electric Association (VEA) worked with Kitty Shubert of the Beatty Economic Redevelopment Corporation (BERC) to install two wind monitoring stations outside the town of Beatty, Nevada. The following is a description of the two sites. The information for a proposed third site is also shown. The sites were selected from previous work by the BERC and Idaho National Laboratory. The equipment was provided by the BERC and installed by researchers from the UNLV CER.

  6. Positive materials identification of existing equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, H.A. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Florham Park, NJ (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable engineering effort and expertise are expended for materials selection at refining and petrochemical facilities. However, the benefits of this effort are undermined if there is an inadvertent material substitution during construction. Although procedures have always been in place to reduce the chance of such substitutions, it is known that these errors have occurred. Accordingly, over the years the industry has periodically reviewed and improved quality control in this effort. However, many older facilities that did not benefit from today`s procedures are still in operation. As a consequence, some companies have conducted positive material identification (PMI) verification of existing equipment. This process is further complicated by the fact that the most susceptible components are typically insulated and must be located. Once located, accessibility and operating temperatures are complicating issues. This paper describes prioritization issues and hardware tradeoffs for conducting a PMI verification program.

  7. Summary of Construction Equipment Tests and Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction Equipment Tests and Activities Bruce Glagola - Sept 2013 Construction Equipment Tests A series of tests were conducted by the APS Construction Vibration...

  8. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results...

  9. Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment:...

  10. Operations Research + Information Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    and the equipment they operate to perform most efficiently. The allocation of resources may be represented of the techniques and modeling concepts needed to analyze and design complex systems. As an operations researcher. All business systems are complex and need sophisticated decision-making methods that enable employees

  11. SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Boom operations and the qualification for training operators on the R/V Oceanus. 6.5.2 Responsibility. The ship's A-frame and Hydro Boom are typically operated in conjunction with other equipment including retracted. C. As with all other weight-handling equipment, the A-Frame and Hydro Boom are tested

  12. air operations vision: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 The Operational Strengths and Weaknesses of Military Night Vision Equipment Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: The Operational Strengths and...

  13. Corrosion indicating equipment UK-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerasimenko, Y.S.; Abrosimov, V.S.; Rudenko, A.K.; Sorokin, V.I.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UK-1, developed and introduced into oil industry corrosion-indicating equipment, has been developed on the basis of the principle of measurements of polarization resistance. It is designed for determining the corrosion activity of effluents of oil fields. The technical data and design of the equipment is discussed. The investigations were carried out on 08kp steel in simulation effluents of oil fields in the presence of corrosion inhibitors used in the oil industry at various temperatures (25-50 C) and liquid flow rate.

  14. Evaluation of emplacement sensors for detecting radiation and volatile organic compounds and for long-term monitoring access tubes for the BWCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, D.L.; Averill, R.H.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates sensors for detecting contaminants in the excavated waste generated by the Buried Waste Containment System (BWCS). The Barrier Placement Machine (BPM) removes spoils from under a landfill or plume and places it on a conveyor belt on the left and right sides of the BPM. The spoils will travel down the conveyor belts past assay monitors and be deposited on top of the site being worked. The belts are 5 ft wide and transport approximately 15 ft3 /minute of spoils. This corresponds to a 10 ft per hour BPM advance rate. With a 2 in. spoils height the belt speed would be 3.6 in. per second. The spoils being removed are expected to be {open_quotes}clean{close_quotes} (no radiation or volatile organics above background levels). To ensure that the equipment is not digging through a contaminated area, assay equipment will monitor the spoils for mg radiation and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The radiation monitors will check for gross radiation indication. Upon detection of radiation levels above a predetermined setpoint, further evaluation will be performed to determine the isotopes present and their quantity. This will require hand held monitors and a remote monitoring station. Simultaneously, VOC monitors will monitor for predetermined volatile/semi-volatile organic compounds. A Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) monitor is recommended for this operation. Specific site requirements and regulations will determine setpoints and operation scenarios. If VOCs are detected, the data will be collected and recorded. A flat panel display will be mounted in the BPM operator`s cab showing the radio nuclide and VOC monitoring data. As the BPM advances, a 3-in. diameter PVC tube will be placed on the bottom of the barrier slot in front of the 12 to 16-in. containment barrier being emplaced.

  15. Use of the UNCLE Facility to Assess Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversions at Uranium Conversion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Rauch, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, the approach to safeguarding nuclear material in the front end of the fuel cycle was implemented only at the stage when UF6 was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. Recent International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exist. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) operating at 6000 MTU/year. Monitoring instruments, including the 3He passive neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter, have been tested at UNCLE and field tested at Springfields. The field trials demonstrated the need to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of operations and safeguards monitoring at additional plants. Currently, UNCLE is testing neutron-based monitoring for detection of noncompliant activities; however, gamma-ray source term monitoring is currently being explored complementary to the neutron detector in order to detect undeclared activities in a more timely manner. The preliminary results of gamma-ray source term modeling and monitoring at UNCLE are being analyzed as part of a comprehensive source term and detector benchmarking effort. Based on neutron source term detection capabilities, alternative gamma-based detection and monitoring methods will be proposed to more effectively monitor NUCP operations in verifying or detecting deviations from declared conversion activities.

  16. Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility: Building 382 Rev. 1, 021100 Training: (1) ESH114 LockoutTagout ASD125 APS LOTO ESH371 Electrical Safety - General ESH195 PPE ESH141 Hand and Power Tools (2) ESH707...

  17. Adaptive Optimization of Central Chiller Plant Equipment Sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.; Priest, J. W.

    and outside air conditions and it insures that the central refrigeration system operates with the lowest possible energy cost at all times. PROBLEM BACKGROUND The specific industrial plant for which the control algorithm was developed is the Texas... was developed to select the optimal sequence of central refrigeration equipment (chillers, cooling towers, pumps) to operate in an industrial plant. The control algorithm adapts the optimal equipaent sequence to reflect changes in the plant's cooling load...

  18. Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including imaging equipment, which is covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  19. Monitoring materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

  20. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

  1. Development of unique ISI equipment for an RPV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokunaga, Katsumi; Aoki, Takayuki (Japan Atomic Power Co., Tsuruga-shi, Fukui (Japan)); Sasaki, Tsukasa (Hitachi Works, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooperative effort involving the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) and Hitachi Ltd. has provided unique automated ultrasonic testing equipment for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of JAPC's Tsuruga unit 1, which is a 357-MW (electric) non-jet-pumped boiling water reactor. Using this equipment package at the 20th scheduled outage of Tsuruga unit 1, the in-service inspection (ISI) performed in accordance with Japanese ISI standard JEAC 4205 (similar to ASME Sec. XI) was successfully completed. Through this field application, the capability and reliability of this equipment have been verified. Tsuruga unit 1 has an RPV that cannot be reached from the outside because of the limited space between the RPV and a biological shield. Therefore, it must be inspected with ID inspection equipment such as that for pressurized water reactors. A major consideration in the design of this new equipment was that it pass an ultrasonic testing head and arm through a very narrow gap between reactor internals and allow precise control from a great distance below the RPV flange (the maximum is {approximately}12m below). The design philosophy focused on how to avoid interference between any reactor internals and the equipment during the operation.

  2. automatic equipment operation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    free text against audio signals we in- vent an "automatic record review" system that labels new music audio with maximal semantic value for future re- trieval tasks. In...

  3. Data Center Efficiency and IT Equipment Reliability at Wider Operating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This work was performedEnergy

  4. Operating Experience Level 3, Industrial Equipment Impacts Infrastructure |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO Overview OCHCO OCHCO OverviewFreedom ofDepartment offorOccupied

  5. Used energy-related laboratory equipment grant program for institutions of higher learning. Eligible equipment catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a listing of energy related equipment available through the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment Grant Program which grants used equipment to institutions of higher education for energy-related research. Information included is an overview of the program, how to apply for a grant of equipment, eligibility requirements, types of equipment available, and the costs for the institution.

  6. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Furr, A. (Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the U.S. Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system was operated this reporting period to evaluate two types of lime-based sorbents with two different sulfur content coals. The air quality monitoring data presented in this report are based on emission data that are specific to the coal/sorbent combination utilized during a specific injection period and the combination of combustion and air pollution control equipment used at the Lorain facility. To determine LIMB operating efficiencies and environmental impacts, monitoring data collected during the sorbent/coal injection periods were compared to Baseline data. For this reporting period, wastewaters monitoring and fly ash sampling were undertaken; the environmental impact of fly ash disposal was also investigated. Air dispersion modeling was conducted using Coolside data, Baseline data, and data generated during the two sorbents/nominal 3.0 percent sulfur coal combinations. Employee health and safety monitoring was conducted. The facility's compliance monitoring status was received for this period. 5 figs.,16 tabs.

  7. Tenneco upgrades system with equipment conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, K. [Ariel Corp., Mt. Vernon, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tenneco Gas, Inc., Houston, recently completed the successful conversion of over 14,300 horsepower compression equipment at its transmission in Catlettsburg, KY. The system consists of three identical Ariel JGC/6 compressors, driven by three matching Ansaldo electric motors, capable of running between 450 and 900 rpm. These variable speed, synchronous electric motors allow for greater flexibility, without the use of traditional cylinder unloaders. If desired Eureka Energy Systems, Richardson, TX designed the compressor package. One of Tenneco`s objectives when selecting a package to upgrade existing compression capabilities was to ensure compliance with future regulations promulgated pursuant to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Initially, Tenneco considered separable compressors because of the availability of the newer, clean burning, gas ignited drivers in the 5,000 horsepower range, such as the Caterpillar 3612 and 3616. This paper reviews the design, performance and comparative operating cost of these compressor units.

  8. Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

  9. Integrated Scheduling and Dynamic Optimization of Batch Processes Using State Equipment Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integrated Scheduling and Dynamic Optimization of Batch Processes Using State Equipment Networks value to existing assets Improving plant reliability 1 J.M. Wassick and J. Ferrio. Extending A batch plant with existing equipment A time horizon to make products Dynamic models of process operations

  10. Test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokuda, E.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration (CRD). Air monitors will be used to sample for the tracer elements neodymium, terbium, and ytterbium, and dysprosium. The results from this air monitoring will be used to determine if the CRD is successful in controlling dust and minimizing contamination. Procedures and equipment specifications for the test are included.

  11. SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    overboarding operations on the vessel. 7.16.2 Scope This procedure covers the design, installation, maintenance.16.1 Purpose The purpose of this procedure is to set forth standards to ensure safe overboarding equipment on RSAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 7.16 OVERBOARDING EQUIPMENT Originator: Approved By

  12. Nuclear fuel post-irradiation examination equipment package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCooman, W.J. [AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Spellman, D.J. [UT-Battelle, LLC, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot cell capabilities in the U.S. are being reviewed and revived to meet today's demand for fuel reliability, tomorrow's demands for higher burnup fuel and future demand for fuel recycling. Fuel reliability, zero tolerance for failure, is more than an industry buzz. It is becoming a requirement to meet the rapidly escalating demands for the impending renaissance of nuclear power generation, fuel development, and management of new waste forms that will need to be dealt with from programs such as the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Fuel performance data is required to license fuel for higher burnup; to verify recycled fuel performance, such as MOX, for wide-scale use in commercial reactors; and, possibly, to license fuel for a new generation of fast reactors. Additionally, fuel isotopic analysis and recycling technologies will be critical factors in the goal to eventually close the fuel cycle. This focus on fuel reliability coupled with the renewed interest in recycling puts a major spotlight on existing hot cell capabilities in the U.S. and their ability to provide the baseline analysis to achieve a closed fuel cycle. Hot cell examination equipment is necessary to determine the characteristics and performance of irradiated materials that are subjected to nuclear reactor environments. The equipment within the hot cells is typically operated via master-slave manipulators and is typically manually operated. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is modernizing their hot cell nuclear fuel examination equipment, installing automated examination equipment and data gathering capabilities. Currently, the equipment has the capability to perform fuel rod visual examinations, length and diametrical measurements, eddy current examination, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas collection and void fraction measurement, and fuel rod segmentation. The used fuel postirradiation examination equipment was designed to examine full-length fuel rods for both Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors. (authors)

  13. Machinery and Equipment Expensing Deduction (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Machinery and Equipment Expensing Deduction allows Kansas taxpayers to claim an expense deduction for business machinery and equipment, placed in service in Kansas during the tax year. The one-time...

  14. Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have the refrigerant recovered in accordance with EPA's requirements for servicing. However, equipment that typically

  15. VALVE FUNNEL SPRING PIN PRESS PERFORMANCE AND FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS EVALUATION FOR SPECIAL TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WITHERSPOON JT

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This evaluation allows use of the valve funnel spring pin press and describes appropriate handling instructions for the tool. The engineering evaluation is required for operations and field use of special tools and equipment.

  16. Energy Comparison Vacuum Producing Equipment - Mechanical Vacuum Pumps vs. Steam Ejectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foisy, E. C.; Munkittrick, M. T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vacuum on condensers, process reactors, or equipment and processes requiring subatmospheric conditions, has been to utilize steam ejectors. Due to the inherent operating inefficiency and wastefulness of the steam ejector, coupled with the rapidly...

  17. Confortable Performance: Retro-Commissioning Building Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botan, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -11, 2013 Building owner?s challenges ? Tenant comfort ? Operating cost ? Equipment Condition and Life Cycle ? Environmental impact 2 ESL-IC-13-10-07 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Montreal, Quebec..., October 8-11, 2013 Building owner?s challenges ? Tenant comfort ? Operating cost ? Equipment Condition and Life Cycle ? Environmental impact 3 ESL-IC-13-10-07 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations...

  18. Intrusion detection and monitoring for wireless networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Eric D.; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Lee, Erik J.; Stephano, Amanda (Indiana University); Tabriz, Parisa (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign); Pelon, Kristen (Cedarville University); McCoy, Damon (University of Colorado, Boulder); Lodato, Mark (Lafayette College); Hemingway, Franklin (University of New Mexico); Custer, Ryan P.; Averin, Dimitry (Polytechnic University); Franklin, Jason (Carnegie Mellon University); Kilman, Dominique Marie

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless computer networks are increasing exponentially around the world. They are being implemented in both the unlicensed radio frequency (RF) spectrum (IEEE 802.11a/b/g) and the licensed spectrum (e.g., Firetide [1] and Motorola Canopy [2]). Wireless networks operating in the unlicensed spectrum are by far the most popular wireless computer networks in existence. The open (i.e., proprietary) nature of the IEEE 802.11 protocols and the availability of ''free'' RF spectrum have encouraged many producers of enterprise and common off-the-shelf (COTS) computer networking equipment to jump into the wireless arena. Competition between these companies has driven down the price of 802.11 wireless networking equipment and has improved user experiences with such equipment. The end result has been an increased adoption of the equipment by businesses and consumers, the establishment of the Wi-Fi Alliance [3], and widespread use of the Alliance's ''Wi-Fi'' moniker to describe these networks. Consumers use 802.11 equipment at home to reduce the burden of running wires in existing construction, facilitate the sharing of broadband Internet services with roommates or neighbors, and increase their range of ''connectedness''. Private businesses and government entities (at all levels) are deploying wireless networks to reduce wiring costs, increase employee mobility, enable non-employees to access the Internet, and create an added revenue stream to their existing business models (coffee houses, airports, hotels, etc.). Municipalities (Philadelphia; San Francisco; Grand Haven, MI) are deploying wireless networks so they can bring broadband Internet access to places lacking such access; offer limited-speed broadband access to impoverished communities; offer broadband in places, such as marinas and state parks, that are passed over by traditional broadband providers; and provide themselves with higher quality, more complete network coverage for use by emergency responders and other municipal agencies. In short, these Wi-Fi networks are being deployed everywhere. Much thought has been and is being put into evaluating cost-benefit analyses of wired vs. wireless networks and issues such as how to effectively cover an office building or municipality, how to efficiently manage a large network of wireless access points (APs), and how to save money by replacing an Internet service provider (ISP) with 802.11 technology. In comparison, very little thought and money are being focused on wireless security and monitoring for security purposes.

  19. Equipment Listing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation Equipment Listing

  20. Equipment Loans | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation Equipment ListingLoans

  1. Equipment Pool | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation Equipment

  2. Equipment Certification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolisEnviroMissionEquipment

  3. MPC Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'll Love YouTokamak |MPC Equipment The MPC

  4. Remote Handling Equipment for a High-Level Waste Waste Package Closure System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin M. Croft; Scott M. Allen; Mark W. Borland

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level waste will be placed in sealed waste packages inside a shielded closure cell. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has designed a system for closing the waste packages including all cell interior equipment and support systems. This paper discusses the material handling aspects of the equipment used and operations that will take place as part of the waste package closure operations. Prior to construction, the cell and support system will be assembled in a full-scale mockup at INL.

  5. Analysis of radiation doses from operation of postulated commercial spent fuel transportation systems: Analysis of a system containing a monitored retrievable storage facility. Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.I.; Daling, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Faletti, D.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This addendum report extends the original study of the estimated radiation doses to the public and to workers resulting from transporting spent nuclear fuel from commercial nuclear power reactor stations through the federal waste management system (FWMS), to a system that contains a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The system concepts and designs utilized herein are consistent with those used in the original study (circa 1985--1987). Because the FWMS design is still evolving, the results of these analyses may no longer apply to the design for casks and cask handling systems that are currently being considered. Four system scenarios are examined and compared with the reference No-MRS scenario (all spent fuel transported directly from the reactors to the western repository in standard-capacity truck and rail casks). In Scenarios 1 and 2, an MRS facility is located in eastern United States and ships either intact fuel assemblies or consolidated fuel rods and compacted assembly hardware in canisters. In Scenarios 3 and 4, an MRS facility is located in the western United States and ship either intact fuel assemblies or consolidated fuel rods and compacted assembly hardware in canisters.

  6. BENCHMARK DATA FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING Jyrki Kullaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    BENCHMARK DATA FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING Jyrki Kullaa Helsinki Metropolia University analysis is a key function in structural health monitoring (SHM). To develop algorithms for SHM, one needs. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring, damage detection, environmental or operational effects, moving

  7. Suncatcher Monitoring Project. Quarterly technical report 1, October-December 1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, B T

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in monitoring the Suncatcher solar home is reviewed. The following are included: equipment purchase and preparations, sensor installation, house comfort monitoring, experiments, and natrual gas and electric use. Some data are given. (MHR)

  8. Practical aspects of steam injection processes: A handbook for independent operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 80% of the total steam injection process operating costs are for the production of steam and the operation of surface and subsurface equipment. The proper design and operation of the surface equipment is of critical importance to the success of any steam injection operation. However, the published monographs on thermal recovery have attached very little importance to this aspect of thermal oil recovery; hence, a definite need exists for a comprehensive manual that places emphasis on steam injection field practices and problems. This handbook is an attempt to fulfill this need. This handbook explores the concept behind steam injection processes and discusses the information required to evaluate, design, and implement these processes in the field. The emphasis is on operational aspects and those factors that affect the technology and economics of oil recovery by steam. The first four chapters describe the screening criteria, engineering, and economics of steam injection operation as well as discussion of the steam injection fundamentals. The next four chapters begin by considering the treatment of the water used to generate steam and discuss in considerable detail the design, operation and problems of steam generations, distribution and steam quality determination. The subsurface aspects of steamflood operations are addressed in chapters 9 through 12. These include thermal well completion and cementing practices, insulated tubulars, and lifting equipment. The next two chapters are devoted to subsurface operational problems encountered with the use of steam. Briefly described in chapters 15 and 16 are the steam injection process surface production facilities, problems and practices. Chapter 17 discusses the importance of monitoring in a steam injection project. The environmental laws and issues of importance to steam injection operation are outlined in chapter 18.

  9. Monitoring radiation use in cardiac fluoroscopy imaging procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, Nathaniel T.; Steiner, Stefan H.; Smith, Ian R.; MacKay, R. Jock [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Business and Industrial Statistics Research Group, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); St. Andrew's Medical Institute, St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland 4000 (Australia); Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Business and Industrial Statistics Research Group, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment performance associated with relocation of the equipment to a new department. When tested under simulated conditions, the EWMA chart was capable of detecting a sustained 15% increase in average radiation output within 60 cases (<1 month of operation), while a 33% increase would be signaled within 20 cases. Conclusions: This technique offers a valuable enhancement to existing quality assurance programs in radiology that rely upon the testing of equipment radiation output at discrete time frames to ensure performance security.

  10. Tritium monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVore, J.R.; Buckner, M.A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of their operations, the U.S. Navy is required to store or maintain operational nuclear weapons on ships and at shore facilities. Since these weapons contain tritium, there are safety implications relevant to the exposure of personnel to tritium. This is particularly important for shipboard operations since these types of environments can make low-level tritium detection difficult. Some of these ships have closed systems, which can result in exposure to tritium at levels that are below normally acceptable levels but could still cause radiation doses that are higher than necessary or could hamper ship operations. This report describes the state of the art in commercial tritium detection and monitoring and recommends approaches for low-level tritium monitoring in these environments.

  11. Changing nature of equipment and parts qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucci, R.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ideally, the original supplier of a piece of nuclear safety-related equipment has performed a qualification program and will continue to support that equipment throughout the lifetime of the nuclear power plants in which in equipment is installed. The supplier's nuclear quality assurance program will be maintained and he will continue to offer all necessary replacement parts. These parts will be identical to the original parts, certified to the original purchase order requirements, and the parts will be offered at competitive prices. Due to the changing nature of the nuclear plant equipment market, however, one or more of those ideal features are frequently unavailable when safety-related replacement equipment or parts are required. Thus, the process of equipment and parts qualification has had to adjust in order to ensure obtaining qualified replacements when needed. This paper presents some new directions taken in the qualification of replacement equipment and parts to meet changes in the marketplace.

  12. After-hours power status of office equipment and energy use of miscellaneous plug-load equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Marageret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of miscellaneous plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. For most types of miscellaneous equipment, we also estimated typical unit energy consumption in order to estimate total energy consumption of the miscellaneous devices within our sample. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from sixteen commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: four education buildings, two medical buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees each), and five small business offices (< 50 employees each). Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay are a of California, nine (including the five small businesses) are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

  13. Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program: Monitoring Equipment Installation Manual (October 1994)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohmer, C.; Lippman, R.; McBride, J.; Casebolt, C.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by which the apparent power (amperes times volts) must be adjusted to obtain real power. Power in any single-phase or 3 phase 4 wire (3$-$W) system is equal to the sum of the power in the individual phases. The formula below is used to calculate power... the RTD output, reads the resistance which increases linearly with temperature, and calculates the temperature. For installations with long sensor lead lengths, the resistance of signal wire should be determined, and the DAS input channel must be offset...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Earth Science: Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ManagementEarth ScienceEarth Science: Facilities and Equipment Earth Science: Facilities and Equipment Geoscience Facilities and Equipment High-pressure thermalmechanical...

  15. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, M.A.; Grot, S.A.

    1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring the performance of H{sub 2}--O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H{sub 2} sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken. 2 figs.

  16. Deploying Server-side File System Monitoring at NERSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uselton, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deploying Server-side File System Monitoring at NERSC Andrewcenter was equipped with the server-side I/O monitoringfor observing and recording server-side per- formance

  17. Decision support for operations and maintenance (DSOM) system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarrell, Donald B. (Kennewick, WA); Meador, Richard J. (Richland, WA); Sisk, Daniel R. (Richland, WA); Hatley, Darrel D. (Kennewick, WA); Brown, Daryl R. (Richland, WA); Keibel, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Gowri, Krishnan (Richland, WA); Reyes-Spindola, Jorge F. (Richland, WA); Adams, Kevin J. (San Bruno, CA); Yates, Kenneth R. (Lake Oswego, OR); Eschbach, Elizabeth J. (Fort Collins, CO); Stratton, Rex C. (Richland, WA)

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for minimizing the life cycle cost of processes such as heating a building. The method utilizes sensors to monitor various pieces of equipment used in the process, for example, boilers, turbines, and the like. The method then performs the steps of identifying a set optimal operating conditions for the process, identifying and measuring parameters necessary to characterize the actual operating condition of the process, validating data generated by measuring those parameters, characterizing the actual condition of the process, identifying an optimal condition corresponding to the actual condition, comparing said optimal condition with the actual condition and identifying variances between the two, and drawing from a set of pre-defined algorithms created using best engineering practices, an explanation of at least one likely source and at least one recommended remedial action for selected variances, and providing said explanation as an output to at least one user.

  18. The Effect of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Gunther, B.; Martinez-Guridi, G. (BNL); Xing, J.; Barnes, V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in new and advanced nuclear power plants (NPPs) will support operators in monitoring and controlling the plants. Even though digital systems typically are expected to be reliable, their potential for degradation or failure significantly could affect the operators performance and, consequently, jeopardize plant safety. This U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) research investigated the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and on plant operations. The objective was to develop technical basis and guidance for human factors engineering (HFE) reviews addressing the operator's ability to detect and manage degraded digital I&C conditions. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we evaluated the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater control system of a currently operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and the operators performance. Our findings indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems, and the overall effects on the plant's behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations may affect the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, deterioration of the sensors can complicate the operators interpretation of displays, and sometimes may mislead them by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the findings as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance.

  19. Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leah Glameyer

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project accomplishments, including the course development phases, tasks associated with each phase, and detailed list of the course materials developed. A summary of each year's activities is also included.

  20. Workshop on environmental qualification of electric equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofaro, R.; Gunther, W.; Villaran, M.; Lee, B.S.; Taylor, J. [comps.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Questions concerning the Environmental Qualification (EQ) of electrical equipment used in commercial nuclear power plants have recently become the subject of significant interest to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Initial questions centered on whether compliance with the EQ requirements for older plants were adequate to support plant operation beyond 40 years. After subsequent investigation, the NRC Staff concluded that questions related to the differences in EQ requirements between older and newer plants constitute a potential generic issue which should be evaluated for backfit, independent of license renewal activities. EQ testing of electric cables was performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under contract to the NRC in support of license renewal activities. Results showed that some of the environmentally qualified cables either failed or exhibited marginal insulation resistance after a simulated plant life of 20 years during accident simulation. This indicated that the EQ process for some electric cables may be non-conservative. These results raised questions regarding the EQ process including the bases for conclusions about the qualified life of components based upon artificial aging prior to testing.

  1. Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction allows businesses to deduct from their Alabama net worth the net amount invested in all devices, facilities, or structures, and all identifiable...

  2. Commercial and Industrial Kitchen Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: All equipment must be installed on or after January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015. The documentation must be received no later than March 31, 2016.

  3. Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program tip sheet describes how to save energy and costs by reducing expensive heat losses from industrial heating equipment, such as furnaces.

  4. Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Electrical Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    recognized hazards and meets code requirements Labeled. A nationally recognized testing laboratory (NRTL equipment as listed unless it is also labeled. Nationally recognized testing laboratory (NRTL

  5. Cask fleet operations study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Waste Management the responsibility for disposing of high-level waste and spent fuel. A significant part of that responsibility involves transporting nuclear waste materials within the federal waste management system; that is, from the waste generator to the repository. The lead responsibility for transportation operations has been assigned to Oak Ridge Operations, with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing technical support through the Transportation Operations Support Task Group. One of the ORNL support activities involves assessing what facilities, equipment and services are required to assure that an acceptable, cost-effective and safe transportation operations system can be designed, operated and maintained. This study reviews, surveys and assesses the experience of Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) in operating a fleet of spent-fuel shipping casks to aid in developing the spent-fuel transportation system.

  6. Achieving a "SIL 1" TCR Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartolom, R; Scibile, L; Grau, S

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIL 1 (Safety Integrity Level 1) refers to the quantification and measurement of the availability, reliability, maintenance and safety of the monitoring system. In the last few years the computer infrastructure used to acquire and to diffuse data to the TCR has evolved very rapidly. A number of measures in hardware, software and management have been introduced to cope with this situation. These include: the Multipurpose Monitoring Device (MMD), a standard data acquisition platform used in the renovation of old front end monitoring equipment, the Smart Equipment Controller (Dsec), a driver that reduces the layers in the data diffusion pyramid, the multiplatform monitoring software to integrate the different SCADA systems, a software configuration tool (RAZOR) for problem tracking and version control, and a complete development environment reproducing a real installation for thorough testing of any changes. To achieve SIL 1 objectives, while mastering the evolution of our systems will be the challenge for the c...

  7. assemblies equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capital equipment manufacturing plant : component level and assembly level inventory management MIT - DSpace Summary: Semiconductor capital equipment is manufactured in...

  8. Ion Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  12. University of California Policy Personal Protective Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    /technical area is a location where the use or storage of hazardous materials occurs or where equipment may hazardous materials, adjacent to or in proximity to a hazard or in areas where there is a reasonable risk performs work functions with hazardous materials or equipment in a laboratory/technical area. A "worker

  13. In-situ corrosivity monitoring of military hardware environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwala, V.S. [Naval Air Warfare Center, Patuxent River, MD (United States). Aircraft Div.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to monitor corrosive conditions (environments) for military equipment was developed. The concept is based on the electrochemical principles of galvanic corrosion. It consisted of a novel thin film device (interdigitized bimetallic strips on a kapton polymer) which was galvanically coupled or short circuited through a zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) and interfaced to a custom design data acquisition system called Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS). The sensor`s unique design allowed the use of any metal as the active element or anode to form the galvanic couple, which enhanced sensor`s versatility and usefulness in almost any application. In most applications Cd-Au sensor was used. For in-situ corrosivity monitoring sensors were installed in the interior of the aircraft, hidden structures, avionics bays, and embedded under coatings and sealants. The test sites included: military bases, aircraft carrier flight decks, marine atmosphere and operational aircraft and weapons storage areas. The results show a significant correlation between the output of the sensors and the corrosive conditions present, and may become a basis for condition based maintenance of military hardware in the future.

  14. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  15. Equipment compatibility and logistics assessment for containment foam deployment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McRoberts, Vincent M.; Martell, Mary-Alena; Jones, Joseph A.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deployment of the Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) is evolving toward a lean and mobile response team. As a result, opportunities to support more rapid mobilization are being investigated. This study investigates three specific opportunities including: (1) the potential of using standard firefighting equipment to support deployment of the aqueous foam concentrate (AFC-380); (2) determining the feasibility and needs for regional staging of equipment to reduce the inventory currently mobilized during a JTOT response; and (3) determining the feasibility and needs for development of the next generation AFC-380 to reduce the volume of foam concentrate required for a response. This study supports the need to ensure that requirements for alternative deployment schemes are understood and in place to support improved response activities.

  16. Directory of manufacturers of small hydropower equipment. Third edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inversin, A.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic information on manufacturers of hydraulic turbines in the 1-100 kW power range and on their product lines is provided in this two-section directory. An introduction makes general comments on cost trends in relation both to the magnitude of the operating head and to unit capacity, although no specific cost figures are given for equipment packages. The section also describes various cost-reduction techniques (the use of load control, the use of pumps as turbines, and the integration of turbine equipment with other functions). The second section comprises the bulk of the document and is composed of 28 entries on turbine manufacturers, 20 of them in the United States, the others in Nepal (2), the Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, India, Canada, and Puerto Rico.

  17. Field Demonstration of a Real-time Non-intrusive Monitoring System for Condition-based Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proper, Ethan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of important electrical loads on mission critical systems like warships or off-shore platforms is often tracked by dedicated monitoring equipment. Individual monitoring of each load is expensive and risky. ...

  18. Depollution benchmarks for capacitors, batteries and printed wiring boards from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savi, Daniel, E-mail: d.savi@umweltchemie.ch [Dipl. Environmental Sci. ETH, bro fr umweltchemie, Zurich (Switzerland); Kasser, Ueli [Lic. Phil. Nat. (Chemist), bro fr umweltchemie, Zurich (Switzerland); Ott, Thomas [Dipl. Phys. ETH, Institute of Applied Simulation, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Wdenswil (Switzerland)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Weve analysed data on the dismantling of electronic and electrical appliances. Ten years of mass balance data of more than recycling companies have been considered. Percentages of dismantled batteries, capacitors and PWB have been studied. Threshold values and benchmarks for batteries and capacitors have been identified. No benchmark for the dismantling of printed wiring boards should be set. - Abstract: The article compiles and analyses sample data for toxic components removed from waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) from more than 30 recycling companies in Switzerland over the past ten years. According to European and Swiss legislation, toxic components like batteries, capacitors and printed wiring boards have to be removed from WEEE. The control bodies of the Swiss take back schemes have been monitoring the activities of WEEE recyclers in Switzerland for about 15 years. All recyclers have to provide annual mass balance data for every year of operation. From this data, percentage shares of removed batteries and capacitors are calculated in relation to the amount of each respective WEEE category treated. A rationale is developed, why such an indicator should not be calculated for printed wiring boards. The distributions of these de-pollution indicators are analysed and their suitability for defining lower threshold values and benchmarks for the depollution of WEEE is discussed. Recommendations for benchmarks and threshold values for the removal of capacitors and batteries are given.

  19. Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing of Power Plant Equipment: Revision 3 to TR-102323

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Cunningham and J. Shank

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To continue meeting safety and reliability requirements while controlling costs, operators of nuclear power plants must be able to replace and upgrade equipment in a cost-effective manner. One issue that has been problematic for new plant equipment and especially for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in recent years is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). The EMC issue usually involves testing to show that critical equipment will not be adversely affected by electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the plant environment. This guide will help nuclear plant engineers address EMC issues and qualification testing in a consistent, comprehensive manner.

  20. Safe Operating Procedure (Created 5/11)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    ://ehs.unl.edu (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: WRITTEN PROCEDURES during maintenance and repair operations. In these situations, a lockout/tagout (LO/TO) program must/TO procedures, as well as other program requirements. See EHS SOP, Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment

  1. Applications guide to pedestrian SNM monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applications guide introduces readers to the pedestrian special nuclear material (SNM) monitors that provide nuclear material control at DOE contractor facilities. It explains the principles of operation, the strong and weak points, and steps for calibration and maintenance of the monitors. Administrators and security specialists will find an overview of pedestrain monitor application and upkeep in Part 1 of the guide and a descriptive catalog of present-day monitors in Part 3. Technically oriented readers will be interested in the more detailed discussion of SNM monitoring physics and SNM monitor design principles found in Part 2. 18 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation Desert Peak EGS Project...

  3. The Blend Down Monitoring System Demonstration at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benton, J.; Close, D.; Johnson, W., Jr.; Kerr, P.; March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Moss, C.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, R.; Wright, P.D.

    1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Agreements between the governments of the US and the Russian Federation for the US purchase of low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons calls for the establishment of transparency measures to provide confidence that nuclear nonproliferation goals are being met. To meet these transparency goals, the agreements call for the installation of nonintrusive US instruments to monitor the down blending of HEU to LEU. The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) has been jointly developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to continuously monitor {sup 235}U enrichments and mass flow rates at Russian blending facilities. Prior to its installation in Russian facilities, the BDMS was installed and operated in a UF{sub 6} flow loop in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant simulating flow and enrichment conditions expected in a typical down-blending facility. A Russian delegation to the US witnessed the equipment demonstration in June, 1998. To conduct the demonstration in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the BDMS was required to meet stringent Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing, safety and operational requirements. The Paducah demonstration was an important milestone in achieving the operational certification for the BDMS use in Russian facilities.

  4. Progress report and technology status development of an EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha/beta particulate monitor for use on the East Tennessee Technology Park Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, J.T.; Singh, S.P.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Gibson, L.V. Jr. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). ASO Customer Services Div.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to modify and evaluate a commercially available EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha-beta radionuclide particulate monitor for the high-temperature and moisture-saturation conditions of the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Site) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator stack. The monitor was originally outfitted for operation at gas temperatures of 150 F on the defunct Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) controlled air incinerator, and the objective was to widen its operating envelope. A laboratory apparatus was constructed that simulated the effects of water-saturated air at the TSCA Incinerator stack-gas temperatures, 183 F. An instrumented set of heat exchangers was constructed to then condition the gas so that the radionuclide monitor could be operated without condensation. Data were collected under the conditions of the elevated temperatures and humidities and are reported herein, and design considerations of the apparatus are provided. The heat exchangers and humidification equipment performed as designed, the Mylar film held, and the instrument suffered no ill effects. However, for reasons as yet undetermined, the sensitivity of the radionuclide detection diminishes as the gas temperature is elevated, whether the gas is humidified or not. The manufacturer has had no experience with (a) the operation of the monitor under these conditions and (b) any commercial market that might exist for an instrument that operates under these conditions. The monitor was not installed into the radiologically contaminated environment of the TSCA Incinerator stack pending resolution of this technical issue.

  5. REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSON RL

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

  6. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  7. Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Introduction Monitoring Division Mgr Training, Adv NARAC Dispersion Modeling NARAC Web Operations Overview of Consequence Management Overview of the DOENNSA Emergency...

  8. RDS operations manualField implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    for trainings and TA. #12;RDS operations manual IBBS Toolbox 227 Women's Health Monitoring Survey fieldRDS operations manualField implementation #12;RDS operations manual 226 IBBS Toolbox RDS operations manual The RDS operations manual is designed to guide project staff during the implementation of RDS

  9. Void Fraction Instrument operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgonovi, G.; Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.; Martin, J.D.; Gimera, M.; Graves, D.B.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operations and Maintenance Manual (O&MM) addresses riser installation, equipment and personnel hazards, operating instructions, calibration, maintenance, removal, and other pertinent information necessary to safely operate and store the Void Fraction Instrument. Final decontamination and decommissioning of the Void Fraction Instrument are not covered in this document.

  10. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Annual Site Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 226 Annual Site Maintenance Date Last Modified Modified This standard operating procedure (SOP) describes the procedures for annual maintenance of equipment Sampler Operation Manual #12;SOP 226: Annual Site Maintenance 3 1.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY

  11. Guide to good practices for control of equipment and system status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Control of Equipment and System Status, Chapter VIII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing equipment and system status control programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Control of Equipment and System Status is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the need for a formal status control program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  12. Solar and Wind Energy Equipment Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Wisconsin, any value added by a solar-energy system or a wind-energy system is exempt from general property taxes. A solar-energy system is defined as "equipment which directly converts and then...

  13. Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005, New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels, or biobased products in...

  14. Clark Public Utilities- Solar Energy Equipment Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clark Public Utilities offers financing available to its customers for the purchase and installation of residential solar equipment. Loans up to $10,000 are available for solar pool heaters and...

  15. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  16. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

  17. Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005 New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels or biobased products in...

  18. Tax Credit for Renewable Energy Equipment Manufacturers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tax Credit for Renewable Energy Resource Equipment Manufacturing Facilities was enacted as a part of Oregon's Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) in July 2007, with the passage of HB 3201. The ...

  19. Property Tax Assessment for Renewable Energy Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HB 2403 of 2014 clarified that depreciation should be determined using straight-line depreciation over the useful life of the equipment. The taxable original cost equals the original cost of the...

  20. Equipment Energy Models Using Spreadsheet Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    EQUIPMENT ENERGY MODELS USING SPREADSHEET PROGRAMS Joel S. Gilbert, Dames & Moore, Bethesda, Maryland Engineering calculations on PC's are undergoing a revolution with the advent of spreadsheet programs. The author has found that virtually all...

  1. Consider Steam Turbine Drives for Rotating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on steam turbine drives for rotating equipment provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  2. Efficiency improvements in US Office equipment: Expected policy impacts and uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Cramer, M.; Piette, M.A.; Eto, J.H.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a detailed end-use forecast of office equipment energy use for the US commercial sector. We explore the likely impacts of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s ENERGY STAR office equipment program and the potential impacts of advanced technologies. The ENERGY STAR program encourages manufacturers to voluntarily incorporate power saving features into personal computers, monitors, printers, copiers, and fax machines in exchange for allowing manufacturers to use the EPA ENERGY STAR logo in their advertising campaigns. The Advanced technology case assumes that the most energy efficient current technologies are implemented regardless of cost.

  3. Dairy Manure Handling Systems and Equipment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A&M University System ? Texas Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter, Director College Station 8?1446 DAIRY MANURE HANDLING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT DAIRY MANURE HANDLING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT John M. Sweeten, Ph....D., P.E.* A manure management system for a modern dairy should be capable of controlling solid or liquid manure and wastewater from the open corrals (manure and rainfall runoff), free stall barn , feeding barn , holding lot or holding shed , milking...

  4. Experience gained from equipment qualification inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobus, M.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes issues which have been identified during equipment qualification inspections. Generic qualification information is discussed first, such as qualification bases, utility/supplier interfaces, file auditability, and generic environmental qualification. Next, technical strategies with specific examples are discussed. Issues covered include functional performance requirements, post accident qualification, similarity, installation and interfaces, maintenance, aging, and testing. Finally, additions and deletions to equipment qualification master lists and environmental enveloping are discussed.

  5. Augmented reality building operations tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method (700) for providing an augmented reality operations tool to a mobile client (642) positioned in a building (604). The method (700) includes, with a server (660), receiving (720) from the client (642) an augmented reality request for building system equipment (612) managed by an energy management system (EMS) (620). The method (700) includes transmitting (740) a data request for the equipment (612) to the EMS (620) and receiving (750) building management data (634) for the equipment (612). The method (700) includes generating (760) an overlay (656) with an object created based on the building management data (634), which may be sensor data, diagnostic procedures, or the like. The overlay (656) is configured for concurrent display on a display screen (652) of the client (642) with a real-time image of the building equipment (612). The method (700) includes transmitting (770) the overlay (656) to the client (642).

  6. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    are analyzed to assess the environmental impact of DOE operations on the entire reservation and the surroundingORR Environmental Monitoring Program 6-1 6. ORR Environmental Monitoring Program In addition to environmental monitoring conducted at the three major Oak Ridge DOE installations, reservation

  7. DOE-EPRI On-Line Monitoring Implementation Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Davis; R. Bickford

    2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B139 Industry and EPRI experience at several plants has shown on-line monitoring to be very effective in identifying out-of-calibration instrument channels or indications of equipment-degradation problems. The EPRI implementation project for on-line monitoring has demonstrated the feasibility of on-line monitoring at several participating nuclear plants. The results have been very encouraging, and substantial progress is anticipated in the coming years.

  8. DOE-EPRI On-Line Monitoring Implementation Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Davis, R. Bickford

    2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry and EPRI experience at several plants has shown on-line monitoring to be very effective in identifying out-of-calibration instrument channels or indications of equipment-degradation problems. The EPRI implementation project for on-line monitoring has demonstrated the feasability of on-line monitoring at several participating nuclear plants. The results have been very enouraging, and substantial progress is anticipated in the coming years.

  9. Fermilab | Director's Policy Manual | No. 4.000 Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.000 Rev. 0 Operations 2.0 Effective Date 1199 3.0 Scope This policy addresses the safe operation of the equipment and facilities that comprise Fermilab. Particular emphasis is...

  10. Monitoring/Verification using DMS: TATP Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle, Manuel Manard

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Field-rugged and field-programmable differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) networks provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. CBE sensor motes used in conjunction with automated fast gas chromatography with DMS detection (GC/DMS) verification instrumentation integrated into situational operations-management systems can be readily deployed and optimized for changing application scenarios. The feasibility of developing selective DMS motes for a smart dust sampling approach with guided, highly selective, fast GC/DMS verification analysis is a compelling approach to minimize or prevent the illegal use of explosives or chemical and biological materials. DMS is currently one of the foremost emerging technologies for field separation and detection of gas-phase chemical species. This is due to trace-level detection limits, high selectivity, and small size. Fast GC is the leading field analytical method for gas phase separation of chemical species in complex mixtures. Low-thermal-mass GC columns have led to compact, low-power field systems capable of complete analyses in 15300 seconds. A collaborative effort optimized a handheld, fast GC/DMS, equipped with a non-rad ionization source, for peroxide-based explosive measurements.

  11. Energy Management Programs- Monitoring Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauls, S. P.; Shamy, M. D.

    ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS - MONITORING PERFORMANCE Stanley P. Pauls Mustafa D. Shamy Merck & Co., Inc. Rahway, N. J. ABSTRACT of the historical energy consumption records. Energy use standards have been established to Steam Model monitor... energy conservation performance in bulk pharmaceutical plants. The model considers The basic steam model for most industrial process, comfort heating, and fixed loads. operations is made up of the following components: As the oil crisis developed...

  12. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  13. Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report and Appendices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-45917 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report..............................................................................................46 #12;#12;1 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S. Kaoru Kawamoto and network equipment, there has been no recent study that estimates in detail how much electricity

  14. 4th World Conference on Structural Control and Monitoring 4WCSCM-307 MONITORING INFRASTRUCTURAL HEALTH: IN-SITU DAMAGE DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chenyang

    for structural health monitoring applications. In fact, despite recent advancements in wireless radio4th World Conference on Structural Control and Monitoring 4WCSCM-307 MONITORING INFRASTRUCTURAL struc- tural health monitoring (SHM) applications have been configured to operate in a fashion

  15. michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators approach! · directly Smith, Rolfs, Barnes NIMA306 (1991) 233 #12;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators proof of concept with 12C

  16. Italian WEEE management system and treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments for CFCs removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sansotera, M., E-mail: maurizio.sansotera@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Navarrini, W. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), via Giusti 9, I-50121 Firenze (Italy); Talaeemashhadi, S.; Venturini, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Italian data about WEEE management in the period 20052010 have been reported. In 20012004 CFC release was monitored and Po Valley resulted as main source region. The Italian directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2005 but took effect in 2008. The CFC analytic procedures of the audit assessments have been discussed. - Abstract: This study presents and analyzes the data of the Italian system for take-back and recovery of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEEs) in the start-up period 20082010. The analysis was focused particularly on the data about the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments. In fact, the wastes of cooling and freezing equipments have a high environmental impact. Indeed, in their compressor oil and insulation polyurethane (PU) foams chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) ozone-depleting gases are still present. In the period 20012004 Northern Italy resulted the main source in Europe of CFCs. The European Directive on WEEE management was enacted in 2002, but in Italy it was implemented by the legislative Decree in 2005 and it became operational in 2008. Actually, in 2008 the national WEEE Coordination Centre was founded in order to organize the WEEE pick-up process and to control collection, recovery and recycling targets. As a result, in 2010 the average WEEE collection per capita exceeded the threshold of more than 4 kg per inhabitant, as well as cooling and freezing appliances represented more than one fourth of the Italian WEEE collection stream. During the treatment of end-of-life cooling and freezing equipments, CFCs were recovered and disposed principally by burner methods. The analyses of defined specimens collected in the treatment facilities were standardized to reliably determine the amount of recovered CFCs. Samples of alkaline solid salt, alkaline saline solution, polyurethane matrix and compressor oil collected during the audit assessment procedure were analyzed and the results were discussed. In particular, the analysis of PU samples after the shredding and the warm pressing procedures measured a residual CFCs content around 5001300 mg/kg of CFCs within the foam matrix.

  17. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, V

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified interface for controlling the monitor hardware and communicating with the host Distributed Control System (DCS). In order to provide user friendly software for the process personnel, the software was broken down into just a few software modules. These software modules are the Application Window, Detector Selection, Detector Configuration Settings, Background Counting, and Routine Data Acquisition. Instructions for using the software have been included in a user's manual that is appended to this report. The work presented in this report meets all of the requirements set forth in the project task plan to design and implement gamma ray monitors for the MCU. Additional setup and testing of the system will be required when it implemented in the process.

  18. Groundwater monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ames, Kenneth R. (Pasco, WA); Doesburg, James M. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); Kelley, Roy C. (Kennewick, WA); Myers, David A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

  19. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

  20. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  1. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  2. Seismic qualification of equipment by means of probabilistic risk assessment. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azarm, M.A.; Farahzad, P.; Boccio, J.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upon the sponsorship of the Equipment Qualification Branch (EQB) of NRC, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has utilized a risk-based approach for identifying, in a generic fashion, seismically risk-sensitive equipment. It is anticipated that the conclusions drawn therefrom and the methodology employed will, in part, reconcile some of the concerns dealing with the seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants. The approach taken augments an existing sensitivity analysis, based upon the WASH-1400 Reactor Safety Study (RSS), by accounting for seismicity and component fragility with the Kennedy model and by essentially including the requisite seismic data presented in the Zion Probabilistic Safety Study (ZPSS). Parametrically adjusting the seismic-related variables and ascertaining their effects on overall plant risk, core-melt probability, accident sequence probability, etc., allows one to identify those seismically risk-sensitive systems and equipment. This paper describes the approach taken and highlights the results obtained thus far for a hypothetical pressurized water reactor (PWR).

  3. Cold-Start Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with a Passive Adsorber for Hydrocarbons and NOx Cold-Start Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with a Passive Adsorber for...

  4. Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid The National Renewable Energy...

  5. advanced electronic equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    common equipment through predetermined global ... Chouinard, Natalie, 1979- 2009-01-01 85 Logging Equipment and Loren Kellogg Renewable Energy Websites Summary: and the control is...

  6. Southwest Gas Corporation- Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers rebates to commercial customers in Nevada who purchase energy efficient natural gas equipment. Eligible equipment includes clothes washers, storage water...

  7. Southwest Gas Corporation- Commercial High-Efficiency Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers rebates to commercial customers in Arizona who purchase energy efficient natural gas equipment. Eligible equipment includes natural gas storage and tankless...

  8. Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic...

  9. Master equipment list -- Phase 1. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jech, J.B.

    1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the system requirements for the Master Equipment List (MEL) Phase 1 project. The intended audience for this document includes Data Automation Engineering (DAE), Configuration Management Improvement and Control Engineering (CMI and CE), Data Administration Council (DAC), and Tank Waste Remedial System (TWRS) personnel. The intent of Phase 1 is to develop a user-friendly system to support the immediate needs of the TWRS labeling program. Phase 1 will provide CMI and CE the ability to administrate, distribute, and maintain key information generated by the labeling program. CMI and CE is assigning new Equipment Identification Numbers (EINs) to selected equipment in Tank Farms per the TWRS Data Standard ``Tank Farm Equipment Identification Number``. The MEL Phase 1 system will be a multi-user system available through the HLAN network. It will provide basic functions such as view, query, and report, edit, data entry, password access control, administration and change control. The scope of Phase 1 data will encompass all Tank Farm Equipment identified by the labeling program. The data will consist of fields from the labeling program`s working database, relational key references and pointers, safety class information, and field verification data.

  10. automatic monitoring system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for monitoring the structural condition and the operational efficiency of the wind turbine. The monitoring system has been installed on a 500 kW wind turbine located in...

  11. Blandford MTA Tower Wind Monitoring This document provides information not repeated in the monthly wind monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Blandford MTA Tower Wind Monitoring This document provides information not repeated in the monthly on the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority (MTA) tower at Blandford. A wind vane and two anemometers are located at two heights on the tower: 60 m and 40 m. Details of the equipment and models are: NRG model Symphonie

  12. Marion Meteorological Tower Wind Monitoring This document provides information not repeated in the monthly wind monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Marion Meteorological Tower Wind Monitoring This document provides information not repeated on the meteorological tower at Marion: Great Hill Dairy. A wind vane and two anemometers are located at two heights on the tower: 50 m and 38 m. Details of the equipment and models are: NRG model Symphonie Cellogger 4 #40

  13. Operation manual Installation Category I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Cary 50 Hardware Operation manual Installation Category I Pollution Degree 2 Safety Class 3 (EN-2:1991 IEC 801-3:1984 IEC 801-4:1988 Equipment Model Number Cary 50 Series Responsible Person in the EUUV software 4-13 5 Spare parts 5-1 #12;Cary 50 Publication date: 06/99 vii Safety practices and hazards Your

  14. DIVING OPERATIONS 30.A GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    as in the contract, using the particular diving techniques and equipment to be used under the contract. Divers shall demonstrate that at least one (1) of the four (4) qualification dives was performed in the last 6 months prior to the start of dive operations. The DDC will ensure USACE divers meet the training and qualification

  15. Transmission Line Security Monitor: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Svoboda

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Transmission Line Security Monitor System Operational Test is a project funded by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). TSWG operates under the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office that functions under the Department of Defense. The Transmission Line Security Monitor System is based on technology developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The technology provides a means for real-time monitoring of physical threats and/or damage to electrical transmission line towers and conductors as well as providing operational parameters to transmission line operators to optimize transmission line operation. The end use is for monitoring long stretches of transmission lines that deliver electrical power from remote generating stations to cities and industry. These transmission lines are generally located in remote transmission line corridors where security infrastructure may not exist. Security and operational sensors in the sensor platform on the conductors take power from the transmission line and relay security and operational information to operations personnel hundreds of miles away without relying on existing infrastructure. Initiated on May 25, 2007, this project resulted in pre-production units tested in realistic operational environments during 2010. A technology licensee, Lindsey Manufacturing of Azusa California, is assisting in design, testing, and ultimately production. The platform was originally designed for a security monitoring mission, but it has been enhanced to include important operational features desired by electrical utilities.

  16. 1990 Weatherization Assistance Program monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuels, L.S.

    1992-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year 1990 DOE weatherization programs were monitored in Indiana, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The focus of the monitoring was on a total of 18 subgrantees. Separate reports on the monitoring completed on each site was submitted as well as the final summary report for each state. The scope of monitoring consisted of a review of current contracts, budgets, program operating procedures, staffing, inventory control, financial and procurement procedures, review of client files and audit reports, inspection of completed dwelling units and assessment of monitoring, training, and technical assistance provided by the grantees. A random sampling of completed units were selected and visits were made to inspect these weatherized dwellings.

  17. Security Equipment and Systems Certification Program (SESCP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, B.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papier, I.I. [Underwriters Labs., Inc., Northbrook, IL (United States)

    1996-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., (UL) have jointly established the Security Equipment and Systems Certification Program (SESCP). The goal of this program is to enhance industrial and national security by providing a nationally recognized method for making informed selection and use decisions when buying security equipment and systems. The SESCP will provide a coordinated structure for private and governmental security standardization review. Members will participate in meetings to identify security problems, develop ad-hoc subcommittees (as needed) to address these identified problems, and to maintain a communications network that encourages a meaningful exchange of ideas. This program will enhance national security by providing improved security equipment and security systems based on consistent, reliable standards and certification programs.

  18. Interactions between Brown-out Accidents and Night Vision Equipment in Military Aviation Accidents C.W. Johnson, Ph.D.; Department of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Scotland.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    , including flaws in the design of equipment, Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) or maintenance procedures risks in low visibility operations through image intensification or infrared imaging. However, NVDs create new risks, including a host of human factors problems. The operation of night vision equipment has

  19. dieSel/heAvy equipMent College of Rural and Community Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    907-455-2809 www.ctc.uaf.edu/programs/diesel/ certificate Minimum Requirements for Certificate: 36 credits The diesel and heavy equipment mechanics program offers the student training in the maintenance and equipment overhauls. Students work on large truck fuel, electrical and air systems, diesel engines

  20. TEMPERATURE AND LOAD EFFECTS ON ACOUSTIC EMISSION SIGNALS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    TEMPERATURE AND LOAD EFFECTS ON ACOUSTIC EMISSION SIGNALS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING. KEYWORDS : Structural Health Monitoring, Acoustic Emission, Environmental and Operational Conditions2014 Author manuscript, published in "EWSHM - 7th European Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring

  1. Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

  2. Total Energy Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, S

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The total energy monitor (TE) is a thermal sensor that determines the total energy of each FEL pulse based on the temperature rise induced in a silicon wafer upon absorption of the FEL. The TE provides a destructive measurement of the FEL pulse energy in real-time on a pulse-by-pulse basis. As a thermal detector, the TE is expected to suffer least from ultra-fast non-linear effects and to be easy to calibrate. It will therefore primarily be used to cross-calibrate other detectors such as the Gas Detector or the Direct Imager during LCLS commissioning. This document describes the design of the TE and summarizes the considerations and calculations that have led to it. This document summarizes the physics behind the operation of the Total Energy Monitor at LCLS and derives associated engineering specifications.

  3. Conceptual design report, CEBAF basic experimental equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will be dedicated to basic research in Nuclear Physics using electrons and photons as projectiles. The accelerator configuration allows three nearly continuous beams to be delivered simultaneously in three experimental halls, which will be equipped with complementary sets of instruments: Hall A--two high resolution magnetic spectrometers; Hall B--a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer; Hall C--a high-momentum, moderate resolution, magnetic spectrometer and a variety of more dedicated instruments. This report contains a short description of the initial complement of experimental equipment to be installed in each of the three halls.

  4. Global nuclear material monitoring with NDA and C/S data through integrated facility monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.A.; Menlove, H.O.; Argo, P.; Goulding, C.; Klosterbuer, S.; Halbig, J.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on a flexible, integrated demonstration of a monitoring approach for nuclear material monitoring. This includes aspects of item signature identification, perimeter portal monitoring, advanced data analysis, and communication as a part of an unattended continuous monitoring system in an operating nuclear facility. Advanced analysis is applied to the integrated nondestructive assay and containment and surveillance data that are synchronized in time. End result will be the foundation for a cost-effective monitoring system that could provide the necessary transparency even in areas that are denied to foreign nationals of both US and Russia should these processes and materials come under full-scope safeguards or bilateral agreements. Monitoring systems of this kind have the potential to provide additional benefits including improved nuclear facility security and safeguards and lower personnel radiation exposures. Demonstration facilities in this paper include VTRAP-prototype, Los Alamos Critical Assemblies Facility, Kazakhstan BM-350 Reactor monitor, DUPIC radiation monitoring, and JOYO and MONJU radiation monitoring.

  5. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  6. Confortable Performance: Retro-Commissioning Building Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botan, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comfortable Performance Retro-Commissioning Building Operations Liviu Botan, P.Eng. CB Consulting Toronto 1 ESL-IC-13-10-07 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Montreal, Quebec, October 8...-11, 2013 Building owner?s challenges ? Tenant comfort ? Operating cost ? Equipment Condition and Life Cycle ? Environmental impact 2 ESL-IC-13-10-07 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Montreal, Quebec...

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE: VEHICLE FUELING Standard Operating Procedure: Vehicle Fueling I. Introduction and Purpose Vehicle and equipment maintenance yards with fueling, including mobile fueling operations. III. Standards and Specifications (for

  8. Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehabi, Arman

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by potential equipment reliability concerns associated withblack carbon; equipment reliability; energy efficiency 1.potential equipment reliability concerns associated with

  9. Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehabi, Arman

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by potential equipment reliability concerns associated withblack carbon; equipment reliability; energy efficiency 1.potential equipment reliability concerns associated with

  10. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

  11. WSC 2000 1http://www.isr.umd.edu/IPDPM/ Understanding the Impact of Equipment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    simulation applications Process, equipment or industrial engineers Operations engineer Lot Process Times # process chambers 2 Scheduling algorithm push OD time 15 sec Robot move time 6 sec W CVD cluster tool # process chambers 3 Scheduling algorithm pull OD time 12 sec Robot move time 5 sec TiN PVD Thickness 30 nm

  12. Energy costs continue to rise. Examining ways to managing equipment energy costs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    for Motors Calculating Annual Energy Use and Cost Input Power (kW)______________ Annual Energy UseEnergy costs continue to rise. Examining ways to managing equipment energy costs. Energy Use in comparing products. where where range of conditions. #12;operating conditions over a season. power

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commercial, Residential Savings Category: Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Govt, Systems Integrator, Transportation, Tribal Government, Utility Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation...

  15. Assuring Mechanical Integrity of Refinery Equipment Through Global ON-Stream Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Berthold

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of global on-stream inspection technology will have a dramatic effect on how refinery operations are managed in the U.S. in the future. Global on-stream inspection will provide assurance of the mechanical integrity of critical plant equipment and will allow refineries to operate more efficiently with less impact on our environment and with an increased margin of safety.

  16. Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich CMPE 640 11/23/05 #12;Testing Verifies that manufactured chip meets design specifications. Cannot test for every potential defect. Modeling defects as faults allows for passing and failing of chips. Ideal test would capture all defects and pass only chips

  17. Right-Size Heating and Cooling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet helps people choose the correct equipment size for heating and cooling to improve comfort and reduce costs, maintenance, and energy use.

  18. An Approach to Evaluating Equipment Efficiency Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsom, D. E.; Evans, A. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of several types of industr~al equipment to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of labeling rules and minimum energy effic~ency standards. An approach to the evaluation of these and related policy options is under development. Th~ approach...

  19. APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS 3 JUNE 1974 NOTE: Discussions of closed problems COMPOSITION EXPERIMENT ZERO OFFSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6 APOLLO 14 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT INTERMITTENT SCIENCE DATA. 3.7 APOLLO 15 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT NOISY DATA

  20. APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS 18 SEPTEMBER 1973 NOTE: Discussions of closed-14 4-18 4-19 ZERO OFFSET. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20 4. 6 APOLLO 14 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT INTERMITTENT SCIENCE DATA 4. ? APOLLO 15 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT

  1. APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS 1 DECEMBER 1973 NOTE: Discussions of closed problems. . . . . . . . CLOSED 4.6 APOLLO 14 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT INTERMITTENT SCIENCE DATA . CLOSED 4.7 APOLLO 15 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT NOISY DATA AND INTERMITTENT AUTOMATIC ZERO

  2. APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS 1 MARCH 1974 NOTE: Discussions of closed problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . APOLLO 14 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT INTERMITTENT SCIENCE DATA . APOLLO 15 ALSEP COLD . . . . 0 . . . . . APOLLO 15 LUNAR SURFACE MAGNETOMETER LOSS OF SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING DATA. APOLLO 14

  3. Equipment Policy for Federal Sponsored Effective Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Property Manager I. Background Division of Research Florida Atlantic University is required to comply. Equipment shall be defined as an article of nonexpendable tangible personal property. Florida Atlantic and a useful life of more than one year. III. General Statement Research Accounting and Property Management

  4. Electrical Equipment Replacement: Energy Efficiency versus System Compatibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, G. W.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upgrading electrical equipment to energy efficient models, including conductor sizing, overcurrent protective devices, grounding, and harmonics. The pages that follow provide guidance in the decision-making process when replacing electrical equipment... equipment. Several areas of compatibility must be addressed for equipment to work properly. Critical areas of concern are conductor sizing, overcurrent protection devices, grounding, and harmonics. Conductor Sizing Conductors are sized...

  5. THE GAME, FIELD, PLAYERS AND EQUIPMENT General Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    metal cleats are permitted. (See illegal player equipment) Game and Player Equipment (Illegal) 1. A player wearing illegal equipment shall not be permitted to play. This applies to any equipment, which be declared illegal include: A. Headgear containing any hard, unyielding, or stiff material, including billed

  6. MACHINE MONITORING USING PROBABILITY THRESHOLDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Stephen

    MACHINE MONITORING USING PROBABILITY THRESHOLDS AND SYSTEM OPERATING CHARACTERISTICS Stephen M and Jeffrey M. Alden G.M. R&D Center Warren, MI 48090 IOE Tech Report 95-14 #12;1. Introduction We a discrete-part production machine, with the objective of effectively determining when to shut the machine

  7. Expert Systems for Monitoring and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    the next two weeks into the worst nuclear power plant accident in the United States --- the Three Milebased systems that assist plant/process operators in the task of monitoring and control. The goal herei Expert Systems for Monitoring and Control Daniel L. Dvorak Department of Computer Sciences

  8. TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance This technology allows for CMV operators to have knowledge of their steer, drive, and tandem axle group weights setup is required. Current Safety/Enforcement Technologies EOBR (electronic on-board recorder) On

  9. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

  10. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, Michael D. (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard J. (Aurora, CO); Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO); Sagan, Francis J. (Lakewood, CO); Marmaro, Roger W. (Littleton, CO); Wilson, Kevin G. (Littleton, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  11. alarm border monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alarm). Pu Plutonium. ROC Receiver operating characteristic. RPM Radiation portal monitor. WGPu Weapons grade plutonium. I. INTRODUCTION Parasuraman, Raja 54 Fire Alarm...

  12. FRMAC Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frandsen, K.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the event of a major radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) will coordinate the federal agencies that have various statutory responsibilities. The FRMAC is responsible for coordinating all environmental radiological monitoring, sampling, and assessment activities for the response. This manual describes the FRMACs response activities in a radiological incident. It also outlines how FRMAC fits in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) under the National Response Framework (NRF) and describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the affected areas. In the event of a potential or existing major radiological incident, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is responsible for establishing and managing the FRMAC during the initial phases.

  13. S-STORAGE OPERATORS Karim NOUR 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nour, Karim

    S-STORAGE OPERATORS Karim NOUR 1 LAMA - Equipe de Logique, Universit´e de Savoie - 73376 Le Bourget du Lac cedex 2 Abstract In 1990, J.L. Krivine introduced the notion of storage operator to simulate define, for every -term S which realizes the successor function on Church integers, the notion of S-storage

  14. STORAGE OPERATORS DIRECTED LAMBDA-CALCULUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    STORAGE OPERATORS AND DIRECTED LAMBDA-CALCULUS Ren DAVID & Karim NOUR LAMA - Equipe de Logique) p 1054-1086" #12;Abstract Storage operators have been introduced by J.L. Krivine in [5 of the ordinary l-calculus. With this calculus we get an equivalent - and simple - definition of the storage

  15. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations and Maintenance Operations OASIS: OATI (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) Contact Information...

  16. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates Operations & Maintenance Operations OASIS: WACM (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) wesTTrans Common...

  17. Monitoring System Used to Optimize Compressed Air System Efficiency, Cut Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, W. A.

    feeders, and major equipment and systems including compressed air. For the compressed air system, monitored data included compressor amps, electrical demand and consumption, pressure and airflow. The resulting UtiliTRACK reports and graphs showed a...

  18. Diagnostic indicators for shipboard mechanical systems using Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKay, Thomas Duncan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the use of Non-intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM) in auxiliary shipboard systems, such as a low pressure air system, to determine the state of equipment in larger connected systems, such as the main ...

  19. Data driven process monitoring based on neural networks and classification trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yifeng

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process monitoring in the chemical and other process industries has been of great practical importance. Early detection of faults is critical in avoiding product quality deterioration, equipment damage, and personal injury. ...

  20. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV`s) in S area. The FESV`s are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request.

  1. Correctly specify insulation for process equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, C. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insulation serves as a thermal barrier to resist the flow of heat. When insulation is installed over piping or equipment to minimize heat losses, the insulation is categorized as heat conservation. Software programs for determining heat losses are based on ASTM C 680. If heat conservation insulation is calculated to determine the most cost-effective thickness for piping or equipment, then the insulation is categorized as economic insulation. Methods for manually determining economic thicknesses using various graphs and precalculated charts are given in Turner and Malloy. However, modern software programs available from industrial associations calculate economic thicknesses based on after-tax annual costs. Costs associated with owning insulation are expressed on an equivalent uniform annual cost basis. The thickness with the lowest annual cost is reported as the economic thickness. Some of the economic data needed to calculate economic thicknesses are fuel cost, depreciation period, annual fuel inflation rate, annual hours of operation, return on investment, effective income tax rate, annual insulation maintenance costs, and installed costs. To obtain accurate economical thicknesses, it is best to solicit installed costs from a local contractor likely to bid on the work. This paper covers the most suitable insulation materials for certain applications, the most economic material and thickness to use, and how the total insulation system should be designed.

  2. Criticality safety concerns of uranium deposits in cascade equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, M.J. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants enrich uranium in the {sup 235}U isotope by diffusing gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) through a porous barrier. The UF{sub 6} gaseous diffusion cascade utilized several thousand {open_quotes}stages{close_quotes} of barrier to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU). Historically, Portsmouth has enriched the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant`s product (typically 1.8 wt% {sup 235}U) as well as natural enrichment feed stock up to 97 wt%. Due to the chemical reactivity of UF{sub 6}, particularly with water, the formation of solid uranium deposits occur at a gaseous diffusion plant. Much of the equipment operates below atmospheric pressure, and deposits are formed when atmospheric air enters the cascade. Deposits may also be formed from UF{sub 6} reactions with oil, UF{sub 6} reactions with the metallic surfaces of equipment, and desublimation of UF{sub 6}. The major deposits form as a result of moist air in leakage due to failure of compressor casing flanges, blow-off plates, seals, expansion joint convolutions, and instrument lines. This report describes criticality concerns and deposit disposition.

  3. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D&D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D&D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D&D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D&D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their relevance to DOE`s facility transitioning mission.

  4. Process Monitoring for Nuclear Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL] [ORNL; Pomeroy, George D [ORNL] [ORNL; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process Monitoring has long been used to evaluate industrial processes and operating conditions in nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. In nuclear applications there is a recognized need to demonstrate the safeguards benefits from using advanced process monitoring on spent fuel reprocessing technologies and associated facilities, as a complement to nuclear materials accounting. This can be accomplished by: defining credible diversion pathway scenarios as a sample problem; using advanced sensor and data analysis techniques to illustrate detection capabilities; and formulating 'event detection' methodologies as a means to quantify performance of the safeguards system. Over the past 30 years there have been rapid advances and improvement in the technology associated with monitoring and control of industrial processes. In the context of bulk handling facilities that process nuclear materials, modern technology can provide more timely information on the location and movement of nuclear material to help develop more effective safeguards. For international safeguards, inspection means verification of material balance data as reported by the operator through the State to the international inspectorate agency. This verification recognizes that the State may be in collusion with the operator to hide clandestine activities, potentially during abnormal process conditions with falsification of data to mask the removal. Records provided may show material is accounted for even though a removal occurred. Process monitoring can offer additional fidelity during a wide variety of operating conditions to help verify the declaration or identify possible diversions. The challenge is how to use modern technology for process monitoring and control in a proprietary operating environment subject to safeguards inspectorate or other regulatory oversight. Under the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, a range of potential safeguards applications for process monitoring are under conceptual development and evaluation. This paper reports on a study of process monitoring for a sample problem involving spent fuel reprocessing with aqueous reprocessing technologies. This includes modeling the processes in the context of a nuclear material diversion scenario and measuring the associated process chemistry. A systems-centric model is applied using actual and simulated plant data, advanced sensors, anomaly detection methods, statistical analysis and data authentication methods, to help illustrate the benefits of process monitoring applications.

  5. Machine tool evaluation and machining operation development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, T.O. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kegg, R. [Cincinnati Milacron Marketing Co., OH (United States)

    1997-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this CRADA was to support Cincinnati Milacron`s needs in fabricating precision components, from difficult to machine materials, while maintaining and enhancing the precision manufacturing skills of the Oak Ridge Complex. Oak Ridge and Cincinnati Milacron personnel worked in a team relationship wherein each contributed equally to the success of the program. Process characterization, control technologies, machine tool capabilities, and environmental issues were the primary focus areas. In general, Oak Ridge contributed a wider range of expertise in machine tool testing and monitoring, and environmental testing on machining fluids to the defined tasks while Cincinnati Milacron personnel provided equipment, operations-specific knowledge and shop-floor services to each task. Cincinnati Milacron was very pleased with the results of all of the CRADA tasks. However, some of the environmental tasks were not carried through to a desired completion due to an expanding realization of need as the work progressed. This expansion of the desired goals then exceeded the time length of the CRADA. Discussions are underway on continuing these tasks under either a Work for Others agreement or some alternate funding.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this one-year investigation is to perform a technology integration/search, thereby ensuring that the safest and most cost-effective options are developed and subsequently used during the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sites. Issues of worker health and safety are the main concern, followed by cost. Two lines of action were explored: innovative Personal Cooling Systems (PCS) and Personal Monitoring Equipment (PME). PME refers to sensors affixed to the worker that warn of an approaching heat stress condition, thereby preventing it. Three types of cooling systems were investigated: Pre-Chilled or Forced-Air System (PCFA), Umbilical Fluid-Chilled System (UFCS), and Passive Vest System (PVS). Of these, the UFCS leads the way. The PVS or Gel pack vest lagged due to a limited cooling duration. And the PCFA or chilled liquid air supply was cumbersome and required an expensive and complex recharge system. The UFCS in the form of the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS) performed exceptionally. The technology uses a chilled liquid circulating undergarment and a Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) external pump and ice reservoir. The system is moderately expensive, but the recharge is low-tech and inexpensive enough to offset the cost. There are commercially available PME that can be augmented to meet the DOE's heat stress alleviation need. The technology is costly, in excess of $4,000 per unit. Workers easily ignore the alarm. The benefit to health & safety is indirect so can be overlooked. A PCS is a more justifiable expenditure.

  7. BENEFITS OF VIBRATION ANALYSIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN HLW TANKS - 12341

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely collected during pre-installation tests and screened for: Critical speeds or resonance, Imbalance of rotating parts, Shaft misalignment, Fluid whirl or lubrication break down, Bearing damages, and Other component abnormalities. Examples of previous changes in operating parameters and fabrication tolerances and extension of equipment life resulting from the SRS vibration analysis program include: (1) Limiting operational speeds for some pumps to extend service life without design or part changes; (2) Modifying manufacturing methods (tightening tolerances) for impellers on slurry mixing pumps based on vibration data that indicated hydraulic imbalance; (3) Identifying rolling element mounting defects and replacing those components in pump seals before installation; and (4) Identifying the need for bearing design modification for SRS long-shaft mixing pump designs to eliminate fluid whirl and critical speeds which significantly increased the equipment service life. In addition, vibration analyses and related analyses have been used during new equipment scale-up tests to identify the need for design improvements for full-scale operation / deployment of the equipment in the full size tanks. For example, vibration analyses were recently included in the rotary micro-filtration scale-up test program at SRNL.

  8. A novel compact design of calibration equipment for gas and thermal sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, P. X.; Zhang, H. X.; Peng, X. Y.; Sajjad, M.; Chu, J. [Institute for Functional Nanomaterials and Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 70377, San Juan, 00936-8377 (Puerto Rico)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel design of calibration equipment has been developed for static and dynamic calibrations of gas and thermal sensors. This system is cheap, compact, and easily adjustable, which is also combined with a plasma surface modification source for tailoring the surface of sensors to ensure the sensitivity and selectivity. The main advantage of this equipment is that the operating temperature, bias voltage, types of plasma source (for surface modification), types of feeding gases, and gas flow rate (for calibrations), etc., can be independently controlled. This novel system provides a highly reliable, reproducible, and economical method of calibrations for various gas and thermal sensors.

  9. The Effects of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance: HFE Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara, J.M.; W. Gunther, G. Martinez-Guridi

    2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    New and advanced reactors will use integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems to support operators in their monitoring and control functions. Even though digital systems are typically highly reliable, their potential for degradation or failure could significantly affect operator performance and, consequently, impact plant safety. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) supported this research project to investigate the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and plant operations. The objective was to develop human factors engineering (HFE) review guidance addressing the detection and management of degraded digital I&C conditions by plant operators. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we conducted an evaluation of the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater system on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and operator performance. The results indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems and the overall effects on plant behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or causing equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations can impact the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, sensor degradations can make displays difficult to interpret and can sometimes mislead operators by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the information obtained as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance. The guidance addresses the treatment of degraded I&C conditions as part of the design process and the HSI features and functions that support operators to monitor I&C performance and manage I&C degradations when they occur. In addition, we identified topics for future research.

  10. Viewing device for electron-beam equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasyrov, R.S.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viewing devices are used to observe melting, welding, and so on in vacuum systems, an it is necessary to protect the windows from droplets and vapor. A viewing device for electron-beam equipment is described in which the viewing tube and mounting flange are made as a tubular ball joint enclosed in a steel bellows, which render the viewing device flexible. Bending the viewing tube in the intervals between observations protects the viewing window from sputtering and from drops of molten metal.

  11. A lessee's guide to leasing industrial equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jones Eugene

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is included in the agree- ment, the lessee is treading on dangerous ground, The Internal Reve- nue Service will examine such agreements closely and may decide the original transaction was a sale and not a lease. Regardless, whether the lessee actually...A LESSEE'S GUIDE TO LEASING INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Business Administration...

  12. Measured Peak Equipment Loads in Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical bulletin documents measured peak equipment load data from 39 laboratory spaces in nine buildings across five institutions. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain data on the actual peak loads in laboratories, which can be used to rightsize the design of HVAC systems in new laboratories. While any given laboratory may have unique loads and other design considerations, these results may be used as a 'sanity check' for design assumptions.

  13. Effectiveness of cabs for dust and silica control on mobile mining equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, J.J.; Gresh, R.E.; Gareis, M.B.; Haney, R.A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of cabs for controlling silica dust exposure during operation of mobile mining equipment. This study focused on bulldozers, front-end loaders and haul trucks, was conducted at surface coal mining operations and underground metal and nonmetal mining operations. Each piece of equipment tested was equipped with a cab. The vehicles sampled were from a range of manufacturers having different types of filter media and air intake configurations. The purpose of this study was to determine the reduction of dust and silica exposure that could be achieved through the use of a well-maintained cab. For each piece of equipment, dust and silica concentrations inside and outside the cab were determined and compared. In some cases, filtration efficiencies could be calculated. A properly designed environmental cab is sealed, has an intake air filtration system, and a heating and cooling system. Cabs should have good seals around the doors and windows. Factors such as cab pressurization filtration systems, filter media, and maintenance practices were also examined. In some cases, dust and silica reduction of 90 to 95% were observed.

  14. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

  15. Operational health physics training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  16. 1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. V. Street

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  17. Turlock Lake Powerhouse. Turlock Irrigation District design report and operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of equipment selection and design is outlined and operational criteria for the hydroelectric power drop at the Turlock Lake California Powerhouse are established.

  18. A role for arms control and technology in peace-keeping operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Indusi, J.; Allentuck, J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a potential role for arms control monitoring technology in peace-keeping operations. The basic idea is to utilize monitoring technology developed or suggested for treaty verification (primarily Conventional Forces Europe (CFE), but other treaties as well) to minimize the exposure of humans as part of ``peace-keeping`` forces in various trouble spots throughout the world. The impetus comes from the dangers and high costs of stationing peace-keeping of forces in areas such as Bosnia-Herzegovina. Aside from the costs associated with such efforts the loss of life has escalated recently from 743 peace keepers lost from 1948 to 1988, to 180 lives lost in 1993 alone. Some potential advantages to using technology for certain monitoring roles are discussed in the paper and include: minimizing exposure/risk to peace-keeping personnel from hostile fire, hostage taking, etc.; sharable technology will allow all parties to view results, assess violations or transgressions, etc.; can be applied to equipment, railways, roads, etc., to confirm human and other monitoring capabilities; and provides data to settle disputes on which side initiated hostilities.

  19. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY84 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a complete year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak was in operation and the RF Test Facility came on-line. The phased approach of TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the addition of neutron monitors. During CY84 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations.

  20. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Small HVAC Database Of Monitored

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , it is not individual building components, equipment, or materials that optimize energy efficiency. Instead, energy efficiency is improved through the integrated design, construction, and operation of building systems: Architectural Energy Corporation Pete Jacobs, Lead Author Boulder, Colorado Managed By: New Buildings Institute

  1. Challenges of Video Monitoring for Phenomenological Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    . This platform has been validated on Tore Supra during operation and is under evaluation for the foreseen imaging. As a consequence, present Tokamaks are equipped and/or upgraded with networks of infrared and visible video cameras processing. The first technical specifications concerning sensor perfor- mance planned for the ITER VIS

  2. Direct Liquid Cooling for Electronic Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Henry; Greenberg, Steve

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a demonstration of an electronic--equipment cooling system in the engineering prototype development stage that can be applied in data centers. The technology provides cooling by bringing a water--based cooling fluid into direct contact with high--heat--generating electronic components. This direct cooling system improves overall data center energy efficiency in three ways: High--heat--generating electronic components are more efficiently cooled directly using water, capturing a large portion of the total electronic equipment heat generated. This captured heat reduces the load on the less--efficient air--based data center room cooling systems. The combination contributes to the overall savings. The power consumption of the electronic equipment internal fans is significantly reduced when equipped with this cooling system. The temperature of the cooling water supplied to the direct cooling system can be much higher than that commonly provided by facility chilled water loops, and therefore can be produced with lower cooling infrastructure energy consumption and possibly compressor-free cooling. Providing opportunities for heat reuse is an additional benefit of this technology. The cooling system can be controlled to produce high return water temperatures while providing adequate component cooling. The demonstration was conducted in a data center located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. Thirty--eight servers equipped with the liquid cooling system and instrumented for energy measurements were placed in a single rack. Two unmodified servers of the same configuration, located in an adjacent rack, were used to provide a baseline. The demonstration characterized the fraction of heat removed by the direct cooling technology, quantified the energy savings for a number of cooling infrastructure scenarios, and provided information that could be used to investigate heat reuse opportunities. Thermal measurement data were used with data center energy use modeling software to estimate overall site energy use. These estimates show that an overall data center energy savings of approximately 20 percent can be expected if a center is retrofitted as specified in the models used. Increasing the portion of heat captured by this technology is an area suggested for further development.

  3. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O'Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be successfully calcined at 600 C with an AAR of 1.75. Unburned hydrocarbons are reduced to less than 10 ppm (7% O2, dry basis), with >90% reduction of NOx emissions. Mercury removal by the carbon bed reached 99.99%, surpassing the control efficiency needed to meet MACT emissions standards. No deleterious impacts on the carbon bed were observed during the tests. The test results imply that upgrading the NWCF calciner with a more efficient cyclone separator and the proposed MACT equipment can process the remaining tanks wastes in 3 years or less, and comply with the MACT standards.

  4. Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

  5. Monitoring and analysis of two grid connected PV systems Michael BRESSAN* Valrie DUPE**, Bruno JAMMES**, Thierry TALBERT*, Corinne ALONSO**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    . Adapted to all kinds of equipment, it can be installed on any inverter or PV array. This monitoring system l building ha u" (1 inverte mum power ur rideau" a monitoring (latitude 43 V technolog PV array. A microco meter can m PV inverte re 1: Monitor grid con el systems study PV s a non linear everal pape

  6. Hurricane slams gulf operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that reports of damage by Hurricane Andrew escalated last week as operators stepped up inspections of oil and gas installations in the Gulf of Mexico. By midweek, companies operating in the gulf and South Louisiana were beginning to agree that earlier assessments of damage only scratched the surface. Damage reports included scores of lost, toppled, or crippled platforms, pipeline ruptures, and oil slicks. By midweek the U.S. coast Guard had received reports of 79 oil spills. Even platforms capable of resuming production in some instances were begin curtailed because of damaged pipelines. Offshore service companies the another 2-4 weeks could be needed to fully assess Andrew's wrath. Lack of personnel and equipment was slowing damage assessment and repair.

  7. An Environmental Monitoring System with Integrated Wired and Wireless Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yan

    environmental monitoring cyber infrastruc- ture that features (1) soil moisture monitoring with flexible spatial Environmental Observatory (TEO) infrastructure [9] for long-term operation. The new WSN-based soil moistureAn Environmental Monitoring System with Integrated Wired and Wireless Sensors Jue Yang, Chengyang

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a high-level summary of environmental monitoring performed by various organizations within and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Guide DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, and in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The purpose of these orders is to 1) implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations, and 2) to establish standards and requirements for the operations of DOE and DOE contractors with respect to protection of the environment and members of the public against undue risk from radiation. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL Site, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. Detailed monitoring procedures, program plans, or other governing documents used by contractors or agencies to implement requirements are referenced in this plan. This plan covers all planned monitoring and environmental surveillance. Nonroutine activities such as special research studies and characterization of individual sites for environmental restoration are outside the scope of this plan.

  9. Detection of Unauthorized Construction Equipment in Pipeline Right-of-Ways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurice Givens; James E. Huebler

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The leading cause of incidents on transmission pipelines is damage by third-party construction equipment. A single incident can be devastating, causing death and millions of dollars of property loss. This damage would be prevented if potentially hazardous construction equipment could be detected, identified, and an alert given before the pipeline is hit. Currently there is no method for continuously monitoring a pipeline right-of-way. Instead, companies periodically walk or fly over the pipeline to find unauthorized construction activities. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is developing a system to solve this problem by using an optical fiber buried above the pipeline as a distributed sensor. A custom optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) is used to interrogate the fiber. Key issues in the development of this technology are the ability to detect encroachment and the ability to discriminate among potentially hazardous and benign encroachments. Advantages of the reflectometry technique are the ability to accurately pinpoint the location of the construction activity and the ability to separately monitor simultaneously occurring events. The basic concept of using OTDR with an optical fiber buried above the pipeline to detect encroachment of construction equipment into the right of way works. Sufficiently rapid time response is possible; permitting discrimination between encroachment types. Additional work is required to improve the system into a practical device.

  10. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. (Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

  11. Current techniques in acid-chloride corrosion control and monitoring at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirtz, Paul; Buck, Cliff; Kunzman, Russell

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid chloride corrosion of geothermal well casings, production piping and power plant equipment has resulted in costly corrosion damage, frequent curtailments of power plants and the permanent shut-in of wells in certain areas of The Geysers. Techniques have been developed to mitigate these corrosion problems, allowing continued production of steam from high chloride wells with minimal impact on production and power generation facilities.The optimization of water and caustic steam scrubbing, steam/liquid separation and process fluid chemistry has led to effective and reliable corrosion mitigation systems currently in routine use at The Geysers. When properly operated, these systems can yield steam purities equal to or greater than those encountered in areas of The Geysers where chloride corrosion is not a problem. Developments in corrosion monitoring techniques, steam sampling and analytical methodologies for trace impurities, and computer modeling of the fluid chemistry has been instrumental in the success of this technology.

  12. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) is the main limiting factor in our fisheries.

  13. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

  14. Anne Arundel County- Solar and Geothermal Equipment Property Tax Credits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Anne Arundel County offers a one-time credit from county property taxes on residential dwellings that use solar and geothermal energy equipment for heating and cooling, and solar energy equipment...

  15. Anne Arundel County- Solar and Geothermal Equipment Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a one-time credit from county property taxes on residential structures that use solar and geothermal energy equipment for heating and cooling and solar energy equipment for water heating...

  16. Training Room Equipment Instructions Projector and TV Display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Training Room Equipment Instructions Projector and TV Display The control panel on the wall are connected to a training room computer and room is equipped with a keyboard, mouse and clicker. Connect USB

  17. Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies exists for low-dollar items of machinery, equipment, materials and supplies used for business purposes, or in activities...

  18. New web page lists excess equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New web page lists excess equipment If you need a piece of equipment or office furniture, you can now go online to see if there's something at the Ames Laboratory warehouse that...

  19. Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF In reference...

  20. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indiana does not have a specific sales and use tax exemption for equipment used in the production of renewable electricity. Therefore, such equipment is presumed to be subject to sales and use tax....

  1. Home and Farm Security Machinery and Equipment Identification.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Gary S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    73 Fibme and Farm Security -m Machinery and Equipment identification Home and Farm Security chinery and Equipment Identification *Gary S. Nelson is no longer just an urban problem. d burglaries in rural communities have to an alarming...

  2. Safe Operating Procedure SAFETY AUDIT GUIDELINES FOR BIOSAFETY LEVEL 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    analysis, unique facility/equipment attributes, etc. The audit checklist for chemical laboratories is also to substantiate current medical qualification/testing of all persons listed in the protocol (as applicable). Facility Design and Equipment Inspection Lab doors are operable and kept closed while work is in progress

  3. Biodiesel Emissions Testing with a Modern Diesel Engine - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-399

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the emissions and performance impact of biodiesel in a modern diesel engine equipped with a diesel particulate filter. This testing is in support of the Non-Petroleum Based Fuels (NPBF) 2010 Annual Operating Plan (AOP).

  4. Method and apparatus for monitoring machine performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN); Castleberry, Kimberly N. (Harriman, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Machine operating conditions can be monitored by analyzing, in either the time or frequency domain, the spectral components of the motor current. Changes in the electric background noise, induced by mechanical variations in the machine, are correlated to changes in the operating parameters of the machine.

  5. Online Monitoring Technical Basis and Analysis Framework for Emergency Diesel Generators - Interim Report for FY 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binh T. Pham; Nancy J. Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is actively conducting research to develop and demonstrate online monitoring capabilities for active components in existing nuclear power plants. Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute are working jointly to implement a pilot project to apply these capabilities to emergency diesel generators and generator step-up transformers. The Electric Power Research Institute Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Software Suite will be used to implement monitoring in conjunction with utility partners: Braidwood Generating Station (owned by Exelon Corporation) for emergency diesel generators, and Shearon Harris Nuclear Generating Station (owned by Duke Energy Progress) for generator step-up transformers. This report presents monitoring techniques, fault signatures, and diagnostic and prognostic models for emergency diesel generators. Emergency diesel generators provide backup power to the nuclear power plant, allowing operation of essential equipment such as pumps in the emergency core coolant system during catastrophic events, including loss of offsite power. Technical experts from Braidwood are assisting Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Power Research Institute in identifying critical faults and defining fault signatures associated with each fault. The resulting diagnostic models will be implemented in the Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Software Suite and tested using data from Braidwood. Parallel research on generator step-up transformers was summarized in an interim report during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  6. Equipment Selection for Surface Mining: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christina Burt

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 16, 2013 ... Abstract: One of the challenging problems for surface mining operation optimization is choosing the optimal truck and loader fleet. This problem...

  7. Design and operation of a virtual reality operator-training system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okapuu-von Veh, A.; Malowany, A.; Shaikh, A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Marceau, R.J.; Desbiens, P.; Daigle, A.; Rizzi, J.C. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Genie Electrique et Informatique] [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Genie Electrique et Informatique; Garant, E.; Gauthier, R. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risks to equipment and personnel associated with the manual operation of switching station equipment demand rigorous personnel instruction. Additionally, switching errors reduce customer service quality. With the virtual reality operator-training simulator ESOPE-VR, trainees can practice all necessary switching operations in complete safety, while maintaining a high degree of realism. A speech-recognition system allows for complete control of the training session by the operator trainee, while sound immersion adds a dimension of realism to the virtual world. An expert-system validates the trainee`s operations at all stages of the process and provides verbal context-sensitive advice whenever errors are made. A steady-state power-flow simulator recalculates network variables whenever operator actions lead to changes in topology. The automated conversion of station single-line diagrams to realistic three-dimensional models permits an operator to be trained economically for a larger number of stations.

  8. An Approach to Evaluating Equipment Efficiency Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsom, D. E.; Evans, A. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN APPROACH TO EVALUATING EQUIPMENT EFFICIENCY POLICIES Donald E. Newsom, Ph.D. and Allan R. Evans, Ph.D., P.E. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois ABSTRACT The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 authorized studies... odology to be used in performing the studies. i In response to the requirements of NECPA, 4r gonne National Laboratory has been engaged in t~e development of an approach to the evaluation of!pos i sible governmental policy options that would en~our- I...

  9. Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003ToolsearchTransportation Equipment (2010 MECS)

  10. Smart Buildings Equipment Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready, Set,Buildings Equipment Initiative Smart

  11. Zhongneng Windpower Equipments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifang SwisselectronicXianEquipments Jump to: navigation,

  12. Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards: Guidance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3Appliance and Equipment Standards Fact

  13. Equipment-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation100 tonEquipment

  14. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Application Process

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in807 DE89 002669 RF and^Equipment

  15. Equipment Certification Requirements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolisEnviroMissionEquipment Certification

  16. INL Equipment to Aid Regional Response Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in HallLeo282INL Equipment to

  17. Commercial Cooking Equipment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia, North Carolina:Cooking Equipment Incentives

  18. Commercial Refrigeration Equipment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia, North Carolina:Cooking Equipment

  19. Equips Nucleares SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision|LLCInsulation Incentives Retrieved fromEquips

  20. Evaluation of workplace air monitoring locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Cicotte, G.R.; Lynch, T.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Aldrich, L.K. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current federal guidance on occupational radiation protection recognizes the importance of conducting air flow studies to assist in the placement of air sampling and monitoring equipment. In support of this, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has provided technical assistance to Westinghouse Hanford Company for the purpose of evaluating the adequacy of air sampling and monitoring locations at selected Hanford facilities. Qualitative air flow studies were performed using smoke aerosols to visually determine air movement. Three examples are provided of how air flow studies results, along with information on the purpose of the air sample being collected, were used as a guide in placing the air samplers and monitors. Preparatory steps in conducting an air flow study should include: (1) identifying type of work performed in the work area including any actual or potential release points; (2) determining the amounts of radioactive material available for release and its chemical and physical form; (3) obtaining accurate work area descriptions and diagrams; (4) identifying the location of existing air samplers and monitors; (5) documenting physical and ventilation configurations; (6) notifying appropriate staff of the test; and (7) obtaining necessary equipment and supplies. The primary steps in conducting an air flow study are measurements of air velocities in the work area, release of the smoke aerosol at selected locations in the work area and the observation of air flow patterns, and finally evaluation and documentation of the results. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  1. INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Forbes

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

  2. Instrumentation development for real time brainwave monitoring.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Lawrence Frederick; Clough, Benjamin W.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The human brain functions through a chemically-induced biological process which operates in a manner similar to electrical systems. The signal resulting from this biochemical process can actually be monitored and read using tools and having patterns similar to those found in electrical and electronics engineering. The primary signature of this electrical activity is the ''brain wave'', which looks remarkably similar to the output of many electrical systems. Likewise, the device currently used in medical arenas to read brain electrical activity is the electroencephalogram (EEG) which is synonymous with a multi-channel oscilloscope reading. Brain wave readings and recordings for medical purposes are traditionally taken in clinical settings such as hospitals, laboratories or diagnostic clinics. The signal is captured via externally applied scalp electrodes using semi-viscous gel to reduce impedance. The signal will be in the 10 to 100 microvolt range. In other instances, where surgeons are attempting to isolate particular types of minute brain signals, the electrodes may actually be temporarily implanted in the brain during a preliminary procedure. The current configurations of equipment required for EEGs involve large recording instruments, many electrodes, wires, and large amounts of hard disk space devoted to storing large files of brain wave data which are then eventually analyzed for patterns of concern. Advances in sensors, signal processing, data storage and microelectronics over the last decade would seem to have paved the way for the realization of devices capable of ''real time'' external monitoring, and possible assessment, of brain activity. A myriad of applications for such a capability are likewise presenting themselves, including the ability to assess brain functioning, level of functioning and malfunctioning. Our plan is to develop the sensors, signal processing, and portable instrumentation package which could capture, analyze, and communicate information on brain activity which could be of use to the individual, medical personnel or in other potential arenas. To take this option one step further, one might foresee that the signal would be captured, analyzed, and communicated to a person or device and which would result an action or reaction by that person or device. It is envisioned that ultimately a system would include a sensor detection mechanism, transmitter, receiver, microprocessor and associated memory, and audio and/or visual alert system. If successful in prototyping, the device could be considered for eventual implementation in ASIC form or as a fully integrated CMOS microsystem.

  3. New Remote Method for Estimation of Contamination Levels of Reactor Equipment - 13175

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilovich, Alexey; Ivanov, Oleg; Potapov, Victor; Semenov, Sergey; Semin, Ilya; Smirnov, Sergey; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Volkovich, Anatoly [National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)] [National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projects for decommissioning of shutdown reactors and reactor facilities carried out in several countries, including Russia. In the National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute' decontamination and decommissioning of the research reactor MR (Material Testing Reactor) has been initiated. The research reactor MR has a long history and consists of nine loop facilities for experiments with different kinds of fuel. During the operation of main and auxiliary equipment of reactors it was subjected to strong radioactive contamination. The character of this contamination requires individual strategies for the decontamination work. This requires information about the character of the distribution of radioactive contamination of equipment in the premises. A detailed radiation survey of these premises using standard dosimetric equipment is almost impossible because of high levels of radiation and high-density of the equipment that does not allow identifying the most active fragments using standard tools of measurement. The problem can be solved using the method of remote measurements of distribution of radioactivity with help of the collimated gamma-ray detectors. For radiation surveys of the premises of loop installations remotely operated spectrometric collimated system was used [1, 2, 3]. As a result of the work, maps of the distribution of activity and dose rate for surveyed premises were plotted and superimposed on its photo. The new results of measurements in different areas of the reactor and at its loop installations, with emphasis on the radioactive survey of highly-contaminated samples, are presented. (authors)

  4. Wireless Infrastructure for Performing Monitoring, Diagnostics, and Control HVAC and Other Energy-Using Systems in Small Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick O'Neill

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on developing a low-cost wireless infrastructure for monitoring, diagnosing, and controlling building systems and equipment. End users receive information via the Internet and need only a web browser and Internet connection. The system used wireless communications for: (1) collecting data centrally on site from many wireless sensors installed on building equipment, (2) transmitting control signals to actuators and (3) transmitting data to an offsite network operations center where it is processed and made available to clients on the Web (see Figure 1). Although this wireless infrastructure can be applied to any building system, it was tested on two representative applications: (1) monitoring and diagnostics for packaged rooftop HVAC units used widely on small commercial buildings and (2) continuous diagnosis and control of scheduling errors such as lights and equipment left on during unoccupied hours. This project developed a generic infrastructure for performance monitoring, diagnostics, and control, applicable to a broad range of building systems and equipment, but targeted specifically to small to medium commercial buildings (an underserved market segment). The proposed solution is based on two wireless technologies. The first, wireless telemetry, is used for cell phones and paging and is reliable and widely available. This risk proved to be easily managed during the project. The second technology is on-site wireless communication for acquiring data from sensors and transmitting control signals. The technology must enable communication with many nodes, overcome physical obstructions, operate in environments with other electrical equipment, support operation with on-board power (instead of line power) for some applications, operate at low transmission power in license-free radio bands, and be low cost. We proposed wireless mesh networking to meet these needs. This technology is relatively new and has been applied only in research and tests. This proved to be a major challenge for the project and was ultimately abandoned in favor of a directly wired solution for collecting sensor data at the building. The primary reason for this was the relatively short ranges at which we were able to effectively place the sensor nodes from the central receiving unit. Several different mesh technologies were attempted with similar results. Two hardware devices were created during the original performance period of the project. The first device, the WEB-MC, is a master control unit that has two radios, a CPU, memory, and serves as the central communications device for the WEB-MC System (Currently called the 'BEST Wireless HVAC Maintenance System' as a tentative commercial product name). The WEB-MC communicates with the local mesh network system via one of its antennas. Communication with the mesh network enables the WEB-MC to configure the network, send/receive data from individual motes, and serves as the primary mechanism for collecting sensor data at remote locations. The second antenna enables the WEB-MC to connect to a cellular network ('Long-Haul Communications') to transfer data to and from the NorthWrite Network Operations Center (NOC). A third 'all-in-one' hardware solution was created after the project was extended (Phase 2) and additional resources were provided. The project team leveraged a project funded by the State of Washington to develop a hardware solution that integrated the functionality of the original two devices. The primary reason for this approach was to eliminate the mesh network technical difficulties that severely limited the functionality of the original hardware approach. There were five separate software developments required to deliver the functionality needed for this project. These include the Data Server (or Network Operations Center), Web Application, Diagnostic Software, WEB-MC Embedded Software, Mote Embedded Software. Each of these developments was necessarily dependent on the others. This resulted in a challenging management task - requiring high bandwidth communications among

  5. Mixed Oxide Fresh Fuel Package Auxiliary Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapuncich, F.; Ross, A. [AREVA Federal Services (AFS), Tacoma WA (United States); Clark, R.H. [Shaw AREVA MOX Services, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Ammerman, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is overseeing the construction the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) on the Savannah River Site. The new facility, being constructed by NNSA's contractor Shaw AREVA MOX Services, will fabricate fuel assemblies utilizing surplus plutonium as feedstock. The fuel will be used in designated commercial nuclear reactors. The MOX Fresh Fuel Package (MFFP), which has recently been licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a type B package (USA/9295/B(U)F-96), will be utilized to transport the fabricated fuel assemblies from the MFFF to the nuclear reactors. It was necessary to develop auxiliary equipment that would be able to efficiently handle the high precision fuel assemblies. Also, the physical constraints of the MFFF and the nuclear power plants require that the equipment be capable of loading and unloading the fuel assemblies both vertically and horizontally. The ability to reconfigure the load/unload evolution builds in a large degree of flexibility for the MFFP for the handling of many types of both fuel and non fuel payloads. The design and analysis met various technical specifications including dynamic and static seismic criteria. The fabrication was completed by three major fabrication facilities within the United States. The testing was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. The unique design specifications and successful testing sequences will be discussed. (authors)

  6. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs.

  7. Electronics of LHCb calorimeter monitoring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konoplyannikov, A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All calorimeter sub-detectors in LHCb, the Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD), the Preshower detector (PS), the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) and the Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) are equipped with the Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes (PMT) as devices for light to electrical signal conversion [1]. The PMT gain behaviour is not stable in a time, due to changes in the load current and due to ageing. The calorimeter light emitting diode (LED) monitoring system has been developed to monitor the PMT gain over time during data taking. Furthermore the system will play an important role during the detector commissioning and during LHC machine stops, in order to perform tests of the PMTs, cables and FE boards and measurements of relative time alignment. The aim of the paper is to describe the LED monitoring system architecture, some technical details of the electronics implementation based on radiation tolerant components and to summarize the system performance.

  8. 2. Unit Operation Dynamic simulation Unit operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    specification . 2.2 Heat transfer equipment Air cooler, cooler/heater, heat exchanger, fired heater LNG multi flow heat exchanger . 2.3 Piping equipment Mixer, tee, pipe, gas pipe, valve, relief valve . 2.4 Rotating equipment Centrifugal compressor or expander, reciprocating compressor pump ,dynamic simulation

  9. Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The statute establishes a procedure for the review, approval, monitoring, and enforcement of compliance in the planning, siting, construction, and operation of energy facilities, including...

  10. Seeps and springs sampling and analysis plant for the Environmental Monitoring Plan at Waste Area Grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted at seeps and springs and at two french drain outlets in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-land-burial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Lockheed Martin Energy System, Inc. Initially, sampling will be conducted at as many as 15 locations within WAG 6 (as many as 13 seeps and 2 french drain outlets). After evaluating the results obtained and reviewing the observations made by field personnel during the first round of sampling, several seeps and springs will be chosen as permanent monitoring points, together with the two french drain outlets. Baseline sampling of these points will then be conducted quarterly for 1 year (i.e., four rounds of sampling after the initial round). The samples will be analyzed for various geochemical, organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. Permanent sampling points having suitable flow rates and conditions may be outfitted with automatic flow-monitoring equipment. The results of the sampling and flow-monitoring efforts will help to quantify flux moving across the ungauged perimeter of the site and will help to identify changes in releases from the contaminant sources.

  11. Seeps and springs sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted at seeps and springs and at two french drain outlets in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-land-burial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Initially, sampling will be conducted at as many as 15 locations within WAG 6 (as many as 13 seeps and 2 french drain outlets). After evaluating the results obtained and reviewing the observations made by field personnel during the first round of sampling, several seeps and springs will be chosen as permanent monitoring points, together with the two french drain outlets. Baseline sampling of these points will then be conducted quarterly for 1 year (i.e., four rounds of sampling after the initial round). The samples will be analyzed for various geochemical, organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. Permanent sampling points having suitable flow rates and conditions may be outfitted with automatic flow-monitoring equipment. The results of the sampling and flow-monitoring efforts will help to quantify flux moving across the ungauged perimeter of the site and will help to identify changes in releases from the contaminant sources.

  12. Reducing complexity In biomanufacturing operations through single-use assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfano, Edward J. (Edward James)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics operates a centralized equipment cleaning and preparation suite at a vaccine production facility in Marburg, Germany. The ~100 pieces of multi-use stainless steel, glass, and plastic ...

  13. Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant Modules Designed to Integrate with Standard Unitary Rooftop Package Equipment - Final Report: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, J

    2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the investigation of two active desiccant module (ADM) pilot site installations initiated in 2001. Both pilot installations were retrofits at existing facilities served by conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems that had encountered frequent humidity control, indoor air quality (IAQ), and other operational problems. Each installation involved combining a SEMCO, Inc., ADM (as described in Fischer and Sand 2002) with a standard packaged rooftop unit built by the Trane Company. A direct digital control (DDC) system integral to the ADM performed the dual function of controlling the ADM/rooftop combination and facilitating data collection, trending, and remote performance monitoring. The first installation involved providing preconditioned outdoor air to replace air exhausted from the large kitchen hood and bathrooms of a Hooters restaurant located in Rome, Georgia. This facility had previously added an additional rooftop unit in an attempt to achieve occupant comfort without success. The second involved conditioning the outdoor air delivered to each room of a wing of the Mountain Creek Inn at the Callaway Gardens resort. This hotel, designed in the ''motor lodge'' format with each room opening to the outdoors, is located in southwest Georgia. Controlling the space humidity always presented a serious challenge. Uncomfortable conditions and musty odors had caused many guests to request to move to other areas within the resort. This is the first field demonstration performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory where significant energy savings, operating cost savings, and dramatically improved indoor environmental conditions can all be claimed as the results of a retrofit desiccant equipment field installation. The ADM/rooftop combination installed at the restaurant resulted in a reduction of about 34% in the electricity used by the building's air-conditioning system. This represents a reduction of approximately 15% in overall electrical energy consumption and a 12.5-kW reduction in peak demand. The cost of gas used for regeneration of the desiccant wheel over this period of time is estimated to be only $740, using a gas cost of $0.50 per therm--the summer rate in 2001. The estimated net savings is $5400 annually, resulting in a 1-2 year payback. It is likely that similar energy/cost savings were realized at the Callaway Gardens hotel. In this installation, however, a central plant supplied the chilled water serving fan coil units in the hotel wing retrofitted with the ADM, so it was not metered separately. Consequently, the owner could not provide actual energy consumption data specific to the facility. The energy and operating cost savings at both sites are directly attributable to higher cooling-season thermostat settings and decreased conventional system run times. These field installations were selected as an immediate and appropriate response to correct indoor humidity and fresh air ventilation problems being experienced by building occupants and owners, so no rigorous baseline-building vs. test-building energy use/operating cost savings results can be presented. The report presents several simulated comparisons between the ADM/roof HVAC approach and other equipment combinations, where both desiccant and conventional systems are modeled to provide comparable fresh air ventilation rates and indoor humidity levels. The results obtained from these simulations demonstrate convincingly the energy and operating cost savings obtainable with this hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression technology, verifying those actually seen at the pilot installations. The ADM approach is less expensive than conventional alternatives providing similar performance and indoor air quality and provides a very favorable payback (1 year or so) compared with oversized rooftop units that cannot be operated effectively with the necessary high outdoor air percentages.

  14. Risk-Informed Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (RI-MVA). An NRAP White Paper Documenting Methods and a Demonstration Model for Risk-Informed MVA System Design and Operations in Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Sullivan, E. C.; Anderson, Richard M.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper accompanies a demonstration model that implements methods for the risk-informed design of monitoring, verification and accounting (RI-MVA) systems in geologic carbon sequestration projects. The intent is that this model will ultimately be integrated with, or interfaced with, the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) integrated assessment model (IAM). The RI-MVA methods described here apply optimization techniques in the analytical environment of NRAP risk profiles to allow systematic identification and comparison of the risk and cost attributes of MVA design options.

  15. Space and Movable Equipment Inventory Revision: July 31, 2014 CERTIFICATION OF SPACE AND MOVABLE EQUIPMENT INVENTORY -FISCAL YEAR 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Space and Movable Equipment Inventory Revision: July 31, 2014 CERTIFICATION OF SPACE AND MOVABLE EQUIPMENT INVENTORY - FISCAL YEAR 2014 TO BE USED FOR IBB PLANNING FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016 I acknowledge that the space and movable equipment inventory results conducted for this fiscal year will be used for IBB

  16. Managing EHS of PV-Related Equipment at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCuskey, T.; Nelson, B. P.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing environment, health, and safety (EHS) risks at a national laboratory, or university, can be intimidating to a researcher who is focused on research results. Laboratory research and development (R&D) operations are often driven by scientists with limited engineering support and lack well-refined equipment development resources. To add to the burden for a researcher, there is a plethora of codes, standards, and regulations that govern the safe installation and operation of photovoltaic-related R&D equipment -- especially those involving hazardous production materials. To help guide the researcher through the vast list of requirements, the EHS office at NREL has taken a variety of steps. Organizationally, the office has developed hazard-specific laboratory-level procedures to govern particular activities. These procedures are a distillation of appropriate international codes, fire agencies, SEMI standards, U.S. Department of Energy orders, and other industry standards to those necessary and sufficient to govern the safe operation of a given activity. The EHS office works proactively with researchers after a concept for a new R&D capability is conceived to help guide the safe design, acquisition, installation, and operation of the equipment. It starts with a safety assessment at the early stages such that requirements are implemented to determine the level of risk and degree of complexity presented by the activity so appropriate controls can be put in place to manage the risk. As the equipment requirements and design are refined, appropriate equipment standards are applied. Before the 'to-build' specifications are finalized, a process hazard analysis is performed to ensure that no single-point failure presents an unacceptable risk. Finally, as the tool goes through construction and installation stages, reviews are performed at logical times to ensure that the requisite engineering controls and design are in place and operational. Authorization to operate is not given until adherence to these requirements is fully verified and documented. Operations continue under the conditions defined through this process and are reviewed with changing processes.

  17. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market. Turf grass is a fixture of the American landscape and the American economy. It is the nation's largest irrigated crop, covering more than 40 million acres. Legions of lawnmowers care for this expanse during the growing season-up to year-round in the warmest climates. The annual economic impact of the U.S. turf grass industry has been estimated at more than $62 billion. Lawn mowing also contributes to the nation's petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions. Mowers consume 1.2 billion gallons of gasoline annually, about 1% of U.S. motor gasoline consumption. Commercial mowing accounts for about 35% of this total and is the highest-intensity use. Large property owners and mowing companies cut lawns, sports fields, golf courses, parks, roadsides, and other grassy areas for 7 hours per day and consume 900 to 2,000 gallons of fuel annually depending on climate and length of the growing season. In addition to gasoline, commercial mowing consumes more than 100 million gallons of diesel annually. Alternative fuel mowers are one way to reduce the energy and environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. They can reduce petroleum use and emissions compared with gasoline- and diesel-fueled mowers. They may also save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and promote a 'green' image. And on ozone alert days, alternative fuel mowers may not be subject to the operational restrictions that gasoline mowers must abide by. To help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits, Clean Cities produced this guide to alternative fuel commercial lawn equipment. Although the guide's focus is on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) mowers, some mowers can be converted to run on alternative fuels. For more information about propane conversions. This guide may be particularly helpful for organizations that are already using alternative fuels in their vehicles and have an alternative fuel supply or electric charging in place (e.g., golf cart charging stations at most golf courses). On the flip side, experiencing the benefits of using alternative fuels in mowing equipment may encourage organizations to try them in on-road vehicles as well. Whatever the case, alternative fuel commercial lawnmowers are a powerful and cost-effective way to reduce U.S. petroleum dependence and help protect the environment.

  18. Monitoring Battery System for Electric Vehicle, Based On "One Wire" Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Catlica de Chile)

    Monitoring Battery System for Electric Vehicle, Based On "One Wire" Technology Javier Ibez Vial Santiago, Chile jdixon@ing.puc.cl Abstract-- A monitoring system for a battery powered electric vehicle (EV- powered electric vehicles, the need for fast information related to different components and equipment

  19. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

  1. Reactor operation safety information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

  2. Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

  3. Emergency sacrificial sealing method in filters, equipment, or systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Erik P

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system seals a filter or equipment component to a base and will continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire. The system includes a first sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base; and a second sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base and proximate the first sealing material. The first sealing material and the second seal material are positioned relative to each other and relative to the filter or equipment component and the base to seal the filter or equipment component to the base and upon the event of fire the second sealing material will be activated and expand to continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire.

  4. Engineering Work Plan for the Development of Phased Startup Initiative (PSI) Phases 3 and 4 Test Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of tools and equipment pieces are required to facilitate planned test operations during Phases 3 and 4 of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). These items will be used in assessing residual canister sludge quantities on cleaned fuel assemblies, sorting coarse and fine scrap fuel pieces, assessing the size distribution of scrap pieces, loading scrap into a canister, and measuring the depth of the accumulated scrap in a canister. This work plan supercedes those previously issued for development of several of these test items. These items will be considered prototype equipment until testing has confirmed their suitability for use in K West Basin. The process described in AP-EN-6-032 will be used to qualify the equipment for facility use. These items are considered non-OCRWM for PSI Phase 3 applications. The safety classification of this equipment is General Service, with Quality Level 0 (for PSI Phase 3). Quality Control inspections shall be performed to verify basic dimensions and overall configurations of fabricated components, and any special quality control verifications specified in this work plan (Section 3.1.5). These inspections shall serve to approve the test equipment for use in K West Basin (Acceptance Tag). This equipment is for information gathering only during PSI Phases 3 and 4 activities, and will be discarded at the completion of PSI. For equipment needed to support actual production throughput, development/fabrication/testing activities would be more rigorously controlled.

  5. Addressing equipment set-up time and manufacturing cost through real time inline inspection in tantalum wire manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzlez, Carlos A. (Carlos Alberto), 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For this study, a novel wire inspection system was developed to detect surface defects and monitor diameter real-time during the final wire drawing operation. Throughout his work, it was proven that the new inspection ...

  6. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  7. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  8. Real-time performance monitoring and management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  9. Safety analysis report for packaging, onsite, long-length contaminated equipment transport system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the components of the long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) transport system (TS) and provides the analyses, evaluations, and associated operational controls necessary for the safe use of the LLCE TS on the Hanford Site. The LLCE TS will provide a standardized, comprehensive approach for the disposal of approximately 98% of LLCE scheduled to be removed from the 200 Area waste tanks.

  10. Use of a Conversational Computer Program in Operator Training for Improved Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brickman, S. W.; Mergens, E. H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficient operation of process equipment requires attentive operation by well-trained personnel. Use of a computer simulation model together with a conversational computer program, which provides dynamic game playing opportunities...

  11. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

  12. Remote Operation, Immersive 3D Virtual Environments and Interactive Screen Experiments for Teaching Practical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Andrew J.

    scale, and may broadly be divided into three categories: 1. remote operation of equipment 2. immersive 3 will be a compulsory component of the new BSc Natural Science qualification that is currently being developed by the OU Operation of Equipment : PIRATE PIRATE (the Physics Innovations Robotic Astronomical TElescope) is a remote

  13. Brief scales to assess physical activity and sedentary equipment in the home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assess test- retest reliability of equipment counts for eachhigher test-retest reliability for all equipment scales thanreliability of report- ing portable electronic equipment and

  14. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years.

  16. Beam Loss Monitors in the NSLS Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer,S.L.; Fedurin, M.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam loss monitors (BLM) have been used for more than two decades in the VUV ring at the NSLS. These have proved useful for optimizing injection and operation of the ring. Recently similar monitors have been installed in the X-ray ring and are being used to better understand injection, as well as operation of the ring. These units have been compared with the Bergoz BLMs, which have been mostly useful for understanding operating beam losses.

  17. Fissile Flow and Enrichment Monitor for GCEP Advanced Safeguards Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL] [ORNL; Uckan, Taner [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents experimental data that demonstrate a concept for a {sup 235}U flow and enrichment monitor (FEMO) based on passive measurements of process equipment in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The primary goal of the FEMO is to prevent, without using pipe penetrations or active interrogation with external sources, the production and diversion of undeclared nuclear material. This FEMO concept utilizes: (1) calibrated measurements of {sup 235}U density in cascade headers, and (2) measurements of pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate, which are correlated to the electrical power consumed by the GCEP pumps that transport UF{sub 6} from the cascade to the condensation cylinders. The {sup 235}U density is measured by counting 186 keV emissions using a NaI gamma detector located upstream of the pump. The pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate are determined using a correlation that is a function of the measured pump operational parameters (e.g., electric power consumption and rotational frequency) and the pumping configuration. The concept has been demonstrated in a low-pressure flow loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  18. Monitoring and Commissioning for Green Campuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietilainen, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tool supporting tool in walk-through audits.  Indoor and outdoor thermography can be done during that one-day assessment"Level IV"Continuous & Monitoring Based Commissioning VTT Copyright VTT Energy Auditing & Continuous Commissioning Owner O&M User...1International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations (ICEBO 2014) Tsinghua University, September 14-17, 2014, Beijing, China Jorma Pietilinen, Senior Scientist Janne Peltonen, Senior Scientist Monitoring and Commissioning for Green Campuses...

  19. An instrumentation package for monitoring tractor performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Malcolm Kirk

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of performance for most current tractor models was engine speed. Since overall tractor performance was influenced by several operating variables, not just engine speed, additional monitors and displays of performance were needed. Tractor performance monitors... Rotational Sp D' fferential Speed Measurement Draft Measurement Rear Axle Torque Measurement Fuel Consumption Measurement Campbell CR5 Digital Recorder Field Test Design and Procedures Data Requirements Test Site and Field Variables Travel Speed...

  20. Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVault, Robert C [ORNL; Hudson II, Carl Randy [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of potential cooling, heating and power (CHP) applications requires an assessment of the operations and economics of a particular system in meeting the electric and thermal demands of a specific end-use facility. A key determinate in whether a candidate system will be economic is the proper selection of equipment capacities. A methodology to determine the optimal capacities for CHP prime movers and absorption chillers using nonlinear optimization algorithms has been coded into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tool that performs the capacity optimization and operations simulation. This paper presents details on the use and results of this publicly available tool.

  1. 2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  2. Powerline Communication System for Monitoring and Supervision of Feeder Equipments for MV Substation Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    into the substations by the utilities to integrate data from relays and Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) and capitalize on the protection, control, metering, fault recording, communication functions available been designed and retrofitted into the substations by the utilities to integrate data from relays

  3. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program.

  4. Development of a High Latent Effectiveness Energy Recovery Ventilator with Integration into Rooftop Package Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory M. Dobbs; Norberto O. Lemcoff; Frederick J. Cogswell; Jeffrey T. Benolt

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report covers the Cooperative Program carried out to design and optimize an enhanced flat-plate energy recovery ventilator and integrate it into a packaged unitary (rooftop) air conditioning unit. The project objective was to optimize the design of a flat plate energy recovery ventilator (ERV) core that compares favorably to flat plate air-to-air heat exchanger cores on the market and to cost wise to small enthalpy wheel devices. The benefits of an integrated unit incorporating an enhanced ERV core and a downsized heating/cooling unit were characterized and the design of an integrated unit considering performance and cost was optimized. Phase I was to develop and optimize the design of a membrane based heat exchanger core. Phase II was the creation and observation of a system integrated demonstrator unit consisting of the Enhanced Energy Recovery Ventilator (EERV) developed in Phase I coupled to a standard Carrier 50HJ rooftop packaged unitary air conditioning unit. Phase III was the optimization of the system prior to commercialization based on the knowledge gained in Phase II. To assure that the designs chosen have the possibility of meeting cost objectives, a preliminary manufacturability and production cost study was performed by the Center for Automation Technologies at RPI. Phase I also included a preliminary design for the integrated unit to be further developed in Phase II. This was to assure that the physical design of the heat exchanger designed in Phase I would be acceptable for use in Phase II. An extensive modeling program was performed by the Center for Building Performance & Diagnostics of CMU. Using EnergyPlus as the software, a typical office building with multiple system configurations in multiple climatic zones in the US was simulated. The performance of energy recovery technologies in packaged rooftop HVAC equipment was evaluated. The experimental program carried out in Phases II and III consisted of fabricating and testing a demonstrator unit using Carrier Comfort Network (CCN) based controls. Augmenting the control signals, CCN was also used to monitor and record additional performance data that supported modeling and conceptual understanding. The result of the testing showed that the EERV core developed in Phase I recovered energy in the demonstrator unit at the expected levels based on projections. In fact, at near-ARI conditions the core recovered about one ton of cooling enthalpy when operating with a three-ton rooftop packaged unit.

  5. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vilim, Richard B. (Aurora, IL); Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Hts., IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process.

  6. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vilim, R.B.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system are disclosed for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process. 33 figs.

  7. PLASMAQUEST STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE CORAL Name: Plasmaquest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    PLASMAQUEST STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE CORAL Name: Plasmaquest Model Number: 145 Location: TRL. PROCEDURE: Check reservations in CORAL to insure that you reserved the correct machine in the correct, if this is the case. `Engage' the machine in CORAL for the equipment that you are about to use; use this command

  8. SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    approved personal flotation devices appropriate to the prevailing conditions, hard hats, closed footwearSAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS 7.20 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Originator of 2 7.20.1 Purpose The purpose of this procedure is to establish guidelines for the use of personal

  9. Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program produced this guide to help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits. This guide provides information about equipment powered by propane, ethanol, compressed natural gas, biodiesel, and electricity, as well as advanced engine technology. In addition to providing an overview for organizations considering alternative fuel lawn equipment, this guide may also be helpful for organizations that want to consider using additional alternative fueled equipment.

  10. Home and Farm Security Machinery and Equipment Identification.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Gary S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    73 Fibme and Farm Security -m Machinery and Equipment identification Home and Farm Security chinery and Equipment Identification *Gary S. Nelson is no longer just an urban problem. d burglaries in rural communities have to an alarming... insurance y equipment replacement, lost work urs and so forth. mers can discourage and minimize y theft from their farms is by providing a law enforcement officers to easily identify Mark all machinery and tools with a tification number (ID). Use...

  11. Evaluation of retrieval activities and equipment for removal of containers from the transuranic storage area retrieval enclosure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannister, R.; Rhoden, G.; Davies, G.B. [BNFL, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1970, the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has accepted over 55,000 cubic meters of Transuranic contaminated hazardous waste for interim storage. The waste has been neatly stored in ``cell`` configurations on adjoining, above ground asphalt pads at the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA). A number of reports have been supplied for review and comment describing the methodology and equipment proposed for retrieval of drums and boxes from a storage facility at the INEL site. The contract for this review requires two main issues to be addressed. First, the adequacy of equipment and methodology for the retrieval of containers which have been breached, lost structural integrity, or are otherwise damaged, Second, to review the strategies and equipment for retrieval of intact waste containers. These issues are presented in the following report along with additional detail in the methodology to complete the description of the operations required for retrieval under most operational scenarios. The documentation reviewed is considered to be at an interim stage and is therefore expected to be subject to the development of the methodology from the existing level of detail with input from the facility operators. This review aims to anticipate some of this development by providing suggested detailed methods of retrieval and equipment for both normal and abnormal operations.

  12. Sharif-Abadi and Joseph 1 Soft ground reaction to cyclic loading by large mobile mining equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Tim Grain

    opt for large mobile mining equipment. In the oil sand, loading and hauling of material results, truck and shovels operating on soft-ground will become less stable. Trucks in summer are frequently payloads the cycled ground after only a few passing trucks is unable to support the weight of the truck

  13. Final Technical Report for project entitled "Equipment Request for the Belleville Agricultural Research and Education Center"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Bryan; Nehring, Jarrett; Susan Graham, Brian Klubek

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary The funding provided by the DOE for this project was used exclusively to purchase research equipment involved with the field development and evaluation of crop production technologies and practices for energy crop production. The new equipment has been placed into service on the SIU farms and has significantly enhanced our research capacity and scope for agronomy and precision ag research to support novel seed traits or crop management strategies for improving the efficiency and productivity of corn and soybeans. More specifically, the precision ag capability of the equipment that was purchased has heightened interest by faculty and associated industry partners to develop collaborative projects. In addition, this equipment has provided SIU with a foundation to be more successful at securing competitive grants in energy crop production and precision ag data management. Furthermore, the enhanced capacity for agronomy research in the southern Illinois region has been realized and will benefit crop producers in this region by learning to improve their operations from our research outcomes.

  14. Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.1 Personal Protective Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Date: Facility Representative RL Facility Representative Program May 23, 1995 Surveillance Guide OSS 19.1 Revision 0 Personal Protective Equipment Page 5 of 5...

  15. Research Study - Global Enterprise VoIP Equipment Market Forecasts...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    policy and plan, Enterprise VoIP Equipment product specification, manufacturing process, cost structure etc. Then we deeply analyzed the world's main region market conditions that...

  16. Equipment and capabilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamos instruments Equipment and capabilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center enabled a geologist to determine that a dazzling 217.78-gram...

  17. Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperatures Geothermal Resources City of Eagan Civic Ice Arena Renovation Hybrid and Advanced Air Cooling...

  18. Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperatures Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources City of Eagan Civic Ice Arena Renovation Canby Cascaded Geothermal Project Phase 1 Feasibility...

  19. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: AeroVironment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pROGRAM Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: AeroVironment EVSE Features LED status light EVSE Specifications Grid connection Hardwired Connector type J1772 Test...

  20. Applications of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to Rotating Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    , engines), driven equipment (compressors, pumps, mixers, fans, extruders), transmission devices (gears diagnosis, trouble shooting, maintenance, sensor validation, and control. Artificial Neural Network (ANN