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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Molting in Reptiles and Amphibians  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molting in Reptiles and Amphibians Molting in Reptiles and Amphibians Nature Bulletin No. 642-A May 21, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MOLTING IN REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS A snake or a frog sheds its whole skin in one piece in just one day. On the contrary we lose a little of ours every day. Some is worn away and some is soaked loose every time we bathe. We do not realize how fast our skin grows until we have a broken arm or leg and see the crust of dead skin that forms under the case where it cannot be washed or scratched. Hair and feathers are really parts of the skin of mammals and birds. Dogs -- at least house dogs -- shed hair the year round. In contrast, a fur-bearing animal such as a mink loses its thick underfur in spring and grows a new coat before the next winter. Wild birds, as a rule, molt their feathers and replace them a few at a time so that they are always able to fly. Wild ducks and geese, on the other hand, lose all of their night feathers soon after nesting. Then, for a few weeks, while a new set of feathers is growing, they cannot fly. In order to grow, young insects, spiders and crayfish must exchange their tough outer coverings for new and larger ones.

2

1.1.6. An EDA/Graphics Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... are the goals and the fruits of an open exploratory data analysis (EDA) approach to ... which in the summarization operation do a good job of focusing ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Data:106886dc-19ab-46ed-a3d3-eda3a03c0876 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dc-19ab-46ed-a3d3-eda3a03c0876 dc-19ab-46ed-a3d3-eda3a03c0876 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Alliance, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights- Urban- 250W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.cityofalliance.net/documentcenter/view/237 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

4

Estimating meteor rates using Bayesian inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method for estimating the true meteor rate \\lambda\\ from a small number of observed meteors n is derived. We employ Bayesian inference with a Poissonian likelihood function. We discuss the choice of a suitable prior and propose the adoption of Jeffreys prior, P(\\lambda)=\\lambda^{-0.5}, which yields an expectation value E(\\lambda) = n+0.5 for any n \\geq 0. We update the ZHR meteor activity formula accordingly, and explain how 68%- and 95%-confidence intervals can be computed.

Barentsen, Geert; Fröhlich, Hans-Erich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

On the use of GP-GPUs for accelerating compute-intensive EDA applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General purpose graphics processing units (GP-GPUs) have recently been explored as a new computing paradigm for accelerating compute-intensive EDA applications. Such massively parallel architectures have been applied in accelerating the simulation of ...

Valeria Bertacco, Debapriya Chatterjee, Nicola Bombieri, Franco Fummi, Sara Vinco, A. M. Kaushik, Hiren D. Patel

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Analysis of historical meteor and meteor shower records: Korea, China, and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have compiled and analyzed historical Korean meteor and meteor shower records in three Korean official history books, Samguksagi which covers the three Kingdoms period (57 B.C -- A.D. 935), Goryeosa of Goryeo dynasty (A.D. 918 -- 1392), and Joseonwangjosillok of Joseon dynasty (A.D. 1392 -- 1910). We have found 3861 meteor and 31 meteor shower records. We have confirmed the peaks of Perseids and an excess due to the mixture of Orionids, north-Taurids, or Leonids through the Monte-Carlo test. The peaks persist from the period of Goryeo dynasty to that of Joseon dynasty, for almost one thousand years. Korean records show a decrease of Perseids activity and an increase of Orionids/north-Taurids/Leonids activity. We have also analyzed seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from Korean records. We confirm the seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from the records of Joseon dynasty with the maximum number of events being roughly 1.7 times the minimum. The Korean records are compared with Chinese and Japanese records for the same periods. Major features in Chinese meteor shower records are quite consistent with those of Korean records, particularly for the last millennium. Japanese records also show Perseids feature and Orionids/north-Taurids/Leonids feature, although they are less prominent compared to those of Korean or Chinese records.

Hong-Jin Yang; Changbom Park; Myeong-Gu Park

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Data:6c4275b2-72c0-4b73-9eda-e9204c3755e4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

75b2-72c0-4b73-9eda-e9204c3755e4 75b2-72c0-4b73-9eda-e9204c3755e4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Yale, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Winter Heating Rate Sector: Description: If a residential energy consumer permanently installs and uses equipment for electric space heating for human comfort of not less that 5 kW capacity and so informs the City in writing, 2,000 kWH in excess of 500 kWh shall be classified as space heating block for the Winter season for which the consumer shall be charged 4.3 cents per kWh. with the remaining excess at the prevailing rate schedule. Application of this provision shall apply to billings rendered in the months of November through April annually which is hereby interpreted as the winter heating season.

8

A Study on RFID Book Information Management System with an EDA/SOA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Event-driven architecture not only shares many of the same characteristics with service-oriented architecture, such as modularity, loose-couplings, and adaptability, but also has ability to process event in an asynchronous way .So it is able to respond ... Keywords: EDA/SOA, ESB, RFID Book Information Management system

Wu Jieming; Ding Yu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

EDA solutions to new-defect detection in advanced process technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For decades, EDA test generation tools for digital logic have relied on the Stuck-At fault model, despite the fact that process technologies moved forward from TTL (for which the Stuck-At fault model was originally developed) to nanometer-scale CMOS. ...

Erik Jan Marinissen; Gilbert Vandling; Sandeep Kumar Goel; Friedrich Hapke; Jason Rivers; Nikolaus Mittermaier; Swapnil Bahl

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Improved Prediction of Nitrogen Oxides Using GRNN with K-Means Clustering and EDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current study presented a generalized regression neural network (GRNN) based approach to predict nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted from coal-fired boiler. A novel 'multiple' smoothing parameters, which is different from the standard algorithm in which ... Keywords: GRNN, EDA, K-means Clustering, Nitrogen Oxides, Power plants

Ligang Zheng; Shuijun Yu; Wei Wang; Minggao Yu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Data:273289df-3e81-4909-acbd-1c9508283eda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df-3e81-4909-acbd-1c9508283eda df-3e81-4909-acbd-1c9508283eda No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Midwest Energy Inc Effective date: 2012/06/29 End date if known: Rate name: LAL- MH 1000 Watt 362 kWh (Existing Pole)- Metered Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.mwenergy.com/elecrate.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

12

Preventing Premature Convergence in a Simple EDA Via Global Step Size Setting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a simple real-valued estimation of distribution algorithm (EDA) with Gaussian model and maximum likelihood estimation of parameters is used, it converges prematurely even on the slope of the fitness function. The simplest way of preventing premature convergence by multiplying the variance estimate by a constant factor k each generation is studied. Recent works have shown that when increasing the dimensionality of the search space, such an algorithm becomes very quickly unable to traverse the slope and focus to the optimum at the same time. In this paper it is shown that when isotropic distributions with Gaussian or Cauchy distributed norms are used, the simple constant setting of k is able to ensure a reasonable behaviour of the EDA on the slope and in the valley of the fitness function at the same time.

Petr Posík

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Warm-Air Intrusions in Arizona’s Meteor Crater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Episodic nighttime intrusions of warm air, accompanied by strong winds, enter the enclosed near-circular Meteor Crater basin on clear, synoptically undisturbed nights. Data analysis is used to document these events and to determine their spatial ...

Bianca Adler; C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch; Manuela Lehner; Norbert Kalthoff

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Structure and dynamics of a complex of cellulose with EDA: insights into the action of amines on cellulose  

SciTech Connect

The neutron structure of a complex of EDA with cellulose has been determined to reveal the location of hydrogen atoms involved in hydrogen bonding. EDA disrupts the hydrogen bonding pattern of naturally occurring cellulose by accepting a strong hydrogen bond from the O6 hydroxymethyl group as the conformation of this group is rotated from tg to gt. The O3-H O5 intrachain hydrogen bond commonly found in cellulose allomorphs is observed to be disordered in the neutron structure, and quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics calculations show that O3 prefers to donate to EDA. The hydrogen bonding arrangement is highly dynamic with bonds continually being formed and broken thus explaining the difficulty in locating all of the hydrogen atoms in the neutron scattering density maps. Comparison with other polysaccharide-amine complexes supports a common underlying mechanism for amine disruption of cellulose.

Sawada, Daisuke [ORNL; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales (CERMAV-CNRS); Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Parthasarathi, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gnanakaran, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Forsyth, V. T. [Institut Laue Langevin and Keele University; Wada, Masahisa [University of Tokyo, Japan; Langan, Paul [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Data:2eda98f0-0267-4017-9804-c7232a620824 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eda98f0-0267-4017-9804-c7232a620824 eda98f0-0267-4017-9804-c7232a620824 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: United Electric Coop Service Inc Effective date: 2010/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation Service-Three Phase Option 1 Sector: Commercial Description: *Applicable to crop irrigation service. Subject to Rider Power Cost Recovery Factor Source or reference: http://www.united-cs.com/wp-content/themes/childishly-simple/documents/2013UCSTariff.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

16

Data:1962dc12-eda5-45cb-a5ea-469970428cdd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dc12-eda5-45cb-a5ea-469970428cdd dc12-eda5-45cb-a5ea-469970428cdd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navopache Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: 250 Watt MVL 110 kWh Cooperative Owned Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://navopache.coopwebbuilder.com/sites/navopache.coopwebbuilder.com/files/security_lights_2012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

17

Data:012caa49-81ad-4348-956e-da55ce762cef | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

caa49-81ad-4348-956e-da55ce762cef caa49-81ad-4348-956e-da55ce762cef No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Otero County Electric Coop Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Green Power Program Sector: Description: What is Green Power? Green power refers to electricity generated from renewable sources, such as solar, wind, biomass, and hydro power. How Does the Green Power Program Work? Otero County Electric Cooperative, Inc. (OCEC) purchases green power at a premium from Tri-State under its Voluntary Renewable Resource Program and then passes the cost of green power on to participating OCEC members. The cost of green power has decreased steadily since the program first started. Initially, it was $2.50 per 100 kWh block. Over the past few years it has been 50 cents and then 9 cents a block. Once again, Tri-State is passing along the reduction in the cost of green power to OCEC. Now, the premium is just 7.5 cents per 100 kWh block. This means that the average household purchasing seven blocks of green power can contribute to renewable energy for just 52.5 cents extra a month.

18

Data:69387dfd-178d-4ec4-a1f9-eda14db48462 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7dfd-178d-4ec4-a1f9-eda14db48462 7dfd-178d-4ec4-a1f9-eda14db48462 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nashville Electric Service Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: TDGSA - 1 - General Power TOU Commercial Sector: Commercial Description: * This rate shall apply to the firm power requirements (where the higher of a customer's onpeak or offpeak contract demand is greater than 1,000 kW but not more than 5,000 kW) for electric service to commercial, industrial, and governmental customers, and to institutional customers including, without limitation, churches, clubs, fraternities, orphanages, nursing homes, rooming or boarding houses, and like customers, provided that the other conditions of this section are met.

19

Data:6648eda2-bf9d-4ea7-8032-842dc3476009 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eda2-bf9d-4ea7-8032-842dc3476009 eda2-bf9d-4ea7-8032-842dc3476009 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Dakota Valley Elec Coop Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Electric Heat - Multi-Phase and consumer-owned generation Sector: Commercial Description: This rate is applicable to acceptable permanently wired electric heat installations that serve as a major heat source in a house, shop, livestock containment or small commercial building which are multi-phase accounts or accounts served in total or in part by a consumer-owned source of generation including but not limited to diesel, propane, wind or solar powered generators. The electric heating load must be 5-kW or larger and otherwise meet Cooperative requirements for loads metered. The electric heat installation must be wired and metered separately from the multi-phase or single-phase service which serves other non-electric heat loads and separately from the consumer-owned source of generation.

20

Data:18d37eda-061f-4fe2-abdb-a1a11869248a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eda-061f-4fe2-abdb-a1a11869248a eda-061f-4fe2-abdb-a1a11869248a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Indiana Michigan Power Co (Indiana) Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: ECLS - 70 watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Availability of Service. Available for streetlighting service to municipalities, counties, and other governmental subdivisions. The rates are applicable to new streetlights installed after April 6, 1981, and to 50,000 lumen high pressure sodium streetlights installed before that date. Only the lamps set forth below are available for such new service. Service rendered hereunder is predicated upon the execution by the customer of an agreement specifying the type, minimum number, and location of lamps to be served.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effects of zinc on Salmonella in the layer house environments and laying hens, and the ability of zinc to induce molt in laying hens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is increasing interest in developing methods to detect and identify Salmonella, to eliminate or reduce the risk of contamination of shell eggs, and to retain the economic advantages of induced molting without increasing the risk of Salmonella enteritidis infection. S. enteritidis and S. typhimurium are the most common serotypes among 2449 known serotypes of the Salmonella, and are the causes of most egg- related foodborne salmonellosis in humans in the U. S. These two species are also responsible for environmental contamination and the incidence of infections. Therefore, this study was conducted in three phases consisting of ten in vivo and in vitro experiments. This study investigated the effects of zinc on Salmonella growth and survivability in poultry environments, and its ability to induce a molt in single comb white leghorn hens. In part, the antibacterial properties of zinc may reduce environmental contamination in a poultry house by interrupting airborne routes. The first phase involved detecting airborne bacteria by aerosol sampling methods, and then screening any Salmonella mutant (s) that survived desiccation by transposon footprinting. The second phase examined, in vitro, the addition of zinc on the growth kinetics of Salmonella under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, the effects of combinating zinc and acidic conditions on the growth kinetics of Salmonella in vitro under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, and the effects of zinc amended feed on the survival of a dry inoculum of Salmonella. The third phase investigated the ability of zinc propionate, as an alternative salt form of zinc, to induce molt in laying hens, the influence of zinc acetate and zinc propionate on gastrointestinal tract fermentation, and susceptibility of laying hens to S. enteritidis during an induced molt, and the comparison of digestive microbial crop and cecal communities among molted hens fed by either zinc acetate or zinc propionate amended molting diets with hens undergoing feed withdrawal or full fed nonmolted hens using molecular-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

Park, Shinyoung

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

ARM - Datastreams - moltsedassfcclass0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsmoltsedassfcclass0 Datastreamsmoltsedassfcclass0 Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : MOLTSEDASSFCCLASS0 Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS meteor. analy., basic surface, params, stations Active Dates 1997.06.01 - 1999.09.27 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties, Radiometric, Surface Properties Originating Instrument Model Output Location Time Series (MOLTS) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Horizontal wind U_wind Horizontal wind V_wind Precipitation baseflow Cloud fraction cloud_hi Cloud fraction cloud_low Cloud fraction

23

ARM - Datastreams - moltsedassndclass1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsmoltsedassndclass1 Datastreamsmoltsedassndclass1 Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS meteor. analy., enhances soundings, params, stations Active Dates 1997.06.01 - 2013.07.31 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties, Radiometric, Surface Properties Originating Instrument Model Output Location Time Series (MOLTS) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Cloud fraction cloud_fract Atmospheric moisture cloud_h2o_mix Latent heat flux conv_lat_heat Atmospheric moisture humid Ice water content

24

Data:70fea17e-eda4-4a6a-9e81-5e3a9e785422 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fea17e-eda4-4a6a-9e81-5e3a9e785422 fea17e-eda4-4a6a-9e81-5e3a9e785422 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delaware Electric Cooperative Effective date: 2011/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting Service--Schedule L-1 Mercury Vapor Lamp- Area Lighting Luminaire (175w) Sector: Lighting Description: Available to Members, governments, agencies, public and private organizations desiring Electric Delivery or Electric Supply and Delivery Services through unmetered services for roadway and area lighting. Source or reference: http://www.delaware.coop/my-services/residential/billing/rates

25

Data:Eda86a80-0ed0-40a2-9f60-0167286c1311 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eda86a80-0ed0-40a2-9f60-0167286c1311 Eda86a80-0ed0-40a2-9f60-0167286c1311 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Singing River Elec Pwr Assn (Mississippi) Effective date: 2009/12/04 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting MH 400 W Flood Sector: Lighting Description: *Subject to power cost adjustment, tax expense adjustment, and an environmental compliance charge. Source or reference: http://www.singingriver.com/Files/R-18.pdf Source Parent: Comments Energy Adjustment is Power Cost Adjustment plus Environmental Clause plus Regulatory Adjustment Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

26

Data:D5f5af00-b065-41ed-a073-cec607a716ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f5af00-b065-41ed-a073-cec607a716ad f5af00-b065-41ed-a073-cec607a716ad No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bangor Hydro-Electric Co Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Incandescent-189 watts Sector: Lighting Description: Energy service only to municipalities owning, operating, and maintaining a street lighting system and limited to locations where secondary service is available. Traffic control lighting service may be rendered under this rate providing the customer furnishes the equipment. Customers taking service under this rate schedule are responsible for paying both Distribution Service and Stranded Cost.

27

Data:D7482bcd-9bf5-45ed-a40f-be00f15f715f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bf5-45ed-a40f-be00f15f715f bf5-45ed-a40f-be00f15f715f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Alabama Power Co Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100W High Pressure Sodium Contemporary Style Decorative Post Top Luminaires Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: www.alabamapower.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

28

Data:1ef2f6f9-fc3d-4343-8a9c-46a36f108eda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fc3d-4343-8a9c-46a36f108eda fc3d-4343-8a9c-46a36f108eda No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Wakefield, Michigan (Utility Company) Effective date: 2007/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: Off Peak Sector: Description: Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 3 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

29

Data:Ed342731-0163-43ab-b983-6eda3e8e087c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

31-0163-43ab-b983-6eda3e8e087c 31-0163-43ab-b983-6eda3e8e087c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delmarva Power Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: OL "HPS" 150 Watt (Enclosed) (Customer owned w/o maintanence) 69 kW Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.delmarva.com/_res/documents/DEMasterTariff.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

30

Data:Dd5d1fe0-1d39-4447-84fc-eda0914fb91d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fe0-1d39-4447-84fc-eda0914fb91d fe0-1d39-4447-84fc-eda0914fb91d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Morgan City, Utah (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Yard Lighting- Y5 Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

31

Data:552fc369-7cf0-4f9c-b245-9fab3a11edae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-7cf0-4f9c-b245-9fab3a11edae 9-7cf0-4f9c-b245-9fab3a11edae No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Tacoma, Washington (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: RS - Schedule A-1 - City of University Place Sector: Residential Description: Available for domestic purposes in residences, apartments, duplex houses and multiple family dwellings. Source or reference: www.mytpu.org/customer-service/rates/power-rates/power-rates-schedules.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

32

Data:F90c5677-efb9-4b42-8eda-0fcefd6e54ae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c5677-efb9-4b42-8eda-0fcefd6e54ae c5677-efb9-4b42-8eda-0fcefd6e54ae No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Grantville, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Residential-Monthly Sector: Residential Description: Applicable to all domestic uses of the customer in a separately metered single-family or apartment dwelling unit. Source or reference: Rate Binder#2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

33

Data:Fe10db54-07d8-48ed-a8ff-c0176768cde4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fe10db54-07d8-48ed-a8ff-c0176768cde4 Fe10db54-07d8-48ed-a8ff-c0176768cde4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Borough of Quakertown, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/09/26 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial All Electric (Electric Heat) Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.quakertownboro.com/index.aspx?page=103 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

34

Data:Ee88b6e3-4eda-403f-b0cc-0d550213e1cd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b6e3-4eda-403f-b0cc-0d550213e1cd b6e3-4eda-403f-b0cc-0d550213e1cd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Rita Blanca Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Large Power Sector: Commercial Description: *The Cooperative applies an adjustment factor each month to recover the amount paid to its supplier for fuel to generate electricity during the preceding month. Subject to Power Factor Adjustment. Source or reference: http://ritablancaelectric.com/page5.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

35

Data:Eda7c419-60dd-45b9-92ff-7d8432c39c27 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eda7c419-60dd-45b9-92ff-7d8432c39c27 Eda7c419-60dd-45b9-92ff-7d8432c39c27 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pearl River Valley El Pwr Assn Effective date: 2012/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: 70 OL-8 100/150 HPS, Big Bay Sector: Lighting Description: Available to all Consumer's subject to Association's established rules and regulations. Association's standard outdoor lighting facilities. Service includes Association furnishing, operating, and maintaining lighting fixture, control equipment and lamp. When Association is required to alter its normal facilities to furnish a special outdoor lighting service, there will be an additional monthly charge.

36

Data:8da44762-9c34-48f2-a9da-edae05479083 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

da44762-9c34-48f2-a9da-edae05479083 da44762-9c34-48f2-a9da-edae05479083 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Whitehall Electric Utility Effective date: 2010/02/15 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting- 150W HPS- Overhead Sector: Lighting Description: This schedule will be applied to municipal street lighting. The utility will furnish,install, and maintain street lighting units. This rate is subject to the Power Cost Adjustment Clause. Source or reference: http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/tariffs/viewfile.aspx?type=electric&id=6490 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

37

Data:Bed33fa1-b3d5-4133-b3f9-ebd07eda50c8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bed33fa1-b3d5-4133-b3f9-ebd07eda50c8 Bed33fa1-b3d5-4133-b3f9-ebd07eda50c8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: South Central Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2012/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Area&Directional Lighting Service Rate N732 Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: Illinois State University Rate Binder #10 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

38

Smoke and Dust Particles of Meteoric Origin in the Mesosphere and Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A height profile of ablated mass from meteors is calculated, assuming an incoming mass of 10?16 g cm?2 s?1 (44 metric tons per day) and the velocity distribution of Southworth and Sekanina, which has a mean of 14.5 km s?1. The profile peaks at 84 ...

Donald M. Hunten; Richard P. Turco; Owen B. Toon

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Topographic Effects on the Surface Radiation Balance in and around Arizona’s Meteor Crater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The individual components of the slope-parallel surface radiation balance were measured in and around Arizona’s Meteor Crater to investigate the effects of topography on the radiation balance. The crater basin has a diameter of 1.2 km and a depth ...

Sebastian W. Hoch; C. David Whiteman

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Diurnal Cycle of Thermally Driven Cross-Basin Winds in Arizona’s Meteor Crater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross-basin winds produced by asymmetric insolation of the crater sidewalls occur in Arizona’s Meteor Crater on days with weak background winds. The diurnal cycle of the cross-basin winds is analyzed together with radiation, temperature, and ...

Manuela Lehner; C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Data:Fe1ab725-18f5-423c-8e65-9680b6e95eda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ab725-18f5-423c-8e65-9680b6e95eda ab725-18f5-423c-8e65-9680b6e95eda No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Mitchell Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE PO-14 POULTRY HOUSES Multi-Phase Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY Available to consumers in the business of commercially growing poultry in breeder houses, broiler houses or pullet houses in all territory served by the Cooperative, in accordance with the Cooperative's Service Rules and Regulations, on an experimental basis, solely at the Cooperative's option. This rate schedule may be modified or withdrawn by the Cooperative at any time following sixty days notice to consumer.

42

Data:8589aabb-3b37-44dc-ba05-9eda2159d8fa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aabb-3b37-44dc-ba05-9eda2159d8fa aabb-3b37-44dc-ba05-9eda2159d8fa No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of New Bern, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Medium General Service- Time of Use Sector: Commercial Description: This Schedule is available on a voluntary basis for electric service at a single point of delivery at one of the City's standard voltages used by any non-residential Customer with a monthly demand of 30kW or greater, but less than 750 kW for at least three of the preceding twelve months. Also, this Schedule is available to those customers who were being served under the City's Small General Service (time-of-use) Schedule as of November 15, 1993.

43

Data:F7b8506d-5d3e-4ce0-abc9-a4a383eda56e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

06d-5d3e-4ce0-abc9-a4a383eda56e 06d-5d3e-4ce0-abc9-a4a383eda56e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Wheat Belt Public Power Dist Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: LARGE POWER Sector: Industrial Description: Qualifying Service Any single-phase or multi-phase service, greater than 50 kVA and less than 1000 kVA connected transformer capacity, delivered from the 12.5/7.2 or 24.9/14.4 kV distribution system. Power Factor Charge A power factor charge will be assessed to compensate for average power factor lower than eightyfive (85%) lagging. The power factor charge will be calculated by increasing the demand charge by one percent (1%) for each one percent (1%) by which the average power factor is less than eightyfive (85%) lagging. The District will consult with the customer regarding power factor correction and applicable charges before applying the provisions of this clause.

44

Data:C2221b0f-8650-4eda-9497-0c1f57c393de | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

21b0f-8650-4eda-9497-0c1f57c393de 21b0f-8650-4eda-9497-0c1f57c393de No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central Texas Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights(250 Watt High Pressure Sodium) Sector: Lighting Description: *KWh Allowance=100 KWh per month. When a security light is situated on the member's side of the meter, the kilowatt hours consumed in the operation of the light will be billed the Power Cost-Pass-Through and the Distribution Energy Charge as metered. When a security light is situated on the Cooperative's side of the meter, and the energy is not metered, the Power Cost Pass-Through shall be billed based on the kilowatt hour allowance above.

45

Data:4da4ae56-74b9-48ab-830e-da648de0bb50 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ae56-74b9-48ab-830e-da648de0bb50 ae56-74b9-48ab-830e-da648de0bb50 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sawnee Electric Membership Corporation Effective date: 2012/07/02 End date if known: Rate name: Large Commercial Time- Of- Use On- Peak Demand Three- Phase Service Sector: Commercial Description: *On Peak Demand: On-Peak Demand shall be the highest 30-minute kW measurement during the On-Peak Period, as defined below, for the current month. On- Peak Period: The on-peak period for the calendar months of June through August is defined as the hours starting at 2 p.m. and ending at 8 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding the days on which the following holidays are observed: Independence Day. For the calendar months of September through May, there shall be no hours defined as on-peak.

46

Data:12a99515-0eda-4991-8ebe-b838e14266e0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

15-0eda-4991-8ebe-b838e14266e0 15-0eda-4991-8ebe-b838e14266e0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Columbus Southern Power Co Effective date: 2012/03/09 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Storage Water Heating Energy Charge Sector: Residential Description: Storage Water Heating Provision: Availability of this provision is limited to those customers served under this provision as of December 31,2000.If the customer installs a Company approved storage water heating system which consumes electrical energy only during off-peak hours as specified by the Company and stores hot water for use during on-peak hours, the following shall apply: (a) For minimum capacity of 80 gallons, the last 300 KWH of use in any month shall be billed at the storage water heating energy charge. (Schedule Code 016)

47

Data:297509ed-a30d-475c-928a-3059f0f072d7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9ed-a30d-475c-928a-3059f0f072d7 9ed-a30d-475c-928a-3059f0f072d7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Wisconsin Rapids W W & L Comm Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service TOU Three Phase (8am to 8pm) Sector: Commercial Description: This rate schedule is optional to all Gs-1, General Service customers. Customers that wish to be served on this rate schedule must apply to the utility for service. Once an optional customer begins service on this rate schedule, the customer shall remain on the rate for a minimum of one year. 8am to 8pm This rate is subject to a Public Benefits Charge of 3% of the combined monthly electric charges, not to exceed $1.75.

48

Data:734e918e-80d0-45ed-a31b-dd794e3e5c4a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e918e-80d0-45ed-a31b-dd794e3e5c4a e918e-80d0-45ed-a31b-dd794e3e5c4a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: PUD No 1 of Franklin County Effective date: 2008/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: INDUSTRIAL SERVICE RATE SCHEDULE NO. 2.3 (PRIMARY) Sector: Industrial Description: Service under this schedule shall be available throughout the service area of the District for lighting and power to industrial loads where measured demand equals or exceeds 3,000 kW at least 3 months in a calendar year. MINIMUM BILL: Basic charge, but not less than $0.73 per month per KVA of transformer capacity required to serve the load unless otherwise provided by contract.

49

Data:Afb2f257-d88b-4d11-b2ed-a81722a0ce1d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-d88b-4d11-b2ed-a81722a0ce1d 7-d88b-4d11-b2ed-a81722a0ce1d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Juneau Utility Comm Effective date: 2010/07/15 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-3 Industrial Power Time-of-Day Service above 1,000kW Demand 8am-8pm Transformer Ownership Discount Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0753 per kilowatt-hour.

50

Data:0c6e4f3b-8487-4599-b34d-9eda8d1e68ce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e4f3b-8487-4599-b34d-9eda8d1e68ce e4f3b-8487-4599-b34d-9eda8d1e68ce No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Texas-New Mexico Power Co Effective date: 2009/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Roadway Lighting Service - (overhead service), Schedule I -Wood Pole - 100W, HPS Sector: Lighting Description: The service provided pursuant to this Tariff is for any end-use customer for roadway lighting service where existing facilities have adequate capacity and suitable voltage. Unmetered, automatically controlled, overhead lighting service operating from dusk to dawn. The Company will install, operate and maintain such lighting. Lights will be mounted on an existing service pole or poles and such service will be limited to 120 volt service.

51

Data:E980e058-ab13-47ed-a9a4-cac3d64b3d1b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80e058-ab13-47ed-a9a4-cac3d64b3d1b 80e058-ab13-47ed-a9a4-cac3d64b3d1b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Public Service Co of Colorado Effective date: 2010/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: CUSTOMER-OWNED LIGHTING SERVICE - SCHEDULE COL - Induction 165w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to the Colorado Department of Transportation and municipalities for Customer-Owned Lighting Service. This rate schedule is subject to all applicable Electric Rate Adjustments as on file and in effect in this tariff. Source or reference: http://www.xcelenergy.com/staticfiles/xe/Regulatory/Regulatory%20PDFs/psco_elec_entire_tariff.pdf

52

Data:B0a28cc9-ead6-4b6c-9ef2-2edaed70ed22 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a28cc9-ead6-4b6c-9ef2-2edaed70ed22 a28cc9-ead6-4b6c-9ef2-2edaed70ed22 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Manitowoc Public Utilities Effective date: 2009/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 Small Power Service Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0361 per kilowatt-hour.

53

Data:B1a90fc1-d6bf-4d41-86e8-5edae14aa134 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fc1-d6bf-4d41-86e8-5edae14aa134 fc1-d6bf-4d41-86e8-5edae14aa134 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Consumers Energy Co Effective date: 2012/06/08 End date if known: Rate name: GPD-Substation Ownership Credit Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.consumersenergy.com/tariffs.nsf/ELECTRIC_TARIFFS/BC92E05FDBD165C885257A28005E11D2/$FILE/elerates.pdf?Open Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

54

Data:6bd55fc9-c3f7-4542-bcab-545f8eda261c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bd55fc9-c3f7-4542-bcab-545f8eda261c bd55fc9-c3f7-4542-bcab-545f8eda261c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Borough of Lansdale, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/16 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting 175 W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.lansdale.org/vertical/Sites/%7B862B0D24-07B5-47AF-8DA9-6A7934A26ACB%7D/uploads/Motion_F_Res._13-02_revise_electric_rates_fees_etc._1.16.13.pdf Source Parent: http://www.lansdale.org Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

55

Data:Eda1bf5e-f6d9-4ae1-b465-aafa6122641f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eda1bf5e-f6d9-4ae1-b465-aafa6122641f Eda1bf5e-f6d9-4ae1-b465-aafa6122641f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Cleveland, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Power Rate-- GSC Sector: Industrial Description: This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 15,000 kW but not more than 25,000 kW; provided that the other conditions of this conditions are met. Source or reference: http://www.clevelandutilities.com/PDF/2011JulyElectricRates.pdf

56

Data:7e97dfbf-00d9-41ed-a5a5-ec9743b90beb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dfbf-00d9-41ed-a5a5-ec9743b90beb dfbf-00d9-41ed-a5a5-ec9743b90beb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KEM Electric Coop Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Grain Drying Controlled - Single Phase/Submeter Sector: Commercial Description: Available to all members who are drying agricultural crops. Type of Service This is a sub-meter service, single phase, 60 cycles, at secondary voltages. The Cooperative will provide sub-meter, meter socket, and C.T. equipment, and load management device necessary to measure and interrupt electric usage. Source or reference: http://www.kemelectric.com/Customer_Service/Rate_Schedules/Schedule%20GDS-1/index.html

57

Data:2b82eda6-4a71-47b4-8b86-fe706d41fd70 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eda6-4a71-47b4-8b86-fe706d41fd70 eda6-4a71-47b4-8b86-fe706d41fd70 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Orange & Rockland Utils Inc Effective date: 2012/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: SC16 Flood Lighting Sodium Vapor Overhead and Underground 400w (Customer owned, full service, multiple bills) Sector: Description: APPLICABLE TO USE OF SERVICE FOR: Sales and delivery of electric power supply provided by the Company or delivery of electric power supply provided by an Energy Service Company under the Company's Retail Access Program for outdoor lighting of areas, beyond the limits of public streets, highways or roadways, for use of individuals and private or public organizations where existing distribution facilities are suitable for the service requested.

58

Data:5c7c9657-a173-45b3-ae45-cb89a94eda6b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-a173-45b3-ae45-cb89a94eda6b -a173-45b3-ae45-cb89a94eda6b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Florence Utility Comm Effective date: 2009/11/30 End date if known: Rate name: Gs-2 General Service Single Phase Optional Time-of-Day 7am-7pm Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0791 per kilowatt-hour.

59

Data:6f36fe20-5503-4eda-9734-b5942d9bb0f4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fe20-5503-4eda-9734-b5942d9bb0f4 fe20-5503-4eda-9734-b5942d9bb0f4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Reedsburg Utility Comm Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Transformer Ownership Discount Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0785 per kilowatt-hour.

60

Data:Ba0f3eda-174c-4c9a-b225-2e529b0669d7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f3eda-174c-4c9a-b225-2e529b0669d7 f3eda-174c-4c9a-b225-2e529b0669d7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cg-1 (Time Of Day Three Phase) Sector: Commercial Description: Availability: Available to non-residential customers for single- or three- phase electric service. Not available for customers with a maximum demand of 25 kW or greater. Availability is at discretion of Company and is subject to the ability of Company to obtain and install required metering equipment. Company agrees to keep this schedule or a similar schedule available to customers for a minimum of five years. If customer moves, both original and new customers have the option to retain time-of-day billing or to transfer to Small General Service Rate Schedule Cg-2. Energy Cost Adjustment: Bills subject to the adjustment provided for in Energy Cost Adjustment. See schedule X-1, Sheet No. E 63.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Data:C4e1d877-5473-40c8-b95d-585d99eda5e2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d877-5473-40c8-b95d-585d99eda5e2 d877-5473-40c8-b95d-585d99eda5e2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lodi, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: Gs-2 General Service Optional Time-of-Day Single Phase less than 50kW Demand 9am-9pm with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0811 per kilowatt-hour.

62

Data:0994d8ed-a7ca-41df-8ea3-e826bd154d29 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:0994d8ed-a7ca-41df-8ea3-e826bd154d29 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sulphur Springs Valley E C Inc Effective date: 2013/03/18 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting: 250 Watt HPS - Double/Wood Sector: Lighting Description: Cooperative provided Facilities and Cooperative Owned and Maintained Lighting Service. Source or reference: http://www.ssvec.org/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2013/03/SSVEC-Rates-03.18.13.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

63

Data:31eda70a-0b4d-4182-9231-ef3cb4eba161 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:31eda70a-0b4d-4182-9231-ef3cb4eba161 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Swisher Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation Service Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

64

Data:0e50690c-9390-4982-8fbd-eda61f9d0e73 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c-9390-4982-8fbd-eda61f9d0e73 c-9390-4982-8fbd-eda61f9d0e73 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern Indiana Pub Serv Co Effective date: 2011/12/27 End date if known: Rate name: Multi Family Residential - Heat Pump Sector: Residential Description: TO WHOM AVAILABLE This tariff is available for Residential service to qualified Residential Customers living in a multifamily structure if residential service is supplied through individual unit meters of an apartment house or to a building containing two or more separate living quarters. The customer's service must be located on the Company's distribution lines suitable and adequate for supplying the service requested. Service is subject to the conditions set forth in this schedule and accompanying Rules and Regulations to this tariff. The Customer must have a company accepted heat pump as of the date of the final Order in Cause No. 43969 and operate that heat pump as the primary heating/cooling device for the residence. This device must be permanently installed and the customer shall utilize this device for both heating and cooling the same space. CHARACTER OF SERVICE Alternating current, 60 Hertz, secondary service, as designated by the Company. DETERMINATION OF AMOUNT OF ELECTRIC SERVICE SUPPLIED The electric service to be supplied under this Rate shall be measured as to Energy consumption by a Watt-Hour meter to be installed by the Company.

65

An ET Origin for Stratospheric Particles Collected during the 1998 Leonids Meteor Shower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On 17 November 1998, a helium-filled weather balloon was launched into the stratosphere, equipped with a xerogel microparticle collector. The three-hour flight was designed to sample the dust environment in the stratosphere during the Leonid meteor shower, and possibly to capture Leonid meteoroids. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope analyses of the returned collectors revealed the capture of a $\\sim$30-$\\mu$m particle, with a smooth, multigranular shape, and partially melted, translucent rims; similar to known Antarctic micrometeorites. Energy-dispersive X-ray Mass Spectroscopy shows enriched concentrations of the non-volatile elements, Mg, Al, and Fe. The particle possesses a high magnesium to iron ratio of 2.96, similar to that observed in 1998 Leonids meteors (Borovicka, {\\it et al.} 1999) and sharply higher than the ratio expected for typical material from the earth's crust. A statistical nearest-neighbor analysis of the abundance ratios Mg/Si, Al/Si, and Fe/Si demonstrates that the particle is most similar in composition to cosmic spherules captured during airplane flights through the stratosphere. The mineralogical class is consistent with a stony (S) type of silicates, olivine [(Mg,Fe)$_{2}$SiO$_{4}$] and pyroxene [(Mg,Fe)SiO$_{3}$]--or oxides, herecynite [(Fe, Mg) Al$_{2}$O$_{4}$]. Attribution to the debris stream of the Leonids' parent body, comet Tempel-Tuttle, would make it the first such material from beyond the orbit of Uranus positively identified on Earth.

D. A. Noever; J. A. Phillips; J. M. Horack; G. Jerman; E. Myszka

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Prevailing Wind in the Meteor Zone (80–100 km) over Atlanta and its Association with Midwinter Stratospheric Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind data generated by an all sky, continuous wave radio meteor wind facility at Atlanta (34°N, 84°W) is analyzed over the period of August 1974 through July 1975. Zonal and meridional components of the prevailing wind over the height range ...

Prakash M. Dolas; R. G. Roper

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Data:0dda256b-c753-4982-af6d-152e0a290eda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:0dda256b-c753-4982-af6d-152e0a290eda No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Rochester Gas & Electric Corp Effective date: 2013/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: SERVICE CLASSIFICATION NO. 9 GENERAL SERVICE TIME-OF-USE ESS (Retail) Single Phase Sector: Industrial Description: APPLICABLE TO USE OF SERVICE FOR: All purposes, in Entire Territory, at the option of customers who would otherwise be served under Service Classification No. 2, 3 or 7 of this Schedule. This service classification shall remain available to those customers taking service continuously hereunder as of October 24, 1997, but, after that date this classification shall no longer be available to new or converting customers. This classification is available to all such customers providing that access to a telephone extension is available at the meter location(s). Flat rate Adjustments = SBC+RPS+POR+TCV POR (http://www.rge.com/MediaLibrary/2/5/Content%20Management/RGE/SuppliersPartners/PDFs%20and%20Docs/STAT%20DISC%2019_8%20_2_.pdf)

68

Williston basin. Milestone test renews interest in Red Wing Creek field's meteor crater  

SciTech Connect

New drilling in the vicinity of Red Wing Creek field in McKenzie County, North Dakota has renewed interest in an area that has intrigued geologists for a number of years. Red Wing Creek was discovered in 1972 by True Oil Co. and has demonstrated better per-acre oil recovery than any other oil field in the Williston Basin. Fully developed several years ago, the field produces from what has been described as the central peak of an astrobleme, within a meteor crater. The current test by Milestone Petroleum Inc. is permitted to 14,200 ft and is being drilled on the rim of the crater, in SW SW 35-148n-101w, approx. a mile south of Red Wing production. The primary objective is the Ordovician Red River; but plans call for drilling deeper, through the Winnipeg, to below the Mississippian sediments that produce at Red Wing Creek field. At least 3 unsuccessful Red River tests have been drilled in or near the field in earlier years, but not in the area where Milestone is drilling. Production at Red Wing has come from porosity zones in a Mississippian oil column that measured 2600 ft in the original well; the better wells are in the heart of the field, on a rebound cone in the center of the crater.

Rountree, R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Data:6d0a3dd5-5664-4a8f-a4f2-6eda93c9295d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6d0a3dd5-5664-4a8f-a4f2-6eda93c9295d 6d0a3dd5-5664-4a8f-a4f2-6eda93c9295d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sand Mountain Electric Coop Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule MSD - Manufacturing Service Sector: Industrial Description: Demand Charge: $8.73/kW over contract demand. Source or reference: Illinois State University Archive Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

70

Data:D31e5eda-d939-427c-b9aa-a1c3c4aad728 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e5eda-d939-427c-b9aa-a1c3c4aad728 e5eda-d939-427c-b9aa-a1c3c4aad728 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Memphis Light, Gas & Water Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: GENERAL POWER RATE - TDGSA Commercial Sector: Commercial Description: * This rate shall apply to the firm power requirements (where the higher of a customer's onpeak or offpeak contract demand is greater than 1,000 kW but not more than 5,000 kW) for electric service to commercial, industrial, and governmental customers, and to institutional customers including, without limitation, churches, clubs, fraternities, orphanages, nursing homes, rooming or boarding houses, and like customers, provided that the other conditions of this section are met.

71

Data:E201e95d-c852-41ed-a74e-b79bae2a6e96 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5d-c852-41ed-a74e-b79bae2a6e96 5d-c852-41ed-a74e-b79bae2a6e96 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm Effective date: 2010/02/15 End date if known: Rate name: Residential - RG-1 - Single Phase Sector: Residential Description: *POWER COST ADJUSTMENT CLAUSE (PCAC): All metered rates are subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt - hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased and produced (per kilowatt - hour of sales). Source or reference: http://www.brodheadlibrary.org/WaterandLightRatesandFees.cfm?Ratetype=Elec

72

Data:Cf9a88ed-a6a8-464b-bb9c-9a11291d8f7e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a88ed-a6a8-464b-bb9c-9a11291d8f7e a88ed-a6a8-464b-bb9c-9a11291d8f7e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sumter Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Athletic Field Lighting Service* Sector: Commercial Description: *Applicable only to service for athletic field lighting systems requiring more than 50 kVA of transformer capacity and subject to the established Service Rules and Regulations of the Corporation. Subject to wholesale power cost adjustment. Facilities Charge @ 75.0¢ per kVA of required transformer capacity Source or reference: http://www.sumteremc.com/pdfs/AF-9.pdf

73

Three-dimensional Integrated Circuits: Design, EDA, and Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emerging three-dimensional (3D) integration technology is one of the promising solutions to overcome the barriers in interconnection scaling, thereby offering an opportunity to continue performance improvements using CMOS technology. As the fabrication ...

Guangyu Sun; Yibo Chen; Xiangyu Dong; Jin Ouyang; Yuan Xie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Can EDA combat the rise of electronic counterfeiting?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Semiconductor Industry Associates (SIA) estimates that counterfeiting costs the US semiconductor companies $7.5B in lost revenue, and this is indeed a growing global problem. Repackaging the old ICs, selling the failed test parts, as well as gray ... Keywords: counterfeiting, device and IC aging, reliability

Farinaz Koushanfar; Saverio Fazzari; Carl McCants; William Bryson; Matthew Sale; Peilin Song; Miodrag Potkonjak

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The road to 3D EDA tool readiness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's SoCs/SIPs face numerous design challenges as increased integration of system components on a single die stretches the limits of technology and design capacity. 3D integration, where multiple dies are stacked and interconnected in the vertical ...

Charles Chiang; Subarna Sinha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Radiative heating rate The heating rate due to the divergence of long and shortwave radiative flux. Categories Radiometric, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 : Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS

77

Research Note Survival of Female Harlequin Ducks During Wing Molt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.000) during the 37-day interval over which remiges were replaced and individuals were rendered flightless. Our demands of feather synthesis can be met without significant depletion of endogenous protein or fat

78

Hybrid EDA-based optimal attitude control for a spacecraft in a class of control task  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the practical situation, if failure of one of the actuators occurs, there exists the attitude control task of a rigid spacecraft using only two control torques supplied by momentum wheel actuators. Here, this class of control task for a rigid spacecraft ... Keywords: control, differential evolution, estimation of distribution, optimization, spacecraft

Xiong Luo; Zengqi Sun; Xiang Zhang; Laihong Hu; Chao Wang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

BOSTONIA Fall 2013 spheric blowup of a meteor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glass smashed by the blast, whose force was estimated at 30 times that of the atom bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945. A month later, the US Senate heard former astronaut Edward Lu advocate for beefing up

Spence, Harlan Ernest

80

Validation of HRDI MLT winds with meteor radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

applied to determine whether the wind speed has been overestimated by HRDI ... wind vector components as well as wind speeds, and two nonparametric tests ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

FRAGMENTATION AND SPREADING OF A METEOR-LIKE OBJECT  

SciTech Connect

The phenomenon of fragmentation and spreading of a high-speed flying object resembling a meteorite is studied experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, a model made of graphite is launched in a ballistic range and is made to fragment and spread. The flow field produced by the cloud of the fragments is observed optically. The observed deceleration and spreading behavior is numerically reconstructed using computational-fluid-dynamic calculations, applying an improved meteoroid fragmentation theory. The existing meteoroid fragmentation theory is improved by introducing the hypothesis that the incubation process of the pressurized fluid permeating through the fragment precedes the splitting process. The incubation time is determined by the ratio of permeability of the fragment to the fluid's viscosity and is much longer than the time for splitting given by the existing theory. Agreement is obtained between the observed and calculated behavior of the fragment cloud by appropriately choosing this ratio.

Park, Chul [Department of Aerospace Engineering Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Brown, Jeffrey D. [ERC, Inc., Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

METEOR: An Artificial Intelligence System for Convective Storm Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experienced forecaster can use several different types of knowledge in forcing. First, there is his theoretical understanding of meteorology, which is well entrenched in current numerical models. A second type is his “local knowledge,” gained ...

Renée Elio; Johannes De Haan; G. S. Strong

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Molted carbonate fuel cell product design and improvement - 4th quarter, 1995. Quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to establish the commercial readiness of MW-class IMHEX Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell power plants. Progress is described on marketing, systems design and analysis, product options and manufacturing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Data:287d7eda-44e8-44ad-b5f8-6c6595a57cdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

44e8-44ad-b5f8-6c6595a57cdf 44e8-44ad-b5f8-6c6595a57cdf No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Public Service Co of Colorado Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: COMMERCIAL OUTDOOR AREA LIGHTING SERVICE - SCHEDULE CAL - 250w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable within all territory served for outdoor area lighting of customer's property where such service can be provided directly from existing secondary distribution lines of the Company. Not applicable for lighting of public streets or highways. This rate schedule is subject to all applicable Electric Rate Adjustments as on file and in effect in this tariff.

85

Data:E7a06840-cc66-49ed-a27c-6540052ccea5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Off Peak Demand Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation (DOE...

86

Data:8cf5c3da-dd4c-4436-856c-1eda221a8bfc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Effective date: 20130601 End date if known: Rate name: ISST-1T DDC - Interruptible Standby and Supplemental 69 kV & Above Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference:...

87

1 ANNOUNCEMENT OF FEDERAL FUNDING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... impending closure or restructuring of a ... recorded statement and environmental requirements. ... appropriate EDA Regional Office representative listed ...

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

88

MilTech, a Department of Defense Partnership Intermediary ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... forecast demand. Page 3. 3 M-TACs should partner with EDA TD Clusters that are engaged with sustainable businesses. ...

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

AMP and AM NPO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dept. of Energy Advanced ... Questions: mfgjobsaccelerator@eda.gov Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and ... manufacturing, and foster job creation; ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Welcome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... EPA program Economy, Energy, and Environment ... A focus of EDA's Jobs and Innovation ... competitiveness, business expansion, and job creation: ...

2012-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

91

2011 Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Identified Region: Aitkin County, Carlton County, Cook County, Crow Wing ... Grantee Name: The Solar Energy Consortium (EDA) Orange County ...

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

92

The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCo2 Systems During the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) in surface seawater are an important part of studies of the global carbon cycle and its anthropogenic perturbation. An important step toward the thorough interpretation of the vast amount of available fCO2 data is the establishment of a database system that would make sure measurements more widely available for use in understanding the basin- and global-scale distribution of fCO2 and its influence on the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. Such an effort, however, is based on knowledge of data sets from different laboratories. Currently, however, there is not much known about this subject.

Koertzinger, Arne; Mintrop, Ludger; Duinker, Jan

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Arduino teaches old coder new tricks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Arduino-inspired hardware project using the gEDA open-source Linux software suite for printed circuit development.

Edward Comer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

NNSA, Peru Sign Agreement to Prevent Nuclear Smuggling | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA, Peru Sign Agreement to Prevent Nuclear Smuggling Aug 13, 2013 Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Peru's Minister of Foreign Affairs Eda Rivas Franchini sign an...

95

Clean Energy Solutions Large Scale CHP and Fuel Cells Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA) is offering grants for the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) or fuel cell systems to commercial, industrial, and institutional...

96

Reducció de vibracions residuals en moviments transitoris. Definició de lleis de moviment per mitjà de corbes B-spline.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Molts sistemes mecànics existents tenen un comportament vibratori funcionalment perceptible, que es posa de manifest enfront d'excitacions transitòries. Normalment, les vibracions generades segueixen presents després… (more)

Veciana, Joaquim M. (Joaquim Maria)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Guidelines for developing effective Estimation of Distribution Algorithms in solving single machine scheduling problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to deduce important guidelines for designing effective Estimation of Distribution Algorithms (EDAs). These guidelines will enhance the designed algorithms in balancing the intensification and diversification effects of EDAs. ... Keywords: Diversification, Estimation of Distribution Algorithms, Intensification, Just-in-time, Single machine scheduling problems

Shih-Hsin Chen; Min-Chih Chen; Pei-Chann Chang; Qingfu Zhang; Yuh-Min Chen

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Bold Step by the World to Fusion Energy: ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HISTORY OF INT'L COLLABORATION · 1958: WORLD-WIDE DECLASSIFICATION OF MAGNETICALLY CONFINED FUSIONV TEMPERATURES [20 MILLION DEGREES F] · 1970'S: OIL CRISIS PROPELS MAJOR INVESTMENT IN FUSION RESEARCH FACILITIES HISTORY AND KEY FUSION SCIENCE ADVANCES 85 90 95 00 05 85 90 95 00 05 CDA EDA EDA -ext US out AT

99

Sensors in the wild: exploring electrodermal activity in child-robot interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in biosensor technology enabled the appearance of commercial wireless sensors that can measure electrodermal activity (EDA) in user's everyday settings. In this paper, we investigate the potential benefits of measuring EDA to better understand ... Keywords: affect recognition, children, electrodermal activity, social robots

Iolanda Leite; Rui Henriques; Carlos Martinho; Ana Paiva

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Mass Flux Model of Nocturnal Cold-Air Intrusions into a Closed Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations made during the Meteor Crater Experiment (METCRAX) field campaign revealed unexpected nighttime cooling characteristics in Arizona’s Meteor Crater. Unlike in other natural closed basins, a near-isothermal temperature profile regularly ...

Thomas Haiden; C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch; Manuela Lehner

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Metcrax 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Meteor Crater Experiment (METCRAX 2006) was conducted in October 2006 at Arizona's Meteor Crater to investigate stable boundary layer evolution in a topographically uncomplicated basin surrounded by the nearly homogeneous plain of the ...

C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch; Maura Hahnenberger; Andreas Muschinski; Vincent Hohreiter; Mario Behn; Yonghun Cheon; Sharon Zhong; Wenqing Yao; David Fritts; Craig B. Clements; Thomas W. Horst; William O. J. Brown; Steven P. Oncley

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/V Meteor cruise 15/3 in the South Atlantic Ocean. WOCE Section A9, February--March 1991  

SciTech Connect

The increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations (as well as in other radiatively active trace gases) because of human activity has produced serious concern regarding the heat balance of the global atmosphere (Moore and Braswell 1994). The increasing concentrations of these gases may intensify the earth`s natural greenhouse effect, and force the global climate system in ways that are not well understood. The oceans play a major role in global carbon cycle processes. Carbon in the oceans is unevenly distributed because of complex circulation patterns and biogeochemical cycles, neither of which are completely understood. To better understand the ocean`s role in climate and climatic changes, several large experiments have been conducted in the past, and others are currently under way. The World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) is a major component of the World Climate Research Program. Although total carbon dioxide (TC0{sub 2}) is not an official WOCE measurement, a coordinated effort, supported in the United States by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is being made on WOCE cruises (through 1998) to measure the global, spatial, and temporal distributions of TC0{sub 2} and other carbon-related parameters. The CO{sub 2} survey goals include estimation of the meridional transport of inorganic carbon in a manner analogous to the oceanic heat transport (Bryden and Hall 1980; Brewer et al. 1989; Roemmich and Wunsch 1985), evaluation of the exchange of CO{sub 2} between the atmosphere and the ocean, and preparation of a database suitable for carbon-cycle modeling and the subsequent assessment of the anthropogenic C0{sub 2} increase in the oceans. The C0{sub 2} survey is taking advantage of the sampling opportunities provided by the WOCE cruises during this period. The final data set is expected to cover {approx_gt}23,000 stations.

Johnson, K.M.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Goyet, C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA (United States); Kozyr, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

2008 Nobel Prize in Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phys.46:1644-1646,1971. 2 T. Hayashi, E. Kawai, M. Matsuda, S. Ogawa, S. Shige-Eda (Hiroshima Shudo U.), A possible interpretation of the new event in the cosmic ray experiment....

104

Scaling of the power exhaust channel in Alcator C-Mod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parametric dependences of the heat flux footprint on the outer divertor target plate are explored in EDA H-mode and ohmic L-mode plasmas over a wide range of parameters with attached plasma conditions. Heat flux profile ...

Rowan, W. L.

105

New Jersey Business Growth Fund (New Jersey)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Creditworthy small or mid-sized companies that are creating or retaining jobs in New Jersey can apply for financing through the New Jersey Business Growth Fund, a joint program of the EDA and PNC...

106

Mississippi Moisture Budgets on Regional Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two years of regional analyses based on the Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) are used to examine the mesoscale features of the moisture budgets of the Mississippi River basin and its subbasins. Despite the short period, basic aspects of the ...

Ernesto H. Berbery; Eugene M. Rasmusson

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Electronic design automation for social networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online social networks are a growing internet phenomenon: they connect millions of individuals through sharing of common interests, political and religious views, careers, etc. Social networking websites are observing an ever-increasing number ... Keywords: EDA algorithms, social networks, verification

Andrew DeOrio; Valeria Bertacco

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Department of Energy - New Jersey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

even">

No specific per project limitation; 100 million limit for all offshore wind tax credits (may be exceeded if EDA deems appropriate)

109

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Speaker(s): Teshome Edae Jiru Date: October 12, 2009 - 12:12pm Location: 90-3122 Computer simulation is...

110

www.bakerdconsulting.com Federal Funding for Research Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$250 Economic Development Administration SBA Small Business Development Centers NIST Manufacturing, and narrowly focused: 1. Small Business (SBDC) 2. Distressed Communities (EDA) 3. Small Manufacturers (MEP) 4, airport ground support equipment and cargo- handling equipment. Alternative Fueled Vehicles Pilot Grant

111

Evaluation of the impact of solder die attach versus epoxy die attach in a state of the art power package  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subject of this paper is the thermal investigation of epoxy (EDA) and solder (SDA) die attaches by a comparison of an ASIC with multiple heat sources in different package assemblies. Static and transient thermal measurements and simulations were performed to investigate the thermal behavior of two samples in a state of the art QFP power package differing only in the die attach material (EDA and SDA).

J. Czernohorsky; B. Maj; Matthias Viering; L. Wright; G. Balanon

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Effetti del compost sulla biodiversita in impianti di wildflowers in ambiente urbano.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Con l’avvento dell’industrializzazione, a partire da metà ottocento, molte persone legate all’ambiente rurale, abbandono le campagne per dirigersi verso i centri città. Nascevano le prime… (more)

FAVERO, STEFANO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Unique Institution: The National Bureau of Standards, 1950 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in Europe; in China it had burst through any ... matics, investigations of cosmic rays, meteors, white dwarf stars ... of structures by x-ray diffraction made ...

114

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meteor Soft Landing Meteor Soft Landing Name: Les Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: WA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Given the surface speed of the earth (daily rotation, yearly orbit, etc.) in relation to everything, is it possible for a meteor or asteroid at just the right path and speed to make a "soft" landing on the surface? Replies: Les I guess it is possible that a meteor or asteroid would have just the right course and speed to make a soft landing on Earth, but it is highly unlikely. Most meteors and asteroids travel and really high speeds. You see them burn in the atmosphere nightly and very brief streaks of light. Sincere regards, Mike Stewart Les, It would not be possible without risking burning up in the atmosphere. To make a soft landing, the meteor would also have to be able to make a soft launch. Barring energy loss to the atmosphere, energy conservation requires that such a landing work the same in both directions. Such a landing could be no slower than the speed needed to launch the meteor back to where it came from. With energy loss due to the atmosphere, slowing from this necessary speed to a soft landing would probably burn the meteor up. An Apollo spaceship landing without open parachutes is better than a meteor could do.

115

04/13/2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Innovation Cluster (E-RIC) Q&A Regional Innovation Cluster (E-RIC) Q&A 03/02/10 - 05/05/10 MOST RECENT QUESTIONS Please be advised, we have received a number of questions about EDA forms, attachments and page limits. Please note the following: 1. All parts of the EDA Application (whether standard forms, ED-900, attachments, appendices or narratives, or otherwise) are included in the overall Proposal page limit of 350 pages EXCEPT the CEDS, and articles of incorporation and bylaws, if applicable. 2. Please read the forms carefully, in certain circumstances they ask for attachments. For example, for construction projects, EDA requires an environmental narrative and engineering report. The environmental narrative may require certain attachments itself, these documents

116

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Process Development Process Name: Liesl Status: educator Grade: K-3 Location: Outside U.S. Country: USA Date: Spring 2012 Question: Our 2nd grade class is observing the life cycle of what appears to be monarch butterflies unfold. Currently, our little caterpillars appear to be shedding chunks of their bodies. What is happening to them? Replies: The monarchs are molting. Since insects have exoskeletons (skeletons on the outside of the body) they must periodically "shed" to accommodate further growth. These shed exoskeletons are known as exuvia. Each stage in-between a molt is known as an instar. Try to have your students count the number of molts before the caterpillar undergoes metamorphosis. Dr. Tim Durham Undergraduate Studies & University Colloquium Department of Biological Sciences Florida Gulf Coast University

117

Fourier Spectrum-Based Signature Test: A Genetic CAD Toolbox for Reliable RF Testing Using Low-Performance Test Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the present time, coordinated EDA tools for RF/mixed-signal pin test do not exist. In this paper, a CAD tool for efficient production testing of highperformance RF systems using low-cost baseband ATE is presented. The CAD tool consists of a custom ...

G. Srinivasan; A. Chatterjee

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Evolutionary algorithms for the physical design of VLSI circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic design automation (EDA) is concerned with the design and production of VLSI systems. One of the important steps in creating a VLSI circuit is physical design. The input to the physical design step is a logical representation of the system ...

James Cohoon; John Karro; Jens Lienig

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A Case Study of the Sensitivity of the Eta Data Assimilation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study is utilized to determine the sensitivity of the Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) to all operational observational data types used within it. The work described in this paper should be of interest to Eta Model users trying to ...

Tom H. Zapotocny; Steven J. Nieman; W. Paul Menzel; James P. Nelson III; James A. Jung; Eric Rogers; David F. Parrish; Geoffrey J. DiMego; Michael Baldwin; Timothy J. Schmit

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY FOR THE 21 CENTURY ENERGY MARKET AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY WITH INTERNATIONAL THERMONUCLEAR EXPERIMENTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactor /Commercial Reactor Engineering Design Expending Performance Phase High Working Rate CDA EDA are condensed under the Earth during a few hundred millions of year. This precious gift will be expired within.) Disposal cost for radioactive materials is one of important element for commercial use of fusion. Figure 9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Flexible on-chip power delivery for energy efficient heterogeneous systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterogeneous systems-on-chip pose a challenge for power delivery given the variety of needs for different components. In this paper, we describe recent work that leverages power switches and conventional EDA toolflows to implement a set of power delivery ... Keywords: PDVS, dynamic voltage scaling, leakage, low power design, variable weighted headers

Benton H. Calhoun, Kyle Craig

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

THEUNIVERSITYOFTEXASATAUSTIN Active Shooter/Suicide After Action Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the public. Even terms used by the Command Post (CP) were confusing to some members of the search teams down campus to traffic. Figure 3: Search team prepares to enter Jester residence hall (photo by Ralph the front of the Perry- Castañeda Library (PCL). Before he entered the library, he pulled the ski-mask down

123

How rapid is rapid prototyping? analysis of ESPADON programme results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New methodologies, engineering processes, and support environments are beginning to emerge for embedded signal processing systems. The main objectives are to enable defence industry to field state-of-the-art products in less time and with lower costs, ... Keywords: COTS, EDA tools, FPGA, beamformer, heterogeneous platform, model year, rapid prototyping

Bob K. Madahar; Ian D. Alston; Denis Aulagnier; Hans Schurer; Mark Thomas; Brigitte Saget

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Co-design of quantum and electronic integrations by available circuit simulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a technique is proposed to calculate the quantum phenomena by available circuit simulators. This approach is realized using the Agilent Advanced Design System for calculation of linear and non-linear Schrödinger equations. Good accuracy ... Keywords: EDA, microelectronics, nanoelectronics, quantum physics

Guennadi Kouzaev

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

MFR PAPER 1074 Effects of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MFR PAPER 1074 Effects of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil on Molting Tanner Crabs, Chionoecetes bairdi JOHN F bairdi , from Alaska walers were exposed 10 Prudhoe Bay crude oil in sIalic bioassays ill Ih e laboralory. Crabs in bOlh slages were similarly susceplible 10 crude oil; Ihe eSlimaled 48-hour TLIIl (Illedian

126

Mesoscale Vortices in the Weddell Sea Region (Antarctica)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results of investigations of Antarctic mesocyclones in the Weddell Sea region are presented for the Antarctic summer periods 1983–88. Based on NOAA and METEOR satellite images, a total of 195 mesoscale vortices (scale less than 1000 ...

Günther Heinemann

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Network-ready Camera System Development for All-Sky Observing System Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be located on a rooftop and continually monitors the sky for flashes such as bright meteor fireballs, accuracy of time stamping 2. Research autonomous power options (e.g., solar cells). Considerations include

Johnson, Eric E.

128

The upslope-downslope flow transition on a basin sidewall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The late afternoon upslope-downslope flow transition on the west inner sidewall of Arizona’s Meteor Crater, visualized by photographs of smoke dispersion, is investigated for 20 October 2006 using surface radiative and energy budget data and mean ...

Daniel Martínez Villagrasa; Manuela Lehner; C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch; Joan Cuxart

129

The Upslope–Downslope Flow Transition on a Basin Sidewall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The late afternoon upslope–downslope flow transition on the west inner sidewall of Arizona’s Meteor Crater, visualized by photographs of smoke dispersion, is investigated for 20 October 2006 using surface radiative and energy budget data and mean ...

Daniel Martínez Villagrasa; Manuela Lehner; C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch; Joan Cuxart

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The General Circulation and Meridional Heat Transport of the Subtropical South Atlantic Determined by Inverse Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using hydrographic data of the IGY and METEOR expeditions, the inverse method of Wunsch (1978) has been applied to the subtropical South Atlantic Ocean to determine its general circulation and meridional heat transport. The method is based on the ...

Lee-Lueng Fu

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

lake water (a mixture of meteoric waters and degassed hydrothermal fluids) and by high thermal gradients caused by cooling of the underlying magma body and earliest post-caldera...

132

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings` EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings' EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Compact Ultradense Objects in the Solar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe properties and gravitational interactions of meteor-mass and greater compact ultra dense objects with nuclear density or greater (CUDO s). We discuss possible enclosure of CUDO s in comets, stability of these objects on impact with the Earth and Sun and show that the hypothesis of a CUDO core helps resolve issues challenging the understanding of a few selected cometary impacts.

J. Rafelski; Ch. Dietl; L. Labun

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Electromagnetic interferences from plasmas generated in meteoroids impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submitted to Europhysics Letters. It is shown that the plasma, generated during an impact of a meteoroid with an artificial satellite, can produce electromagnetic radiations below the microwave frequency range. These interferences can disturb the regular satellite operations. Pacs 96.50.Kr: Meteors and meteoroids. Pacs 52.50.Lp: Plasma production and heating by shock waves and compression.

Luigi Foschini

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Double-Moment Multiple-Phase Four-Class Bulk Ice Scheme. Part II: Simulations of Convective Storms in Different Large-Scale Environments and Comparisons with other Bulk Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this study described a detailed four-class bulk ice scheme (4ICE) developed to simulate the hydro-meteor profiles of convective and stratiform precipitation associated with mesoscale convective systems. In Part II, the 4ICE scheme is ...

Brad Schoenberg Ferrier; Wei-Kuo Tao; Joanne Simpson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Nocturnal Cold-Air Intrusions into a Closed Basin: Observational Evidence and Conceptual Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations are analyzed to explain an unusual feature of the nighttime atmospheric structure inside Arizona’s idealized, basin-shaped Meteor Crater. The upper 75%–80% of the crater’s atmosphere, which overlies an intense surface-based inversion ...

C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch; Manuela Lehner; Thomas Haiden

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Adler, R. F., H.-Y. M. Yeh, N. Prasad, W.-K. Tao, and J. Simpson, 1991: Microwave simulations of a tropical rainfall system with a three-dimensional cloud model. J.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES Adler, R. F., H.-Y. M. Yeh, N. Prasad, W.-K. Tao, and J. Simpson, 1991: Microwave. Meteor. Soc., 199-200. Black, R. A., 1990: Radar reflectivity-ice water content relationships for use-altitude supercooled water? Geophys. Res. Lett., 30, 2124-2127. ______, H. B. Bluestein, and M. L. Black, 1994

Jiang, Haiyan

140

Determination of Surface Stress by Seasat-SASS: A Case Study with JASIN Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The values of sea surface stress determined with the dissipation method and those determined with a surface-layer model from observations on F.S. Meteor during the Joint Air-Sea Interaction (JASIN) Experiment are compared with the backscatter ...

W. Timothy Liu; W. G. Large

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Diagenetic overprinting of the sphaerosiderite palaeoclimate proxy: are records of pedogenic groundwater d18  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

margins, replacement textures and increased crystal lattice substitution of Ca2+ , Mg2+ and Mn2+ for Fe2 (Kansas), the Swan River Formation (Saskatchewan) and the Success S2 Formation (Saskatchewan) were and Swan River samples ultimately yield distinct MSLs for the sphaerosiderites, and MCLs (meteoric calcite

González, Luis A.

142

Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.iugonet.org/en IUGONET Development of analysis software The IUGONET project - objectives Metadata DB for Upper Atmosphere on TDAS (THEMIS Data Analysis Software Suite) composed of IDL routines. The software will have capability AE index MAGAS KTB Meteor EAR MU GUI mode Loaded data list Time-range set Choice of instrument Choice

Takada, Shoji

143

Bottom Currents near a Small Hill on the Maderia Abyssal Plain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-bottom currents at depths in exceeds of 5000 m have been measured in the Great Meteor East study area (near 31°30?N, 25°W) over a 3 year period. The sites selected were on top of a small abyssal hill, on its flank, and on the abyssal plain ...

Peter M. Saunders

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Knowledge representation in an expert storm forecasting system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

METEOR is a rule- and frame-based system for short-term (3-18 hour) severe convective storm forecasting. This task requires a framework that supports inferences about the temporal and spatial features of meteorological changes. Initial predictions are ...

Renee Elio; Johannes De Haan

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ground Characterization of the Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB) Flight Model 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB) is a satellite-based radiometer for measurements of the planetary radiation budget. It was launched in January 1994 on a Russian METEOR-3 platform and provided excellent data from February 1994 to March ...

Johannes Mueller; Rolf Stuhlmann; Renate Becker; Ehrhard Raschke; Heiko Rinck; Peter Burkert; Jean-Louis Monge; Francis Sirou; Robert Kandel; Thierry Tremas; Leonid A. Pakhomov

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution showed the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be used in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

Marakhovskii, L.F.; Rezunenko, Y.I.; Popov, A.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Use of ethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect

The investigations of the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S by an EDA solution which show that the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in ethylenediamine solutions is almost twice that in monoethanolamine solutions. Ethylenediamine may be used as an absorber for thorough removal of H/sub 2/S from coke oven gas in the presence of CO/sub 2/ and HCN. The hydrogen cyanide of coke oven gas, having practically no effect on the equilibrium absorption of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/, may in this case be recovered in the form of ethylenethiourea - a marketable byproduct.

Marakhovskii, L.F.; Popov, A.A.; Rezunenko, Yu.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Density-based Energy Decomposition Analysis for Intermolecular Interactions with Variationally Determined Intermediate State Energies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first purely density-based energy decomposition analysis (EDA) for intermolecular binding is developed within the density functional theory. The most important feature of this scheme is to variationally determine the frozen density energy, based on a constrained search formalism and implemented with the Wu-Yang algorithm [Q. Wu and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2498 (2003) ]. This variational process dispenses with the Heitler-London antisymmetrization of wave functions used in most previous methods and calculates the electrostatic and Pauli repulsion energies together without any distortion of the frozen density, an important fact that enables a clean separation of these two terms from the relaxation (i.e., polarization and charge transfer) terms. The new EDA also employs the constrained density functional theory approach [Q. Wu and T. Van Voorhis, Phys. Rev. A 72, 24502 (2005)] to separate out charge transfer effects. Because the charge transfer energy is based on the density flow in real space, it has a small basis set dependence. Applications of this decomposition to hydrogen bonding in the water dimer and the formamide dimer show that the frozen density energy dominates the binding in these systems, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the interactions. A more detailed examination reveals how the interplay of electrostatics and the Pauli repulsion determines the distance and angular dependence of these hydrogen bonds.

Wu, Q.; Ayers, P.W.; Zhang, Y.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

Numerical investigation of edge plasma phenomena in an enhanced D-alpha discharge at Alcator C-Mod: Parallel heat flux and quasi-coherent edge oscillations  

SciTech Connect

Reduced-model scrape-off layer turbulence (SOLT) simulations of an enhanced D-alpha (EDA) H-mode shot observed in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak were conducted to compare with observed variations in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) width of the parallel heat flux profile. In particular, the role of the competition between sheath- and conduction-limited parallel heat fluxes in determining that width was studied for the turbulent SOL plasma that emerged from the simulations. The SOL width decreases with increasing input power and with increasing separatrix temperature in both the experiment and the simulation, consistent with the strong temperature dependence of the parallel heat flux in balance with the perpendicular transport by turbulence and blobs. The particularly strong temperature dependence observed in the case analyzed is attributed to the fact that these simulations produce SOL plasmas which are in the conduction-limited regime for the parallel heat flux. A persistent quasi-coherent (QC) mode dominates the SOLT simulations and bears considerable resemblance to the QC mode observed in C-Mod EDA operation. The SOLT QC mode consists of nonlinearly saturated wave-fronts located just inside the separatrix that are convected poloidally by the mean flow, continuously transporting particles and energy and intermittently emitting blobs into the SOL.

Russell, D. A.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Ave., P-5, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Section 117  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of GOES-7 to a Radiation Budget for April and Validation of GOES-7 to a Radiation Budget for April and July 1994 ARM/IOP Using ScaRaB/Meteor-3/7 Data A. Trishchenko and Z. Li Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Abstract Data from the ScaRaB radiometer flown on board the Meteor- 3/7 satellite were employed for validating a TOA Earth radiation budget product generated from GOES-7 for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Com- parisons were made between coincident and collocated short- wave and long-wave radiative quantities derived from ScaRaB and GOES sensors over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in Oklahoma, U.S.A., during April and July 1994. Calibrations for both visible and infrared window channels appear to be adequate, but narrow- to broad-band conversion of short-wave measure-

151

In the OSTI Collections: Gamma-Ray Bursts | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Gamma-Ray Bursts Gamma-Ray Bursts The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its first lessons Seeing indirectly by shining light through light Gamma-ray bursters The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope An emerging picture References Research Organizations Instrument Websites Reports Available through OSTI's SciTech Connect Additional Reference The night sky, as our unaided eyes present it to us, obviously contains the sun, the moon, thousands of stars, a few planets, a milky band of light that stretches from horizon to horizon, the occasional meteor or meteor shower, and sometimes a comet. A few centuries of examination with eyes aided by many kinds of instruments have revealed more and more of the nature of these objects-for example, that the planets are more or less like the Earth, orbiting the sun, with some planets having moons of various

152

ARM - Journal Articles 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2002 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Smith A Simple Model of Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and Cloud Fraction (Citation) Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc. ARM Jensen Radiative impacts of anvil outflow during the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (Citation) J. of Appl. Meteor. ARM

153

Studying Altocumulus Plus Virga with Ground-based Active and Passive Remote Sensors Zhien Wang1, Kenneth Sassen2, David Whiteman3, and Belay Demoz3 1University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD 21228 2University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 E-mail: zhien@agnes.gsfc.nasa.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Boundary-layer Mixed-phase Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Boundary-layer Mixed-phase Cloud Properties Observed at the ARCF NSA site Zhien Wang, Ming Zhao, and Min Deng University of Wyoming , Laramie, Wyoming, 82071, zwang@uwyo.edu References Curry, J. et al., 1996: Overview of Arctic cloud and radiation characteristics. J. Climate., 9, 1731-1764. Wang, Z. and K. Sassen, 2002: Cirrus cloud microphysical property retrieval using lidar and radar measurements, I: algorithm description and comparison with in situ data. J. Appl. Meteor., 41, 218-229. Wang, Z., K. Sassen, D. Whiteman, and B. Demoz, 2004: Studying altocumulus plus virga with ground-based active and passive remote sensors. J. Appl. Meteor.,43, 449-460. Wang, Z., 2007: Refined Two-channel Microwave Radiometer Liquid Water Path Retrieval at Cold Regions by Using Multiple-sensor Measurements. IEEE Geoscience and Remote

154

Geothermal data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the Valles Caldera - southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field, chemical, and isotopic data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico are presented. This region includes all thermal and mineral waters associated with Valles Caldera and many of those located near the Nacimiento Uplift, near San Ysidro. Waters of the region can be categorized into five general types: (1) surface and near surface meteoric waters; (2) acid-sulfate waters (Valles Caldera); (3) thermal meteoric waters (Valles Caldera); (4) deep geothermal and derivative waters (Valles Caldera); and (5) mineralized waters near San Ysidro. Some waters display chemical and isotopic characteristics intermediate between the types listed. The object of the data is to help interpret geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains region and to provide background data for investigating problems in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry.

Goff, F.; McCormick, Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Grigsby, C.O.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hydrogeochemical data for thermal and nonthermal waters and gases of the Valles Caldera- southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents field, chemical, gas, and isotopic data for thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. This region includes all thermal and mineral waters associated with Valles Caldera and many of those located near the Nacimiento Uplift, north of San Ysidro. Waters of the region can be categorized into five general types: (1) surface and near-surface meteoric waters; (2) acid-sulfate waters at Sulphur Springs (Valles Caldera); (3) thermal meteoric waters in the ring fracture zone (Valles Caldera); (4) deep geothermal waters of the Baca geothermal field and derivative waters in the Soda Dam and Jemez Springs area (Valles Caldera); and (5) mineralized waters near San Ysidro. Some waters display chemical and isotopic characteristics intermediate between the types listed. Data in this report will help in interpreting the geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains region and will provide background for investigating problems in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry.

Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Vuataz, F.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Janik, C.J.; Evans, W.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Geohydrologic data and models of Rainier Mesa and their implications to Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geohydrologic data collected at Rainier Mesa provide the only extensive observations in tunnels presently available on flow and transport in tuff units similar to those of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This information can, therefore, be of great value in planning the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) testing in underground drifts at Yucca Mountain. In this paper, we compare the geohydrologic characteristics of tuff units of these two sites and summarize the hydrochemical data indicating the presence of nearly meteoric water in Rainier Mesa tunnels. A simple analytic model is used to evaluate the possibility of propagating transient pulses of water along fractures or faults through the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff unit to reach the tunnel beds below. The results suggest that fast flow could occur without significant mixing between meteoric fracture water and matrix pore water. The implications of these findings on planning for the ESF Calico Hills study at Yucca Mountain are discussed.

Wang, J.S.Y.; Cook, N.G.W.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Carnahan, C.L.; Javandel, I.; Tsang, C.F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Surface-discharging hydrothermal systems at Yucca Mountain: Examining the evidence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses exposures of altered rock that have been thought to form by recent discharge of water from depth. They were examined to address a concern that hydrothermal processes could compromise the isolation capability of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Suspected hot-spring and hydrothermal-vent deposits are more likely the products of infiltration of meteoric water into newly deposited and still-hot pyroclastic flows >12 Myr ago.

Levy, S.S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Tesla: Translation evaluation of sentences with linearprogramming-based analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present TESLA-M and TESLA, two novel automatic machine translation evaluation metrics with state-of-the-art performances. TESLA-M builds on the success of METEOR and MaxSim, but employs a more expressive linear programming framework. TESLA further exploits parallel texts to build a shallow semantic representation. We evaluate both on the WMT 2009 shared evaluation task and show that they outperform all participating systems in most tasks. 1

Chang Liu; Daniel Dahlmeier; Hwee Tou Ng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Adsorption of Trace Elements on Fresh and Weathered Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of trace elements are associated with fly ash produced by coal combustion. These trace elements are potentially of concern for human health if they are released to the environment, and thus it is important to understand their mobility in coal fly ash management settings. In the fly ash management environment, the ash may react with meteoric fluid to release trace elements into groundwater or surface water. However, fly ash particles also have a relatively high surface area and have the ability ...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydrothermal Systems as Indicators of Paleoclimate: an Example from the Great Basin, Western North America G.B. Arehart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by other chemical tests and can be eliminated from any data set that relates to meteoric water Tonopah F 19.0 -90 -112 Rain A 20.0 -141 -141 Rain A 20.7 -125 -125 Wonder F 22.0 -139 -139 Preble A 23.H., Presser, T.S. and Evans, W.C. 1983. Geochemistry of active geothermal systems in northern Basin and Range

Arehart, Greg B.

162

Hydrothermal system at Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent geological and geophysical studies at Newberry Volcano have been incorporated into conceptual and numerical models of a magma-based hydrothermal system. Numerical simulations begin with emplacement of a small magma body, the presumed source of silicic eruptions at Newberry that began about 10,000 B.P., into a thermal regime representing 100,000 years of cooling of a large underlying intrusion. Simulated flow patterns and thermal histories for three sets of hypothetical permeability values are compatible with data from four geothermal drill holes on the volcano. Meteoric recharge cools the caldera-fill deposits, but thermal water moving up a central conduit representing a permeable volcanic vent produces temperatures close to those observed in drill holes within the caldera. Meteoric recharge from the caldera moves down the flanks and creates a near-isothermal zone that extends several hundred meters below the water table, producing temperature profiles similar to those observed in drill holes on the flanks. The temperatures observed in drill holes on the flanks are not influenced by the postulated Holocene magma body. The elevated temperature gradients measured in the lower portions of these holes may be related to the cumulative effect of older intrusions. The models also indicate that meteoric recharge to the deep hydrothermal system probably originates within or near the caldera. Relatively low fluid velocities at depth suggest that at least a significant fraction of the thermal fluid may be very old.

Sammel, E.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Origin of fluid inclusion water in bedded salt deposits, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Salt horizons in the Palo Duro Basin being considered for repository sites contain fluid inclusions which may represent connate water retained in the salt from the time of original salt deposition and/or external waters which have somehow penetrated the salt. The exact origin of this water is important to the question of whether or not internal portions of the salt deposit have been, and are likely to be, isolated from the hydrosphere for long periods of time. The /sup 18/O//sup 16/O and D/H ratios measured for water extracted from solid salt samples show the inclusions to be dissimilar in isotopic composition to meteoric waters and to formation waters above and below the salt. The fluid inclusions cannot be purely external waters which have migrated into the salt. The isotope data are readily explained in terms of mixed meteoric-marine connate evaporite waters which date back to the time of deposition and early diagenesis of the salt (>250 million years). Any later penetration of the salt by meteoric waters has been insufficient to flush out the connate brines.

Knauth, L.P.; Beeunas, M.A.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications & news,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Philadelphia, 2006 8th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Philadelphia, 2006 Invited Orals A. Hubbard H-mode pedestal and threshold studies over an expanded operating space on Alcator C-Mod R. Parker Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod J. Terry Investigation of Edge Localized Modes on Alcator C-Mod (talk | poster) Contributed Orals M. Bakhtiari Using Mixed Gases for Massive Gas Injection Disruption Mitigation on Alcator C-Mod I. Cziegler Structure and Characteristics of the Quasi-Coherent Mode in EDA H-mode Plasmas M. Greenwald Density peaking at low collisionality on Alcator C-Mod (pdf | powerpoint) V. Izzo Simulations of gas jet disruption mitigation B. Labombard Critical edge gradients and flows with reversed magnetic field in Alcator C-Mod

165

Obama Administration Announces $12 Million i6 Green Investment to Promote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Million i6 Green Investment to 2 Million i6 Green Investment to Promote Clean Energy Innovation and Job Creation Obama Administration Announces $12 Million i6 Green Investment to Promote Clean Energy Innovation and Job Creation September 29, 2011 - 2:22pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Obama Administration today announced the six winners of the i6 Green Challenge, an initiative to drive technology commercialization and entrepreneurship in support of a green innovation economy, increased U.S. competitiveness and new jobs. Projects in Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, New England and Washington will each receive up to $1 million from the U.S. Commerce Department's Economic Development Administration (EDA) and up to $6 million in additional funding and technical assistance from the U.S. Departments of

166

Microsoft PowerPoint - budget_meeting_presentation_2004_09.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2004 7, 2004 E. S. Marmar for the Alcator Group Research Highlights * Spontaneous rotation, momentum transport - Relations among SOL and core rotation, topology and H-mode threshold - Momentum transport in different regimes (L, H, EDA) * Edge turbulence - Scale length dependence on ν*, detailed imaging of coherent structures and comparisons with models - Ballooning nature confirmed - asymmetry drives SOL flows * Error Fields and Locked Modes - Sensitivity, size & field scaling (ITER), control with external coils * Progress understanding H-mode pedestal regulation through improved diagnosis and modeling - Radial localization of QC mode B. LaBombard, et al., submitted to PRL (2004) Topology, Rotation, H-Mode Threshold Linked Research Highlights (continued) * Dimensionless identity experiments suggest plasma

167

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Speaker(s): Teshome Edae Jiru Date: October 12, 2009 - 12:12pm Location: 90-3122 Computer simulation is based on mathematical models developed mostly from theoretical science and helps for studying and prediction of the behavior of engineered systems. The advantages of computer simulation are the ease of varying the desired parameters to investigate various possible design scenarios, explore new theories, and design new experiments to test these theories. It also provides detailed information and serves as a powerful alternative to experimental science and observation when phenomena are not observable or when measurements are impractical or too expensive. This seminar presents the different types of mechanistic modeling approaches

168

Obama Administration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Promote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Obama Administration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Promote Clean Energy Innovation and Economic Growth Obama Administration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Promote Clean Energy Innovation and Economic Growth March 10, 2011 - 4:59pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy joined with the U.S. Commerce Department's Economic Development Administration (EDA) and its Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship today to announce the opening of the $12 million i6 Green Challenge, which will also be conducted in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Science Foundation, and Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The funding will support awards for six teams around the country with the

169

Hutchinson, Kansas Revitalized by Clean Energy Jobs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hutchinson, Kansas Revitalized by Clean Energy Jobs Hutchinson, Kansas Revitalized by Clean Energy Jobs Hutchinson, Kansas Revitalized by Clean Energy Jobs April 6, 2011 - 12:20pm Addthis Employees speak about the changes happening in their lives since a wind turbine component manufacturing facility came to Hutchinson, Kansas. | Video courtesy of Siemens April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Like many communities across the country in 2009, the town of Hutchinson, Kansas, was tightening its belt in order to deal with the effects of the recession. As one resident says, Hutch (as the central Kansas community is known to locals) needed a "shot in the arm." Thanks to the Recovery Act, that's exactly what the town of approximately 42,000 got when the U.S. Economic Development Administration (or EDA --

170

Wind Manufacturing Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Manufacturing Tax Credit Wind Manufacturing Tax Credit Wind Manufacturing Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate No specific per project limitation; 100 million limit for all offshore wind tax credits (may be exceeded if EDA deems appropriate) Program Info Start Date 08/19/2010 State New Jersey Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount 100% of the qualified capital investment Provider New Jersey Economic Development Authority In August 2010 New Jersey enacted legislation ([http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2010/Bills/AL10/57_.PDF S.B. 2036]) creating an offshore wind resource requirement within the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NJ05R&re... state renewables portfolio standard (RPS)] and tax incentives for certain

171

Microsoft PowerPoint - Fiore_EPS_Invited_04  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrier Production Barrier Production and Control in Alcator C-Mod Catherine Fiore MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center 31 st European Physical Society Meeting on Plasma Physics June 30, 2004 London, England With Contributions from: P. T. Bonoli, D. R. Ernst, M. J. Greenwald, A. E. Hubbard, E. S. Marmar, J. E. Rice, S. J. Wukitch, K. Zhurovich, MIT-PSFC, M. H. Redi, PPPL, A. Lynn, P. Phillips, FRC Supported by US DoE C Mod Alcator Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) observed in Alcator C-Mod have strongly peaked pressure and density profiles, reduced core thermal transport to ion neoclassical level. Production of ITBs: Off-axis ICRF heating; Ohmic EDA H-mode Control of particle and impurity accumulation: Central ICRF heating Control of ITB size and position: Magnetic field dependence

172

Obama Adminstration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Promote Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Adminstration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Adminstration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Promote Clean Energy Innovation and Economic Growth Obama Adminstration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Promote Clean Energy Innovation and Economic Growth March 10, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy joined with the U.S. Commerce Department's Economic Development Administration (EDA) and its Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship today to announce the opening of the $12 million i6 Green Challenge, which will also be conducted in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Science Foundation, and Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The funding will support awards for six teams around the country with the

173

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2011 10, 2011 Obama Administration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Promote Clean Energy Innovation and Economic Growth The U.S. Department of Energy joined with the U.S. Commerce Department's Economic Development Administration (EDA) and its Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship today to announce the opening of the $12 million i6 Green Challenge, which will also be conducted in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Science Foundation, and Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. March 10, 2011 Morgan State alumnus and PNNL electrical engineer Jewel Adgerson | Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory From Gadgets to Labs: Morgan State Alum Jewel Adgerson

174

The role of heating and current drive in ITER  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses and summarize the role of heating and non-inductive current drive in ITER as: (1) ITER must have heating power sufficient for ignition. (2) The heating system must be capable of current drive. (3) Steady-state operation is an ``ultimate goal.`` It is recognized that additional heating and current drive power (beyond what is initially installed on ITER) may be required. (4) The ``Ultimate goal of steady-state operation`` means steady-state with Q{sub CD} {ge} 5. Unlike the ``Terms of Reference`` for the ITER CDA, the ``ITER Technical Objectives and Approaches`` for the EDA sets no goal for the neutron wall load during steady-state operation. (5) In addition to bulk current drive, the ITER heating and current drive system should be used for current profile control and for burn control.

Nevins, W.M.; Haney, S.

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

Controlled thermonuclear fusion research in Europe -- Competence in advanced physics and technologies  

SciTech Connect

Development of Fusion power is being pursued in all major industrial countries. The European Union, together with countries associated to the EURATOM-Framework Program undertakes an integrated RTD program for the development of magnetic fusion. The Key Action Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion has the objectives to develop the capacity to construct and operated a Next Step device for which the design is being pursued in international collaboration (ITER EDA, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Engineering Design Activities); to undertake structured activities for concept improvements for a fusion power station; to develop technologies needed in the longer term for a prototype fusion reactor. Work on the socio-economic aspects of fusion and a keep in touch activity coordinating national civil research activities in inertial confinement fusion complement the program.

Bruhns, H.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

501 - 29510 of 31,917 results. 501 - 29510 of 31,917 results. Rebate California Solar Initiative- Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program The California Solar Initiative (CSI) provides financial incentives for installing solar technologies through a variety of smaller sub-programs. Of the $3.2 billion in total funding for the CSI, ... http://energy.gov/savings/california-solar-initiative-single-family-affordable-solar-housing-sash-program Rebate Clean Energy Solutions Large Scale CHP and Fuel Cells Program The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA) is offering grants for the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) or fuel cell systems to commercial, industrial, and institutional... http://energy.gov/savings/clean-energy-solutions-large-scale-chp-and-fuel-cells-program

177

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 The Empowerhouse Collaborative's design model | credit Lisa Bleich Solar Decathlon Participants Bring Innovation to D.C.'s Ward 7 Read about the "Empowerhouse Collaborative" -- a 2011 Solar Decathlon Team partnering with Habitat for Humanity building their home for a family in Washington, D.C. March 11, 2011 CX-005541: Categorical Exclusion Determination 331 Building Landscaping Alteration, Hanford Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/11/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office March 10, 2011 Obama Administration Announces Launch of i6 Green Challenge to Promote Clean Energy Innovation and Economic Growth The U.S. Department of Energy joined with the U.S. Commerce Department's Economic Development Administration (EDA) and its Office of Innovation and

178

Energy availabilities for state and local development: 1974 data volume  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a continuing series developed by ORNL with financial support from the Economic Development Administration to present the supply, demand, and net imports of seven fuel types for four final consuming sectors of BEAs, states, census regions, and the nation in 1973. The data are formatted to present regional energy availability from primary extraction as well as from regional transformation processes. As constructed, the tables depict energy balances between availability and use for each of the specific fuels. The long-term objective of the program is to pinpoint those regions where economic development potentials will most likely be affected by the availability of energy. This information coupled with specific knowledge of projected economic growth and employment distribution patterns can assist EDA in developing its grant-in-aid investment strategy.

Vogt, D. P.; Rice, P. L.; Pai, V. P.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Final Draft of RACER Audit  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the approach Waste and Environmental Services - Environmental Data and Analysis plans to take to resolve the issues presented in a recent audit of the WES-EDA Environmental Database relative to the RACER database. A majority of the issues discovered in the audit will be resolved in May 2011 when the WES-EDA Environmental Database, along with other LANL databases, are integrated and moved to a new vendor providing an Environmental Information Management (EIM) system that allows reporting capabilities for all users directly from the database. The EIM system will reside in a publicly accessible LANL cloud-based software system. When this transition occurs, the data quality, completeness, and access will change significantly. In the remainder of this document, this new structure will be referred to as the LANL Cloud System In general, our plan is to address the issues brought up in this audit in three ways: (1) Data quality issues such as units and detection status, which impinge upon data usability, will be resolved as soon possible so that data quality is maintained. (2) Issues requiring data cleanup, such as look up tables, legacy data, locations, codes, and significant data discrepancies, will be addressed as resources permit. (3) Issues associated with data feed problems will be eliminated by the LANL Cloud System, because there will be no data feed. As discussed in the paragraph above, in the future the data will reside in a publicly accessible system. Note that report writers may choose to convert, adapt, or simplify the information they receive officially through our data base, thereby introducing data discrepancies between the data base and the public report. It is not always possible to incorporate and/or correct these errors when they occur. Issues in the audit will be discussed in the order in which they are presented in the audit report. Clarifications will also be noted as the audit report was a draft document, at the time of this response.

Paige, Karen Schultz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Penelope E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM External Data: Recent Developments and Future Plans ARM External Data: Recent Developments and Future Plans Wagener, R., Gregory, L., Ma, L.L., and Cialella, A., Brookhaven National Laboratory Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting This poster lists new datastreams collected and processed by the ARM External Data Center since the last update in 1999 (MOLTS, TOMS, 30 min OK Mesonet, CSPHOT, TWP AVHRR, ECMWF, RUC, TAO Buoy, IAP). We describe briefly the software tools employed in converting these data to netCDF files, because data-users might find them helpful in dealing with the raw files themselves (GrADS, IDL, Perl). The priorities for future data acquisitions and ingests are set by consensus of the Science Working Groups. The current high priority new collections include: Suominet GPS data, Darwin Radar and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Isotopic Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes There are two possible explanations for the inferred presence of relatively 18O-enriched thermal water at Yellowstone in the past: (1) meteoric

182

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM CUMULATIVE INDEX SUBJECT INDEX 1a'a lava accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Bonin-Mariana arc, 126B42:632 Izu collision zone, 190A1:3 Mariana forearc, 125B24:407­408 Meteor Rise, 114B2:32 New complexes collision zones, 134B1:5­18 contact with continental crust, 112A1:5; 4:72­73; 7:109; 9:134­135; 14 of development, 160B50:674 structural style, 134B23:417­429 subduction zones, 134A9:229­250 tectonics, 160A1

183

Geothermal regimes at Clearlake California: A preliminary review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three distinct geothermal regimes are inferred in the vicinity of the city of Clearlake, California. The first is a conductive heat flow regime, the second is a fault-controlled hot spring flow of ``magmatic`` fluids, and the third is a resurgent flow of meteoric warm water. The conductive heat flow results in flat, horizontal isotherms. The hot spring generates a localized spike in the isotherms. The advective disturbance carries heat laterally to a fault-line resurgence, lowering the apparent heat flow at the surface.

Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.; Zyvoloski, G.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Fluorescent Aerogel for Capture and Identification of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contemporary interstellar dust has never been analyzed in the laboratory, despite its obvious astronomical importance and its potential as a probe of stellar nucleosynthesis and galactic chemical evolution. Here we report the discovery of a novel fluorescent aerogel which is capable of capturing hypervelocity dust grains and passively recording their kinetic energies. An array of these “calorimetric” aerogel collectors in low earth orbit would lead to the capture and identification of large numbers of interstellar dust grains. Subject headings: astrochemistry — instrumentation: detectors — interplanetary medium — dust, extinction — meteors, meteoroids — techniques: image processing 1.

Gerardo Domínguez; Andrew J. Westphal; Mark L. F. Phillips; Steven M. Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Geothermal regimes at Clearlake California: A preliminary review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three distinct geothermal regimes are inferred in the vicinity of the city of Clearlake, California. The first is a conductive heat flow regime, the second is a fault-controlled hot spring flow of magmatic'' fluids, and the third is a resurgent flow of meteoric warm water. The conductive heat flow results in flat, horizontal isotherms. The hot spring generates a localized spike in the isotherms. The advective disturbance carries heat laterally to a fault-line resurgence, lowering the apparent heat flow at the surface.

Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.; Zyvoloski, G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

[Characterization of historical infiltration in the unsaturated zone at the Nevada Test Site using chloride, bromide, and chlorine-36 as environmental tracers]; [Final subcontract report  

SciTech Connect

This document is an end-of-contract report, prepared by Hydro Geo Chem for Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number 9-XDD-6329F-1. The ultimate goal of this work is to characterize historical infiltration and unsaturated flow in the Yucca Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site. Work on this contract has focused on using chloride, bromide, stable chlorine isotopes, and chlorine-36 distributions to evaluate the depth of infiltration in the unsaturated zone. Effort in support of this work has included developing analytical procedures, exploring ways in which to separate the. meteoric component from the rock component, and meeting quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1991-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Minimally-invasive Wearable Sensors and Data Processing Methods for Mental Stress Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chronic stress is endemic to modern society. If we could monitor our mental state, we may be able to develop insights about how we respond to stress. However, it is unfeasible to continuously annotate stress levels all the time. In the studies conducted for this dissertation, a minimally-invasive wearable sensor platform and physiological data processing methods were developed to analyze a number of physiological correlates of mental stress. We present a minimally obtrusive wearable sensor system that incorporates embedded and wireless communication technologies. The system is designed such that it provides a balance between data collection and user comfort. The system records the following stress related physiological and contextual variables: heart rate variability (HRV), respiratory activity, electrodermal activity (EDA), electromyography (EMG), body acceleration, and geographical location. We assume that if the respiratory influences on HRV can be removed, the residual HRV will be more salient to stress in comparison with raw HRV. We develop three signal processing methods to separate HRV into a respiration influenced and residual HRV. The first method consists of estimating respiration-induced portion of HRV using a linear system identification method (autoregressive moving average model with exogenous inputs). The second method consists of decomposing HRV into respiration-induced principal dynamic mode and residual using nonlinear dynamics decomposition method (principal dynamic mode analysis). The third method consists of splitting HRV into respiration-induced power spectrum and residual in frequency domain using spectral weighting method. These methods were validated on a binary discrimination problem of two psychophysiological conditions: mental stress and relaxation. The linear system identification method, nonlinear dynamics decomposition method, and spectral weighting method classified stress and relaxation conditions at 85.2 %, 89.2 %, and 81.5 % respectively. When tonic and phasic EDA features were combined with the linear system identification method, the nonlinear dynamics decomposition method, and the spectral weighting method, the average classification rates were increased to 90.4 %, 93.2 %, and 88.1 % respectively. To evaluate the developed wearable sensors and signal processing methods on multiple subjects, we performed case studies. In the first study, we performed experiments in a laboratory setting. We used the wearable sensors and signal processing methods to discriminate between stress and relaxation conditions. We achieved 81 % average classification rate in the first case study. In the second study, we performed experiments to detect stress in ambulatory settings. We collected data from the subjects who wore the sensors during regular daily activities. Relaxation and stress conditions were allocated during daily activities. We achieved a 72 % average classification rate in ambulatory settings. Together, the results show achievements in recognizing stress from wearable sensors in constrained and ambulatory conditions. The best results for stress detection were achieved by removing respiratory influence from HRV and combining features from EDA.

Choi, Jongyoon

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Anomalous orebody within the Ambrosia Lake trend at Sandstone Mine  

SciTech Connect

The Sandstone Mine contains an anomalous orebody that lacks the characteristic coloring and high gamma-ray expression typically associated with uranium ore in the Ambrosia Lake district. The orebody occurs at the downdip edge of a tongue of hematitic sand in the basal sand unit of the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation. The orebody ranges from white to light gray in color. Preliminary analysis indicates the presence of uranophane (Ca(UO/sub 2/)/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/(OH)/sub 2/.5H/sub 2/O), evidently altered from coffinite, which is the predominant uranium mineral in the district. Equivalent U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ indicates that this orebody is relatively recent. Oxidizing meteoric water, which formed a geochemical cell, remobilized uranium minerals in preexisting trend orebodies and deposited the uranium downdip of the furthest extent of this cell. Post-Dakota deformation influenced the course of the migrating meteoric water and the extent of the redox interface controlling the orebody. As sampling and mining lower grades of uranium becomes increasingly more economical, the potential for unknown reserves adjacent to the redox interface should not be overlooked.

Foster, J.F.; Quintanar, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Geothermal potential of West-Central New Mexico from geochemical and thermal gradient data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To study the low temperature and Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal potential of west-central New Mexico, 46 water samples were collected and geothermal gradient measurements were made in 29 wells. Water chemistry data indicate that all the samples collected are meteoric waters. High temperatures of samples taken from wells between Gallup and Tohatchi indicate these wells may derive water from a warm aquifer below the depth of the wells. The chemistries of the samples farther south on the Zuni Indian reservation suggest these waters are not circulating below 600 m of the surface. Geothermometry calculations support the conclusion that the waters sampled are meteoric. The geothermometry also indicates that the deep reservoir between Gallup and Tohatchi may be greater than 60/sup 0/C. Thermal gradient data indicate an area of high gradient on the Zuni Indian Reservation with a measured maximum of 67/sup 0/C/km between 181 m and 284 m. This high probably is not hydrologically controlled. The maximum gradients in the study area are 76/sup 0/C/km and 138/sup 0/C/km, measured just east of Springerville, Arizona. These gradients are undoubtedly controlled by circulating water, possibly heated by a magmatic source at depth and circulating back to the surface.

Levitte, D.; Gambill, D.T.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Bottom/Side Lift Gantry Conceptual Design Rev. 01  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this task is to update the existing bottom/side lift gantry analysis so that the design is consistent with Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II) design constraints listed in the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (CRWMS M and O 1999a, Section 2.2.1.1, p. 9a). This update is consistent with the requirements of the Technical Guidance Document for License Application Preparation (YMP 1999, Section 6.2.5.1). This update will also take into account the latest available equipment classification and Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document (SDD) (CRWMS M and O 2000c) requirements. The principal objective of this analysis is to verify that the newly developed bottom/side lift gantry concept continues to be a suitable design concept for the current Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) design. This analysis includes an examination of the waste package (WP) transfer operation at the emplacement drift transfer dock. In addition, this analysis verifies that the gantry is compatible with the WP transporter, which has been redesigned to handle WPs sitting on pallets (CRWMS M and O 2000a). The scope of this work is to examine the existing analysis and to determine what, if any, modifications to the analysis may be required as a result of additional requirements imposed by the EDA II concept. Then, a revision will be made to the conceptual design accordingly. The analysis will also be revised to show the approximate sizes and locations of the electrical equipment and control cabinets, and to take into account the weight of that equipment in the total gantry weight. The analytical portions of the analysis are revised, as required, to address changes resulting from modifications to the conceptual design or from changes in classification and/or SDD requirements. Finally, the revised conceptual design is evaluated to verify that it continues to be a suitable method for handling the WPs within the emplacement drift. Except as noted, the scope of this work does not include any new analytical investigations or any detailed studies regarding the mechanical or electrical subsystems of the gantry beyond those in Revision 00 of this analysis. This analysis has been prepared in accordance with the requirements set forth in Bottom/Side Lift Gantry Analysis (CRWMS M and O 1999b). This analysis supports the MGR design that will be presented as part of the Site Recommendation.

Bair, P.S.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Target validation of a myokinin receptor from the southern cattle tick Boophilus microplus (Canestrini)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel approach to control Boophilus microplus is to disrupt the physiological function of an endogenous myokinin receptor of this tick that was previously cloned in our laboratory. To test the hypothesis that this myokinin receptor might be a suitable target for development of a novel acaricide, this target was validated by immunological disruption. A mixture of peptides, corresponding to the sequence of the extracellular loops of this receptor which were synthesized and linked to a carrier protein, was injected into Hereford cattle to induce an immunological response. Immunological tests (ELISA) were developed to test the sera of these animals for antibody titers. The data were analyzed using a randomized block split plot design and were compared between the control (calves numbers 407, 408, 427, 436, and 438) and peptide-injected calves (calves numbers 417, 420, 421, 426, and 435). A gradual increase of antibody production was observed with the peptide-injected calves with bleed 4 showing the highest absorbances. Control calves and peptide-injected calves with high antibody titers were challenged with approximately 20,000 tick larvae at the USDA Cattle Tick Research laboratory. The tick challenge test determined that disruption of the receptor function produces a detrimental effect on tick physiology (development, feeding and reproduction) by looking at percentage of molting, time of survivorship, number of ticks dropped, weight of fed females, weight of egg masses, and blood meal conversion. The results, which were analyzed by a contingency table and a 2 sample T-test, did not support the hypothesis that the sera ingested from the peptide-injected cattle would cause a detrimental effect on tick physiology. There was no statistical significance in the percentage of metanymphs molting from peptide-injected calves versus control calves (p = 0.282) and in the time of adult survivorship. A statistical inference could be made about the number of ticks that dropped since four calves died of bovine babesiosis after the metanymphal collection. There was no statistical significance in the weight of fed females (p = 0.061), weight of egg masses (p = 0.885), and bloodmeal conversion (p = 0.312) from peptide-injected calves versus control calves.

Blandon, Maria Adylia

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Design of Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System of ITER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the end of EDA, the design of the Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH and CD) system has been modified to respond to progress in physics understanding and change of interface conditions. Nominal RF power of 20 MW is shared by four upper launchers or one equatorial launcher RF beams are steered by front steering mirrors providing wide sweeping angle for the RF beam. DC high voltage power supply may be composed of IGBT pulse step modulators because of high frequency modulation and design flexibility to three different types of 170 GHz gyrotrons provided by three parties. The RF power from the 170 GHz gyrotron is transmitted to the launcher by 63.5 mm{phi} corrugated waveguide line and remotely switched by a waveguide switch between the upper launcher and the equatorial launcher. The ECH and CD system has also a start-up sub-system for assist of initial discharge composed of three 127.5 GHz gyrotrons and a dedicated DC high voltage power supply. Three of transmission lines are shared between 170 GHz gyrotron and 127.5 GHz gyrotron so as to inject RF beam for the start-up through the equatorial launcher. R and Ds of components for high power long pulse and mirror steering mechanism have been on-going in the parties to establish a reliable ITER ECH and CD system.

Kobayashi, N. [ITER, Cadarache (France); Bigelow, T.; Rasmussen, D. [ORNL, Oak Ridge (United States); Bonicelli, T.; Ramponi, G.; Saibene, G. [EFDA, Garching (Germany); Cirant, S. [ENEA-CNR, Milan (Italy); Denisov, G. [IAP, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Heidinger, R.; Piosczyk, B. [FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Henderson, M.; Hogge, J.-P.; Thumm, M.; Tran, M. Q. [CRPP, Lausanne (Switzerland); Rao, S. L. [IPR, Bhat (India); Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K. [JAEA, Naka (Japan); Temkin, R. J. [MIT PSFC, Cambridge (United States); Verhoeven, A. G. A. [FOM IPP, Rijnhuizen (Netherlands); Zohm, H. [MPI IPP, Garching (Germany)

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Requirements for US regulatory approval of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)  

SciTech Connect

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is the first fusion machine that will have sufficient decay heat and activation product inventory to pose potential nuclear safety concerns. As a result, nuclear safety and environmental issues will be much more important in the approval process for the design, siting, construction, and operation of ITER in the United States than previous fusion devices, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The purpose of this report is (a) to provide an overview of the regulatory approval process for a Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility; (b) to present the dose limits used by DOE to protect workers, the public, and the environment from the risks of exposure to radiation and hazardous materials; (c) to discuss some key nuclear safety-related issues that must be addressed early in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA) to obtain regulatory approval; and (d) to provide general guidelines to the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) concerning the development of a regulatory framework for the ITER project.

Petti, D.A.; Haire, J.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electrical energy and cost savings potential at DOD facilities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Defense (DOD) has been mandated to reduce energy consumption and costs by 20% from 1985 to 2000 and by 30% from 1985 to 2005. Reduction of electrical energy consumption at DOD facilities requires a better understanding of energy consumption patterns and energy and financial savings potential. This paper utilizes two independent studies--EDA (End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm) and MEIP (Model Energy Installation Program)--and whole-installation electricity use data obtained from a state utility to estimate electrical energy conservation potential (ECP) and cost savings potential (CSP) at the Fort Hood, Texas, military installation and at DOD nationwide. At Fort Hood, the authors estimated an annual electricity savings of 62.2 GWh/yr (18%), a peak demand savings of 10.1 MW (14%), and an annual energy cost savings of $6.5 million per year. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $41.1 million, resulting in a simple payback of 6.3 years. Across the DOD, they estimated an annual electricity savings of 4,900 GWh/yr, a peak demand savings of 694 MW, and an annual energy cost savings of $316 million per year. The estimated cost savings is 16% of the total nationwide DOD 1993 annual energy costs. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $1.23 billion, resulting in a simple payback of 3.9 years.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Lister, L.; DeBaille, L. [Army Construction Engineering Research Labs., Champaign, IL (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications & news,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quebec City, 2000 Quebec City, 2000 Invited Talks Fiore, C.L. - Core Internal Transport Barriers in Alcator C-Mod Plasmas Invited PDF (0.5MB) LaBombard, B. - Particle Transport in the Scrape-Off Layer of Alcator C-Mod Invited PDF (0.7MB) Hubbard, A.E. - Pedestal Profiles and Fluctuations in C-Mod Enhanced D-alpha H-modes Invited PDF (1.0MB) Oral Presentations Boivin, R.L. - Recent Results from the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak Oral PDF (1.7MB) Rice, J.E. - Central Toroidal Rotation Reversal with ITB Formation in Alcator C-Mod Plasmas IAEA Paper PDF (0.6MB) Snipes, J.A. - Peaked Density Profiles in H-mode in Alcator C-Mod Oral PDF (0.2MB) Oral PDF (0.3MB) Greenwald, M. - Studies of EDA H-mode and Its Relation to the Micro-Stability of the Pedestal Oral PDF (0.3MB) Zweben, S.J. - Two Dimensional Imaging of Edge Turbulence in Alcator C-Mod, PPPL

196

Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modem-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modem vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum temperatures and salinities ranged from 440 C and 44 wt. percent NaCl equivalent in the biotite hornfels adjacent to the pluton to 305 C and 5 wt. percent NaCl equivalent at distances of 1730 m from the intrusive contact. The major, minor, and noble gas compositions of fluid inclusions in the hydrothermally altered rocks were integrated with microthermometric and mineralogic data to determine their sources and the effects of mixing and boiling. Major and minor gaseous species were released from the inclusions by crushing or thermal decrepitation; noble gases were released by crushing. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The analyses document the presence of magmatic, crustal, and meteoric components in the trapped fluids. Hydrothermal fluids present during the liquid-dominated phase of the system contained gaseous species derived mainly from crustal and magmatic sources. At The Geysers, N-2/Ar ratios greater than 525 and He-3/He-4 ratios of 6-10.7 Ra are diagnostic of a magmatic component. Crustal gas has CO2/CH4 ratios less than 4, N-2/Ar ratios between 45 and 525, and low 3He/4He ratios (0.5 Ra). Meteoric fluids have CO2/CH4 ratios greater than 4 and N2/Ar ratios between 38 (air-saturated water) and 84 (air). However, N-2/Ar ratios between 15 and 110 can result from boiling. Ratios less than 15 reflect the incorporation of N-2 into NH3-bearing clay minerals. In the central Geysers, the incursion of meteoric fluids occurred during the transition from the liquid- to vapor-dominated regime. Variations in the relative CH4, CO2, and H-2 contents of the gas analyses demonstrate that boiling took place under open-system conditions. The gas data indicate that the inclusions have remained closed to the diffusion of He and H-2 since their formation.

Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Abstract The Valles caldera in New Mexico hosts a high-temperature geothermal system, which is manifested in a number of hot springs discharging in and around the caldera. In order to determine the fluid pathways and the origin of chloride in this system, we measured 36Cl/Cl ratios in waters from high-temperature drill holes and from surface springs in this region. The waters fall into two general categories: recent meteoric water samples with low Cl- concentrations (< 10 mg/L) and relatively high 36Cl/Cl ratios

198

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Temperatures of 100°C are measured at 3 km depth in a well located on the resurgent dome in the center of Long Valley Caldera, California, despite an assumed >800°C magma chamber at 6-8 km depth. Local downflow of cold meteoric water as a process for cooling the resurgent dome is ruled out by a Peclet-number analysis of temperature logs. These analyses reveal zones with fluid circulation at the upper and lower

199

An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 23-m.y.-old, fossil meteoric-hydrothermal system in the Lake City caldera (11 _ 14 km) has been mapped out by measuring Δ 18O values of 300 rock and mineral samples. Δ 18O varies systematically throughout the caldera, reaching values as low as -2. Great topographic relief, regional tilting, and variable degrees of erosion within the caldera all combine to give us a very complete section through the hydrothermal system, from the

200

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., 2007: Improved ground-based liquid water path retrievals using a combined infrared and microwave approach. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15204, doi:10.1029/2007JD008530. Turner, D.D., A.M. Vogelmann, R. Austin, J.C. Barnard, K. Cady-Pereira, C. Chiu, S.A. Clough, C.J. Flynn, M.M. Khaiyer, J.C. Liljegren, K. Johnson, B. Lin, C.N. Long, A. Marshak, S.Y. Matrosov, S.A. McFarlane, M.A. Miller, Q. Min, P. Minnis, W. O'Hirok, Z. Wang, and W. Wiscombe, 2007: Thin liquid water clouds: Their importance and our challenge. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,

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201

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

202

Isotopic Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Deuterium and oxygen- 18 values of the thermal waters indicate that they recharged locally and became K271enriched in oxygen-18 by exchange with rock. The isotopic composition of the waters indicates that they are of meteoric origin. A plot of deuterium versus chloride indicates that as the chloride concentration increases, the deuterium composition remains essentially constant. A plot of oxygen-18 versus chloride shows that the

203

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Abstract Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springson Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understandprocesses that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water,and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower

204

Microsoft PowerPoint - 090402_cops_backup.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goal: Goal: Advance the quality of forecasts of orographically-induced convective precipitation by 4D observations and modeling of its life cycle precipitation by 4D observations and modeling of its life cycle Volker Wulfmeyer Institute of Physics and Meteorology (IPM) f y gy ( ) University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany and the COPS International Science Steering Committee Motivation and strategy Set up and performance Set up and performance First highlights Ongoing and future projects Wulfmeyer et al., Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc. 89(10), 1477-1486, 2008, Ongoing and future projects 1 April 2, 2009 19 th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting, Louisville, USA DOI:10.1175/2008BAMS2367.1. The Importance of Orography for Weather d Cli t R h and Climate Research Global population density 1995 1 k h i t l E

205

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hydrogen isotope values of muscovite (δDMs ∼-100‰) and fluid inclusions in quartz (δDFluid ∼-85‰) indicate the presence of meteoric fluids during detachment dynamics. Recrystallized grain-shape fabrics and quartz c-axis fabric patterns reveal a large component of coaxial strain (pure shear), consistent with thinning of the detachment section. Therefore, the high thermal gradient preserved in the Raft River

206

New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: New Applications Of Geothermal Gas Analysis To Exploration Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Gas analysis is applied to exploration at the Lightn~gD ock geothe~aflie ld, which has no surface manifestations, to exploration by drilling, and to monitoring Cerro Prieto - a producing field. It is assumed that reservoir fluids have a different gas chemistry than local groundwater, and that gas chemistry can be interpreted as a three source system, magmatic, crustal, and meteoric, modified by processes of boiling, mixing, and condensation. We show that gas analyses can delineate the location of major structures that serve as fluid conduits, map fluid flow

207

Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Meteoric waters from cold springs and streams outside of the 1912 eruptive deposits filling the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS) and in the upper parts of the two major rivers draining the 1912 deposits have similar chemical trends. Thermal springs issue in the mid-valley area along a 300-m lateral section of ash-flow tuff, and range in temperature from 21 to 29.8°C in early summer and from 15 to 17°C in mid-summer. Concentrations of major and minor chemical constituents in the thermal waters are nearly identical regardless of temperature. Waters in the

208

Geology of Kilauea Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Kilauea Volcano Geology of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology of Kilauea Volcano Abstract This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, bul the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems lhat develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water, of some of these hydrothermal convection systems are known through studies of surface geology,and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past

209

Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea East Rift Zone geothermal area, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea East Rift Zone geothermal area, Hawaii Abstract Heating and freezing data were obtained for fluid inclusions in hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and anhydrite from several depths in three scientific observation holes drilled along the lower East Rift Zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Compositions of the inclusion fluids range from dilute meteoric water to highly modified sea water concentrated by boiling. Comparison of measured drill-hole temperatures with fluid-inclusion homogenization-temperature (Th) data indicates that only about 15% of the

210

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Chena Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Stable isotope analyses showthat thermalwaters at Chena Hot Springs are meteoric in origin. A Carbon-14 analysis indicates that the age of the springwaters is less than 3000 years. The minimum depth of circulation must

211

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2013 5, 2013 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Feb. 25 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - One West Speaker: Daniel Whiteson, University of California, Irvine Title: Are the FermiLAT Lines Real? 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ALL EXPERIMENTERS' MEETING THIS WEEK Tuesday, Feb. 26 2 p.m. Computing Techniques Seminar - One West Speaker: Stephen Kent, Fermilab Title: Worlds in Collision: The Chelyabinsk Meteor 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Ongoing and upcoming conferences at Fermilab

212

United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal Exploration Leading To Shallow And Intermediate-Deep Drilling At Hawthorne Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nv Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies performed by personnel from the Geothermal Program Office (GPO) strongly suggested that there is a geothermal resource beneath lands controlled by the Hawthorne Ammunition Depot. The geothermal fluid is thought to be convecting meteoric water that is derived from precipitation within the

213

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Cloud-Resolving Model to Identify the Role of Aerosols on Clouds a Cloud-Resolving Model to Identify the Role of Aerosols on Clouds and Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Tao, W., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol, Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Tao, W.-K., X. Li, A. Khain, T. Matsui, S. Lang, and J. Simpson, 2007: The role of atmospheric aerosol concentration on deep convective precipitation: Cloud-resolving model simulations. J. Geophy. Res., (accepted). Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Lang, A. Y. Hou, M. Zhang, and J. Simpson, 2007: On the sensitivity of atmospheric ensemble states to cloud microphyics in long-term cloud-resolving model simulations. J. Meteor. Soc. Jpn., (submitted). Figure 1. Dirty environment (or high CCN) enhances precipitation in a

214

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir. 33 refs., 9 figs.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Geothermal studies in northern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and University of California (UCB), under the auspices of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, are conducting field studies at potential geothermal resource areas in north-central Nevada. The goal of the LBL-UCB program is to develop and evaluate techniques for the assessment of the resource potential of liquid-dominated systems. Field studies presently being conducted in northern Nevada incorporate an integrated program of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical surveys leading to heat flow measurements, and eventually to deep (1.5 to 2 km) confirmatory drill holes. Techniques evaluated include geophysical methods to measure contrasts in electrical resistivity and seismic parameters. Geochemical studies have emphasized techniques to disclose the pathways of water from its meteoric origin into and through the hydrothermal systems. Geochemical and radiometric analyses also help to provide a baseline upon which the effects of future geothermal development may be superimposed.

Wollenberg, H.A.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

Del Grande, Nancy Kerr (San Leandro, CA)

1977-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

218

Forecast for Epoch-of-Reionization as viewable by the PrimevAl Structure Telescope (PAST)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present sensitivity forecasts for the PAST 21cm reionization observations and compare these with the measured sensitivity of a prototype array. We discuss the likely epoch-of-reionization structures and the redshifts that can be observed, and conclude that a 10,000 antenna PAST will be able to image ionized structures with its 1 million pixel map at 6meteor scatter propagation, and of ionospheric variation. These data are also used to verify our large angle map making algorithms.

Ue-Li Pen Xiang-Ping Wu Jeff Peterson

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Chemistry and materials in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a geothermal fluid, from its origin as meteoric water precipitating on the earth's surface, as it flows through the soils and rocks of geological formations, to the point where it returns to the surface as a hot spring, geyser, well, etc. is traced. Water of magmatic origin is also included. The tendency of these hydrothermal fluids to form scales by precipitation of a portion of their dissolved solids is noted. A discussion is presented of types of information required for materials selection for energy systems utilizing geothermal fluids, including pH, temperature, the speciation of the particular geothermal fluid (particularly chloride, sulfide and carbon dioxide content) and various types of corrosive attack on common materials. Specific examplers of materials response to geothermal fluid are given.

Miller, R.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Dissolution study of Metatorbernite: Thermodynamic Properties and the effect of pH and Phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Metatorbernite is a host of uranium that has been identified in the shallow vadose zone of the 300 A area at the Hanford site, WA, USA. Consequently, modeling the evolution of U concentrations in vadose zone porewaters driven by meteoric water recharge requires accurate knowledge of metatorbernite solubility. Previous determinations of the solubility constant for metatorbernite were under constrained. In the present contribution, the dissolution of natural metatorbernite crystals was studied at target pH 2.5 and 3.0, using both nitric and phosphoric acid. Steady state was approached from under- and super-saturation. The experiments and calculations yielded a preferred log Ksp = -28.0 ±0.1 that is significantly different than previously determined values. Further, both stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric dissolution was observed as a function of pH and aqueous phosphate concentration.

Ilton, Eugene S.; Zachara, John M.; Moore, Dean A.; McKinley, James P.; Eckberg, Alison D.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Integrated exploration for low-temperature geothermal resources in the Honey Lake basin, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated exploration study is presented to locate low-temperature geothermal reservoirs in the Honey Lake area of northern California. Regional studies to locate the geothermal resources included gravity, infrared, water-temperature, and water-quality analyses. Five anomalies were mapped from resistivity surveys. Additional study of three anomalies by temperature-gradient and seismic methods was undertaken to define structure and potential of the geothermal resource. The gravity data show a graben structure in the area. Seismic reflection data, indicate faults associated with surface-resistivity and temperature-gradient data. The data support the interpretation that the shallow reservoirs are replenished along the fault zones by deeply circulating heated meteoric waters.

Schimschal, U. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Delineate the subsurface geology Notes The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. The Raft River geothermal system is a hot water convective system relying on deep circulation of meteoric water in a region of high geothermal gradients and open fractures near the base of the Tertiary basin fill. References Covington, H. R. (1 September 1980) Subsurface geology of the

225

Diagenesis and porosity development associated with major sea level fluctuations, Upper Permian, Jameson land, east Greenland  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Permian of Jameson Land includes two major carbonate sequences, represented by the Karstryggen and Wegener Halvoe formations. The initial Karstryggen transgression led to the development of a shallow marine platform with structurally controlled evaporite basins (salinas) separated by stromatolitic, peloidal, or micritic carbonate depositional areas. The Wegener Havloe sequence reflects more rapid and extensive transgression with the deposition of three subcycles of fully marine, platform, or biohermal carbonates containing minor evaporites near the basin margins. Bioherms (bryozoan-brachiopod-marine cement mounds) show > 100 m of relief, indicating that large relative sea level changes were involved. Both the Karstryggen and Wgener Havloe cycles were terminated by major regressions, which led to karstic and/or fluvial incision of the underlying sequences. Not surprisingly, carbonate and evaporite diagenesis was greatly affected by these regional or eustatic sea level fluctuations. Evaporites dissolved or were replaced by calcite and celestite under the influence of meteoric waters. Limestones show collapse brecciation, grain leaching, soil development, and characteristic vadose and phreatic cements. Most significantly meteoric flushing led to massive dissolution of botryoidal marine cements (aragonite and probable high-Mg calcite) within biohermal facies on the Wegener Peninsula. This early porosity resurrection led to the preservation of porous bioherm core zones until hydrocarbon migration. Only late (posthydrocarbon), probably hydrothermal fluid flow led to cementation of the bioherm cores while expelling most of the reservoired hydrocarbons. If the sea level changes affecting the Greenlandic Permian are eustatic, then this study may provide significant clues to porosity development throughout the largely unexplored northern Zechstein basin.

Scholle, P.A.; Ulmer, D.S. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (USA)); Stemmerik, L. (Greenland Geological Survey, Copenhagen (Denmark))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Groundwater in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on groundwater during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the withdrawing its notice of intent of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report were collected for the geothermal resource subzones in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge with respect to groundwater in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii. Groundwater quality in and adjacent to Kilauea`s east rift zone (KERZ), is compared with that of meteoric water, seawater, and geothermal fluid. Two segments of KERZ lie within the Puna District. These segments are the middle east rift zone (KERZ) and lower east rift zone (LERZ). The degree of mixing between meteoric water, seawater, and geothermal water in and adjacent to the also is discussed.

Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Implications of Carbonate Petrology and Geochemistry for the Origin of Coal Balls from the Kalo Formation (Moscovian, Pennsylvanian) of Iowa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal balls are carbonate concretions formed in peat during the Pennsylvanian and early Permian. Microprobe and microscope analysis reveal that polycrystals of high-Mg calcite (HMC), which are also high in Sr, are the earliest calcium carbonate to form in the Williamson No. 3 coal balls from the Kalo formation in Iowa. This HMC has early diagenetic rims of ferroan and non-ferroan low-Mg calcite (LMC) suggesting diagenesis in meteoric water. The combination of HMC followed by LMC suggests the earliest coal ball carbonate formed in a hydrologically dynamic environment, where saltwater influx into the mire was followed by a return to meteoric pore water. Subsequent generations of carbonate are ferroan and non-ferroan LMC and appear to result from diagenesis of the original HMC fabric with LMC rims. HMC polycrystals from coal balls are among the first abiotic HMC to be reported from the mid-Pennsylvanian; coal balls may be a good source of Pennsylvanian HMC. Coal balls that formed in porous peat (i.e. wood and surficial leaf mats) commonly have abundant radiating arrays of HMC polycrystals. Coal balls that formed in matrix-rich, low porosity peats consist primarily of permineralizing anhedral calcite, which is ferroan LMC. The link between the HMC and porous permeable peat is supported by the distribution of HMC and ferroan LMC in plant cells. Wood cells, which have porous walls, are filled with HMC; fiber cells, which have impermeable walls, are filled with ferroan LMC. This study demonstrates a link between pore volume, porosity, plant cell type, and carbonate fabric.

Jones, Courtney

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Regional characteristics, timing, and significance of dissolution and collapse features in Lower Cretaceous carbonate platform strata, Desoto Canyon area, offshore Alabama-Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Cretaceous carbonate strata from the central DeSoto Canyon area, offshore Alabama and Florida were studied to determine the extent, intensity, and controlling factors on dissolution-collapse features within these strata. The collapsed zones across the study area were mapped using a tight 2-D seismic grid. The zones of dissolution-collapse form a crude rectilinear pattern in plan view with the average trend of more elongated sections of the dissolution features being subparallel to regional southwestward dip on the Lower Cretaceous platform. Larger collapse features developed near the modern erosional margin that defines the seaward limit of the Lower Cretaceous platform in the study area. Middle Cretaceous strata up to approximately the Coniacian-Santonian unconformity (middle Late Cretaceous age) have numerous compaction-related faults around sagged areas above apparent dissolution-collapse zones within Lower Cretaceous strata. Bi-directional stratal onlap into the collapsed and sagged zones is only found above the Coniacian-Santonian unconformity. These relationships suggest a regional confined freshwater aquifer system developed within the Lower Cretaceous interval at about Coniacian-Santonian time when meteoric groundwater likely flowed from recharge areas to the north in central Alabama and discharged along the western erosional escarpment of the Lower Cretaceous platform. This meteoric groundwater may have mixed either with seawater that infiltrated the platform from the escarpment edge or with hydrogen-sulfide-rich basinal fluids that migrated to structurally high areas (where the dissolution-collapse zones are found). Alternatively, some combination of these mixing processes may have been responsible for the intense and likely still ongoing dissolution in this area of the Lower Cretaceous carbonate platform.

Iannello, Christine

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geophysical and geochemical studies contributed to conceptual hydrologic model of the blind'' (no surface expression), moderate-temperature (greater than 130{degree}C) Newcastle geothermal system, located in the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition zone of southwestern Utah. Temperature gradient measurements define a thermal anomaly centered near the surface trace of the range-bounding Antelope Range fault with and elongate dissipative plume extending north into the adjacent Escalante Valley. Spontaneous potential and resistivity surveys sharply define the geometry of the dominant upflow zone (not yet explored), indicating that most of the thermal fluid issues form a short segment along the Antelope Range fault and discharges into a gently-dipping aquifer. Production wells show that this aquifer lies at a depth between 85 and 95 meter. Electrical surveys also show that some leakage of thermal fluid occurs over a 1.5 km (minimum) interval along the trace of the Antelope Range fault. Major element, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analyses of water samples indicate that the thermal fluid is a mixture of meteoric water derived from recharge areas in the Pine Valley Mountains and cold, shallow groundwater. A northwest-southeast trending system of faults, encompassing a zone of increased fracture permeability, collects meteoric water from the recharge area, allows circulation to a depth of 3 to 5 kilometers, and intersects the northeast-striking Antelope Range fault. We postulate that mineral precipitates form a seal along the Antelope Range fault, preventing the discharge of thermal fluids into basin-fill sediments at depth, and allowing heated fluid to approach the surface. Eventually, continued mineral deposition could result in the development of hot springs at the ground surface.

Blackett, R.E.; Shubat, M.A.; Bishop, C.E. (Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Chapman, D.S.; Forster, C.B.; Schlinger, C.M. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ray, P. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375-5382 (United States); Wood, D. [Praxis, Inc., 5845 Richmond Highway, Suite 700, Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States); York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A. [Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, P.O. Box 8029, Austin, TX 78713-8029 (United States); Dalal, N. Paravastu [American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Cohen, A. S. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Erickson, W. C., E-mail: Joseph.Lazio@jpl.nasa.go [School of Mathematics and Science, University of Tasmania, Churchill Ave., Sandy Bay, Tasmania 7005 (Australia)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Self-assembly of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystal-clusters into cauliflower-like architectures: Synthesis and characterization  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale cauliflower-like Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} architectures consist of well-assembled magnetite nanocrystal clusters have been synthesized by a simple solvothermal process. The as-synthesized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, FT-IR, SEM, TEM, etc. The results show that the samples exhibit cauliflower-like hierarchical microstructures. The influences of synthesis parameters on the morphology of the samples were experimentally investigated. Magnetic properties of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cauliflower-like hierarchical microstructures have been detected by VSM at room temperature, showing a relatively low saturation magnetization of 65 emu/g and an enhanced coercive force of 247 Oe. - Graphical Abstract: Cauliflower-like Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} architectures consist of well-assembled magnetite nanocrystal clusters have been synthesized by a simple solvothermal process, using FeCl{sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O and EDA as the starting materials. Highlights: > Cauliflower-like Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} architectures were successfully prepared by a simple solvothermal route. > The cauliflower-like Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} architectures have a size in the range of 200-300 nm. > They show a low saturation magnetization of 65 emu/g and an enhanced coercive force of 247 Oe. > These Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} architectures may have potential applications in catalysis and biological fields.

Zhu Luping, E-mail: lpzhu@eed.sspu.cn [School of Urban Development and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Second Polytechnic University, Shanghai 201209 (China); Liao Guihong [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Bing Naici; Wang Linlin; Xie Hongyong [School of Urban Development and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Second Polytechnic University, Shanghai 201209 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 404-A January 30, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SCALE INSECTS AND MEALY BUGS The insect world contains an enormous number and variety of species but, of them all, the Scale Insects and Mealy Bugs come nearest to being vegetables. Most insects are active animals that fly, hop, scamper, crawl or burrow, but these queer creatures spend most of their lives merely sitting in one spot, sucking plant juices from a branch, twig, leaf, or fruit. Some of our most destructive pests are included among the several hundred kinds of these highly specialized insects. They are so small that the average person seldom realizes that they are responsible for the sickly or dying condition of a tree or shrub. Adult scale insects are extremely variable in shape, and range in size from that of a pinhead up to forms which are a quarter of an inch long. Each hides under a hard protective shell, or scale, of wax secreted by pores on its body, and are frequently so numerous that they form a dense crust. The females molt a few times, and usually discard their legs and wings, before they mature. She lays eggs under the scale and then dies. These hatch into young (called "crawlers") which move around for a period varying from a few hours to a day or two before they settle down and build scales. Unlike the female, the male -always the smaller of the two -- goes through a cocoon stage from which he emerges with a pair of wings but with no means of taking food. He merely mates and dies. Males are scarce In most kinds and in many species have never been seen.

236

Alaska Open-File Report 127 Assessment of Thermal Springs Sites in Southern Southeastern Alaska - Preliminary Results and Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information has been gathered on 13 reported thermal-spring sites, 12 in southern Southeastern Alaska and one in western British Columbia. Five of the reported sites could not be substantiated by DGGS. The eight known thermal spring sites are associated with grainitic terrain and, except for Baker Island Hot Springs, occur within or near intensively fractured Cretaceous-age pluons of the Coast Range Batholith. Thermal-spring surface temperatures range from 21 C (Twin Lakes) to 91.5 C (Bailey Bay). The greatest discharge occurs at Chief Shakes hot springs (450 1pm). Bell Island Hot Springs, which has about a 100-1 pm discharge and a 70 C temperature, has had the most development. Two previously unreported thermal-spring sites, Barnes Lake warm springs and Bradfield hot springs, have a low rate of discharge and respective surface temperatures of about 25 and 54 C. The known thermal springs probably originate from circulation of meteoric waters through deep-seated fracture and fault systems. The chemical constituents of the alkali-sulfate to alkali-chloride thermal waters are probably derived from interaction of the deeply circulating meteoric waters with the granitic wall rocks. Chemical geothermometry suggests subsurface temperatures of 55 to 151 C. If waters are being heated solely by conduction from wall rocks, circulation depths must be about 1.5 to 5 km, assuming geothermal gradients of 30 to 50 C/km. Variations in temperature, discharge, and chemistry were noted at several thermal springs for which previous records are available. A major decrease in silica and potassium concentrations at Chief Shakes hot springs is suggested by comparing recent analyses of water chemistry to Waring's (1917) original analysis. The rate of discharge at Bell Island Hot Springs may have increased by a factor of two since Waring's visit to the springs. Subsurface reservoirs associated with thermal springs in southern Southeastern Alaska are of low temperature and are probably limited in extent, compared to geothermal fields now being used elsewhere in the world. Only the Bell Island and Bailey Bay sites now offer any potential for generation of electricity; these sites could also be used for a variety of direct uses such as space heating, wood or lumber processing, and perhaps aquaculture. The other sites have less potential but could be used locally for space heating or agriculture enhancement.

Motyka, Roman J.; Moorman, Mary A.; Reeder, John W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Low-to-moderate temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada, area specific studies. Final report, June 1, 1980-August 30, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hawthorne study area is located in Mineral County, Nevada and surrounds the municipality of the same name. It encompasses an area of approximately 310 sq. km (120 sq. mi), and most of the land belongs to the US Army Ammunition Plant. The energy needs of the military combined with those of the area population (over 5,000 residents) are substantial. The area is classified as having a high potential for direct applications using the evaluation scheme described in Texler and others (1979). A variety of scientific techniques was employed during area-wide resource assessment. General geologic studies demonstrate the lithologic diversity in the area; these studies also indicate possible sources for dissolved fluid constituents. Geophysical investigations include aero-magnetic and gravity surveys which aid in defining the nature of regional, and to a lesser extent, local variations in subsurface configurations. Surface and near-surface structural features are determined using various types of photo imagery including low sun-angle photography. An extensive shallow depth temperature probe survey indicates two zones of elevated temperature on opposite sides of the Walker Lake basin. Temperature-depth profiles from several wells in the study area indicate significant thermal fluid-bearing aquifers. Fluid chemical studies suggest a wide spatial distribution for the resource, and also suggest a meteoric recharge source in the Wassuk Range. Finally, a soil-mercury survey was not a useful technique in this study area. Two test holes were drilled to conclude the area resource assessment, and thermal fluids were encountered in both wells. The western well has measured temperatures as high as 90 C (194 F) within 150 meters (500 ft) of the surface. Temperature profiles in this well indicate a negative temperature gradient below 180 meters (590 ft). The eastern hole had a bottom hole temperature of 61 C (142 F) at a depth of only 120 meters (395 ft). A positive gradient is observed to a total depth in the well. Several conclusions are drawn from this study: the resource is distributed over a relatively large area; resource fluid temperatures can exceed 90 C (194 F), but are probably limited to a maximum of 125 C (257 F); recharge to the thermal system is meteoric, and flow of the fluids in the near surface (< 500 m) is not controlled by faults; heat supplied to the system may be related to a zone of partially melted crustal rocks in the area 25 km (15 mi) south of Hawthorne. Four papers and an introduction are included. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. (MHR)

Trexler, D.T.; Koenig, B.A.; Flynn, T.; Bruce, J.L.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Columbus Day  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Columbus Day Columbus Day Nature Bulletin No. 651 Oct6ober 14, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COLUMBUS DAY October 12th, 1492, was a great turning point in history. On that day Christopher Columbus, with 87 men in three small sailing vessels, sighted the low hills of a little island in the West Indies which he named San Salvador. Although he made three more voyages across the Atlantic he never realized that, instead of a route to the Orient, he had discovered a whole New World. With favorable winds they had sailed westward from the Canary Islands for 33 days and nights without sighting land. As they ran before the wind day after day into unknown seas the crews began to grumble that they would starve before they could make their way back to Spain. On the 6th day a brilliant meteor was an ill omen to the superstitious sailors. To quiet their fears somewhat, Columbus kept two ship's logs: a private record of his own showing the true distances traveled, and a second one -- for the crew -- in which each day's run was reduced.

239

36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The {sub 36}Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The {sub 36}Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field.

Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fluid mixing during deposition of bedded-replacement (BR) deposits in the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois-Kentucky(IK) district is unusual by comparison to other Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) districts in the central US in that it contains fluorspar mineralization primarily, with subordinate quantities of base metals. This mineralization occurs as vein, BR, and breccia-hosted deposits. A clearly discernible paragenetic sequence of color banded fluorite sulfides, carbonates, and sulfates is present in BR deposits in three sub-districts: Cave-in-Rock, Harris Creek, and Carrsville. Homogenization temperatures (T[sub b]) and salinities of fluids in fluorite show that BR deposits formed from at least three fluids, a lower temperature-higher salinity connate fluid (F1) and a higher temperature-lower salinity connate fluid (F2) that mixed at the site of deposition. These fluids were followed by a lower temperature-lower salinity meteoric dominated fluid (F3). The involvement of two distinct regional fluids: a lower temperature, more-saline fluid, and a warmer, less-saline fluid, during mineralization of MVT deposits has previously been recognized for Pb-Zn deposits in southeast Missouri (Shelton et al., 1992), and east Tennessee (Zimmerman and Kesler, 1981; Taylor et al. 1983).

Spry, P.G.; Fuhrmann, G.D. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Geological Atmospheric Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Geochemical modeling at Raft River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical analysis of water from three depth regimes at the Raft River KGRA indicate the presence of at least two distinct hydrothermal fluids. One fluid predominates in the fracture system on the west side of the valley, known as the Bridge Fault. This fluid is characterized by low conductivity (2,000 to 3,000 ..mu..s) and 6 to 9 ..mu..g/ml F/sup -/. The second fluid, encountered in the center of the valley, appears to be associated with the Narrows Structure and is characterized by a conductivity of 6,000 to 11,000 ..mu..s and F/sup -/ of 3 to 6 ..mu..g/ml. Contour mapping of conductivity and Cl/sup -//F/sup -/ ratios indicates upwelling of both deep geothermal fluids into the shallow system. This recharge into the intermediate and shallow zones produces high-conductivity water which is used for irrigation. Application of a simple mixing model shows that all the water sampled in intermediate and deep zones can be described by mixtures of two nearly pure fluids. One mechanism, consistent with the known data, is deep upwelling of a highly mineralized fluid which is heated by the basement rock and then penetrates sediment layers through fractures. The second fluid is relatively recent meteoric water conductively heated by the basement rock.

Allen, C.A.; Chaney, R.E.; McAtee, R.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part II. Water temperature and chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal reconnaissance techniques have identified five areas in Utah County warranting further investigation for low-temperature geothermal resources. One area in northern Utah Valley is along Utah Lake fault zone and includes Saratoga Hot Springs. Water temperatures within this area range from 21 to 43/sup 0/C. Common ion analyses as well as B and Li concentrations indicate waters sampled in this area are anomalous when compared to other samples from the same aquifer. Two other areas in southern Utah Valley also coincide with the Utah Lake fault zone. Common ion analyses, trace element concentrations, and C1/HCO/sub 3/ ratios distinguish these areas from all other waters in this valley. Temperatures within these southern areas range from 21 to 32/sup 0/C. All three thermal areas are possibly the result of deep circulation of meteoric water being warmed and subsequently migrating upward within the Utah Lake fault zone. The Castilla Hot Springs area has been expanded by this study to include a spring located 3 mi further up Spanish Fork Canyon near the Thistle earthflow. A temperature of 50/sup 0/C was recorded for this spring and chemistry is similar to Castilla. In Goshen Valley, the fifth geothermal area identified, measured temperatures range from 20 to 27/sup 0/C for some wells and springs. Chemical analyses, however, do not discern the location of low-temperature geothermal reservoirs. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Klauk, R.H.; Davis, D.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Effect of Data Gaps on LISA Galactic Binary Parameter Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years there has been an enormous effort in parameter estimation studies for different sources with the space based gravitational wave detector, LISA. While these studies have investigated sources of differing complexity, the one thing they all have in common is they assume continuous data streams. In reality, the LISA data stream will contain gaps from such possible events such as repointing of the satellite antennae, to discharging static charge build up on the satellites, to disruptions due to micro-meteor strikes. In this work we conduct a large scale Monte Carlo parameter estimation simulation for galactic binaries assuming data streams containing gaps. As the expected duration and frequency of the gaps are currently unknown, we have decided to focus on gaps of approximately one hour, occurring either once per day or once per week. We also study the case where, as well as the expected periodic gaps, we have a data drop-out of one continuous week. Our results show that for for galactic bina...

Carré, Jérôme

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Shock-Wave Heating Model for Chondrule Formation: Prevention of Isotopic Fractionation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chondrules are considered to have much information on dust particles and processes in the solar nebula. It is naturally expected that protoplanetary disks observed in present star forming regions have similar dust particles and processes, so study of chondrule formation may provide us great information on the formation of the planetary systems. Evaporation during chondrule melting may have resulted in depletion of volatile elements in chondrules. However, no evidence for a large degree of heavy-isotope enrichment has been reported in chondrules. In order to meet this observed constraint, the rapid heating rate at temperatures below the silicate solidus is required to suppress the isotopic fractionation. We have developed a new shock-wave heating model taking into account the radiative transfer of the dust thermal continuum emission and the line emission of gas molecules and calculated the thermal history of chondrules. We have found that optically-thin shock waves for the thermal continuum emission from dust particles can meet the rapid heating constraint, because the dust thermal emission does not keep the dust particles high temperature for a long time in the pre-shock region and dust particles are abruptly heated by the gas drag heating in the post-shock region. We have also derived the upper limit of optical depth of the pre-shock region using the radiative diffusion approximation, above which the rapid heating constraint is not satisfied. It is about 1 ? 10. Subject headings: meteors, meteoroids — shock waves — solar system: formation 1

Hitoshi Miura; Taishi Nakamoto

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in Paso Robles, California  

SciTech Connect

Ninety-eight geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted, and a geologic map and cross sections were compiled. Detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The geological and geophysical work delineated the basement highs and trough-like depressions that can exercise control on the occurrence of the thermal waters. The Rinconada fault was also evident. Cross sections drawn from oil well logs show the sediments conforming against these basement highs and filling the depressions. It is along the locations where the sediments meet the basement highs that three natural warm springs in the area occur. Deep circulation of meteoric waters along faults seems to be a reasonable source for the warm water. The Santa Margarita, Pancho Rico, and Paso Robles Formations would be the first permeable zones that abut the faults through which water would enter. Temperatures and interpretation of well logs indicate the warmest aquifer at the base of the Paso Robles Formation. Warm water may be entering higher up in the section, but mixing with water from cooler zones seems to be evident. Geothermometry indicates reservoir temperatures could be as high as 91/sup 0/C (196/sup 0/F).

Campion, L.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Chemical characteristics of the major thermal springs of Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-one thermal springs in western Montana were sampled for chemical, isotope, and gas compositions. Most of the springs issue dilute to slightly saline sodium-bicarbonate waters of neutral to slightly alkaline pH. A few of the springs issue sodium-mixed anion waters of near neutral pH. Fluoride concentrations are high in most of the thermal waters, up to 18 miligrams per litre, while F/Cl ratios range from 3/1 in the dilute waters to 1/10 in the slightly saline waters. Most of the springs are theoretically in thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to calcite and fluorite. Nitrogen is the major gas escaping from most of the hot springs; however, Hunters Hot Springs issue principally methane. The deuterium content of the hot spring waters is typical of meteoric water in western Montana. Geothermal calculations based on silica concentrations and Na-K-Ca ratios indicate that most of the springs are associated with low temperature aquifers (less than 100/sup 0/C). Chalcedony may be controlling the silica concentrations in these low temperature aquifers even in ''granitic'' terranes.

Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Light stable isotope study of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Southwestern Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The isotopic composition of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon has been determined for regional cold springs, thermal fluids, and rocks and minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area. The geothermal system has developed within plutonic granitic rocks and amphibolite facies gneiss, relying upon fracture-controlled permeability for the migration of the thermal fluids. Probably originating as meteoric waters in the upper elevations of the Mineral Mountains, the thermal waters sampled in the production wells display an oxygen isotopic shift of at least +1.2. Depletions of delta /sup 18/O in wole rock, K-feldspar, and biotite have a positive correlation with alteration intensity. W/R mass ratios, calculated from the isotopic shifts of rock and water, range up to 3.0 in a producing horizon of one well, although the K-feldspar has experienced only 30% exchange with the thermal waters. While veinlet quartz has equilibrated with the thermal waters, the /sup 18/O values of K-mica clay, an alteration product of plagioclase, mimic the isotopic composition of K-feldspar and whole rock. This suggests that locally small W/R ratios enable plagioclase to influence its alteration products by isotopic exchange.

Rohrs D.T.; Bowman, J.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geothermal Energy Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the objectives and the status of a long-range program to develop techniques for assessing the resource potential of liquid-dominated geothermal systems. Field studies underway in northern Nevada comprise a systematic integrated program of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical measurements, necessary to specify a drilling program encompassing heat flow holes, deep calibration holes, and ultimately, deep test wells. The status of Nevada field activities is described. The areas under study are in a region characterized by high heat flow where temperatures at depth in some geothermal systems exceed 180 C. Areas presently being examined include Beowawe Hot Springs in Whirlwind Valley. Buffalo Valley Hot Springs, Leach Hot Springs in Grass Valley, and Kyle Hot Springs in Buena Vista Valley. Geologic studies encompass detailed examinations of structure and lithology to establish the geologic framework of the areas. The geothermal occurrences are characterized by zones of intense fault intersection, which furnish permeable channelways for the introduction of meteoric water into regions of high temperature at depth.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Asaro, F.; Bowman, H.; McEvilly, T.; Morrison, F.; Witherspoon, P.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Preliminary geothermal investigations at Manley Hot Springs, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Manley Hot Springs is one of several hot springs which form a belt extending from the Seward Peninsula to east-central Alaska. All of the hot springs are low-temperature, water-dominated geothermal systems, having formed as the result of circulation of meteoric water along deepseated fractures near or within granitic intrusives. Shallow, thermally disturbed ground at Manley Hot Springs constitutes an area of 1.2 km by 0.6 km along the lower slopes of Bean Ridge on the north side of the Tanana Valley. This area includes 32 springs and seeps and one warm (29.1/sup 0/C) well. The hottest springs range in temperature from 61/sup 0/ to 47/sup 0/C and are presently utilized for space heating and irrigation. This study was designed to characterize the geothermal system present at Manley Hot Springs and delineate likely sites for geothermal drilling. Several surveys were conducted over a grid system which included shallow ground temperature, helium soil gas, mercury soil and resistivity surveys. In addition, a reconnaissance ground temperature survey and water chemistry sampling program was undertaken. The preliminary results, including some preliminary water chemistry, show that shallow hydrothermal activity can be delineated by many of the surveys. Three localities are targeted as likely geothermal well sites, and a model is proposed for the geothermal system at Manley Hot Springs.

East, J.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

On the Flux of Extra-Solar Dust in Earth's Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micron size extrasolar dust particles have been convincingly detected by satellites. Larger extrasolar meteoroids (5-35 microns) have most likely been detected by ground based radar at Arecibo and New Zealand. We present estimates of the minimum detectable particle sizes and collecting areas for both radar systems. We show that particles larger than about 10 microns can propagate for tens of parsecs through the interstellar medium, opening up the possibility that ground based radar systems can detect AGB stars, young stellar objects such as T Tauri stars, and debris disks around Vega-like stars. We provide analytical and numerical estimates of the ejection velocity in the case of a debris disk interacting with a Jupiter mass planet. We provide rough estimates of the flux of large micrometeoroids from all three classes of sources. Current radar systems are unlikely to detect significant numbers of meteors from debris disks such as Beta Pictoris. However, we suggest improvements to radar systems that should allow for the detection of multiple examples of all three classes.

Norman Murray; Joe Weingartner; Paul Capobianco

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springs on Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understand processes that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water, and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower east rift of Kilauea. Samples of thermal water from shallow wells in the lower east rift and vicinity have rather variable chemistry indicating that a number of processes operate in the near surface. Water sampled from the available deep wells is different in composition from the shallow thermal water, indicating that generally there is not a significant component of deep water in the shallow wells. Data for samples from available deep wells show significant gradients in chemistry and steam content of the reservoir fluid. These gradients are interpreted to indicate that the reservoir tapped by the existing wells is an evolving vapor-dominated system.

Janik, C.J.; Nathenson, M.; Scholl, M.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Virginia Regional Seismic Network. Final report (1986--1992)  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the Virginia Regional Seismic Network was one of the few fully calibrated digital seismic networks in the United States. Continued operation has resulted in the archival of signals from 2,000+ local, regional and teleseismic sources. Seismotectonic studies of the central Virginia seismic zone showed the activity in the western part to be related to a large antiformal structure while seismicity in the eastern portion is associated spatially with dike swarms. The eastern Tennessee seismic zone extends over a 300x50 km area and is the result of a compressive stress field acting at the intersection between two large crustal blocks. Hydroseismicity, which proposes a significant role for meteoric water in intraplate seismogenesis, found support in the observation of common cyclicities between streamflow and earthquake strain data. Seismic hazard studies have provided the following results: (1) Damage areas in the eastern United States are three to five times larger than those observed in the west. (2) Judged solely on the basis of cataloged earthquake recurrence rates, the next major shock in the southeast region will probably occur outside the Charleston, South Carolina area. (3) Investigations yielded necessary hazard parameters (for example, maximum magnitudes) for several sites in the southeast. Basic to these investigations was the development and maintenance of several seismological data bases.

Bollinger, G.A.; Sibol, M.S.; Chapman, M.C.; Snoke, J.A. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (US). Seismological Observatory

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Monte Carlo: in the beginning and some great expectations  

SciTech Connect

The central theme will be on the historical setting and origins of the Monte Carlo Method. The scene was post-war Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. There was an inevitability about the Monte Carlo Event: the ENIAC had recently enjoyed its meteoric rise (on a classified Los Alamos problem); Stan Ulam had returned to Los Alamos; John von Neumann was a frequent visitor. Techniques, algorithms, and applications developed rapidly at Los Alamos. Soon, the fascination of the Method reached wider horizons. The first paper was submitted for publication in the spring of 1949. In the summer of 1949, the first open conference was held at the University of California at Los Angeles. Of some interst perhaps is an account of Fermi's earlier, independent application in neutron moderation studies while at the University of Rome. The quantum leap expected with the advent of massively parallel processors will provide stimuli for very ambitious applications of the Monte Carlo Method in disciplines ranging from field theories to cosmology, including more realistic models in the neurosciences. A structure of multi-instruction sets for parallel processing is ideally suited for the Monte Carlo approach. One may even hope for a modest hardening of the soft sciences.

Metropolis, N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Preliminary Gas and Isotope Geochemistry in the Rehai Geothermal Field, P.R. China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on gas and sulphur isotopic composition, two types of steam in Rehai geothermal field are identified. One is with higher CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S concentration, the {delta}{sup 34}S of H{sub 2}S is in the range 2.49{per_thousand} to -1.04{per_thousand} (vs CDT), from which the H{sub 2}S-temperature is over than 250 C. The other is with lower CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S concentration, the {delta}{sup 34}S of H{sub 2}S is in the range -4.0{per_thousand} to -8.36{per_thousand}, from which the H{sub 2}S- and H{sub 2}-temperatures are 180 C-210 C, in good agreement with quartz temperature. The thermal water in the Rehai field is of local meteoric origin. Maximum {delta}{sup 18}O-value shift is less than 2.0{per_thousand} (vs SMOW). Mixing is widespread and could be identified on isotope and solute chemistry.

P., Zhao; Z., Liao

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Water information bulletin No. 30, part 13: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Preliminary geologic reconnaissance of the geothermal occurrences of the Wood River Drainage Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pre-tertiary sediments of the Milligen and Wood River Formations consisting primarily of argillite, quartzite, shale and dolomite are, for the most part, exposed throughout the area and are cut locally by outliers of the Idaho Batholith. At some locations, Tertiary-age Challis Volcanics overlay these formations. Structurally the area is complex with major folding and faulting visible in many exposures. Many of the stream drainages appear to be fault controlled. Hydrologic studies indicate hot spring occurrences are related to major structural trends, as rock permeabilities are generally low. Geochemical studies using stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen indicate the thermal water in the Wood River region to be depleted by about 10 0/00 in D and by 1 to 2 0/00 in /sup 18/0 relative to cold water. This suggests the water could be meteoric water that fell during the late Pleistocene. The geological data, as well as the chemical data, indicate the geothermal waters are heated at depth, and subsequently migrate along permeable structural zones. In almost all cases the chemical data suggest slightly different thermal histories and recharge areas for the water issuing from the hot springs. Sustained use of the thermal water at any of the identified springs is probably limited to flow rates approximating the existing spring discharge. 28 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Anderson, J.E.; Bideganeta, K.; Mitchell, J.C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Light-stable-isotope studies of spring and thermal waters from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort/Sulphurdale Thermal areas and of clay minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The isotopic compositions of hydrogen and oxygen have been determined for spring waters and thermal fluids from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal areas, for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration of the acid-sulfate type in the Roosevelt Hot Springs area, and for spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area of central Utah. The water analyses in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area confirm the origin of the thermal fluids from meteoric water in the Mineral Range. The water analyses in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal area restrict recharge areas for this system to the upper elevations of the Pavant and/or Tushar Ranges. The low /sup 18/O shift observed in these thermal fluids (+0.7 permil) implies either high water/rock ratios or incomplete isotope exchange or both, and further suggests minimal interaction between the thermal fluid and marble country rock in the system. Hydrogen and oxygen-isotope data for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration zones in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal system suggest that the fluids responsible for the shallow acid-sulfate alteration were in part derived from condensed steam produced by boiling of the deep reservoir fluid. The isotope evidence supports the chemical model proposed by Parry et al. (1980) for origin of the acid-sulfate alteration at Roosevelt Hot Springs. The isotope analyses of spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area indicate only a general correlation of isotope composition, salinity and chemical temperatures.

Bowman, J.R.; Rohrs, D.T.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) • Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) • Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 – 081103) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) • Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 – 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 – 090397) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 – 012296) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) • Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 – 102192) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 – 111093) • The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) • Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 – Jan, 1996) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R

258

Geothermal potential on Kirtland Air Force Base lands, Bernalillo County, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extensive sampling and geochemical analysis of groundwater in and near the base disclosed no significant geothermal parameters. However, structural conditions and current hydrologic regimes strongly suggest that thermal waters would be masked by near surface, low temperature meteoric water originating as rain and snowfall in the nearby mountains. Controlled source audio-magnetotelluric (CSAMT) electromagnetic techniques, refraction seismic experiments, and gravity traverses were utilized on the base. These, together with published geohysical information that presents evidence for a shallow magma body beneath the Albuquerque Basin; favorable terrestrial heat flow, water chemistry, and shallow temperature gradient holes on the nearby mesa west of the Rio Grande; interpretation of regional gravity data; and geological data from nearby deep wells tend to confirm structural, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions favorable for developing an extensive intermediate to high-temperature hydrothermal regime on portions of Kirtland AFB lands where intensive land use occurs. Two possible exploration and development scenarios are presented. One involves drilling a well to a depth of 3000 to 5000 ft (914 to 1524 m) to test the possibility of encountering higher than normal water temperatures on the basinward side of the faults underlying the travertine deposits. The other is to conduct limited reflection seismograph surveys in defined areas on the base to determine the depth to basement (granite) and thickness of the overyling, unconfined, water filled, relatively unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifer.

Grant, P.R. Jr.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Heating of near-Earth objects and meteoroids due to close approaches to the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is known that near-Earth objects (NEOs) during their orbital evolution may often undergo close approaches to the Sun. Indeed it is estimated that up to ~70% of them end their orbital evolution colliding with the Sun. Starting from the present orbital properties, it is possible to compute the most likely past evolution for every NEO, and to trace its distance from the Sun. We find that a large fraction of the population may have experienced in the past frequent close approaches, and thus, as a consequence, a considerable Sun-driven heating, not trivially correlated to the present orbits. The detailed dynamical behaviour, the rotational and the thermal properties of NEOs determine the exact amount of the resulting heating due to the Sun. In the present paper we discuss the general features of the process, providing estimates of the surface temperature reached by NEOs during their evolution. Moreover, we investigate the effects of this process on meteor-size bodies, analyzing possible differences with the NEO...

Marchi, S; Morbidelli, A; Paolicchi, P; Lazzarin, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Response of Alum Rock springs to the October 30, 2007 Alum Rock earthquake and implications for the origin of increased discharge after earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The origin of increased stream flow and spring discharge following earthquakes have been the subject of controversy, in large part because there are many models to explain observations and few measurements suitable for distinguishing between hypotheses. On October 30, 2007 a magnitude 5.5 earthquake occurred near the Alum Rock springs, California, USA. Within a day we documented a several-fold increase in discharge. Over the following year, we have monitored a gradual return towards pre-earthquake properties, but for the largest springs there appears to be a permanent increase in the steady discharge at all the springs. The Alum Rock springs discharge waters that represent a mixture between modern ('shallow') meteoric water and old ('deep') connate waters expelled by regional transpression. After the earthquake, the increased discharge at the largest springs was accompanied by a small decrease in the fraction of connate water in the spring discharge. Combined with the rapid response, this implies that the increased discharge has a shallow origin. Increased discharge at these springs occurs for earthquakes that cause static volumetric expansion and those that cause contraction, supporting models in which dynamic strains are responsible for the subsurface changes that cause flow to increase. We show that models in which the permeability of the fracture system feeding the springs increases after the earthquake are in general consistent with the changes in discharge. The response of these springs to another earthquake will provide critical constraints on the changes that occur in the subsurface.

Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manga, Michael [UC BERKELEY

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "molts edas meteor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Utility of drill-stem tests in determination of the geothermal regime of Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate representation of geothermal conditions is necessary to determine generation potential of source rocks buried in Railroad Valley. Boreholes, provide the best source of geothermal information, but formation temperature data must be screened for variations caused by drilling. Bottomhole temperatures from wireline logs are affected by initial formation conditions, drilling fluid that moves into the formation while drilling, and lag time between cessation of drilling fluid circulation and acquisition of logs. More accurate indicators of formation conditions are temperatures recorded during drill-stem tests, especially for tests that recovered large amounts of fluid. Over 130 drill-stem tests were examined to establish the viability of this source of data and to determine the geothermal conditions of the Railroad Valley basin. Results indicate that 500 feet or more of fluid recovery on a test is necessary to get a temperature recorded that is not influenced by drilling perturbations. The formation temperature data collected for Railroad Valley indicate the possibility of 2 thermal regimes. A low-temperature gradient regime is probably influenced by meteoric water. The high-temperature gradient regime probably reflects the regional heat flow associated with the thin crust of the Great Basin.

French, D.E. [Independent Geologist, Billings, MT (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Regulation of Adult Physiology and Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physiological responses involved in mediating adaptive change due to varying environmental conditions or social interactions are complex and involve integration of numerous signaling pathways. With Drosophila melanogaster, I can investigate the responses to varied environmental and social stimuli through quantification of signaling activity, stress resistance, and changes in gene expression and behavior. My work focuses on investigating signaling pathways that adult insects use to regulate homeostasis. The steroid hormone 20- hydroxyecdysone (ecdysone) and its receptor (EcR/USP) are vital during arthropod development for coordinating molting and metamorphosis. However, recent adult studies in Drosophila melanogaster indicate that the hormone and receptor influence many processes. I characterized the wild-type expression patterns and activity of ecdysone receptors in individual tissues during early adult life. I found that receptor components EcR and usp were expressed in numerous adult tissues, but receptor activation varied depending on tissue type and adult age. EcR/USP activity did not detectably change in response to environmental stimuli but is reduced when a constitutively inactive ecdysone receptor is present. The current state of our understanding of this signaling system is reviewed with reference to my findings. I discuss future directions focusing on identifying locations of hormone synthesis, metabolism, and storage, isoform-specific roles of EcR, and functional roles of gene repression and activation to link hormone receptor activity with physiological responses. Adult physiology is also regulated by interactions between adipose tissue and the central nervous system. Genes expressed in the insect fat body are involved in regulating nutrient homeostasis, stress resistance, immunity, reproduction, and behavior. Of particular interest is female-specific independent of transformer (fit). Several studies indicate that fat body expression of fit may influence responses to environmental change by altering adult behavior or physiology. Our lab created fit mutants that I used to assess the effects of these mutations on adult Drosophila physiology and behavior. I found that fit mutant adults survive longer without food, have increased nutrient levels, are more active, and feed extensively. My findings indicate that the fat-biased gene fit influences multiple aspects of adult physiology that affect appetite modulation, metabolism, and behavior.

Schwedes, Christoph 1980-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis of Surface Modification Consisting of Addition of Alluvium (Feature 23a)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document the analysis that was conducted to evaluate the effect of a potential change to the TSPA-VA base case design that could improve long-term repository performance. The design feature evaluated in this report is a modification of the topographic surface of Yucca Mountain. The modification consists of covering the land surface immediately above the repository foot-print with a thick layer of unconsolidated material utilizing rip-rap and plants to mitigate erosion. This surface modification is designated as Feature 23a or simply abbreviated as F23a. The fundamental aim of F23a is to reduce the net infiltration into the unsaturated zone by enhancing the potential for evapotranspiratiration at the surface; such a change would, in turn, reduce the seepage flux and the rate of radionuclide releases from the repository. Field and modeling studies of water movement in the unsaturated zone have indicated that shallow infiltration at the surface is almost negligible in locations where the bedrock is covered by a sufficiently thick soil layer. In addition to providing storage for meteoric water, a thick soil layer would slow the downward movement of soil moisture to such an extent that evaporation and transpiration could easily transfer most of the soil-water back to the atmosphere. Generic requirements for the effectiveness of this design feature are two-fold. First, the soil layer above the repository foot-print must be thick enough to provide sufficient storage of meteoric water (from episodic precipitation events) and accommodate plant roots. Second, the added soil layer must be engineered so as to mitigate thinning by erosional processes and have sufficient thickness to accommodate the roots of common desert plants. Under these two conditions, it is reasonable to expect that modification would be effective for a significant time period and the net infiltration and deep percolation flux would be reduced by orders of magnitude lower than the present levels. Conceptually, the topographic surface above the repository foot-print would be re-contoured to make it more suitable for placement of unconsolidated materials (e.g., alluvium). Figure 1 shows the region of the surface modification in relation to the location of the repository foot-print. The surface contours in this region after modification are shown in the plot presented in Figure 2. Basically, the surface modification would be accomplished by applying cuts to the ridges slopes on the east flank of Yucca Mountain to produce a relatively uniform slope of about 10%. The alluvium would be covered with rock fragments (to imitate the desert pavement) to reduce erosion. This report documents the modeling assumptions and performance analysis conducted to estimate the long-term performance for Feature 23a. The performance measure for this evaluation is dose-rate. Results are presented that compare the dose-rate time histories for the new design feature to those of the TSPA-VA base case calculation (CRWMS M&O 1998a).

N. Erb

1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

Stable isotope and groundwater flow dynamics of agricultural irrigation recharge into groundwater resources of the Central Valley, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intensive agricultural irrigation and overdraft of groundwater in the Central Valley of California profoundly affect the regional quality and availability of shallow groundwater resources. In the natural state, the {delta}{sup 18}O values of groundwater were relatively homogeneous (mostly -7.0 {+-} 0.5{per_thousand}), reflecting local meteoric recharge that slowly (1-3m/yr) flowed toward the valley axis. Today, on the west side of the valley, the isotope distribution is dominated by high {sup 18}O enclosures formed by recharge of evaporated irrigation waters, while the east side has bands of low {sup 18}O groundwater indicating induced recharge from rivers draining the Sierra Nevada mountains. Changes in {delta}{sup 18}O values caused by the agricultural recharge strongly correlate with elevated nitrate concentrations (5 to >100 mg/L) that form pervasive, non-point source pollutants. Small, west-side cities dependent solely on groundwater resources have experienced increases of >1.0 mg/L per year of nitrate for 10-30 years. The resultant high nitrates threaten the economical use of the groundwater for domestic purposes, and have forced some well shut-downs. Furthermore, since >80% of modern recharge is now derived from agricultural irrigation, and because modern recharge rates are {approximately}10 times those of the natural state, agricultural land retirement by urbanization will severely curtail the current safe-yields and promote overdraft pumping. Such overdrafting has occurred in the Sacramento metropolitan area for {approximately}40 years, creating cones of depression {approximately}25m deep. Today, groundwater withdrawal in Sacramento is approximately matched by infiltration of low {sup 18}O water (-11.0{per_thousand}) away from the Sacramento and American Rivers, which is estimated to occur at 100-300m/year from the sharp {sup 18}O gradients in our groundwater isotope map.

Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States) Evans (Charles) and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Application of seismic tomographic techniques in the investigation of geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utility of microearthquake data for characterizing the Northwest Geysers geothermal field and the Long Valley Caldera (LVC) was investigated. Three-dimensional (3-D) P- and S-wave seismic velocity models were estimated for the Coldwater Creek Steam Field (CCSF) in the Northwest Geysers region. Hypocenters relocated using these 3-D models appear to be associated with the steam producing zone, with a deeper cluster of hypocenters beneath an active injection well. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit strong correlation with geothermal exploitation. A 3-D differential attenuation model was also developed for the CCSF from spectral ratios corrected for strong site effects. High-velocity anomalies and low attenuation in the near surface correspond to Franciscan metagraywacke and greenstone units. Microearthquakes recorded at seismographic stations located near the metagraywacke unit exhibit high corner frequencies. Low-velocity anomalies and higher attenuation in the near surface are associated with sections of Franciscan melange. Near-surface high attenuation and high Vp/Vs are interpreted to indicate liquid-saturated regions affected by meteoric recharge. High attenuation and low Vp/Vs marks the steam producing zone, suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. The extent of the high attenuation and low Vp/Vs anomalies suggest that the CCSF steam reservoir may extend northwestward beyond the known producing zone. This study concludes that microearthquake monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool. Seismic velocity and attenuation structures as well as the distribution of microearthquake activity can be used to identify and delineate the geothermal reservoir, while temporal variations in these quantities would be useful in tracking changes during exploitation.

Romero, A.E. Jr.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

POSITION STATEMENT SAVING THE ARECIBO OBSERVATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unique world resource, the Arecibo astronomical observatory in Puerto Rico is scheduled to be phased out over the next few years, due to withdrawal of funding by the National Science Foundation. With its 305-meter diameter antenna, the Arecibo Observatory is the world's largest and most sensitive radio-radar telescope. The IEEE recognized the observatory as an electrical engineering milestone in 2002. Arecibo is essential to support the recent congressionally-mandated NASA mission for highprecision tracking and characterizing potentially hazardous Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)--defined as objects 140 meters or greater in diameter, with orbits that may cross that of Earth. A NASA report released last year estimates that, among the many millions of asteroids and comets in the solar system, approximately 100,000 potentially hazardous NEOs are yet to be located. Some assess the likelihood of such an object hitting the earth in a typical human lifetime as about one in sixty. But we are doing little to reduce that likelihood. If a 140 meter NEO were to hit the earth, a huge amount of energy-- equivalent to 100 megatons of TNT-- would be released. As an actual historical reference, the Tunguska event in Siberia in 1908 was most likely caused by a meteor about 40 meters in diameter, exploding at about 10 kilometers altitude. The explosion toppled more than 80 million trees over 2,150 square kilometers, and was about 1,000 times as powerful as the bomb dropped on Hiroshima. IEEE-USA calls upon Congress and the administration to maintain the Arecibo, supporting the congressionally-mandated NASA NEO mission by: Provide funding for the continued operation and maintenance of the Arecibo facility at its present activity level. Directing the National Science Foundation to initiate and/or extend programs and activities to sustain the NASA mission and Encouraging NASA's continued use of Arecibo to carry out the mission

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Effect of Data Gaps on LISA Galactic Binary Parameter Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years there has been an enormous effort in parameter estimation studies for different sources with the space based gravitational wave detector, LISA. While these studies have investigated sources of differing complexity, the one thing they all have in common is they assume continuous data streams. In reality, the LISA data stream will contain gaps from such possible events such as repointing of the satellite antennae, to discharging static charge build up on the satellites, to disruptions due to micro-meteor strikes. In this work we conduct a large scale Monte Carlo parameter estimation simulation for galactic binaries assuming data streams containing gaps. As the expected duration and frequency of the gaps are currently unknown, we have decided to focus on gaps of approximately one hour, occurring either once per day or once per week. We also study the case where, as well as the expected periodic gaps, we have a data drop-out of one continuous week. Our results show that for for galactic binaries, a gap of once per week introduces a bias of between 0.5% and 1% in the estimation of parameters, for the most important parameters such as the sky position, amplitude and frequency. This number rises to between 3% and 7% for the case of one gap a day, and to between 4% and 9% when we have one gap a day and a spurious gap of a week. A future study will investigate the effect of data gaps on supermassive black hole binaries and extreme mass ratio inspirals.

Jérôme Carré; Edward K. Porter

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

270

Geochemistry, isotopic composition and origin of fluids emanating from mud volcanoes in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two compositionally different groups of mud volcanoes exist in the Copper River Basin: the Tolsona group which discharges Na-Ca rich, HCO/sub 3/-SO/sub 4/ poor saline waters accompanied by small amounts of gas, composed predominately of CH/sub 4/ and N/sub 2/; and the Klawasi group which discharges Ca poor, Na-HCO/sub 3/ rich saline waters accompanied by enormous amounts of CO/sub 2/. The Tolsona-type water chemistry and isotopic composition could have been produced through the following processes: dilution of original interstitial seawaters with paleo-meteoric waters, possibly during a period of uplift in the mid-Cretaceous; loss of HCO/sub 3/ and SO/sub 4/ and modification of other constituent concentrations by shale-membrane filtration; further depletion of Mg, K, HCO/sub 3/, and SO/sub 4/, and enrichment in Ca and Sr through dolomitization, hydrolysis, and clay-forming processes; and leaching of B, I, Li, and SiO/sub 2/ from marine sediments. Compared to the Tolsona waters, the Klawasi waters are strongly enriched in Li, Na, K, Mg, HCO/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, B, SiO/sub 2/ and delta/sup 18/O and strongly depleted in Ca, Sr and D. The Klawasi wates also contain high concentrations of arsenic (10 to 48 ppM). The differences in fluid chemistry between Klawasi and Tolsona can be explained as the result of the interaction of fluids derived from a magmatic intrusion and contact decarbonation of limestone beds underlying the Klawasi area with overlying Tolsona-type formation waters.

Motyka, R.J.; Hawkins, D.B.; Poreda, R.J.; Jeffries, A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Low-to-moderate temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada: Area specific studies, final report for the period June 1, 1980-August 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawthorne study area is located in Mineral County, Nevada and surrounds the municipality of the same name. It encompasses an area of approximately 310 sq. km (120 sq. mi), and most of the land belongs to the US Army Ammunition Plant. The energy needs of the military combined with those of the area population (over 5,000 residents) are substantial. The area is classified as having a high potential for direct applications using the evaluation scheme described in Trexler and others (1979). A variety of scientific techniques was employed during area-wide resource assessment. General geologic studies demonstrate the lithologic diversity in the area; these studies also indicate possible sources for dissolved fluid constituents. Geophysical investigations include aeromagnetic and gravity surveys which aid in defining the nature of regional, and to a lesser extent, local variations in subsurface configurations. Surface and near-surface structural features are determined using various types of photo imagery including low sun-angle photography. An extensive shallow depth temperature probe survey indicates two zones of elevated temperature on opposite sides of the Walker Lake basin. Temperature-depth profiles from several wells in the study area indicate significant thermal fluid-bearing aquifers. Fluid chemical studies suggest a wide spatial distribution for the resource, and also suggest a meteoric recharge source in the Wassuk Range. Finally, a soil-mercury survey was not a useful technique in this study area. Two test holes were drilled to conclude the area resource assessment, and thermal fluids were encountered in both wells. The western well has measured temperatures as high as 90 C (194 F) within 150 meters (500 ft) of the surface. Temperature profiles in this well indicate a negative temperature gradient below 180 meters (590 ft). The eastern hole had a bottom hole temperature of 61 C (142 F) at a depth of only 120 meters (395 ft). A positive gradient is observed to a total depth in the well.

Trexler, Dennis T.; Koeing, Brian A.; Flynn, Thomas; Bruce, James L.; Ghusn, George Jr.

1981-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Geology, characteristics, and resource potential of the low-temperature geothermal system near Midway, Wasatch County, Utah. Report of Investigation No. 142  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To evaluate the geothermal energy potential of the hot springs system near Midway, Wasatch Co., Utah, consideration was given to heat flow, water chemistry, and structural controls. Abnormal heat flow was indicated qualitatively by snow-melt patterns and quantitatively by heat-flow measurements that were obtained from two of four temperature-gradient wells drilled in the area. These measurements indicated that the area north of the town of Midway is characterized by heat flow equal to 321.75 MW/m/sup 2/, which is over four times the value generally considered as normal heat flow. Chemical analyses of water from six selected thermal springs and wells were used in conjunction with the silica and Na-K-Ca geothermometers to estimate the reservoir temperature of the thermal system. Because the calculated temperature was more than 25/sup 0/C above the maximum observed temperature, a mixing model calculation was used to project an upper limit for the reservoir temperature. Based on these calculations, the system has a reservoir temperature ranging from 46 to 125/sup 0/C. Structural information obtained from published geologic maps of the area and from an unpublished gravity survey, enabled two models to be developed for the system. The first model, based on geologic relationships in the mountains to the north and west of Midway, assumes that the heat for the thermal system comes from a relatively young intrusive or related hydrothermal convection system in the vicinity of the Mayflower mine. Meteoric waters would be heated as they approach the heat source and then move laterally to the south through faults and fractures in the rocks. These thermal waters then rise to the surface through fractures in the crest of an anticline underneath the Midway area. The second model, based on the gravity survey, assumes an igneous intrusion directly beneath Midway as the heat source.

Kohler, J.F.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessing the role of ancient and active geothermal systems in oil-reservoir evolution in the eastern Basin and Range province, western USA. Annual progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of our research on the oil fields of the Basin and Range province of the western USA continue to support the following concept: Convecting, moderate-temperature geothermal systems in this region have fostered and in some cases critically influenced the generation, migration, and entrapment of oil. At one Basin-Range field (Grant Canyon), oil-bearing and aqueous fluid inclusions in late-stage hydrothermal quartz were entrapped at temperatures comparable to those now prevailing at reservoir depths (120--130{degrees}C); apparent salinities of the aqueous varieties match closely the actual salinity of the modern, dilute oil-field waters. The inclusion-bearing quartz has the oxygen-isotopic signature for precipitation of the mineral at contemporary temperatures from modern reservoir waters. Measured and fluid-inclusion temperatures define near-coincident isothermal profiles through the oil-reservoir interval, a phenomenon suggesting ongoing heat and mass transfer. These findings are consistent with a model whereby a still-active, convectively circulating, meteoric-hydrothermal system: (1) enhanced porosity in the reservoir rock through dissolution of carbonate; (2) hydrothermally sealed reservoir margins; (3) transported oil to the reservoirs from a deep source of unknown size and configuration; and (4) possibly accelerated source-rock maturation through an increase in the local thermal budget. Grant Canyon and other Basin-Range oil fields are similar to the oil-bearing, Carlin-type, sediment-hosted, disseminated gold deposits of the nearby Alligator Ridge district. The oil fields could represent either weakly mineralized analogues of these deposits, or perhaps an incipient phase in their evolution.

Hulen, J.B.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Controls on reservoir development in Devonian Chert: Permian Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Chert reservoirs of the Lower Devonian Thirtyone Formation contain a significant portion of the hydrocarbon resource in the Permian basin. More than 700 million bbl of oil have been produced from these rocks, and an equivalent amount of mobile oil remains. Effective exploitation of this sizable remaining resource, however, demands a comprehensive appreciation of the complex factors that have contributed to reservoir development. Analysis of Thirtyone Formation chert deposits in Three Bar field and elsewhere in the Permian basin indicates that reservoirs display substantial heterogeneity resulting from depositional, diagenetic, and structural processes. Large-scale reservoir geometries and finer scale, intra-reservoir heterogeneity are primarily attributable to original depositional processes. Despite facies variations, porosity development in these cherts is principally a result of variations in rates and products of early silica diagenesis. Because this diagenesis was in part a function of depositional facies architecture, porosity development follows original depositional patterns. In reservoirs such as Three Bar field, where the Thirtyone Formation has been unroofed by Pennsylvanian deformation, meteoric diagenesis has created additional heterogeneity by causing dissolution of chert and carbonate, especially in areas of higher density fracturing and faulting and along truncated reservoir margins. Structural deformation also has exerted direct controls on heterogeneity that are particularly noteworthy in reservoirs under waterflood. High-density fracture zones create preferred flow paths that result in nonuniform sweep through the reservoir. Faulting locally creates compartments by offsetting reservoir flow units. As such, the processes and models defined here improve understanding of the causes of heterogeneity in all Thirtyone chert reservoirs in the Permian basin and aid recovery of the sizable hydrocarbon resource remaining in these rocks.

Ruppel, S.C.; Hovorka, S.D. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Origin, distribution, and movement of brine in the Permian Basin (U. S. A. ). A model for displacement of connate brine  

SciTech Connect

Na-Cl, halite Ca-Cl, and gypsum Ca-Cl brines with salinities from 45 to >300 g/L are identified and mapped in four hydrostratigraphic units in the Permian Basin area beneath western Texas and Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico, providing spatial and lithologic constraints on the interpretation of the origin and movement of brine. Na-Cl brine is derived from meteoric water as young as 5-10 Ma that dissolved anhydrite and halite, whereas Ca-Cl brine is interpreted to be ancient, modified-connate Permian brine that now is mixing with, and being displaced by, the Na-Cl brine. Displacement fronts appear as broad mixing zones with no significant salinity gradients. Evolution of Ca-Cl brine composition from ideal evaporated sea water is attributed to dolomitization and syndepositional recycling of halite and bittern salts by intermittent influx of fresh water and sea water. Halite Ca-Cl brine in the evaporite section in the northern part of the basin differs from gypsum Ca-Cl brine in the south-central part in salinity and Na/Cl ratio and reflects segregation between halite- and gypsum-precipitating lagoons during the Permian. Ca-Cl brine moved downward through the evaporite section into the underlying Lower Permian and Pennsylvanian marine section that is now the deep-basin brine aquifer, mixing there with pre-existing sea water. Buoyancy-driven convection of brine dominated local flow for most of basin history, with regional advection governed by topographically related forces dominant only for the past 5 to 10 Ma. 71 refs., 11 figs.

Bein, A.; Dutton, A.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geochemical constraints on microbial methanogenesis in an unconventional gas reservoir: Devonian Antrim shale, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper Devonian Antrim Shale is a self-sourced, highly fractured gas reservoir. It subcrops around the margin of the Michigan Basin below Pleistocene glacial drift, which has served as a source of meteoric recharge to the unit. The Antrim Shale is organic-rich (>10% total organic carbon), hydrogen-rich (Type I kerogen) and thermally immature (R[sub o] = 0.4 to 0.6). Reserve estimates range from 4-8 Tcf, based on assumptions of a thermogenic gas play. Chemical and isotopic properties measured in the formation waters show significant regional variations and probably delineate zones of increased fluid flow controlled by the fracture network. [sup 14]C determinations on dissolved inorganic carbon indicate that freshwater recharge occurred during the period between the last glacial advance and the present. The isotopic composition of Antrim methane ([delta][sup 13]C = -49 to -59[per thousand]) has been used to suggest that the gas is of early thermogenic origin. However, the highly positive carbon of co-produced CO[sub 2] gas ([delta][sup 13]C [approximately] +22[per thousand]) and DIC in associated Antrim brines ([delta][sup 13]C = +19 to +31[per thousand]) are consistent with bacterially mediated fractionation. The correlation of deuterium in methane ([delta]D = -200 to -260[per thousand]) with that of the co-produced waters (SD = -20 to -90176) suggests that the major source of this microbial gas is via the CO[sub 2] reduction pathway within the reservoir. Chemical and isotopic results also demonstrate a significant (up to 25%) component of thermogenic gas as the production interval depth increases. The connection between the timing of groundwater recharge, hydrogeochemistry and gas production within the Antrim Shale, Michigan Basin, is likely not unique and may find application to similar resources elsewhere.

Martini, A.M.; Budal, J.M.; Walter, L.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Waters of Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas: their nature and origin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 47 hot springs of Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas, issue from the plunging crestline of a large overturned anticline, along the southern margin of the Ouachita anticlinorium, in the Zigzag Mountains. The combined flow of the hot springs ranges from 750,000 to 950,000 gallons per day (3.29 x 10/sup -2/ to 4.16 x 10/sup -2/ cubic meters per second). The radioactivity and chemical composition of the hot-water springs are similar to that of the cold-water springs and wells in the area. The tritium and carbon-14 analyses of the water indicate that the water is a mixture of a very small amount of water less than 20 years old and a preponderance of water about 4400 years old. The presence of radium and radon in the hot-springs waters has been established by analyses. Mathematical models were employed to test various conceptual models of the hot-springs flow system. The geochemical data, flow measurements, and geologic structure of the region support the concept that virtually all the hot-springs water is of local, meteoric origin. Recharge to the hot-springs artesian-flow system is by infiltration of rainfall in the outcrop areas of the Bigfork Chert and the Arkansas Novaculite. The water moves slowly to depth where it is heated by contact with rocks of high temperature. Highly permeable zones, related to jointing or faulting, collect the heated water in the aquifer and provide avenues for the water to travel rapidly to the surface.

Bedinger, M.S.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.; Reed, J.E.; Sniegocki, R.T.; Stone, C.G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Stable isotope investigation of fluids and water-rock interaction in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-hydrogen-oxygen isotope compositions have been measured in regional cold waters, geothermal fluids, and hydrothermally altered rocks from the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area. These data have been used, in conjunction with other geological and geochemical data from this geothermal system, to place some limits on the origin of geothermal fluids and reservoir carbon, the fluid recharge area, physical-chemical environment of hydrothermal alteration, and relative permeability of the geothermal system. The similarity of hydrogen isotope compositions of local meteoric water and geothermal reservoir fluid indicate that the geothermal fluids are virtually entirely of surface derivation. An isotopically reasonable source area would be the Mineral Mountains directly to the east of the Roosevelt system. Hydrothermal calcite appears to be in isotopic equilibrium with the deep reservoir fluid. The deltaC/sup 13/ values of deep calcites and T- pH-f0/sub 2/ conditions of the reservoir defined by measured temperature, fluid chemistry, and alteration mineralogy fix the delta/sup 13/C value of the geothermal system to -5 to -6.5% (PDB). These values do not unambiguously define any one source or process, however. There is a relatively small increase in /sup 18/O of geothermal fluids relative to their cold surface water precursors and significant /sup 18/O depletion accompanying hydrothermal alteration of the granitic host rock. These isotopic shifts indicate a high ratio of geothermal fluid to altered rock for the geothermal system, implying relatively rapid (geologically) recirculation rates and significant permeability of the geothermal system.

Bowman, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Geothermal systems of northern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot springs are numerous and nearly uniformly distributed in northern Nevada. Most occur on the flanks of basins, along Basin and Range (late Miocene to Holocene) faults, while some occur in the inner parts of the basins. Surface temperatures of the springs range from slightly above ambient to boiling; some springs are superheated. Maximum subsurface water temperatures calculated on the basis of quartz solubility range as high as 252/sup 0/C, although most are below 190/sup 0/C. Flows range from a trickle to several hundred liters per minute. The Nevada geothermal systems differ markedly from the power-producing system at The Geysers, Calif., and from those areas with a high potential for power production (e.g., Yellowstone Park, Wyo.; Jemez Mountains, N. Mex.). These other systems are associated with Quaternary felsic volcanic rocks and probably derive their heat from cooling magma rather high in the crust. In northern Nevada, however, felsic volcanic rocks are virtually all older than 10 million years, and analogous magmatic heat sources are, therefore, probably lacking. Nevada is part of an area of much higher average heat flow than the rest of the United States. In north-central Nevada, geothermal gradients are as great as 64/sup 0/C per kilometer in bedrock and even higher in basin fill. The high gradients probably result from a combination of thin crust and high temperature upper mantle. It is suggested that the geothermal systems of northern Nevada result from circulation of meteoric waters along Basin and Range faults and that their temperature chiefly depends upon (1) depth of circulation and (2) the geothermal gradient near the faults.

Hose, R.K.; Taylor, B.E.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Geothermal investigations at Crystal Hot Springs, Salt Lake County, Utah. Report of Investigation No. 139  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Crystal Hot Springs geothermal system is located in southern Salt Lake County, Utah 22.5 km (14 miles) south of Salt Lake City near the town of Draper. The system is immediately west of the Wasatch Mountains at the easternmost edge of the Basin and Range physiographic province within an active seismic zone referred to as the Intermountain Seismic Belt. The springs are located north of an east-west trending horst known as the Traverse Range. The range is intermediate in elevation between the Wasatch Range to the east and the valley grabens to the north and south. A series of northeast striking normal faults with a combined displacement of at least 90/sup 0/m (3000 ft) separate the horst from the Jordan Valley graben to the north. The spring system is located between two closely spaced range-front faults where the faults are intersected by a north-northeast striking fault. The fractured Paleozoic quartzite bedrock 25 m (80 ft) beneath the surface leaks thermal water into the overlying unconsolidated material and the springs issue along zones of weaknesses in the relatively impermeable confining zone that parallel the bedrock faults. Meteoric water from the Wasatch Range is warmed in the normal geothermal gradient of the province (approximately 32/sup 0/C/km) as the water circulates to a minimum depth of approximately 2.5 km (1.55 miles) via an undetermined path through aquifers and faults. Data collected at the Crystal Hot Springs system under the DOE state coupled program are presented for use by individuals interested in the system.

Murphy, P.J.; Gwynn, J.W.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Reservoir characterization and diagenesis of the oligocene 64-zone sandstone, North Belridge Field, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oligocene (Zemorrian) 64-Zone sandstone is an important oil and gas reservoir in North Belridge field, Kern County, California. The 64-Zone is a submarine-fan deposit that ranges from 83 to 137 m in thickness. The overall variations in reservoir quality reflect an upward increase in grain size associated with depositional processes. Three diagenetic events have had a significant impact on reservoir quality: (1) compaction, which reduced intergranular volume to an average of 20%, (2) quartz cement, which reduced porosity by an average of 6.2%, and (3) feldspar dissolution. Although an average of 2.7% porosity is directly associated with leached feldspar grains, mass balance calculations indicate secondary porosity is roughly balanced by formation of authigenic kaolinite, resulting in little or no net gain in porosity. Three episodes of calcite cementation reflect various stages of burial history. Petrographic and isotopic data demonstrate that calcite I formed at shallow depths in the zone of bacterial sulfate reduction. Fluid inclusion data indicate that calcite II precipitated at temperatures of 92 to 167[degrees]C from fluids less saline than seawater. Fracture-filing calcite III post-dates calcite II, but formed at lower temperatures (85 to 125[degrees]C). The results of isotopic modeling indicate that calcite II precipitated in equilibrium with waters expelled by shales during I/S diagenesis ([delta][sup 18]O[sub SMOW] = + 2 to +8%) and that calcite III precipitated during tectonic uplift from a mixture of shale-derived and meteoric waters ([delta][sup 18]O[sub SMOW] = 0 to +4%). Most fluid inclusions in calcite II yield temperatures greater than present bottom-hole values ([approximately]110[degrees]C). Assuming that fluid inclusions in calcite II record maximum burial and geothermal gradient of 33[degrees]C/km, tectonic uplift of 0.6 to 1.7 km ([approximately]2000-5700 ft) would be required to explain the fluid inclusion data. 48 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Taylor, T.R. (Shell Development Company, Houston, TX (United States)); Soule, C.H. (Applied Geotechnology, Inc., Bellevue, WA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Determination of dispersivities and reactionkinetics of selected basalts of columbia river plateau using an inverse analytical solution technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Columbia River Plateau consists of over 100 layers of tholemtic flood basaits, ranging in thickness from 1 m to greater than 100 m, with groundwater flow occurring predominantly along the fractured and weathered flow tops. This study focuses on the determination of transport parameters by modeling sodium transport in the Priest Rapids and Roza flow tops of the Wanapum formation, and Rocky Coulee and Umtanum flow tops of the Grande Ronde formation, within the Cold Creek Syncline of the Hanford Nuclear Waste Reservation. Regional scale lateral dispersivities and reaction rate coefficients were determined from sodium concentration distributions, using an inverse analytical solution technique developed by Domenico (1987) to model nonconservative mass transport. Deuterium, a conservative species, was also modeled using the same technique, to determine a "baseline" reaction rate coefficient. Source concentration values and source dimension sizes were also produced by the model. Model results were compared to those determined by LaVenue (1 985) for chloride, and Adamski (1 993) for boron and potassium. Results from the Wanapum formation yielded a source Y dimension ranging from 11581 m to 13583 m and a lateral dispersivity value ranging from 26 m to 96 m. Relative reaction rate coefficients for this formation were determined to be 10-'-10-' and 10-'-10-9, respectively for sodium and deuterium. Results from the Grande Ronde formation yield a source Y dimension ranging from 6500 m to 12360 m, and a lateral dispersivity value ranging from 70 m to 488 m. Relative reaction rate coefficients for sodium and deuterium in the Grande Ronde formation were determined to be approximately 10-' m-1 and 1 O-Il? 0-7 m-1, respectively. Larger variations in values of source Y dimension and lateral dispersivity (ay) for the Grande Ronde formation are probably due to a minimum amount of available data control points. Oxygen-18 and deuterium isotopic data for waters from the flowtops upgradient and downgradient of the Cold Creek Barrier (a hydrologic discontinuity), and from a deep formation well support the hypothesis that deeper formation waters are moving upward along the Cold Creek Barrier and then laterally along the flow tops in the downgradient direction. Fluids found in deeper flow tops have an isotopic signature closer to those of the deep formation well; and fluids of shallower flow tops have an isotopic signature suggesting mixing between local meteoric waters and deep formation waters.

Fahlquist, Lisa Armstrong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Isotopic evidence for the infiltration of mantle and metamorphic CO2-H2O fluids from below in faulted rocks from the San Andreas Fault System  

SciTech Connect

To characterize the origin of the fluids involved in the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system, we carried out an isotope study of exhumed faulted rocks from deformation zones, vein fillings and their hosts and the fluid inclusions associated with these materials. Samples were collected from segments along the SAF system selected to provide a depth profile from upper to lower crust. In all, 75 samples from various structures and lithologies from 13 localities were analyzed for noble gas, carbon, and oxygen isotope compositions. Fluid inclusions exhibit helium isotope ratios ({sup 3}He/{sup 4}He) of 0.1-2.5 times the ratio in air, indicating that past fluids percolating through the SAF system contained mantle helium contributions of at least 35%, similar to what has been measured in present-day ground waters associated with the fault (Kennedy et al., 1997). Calcite is the predominant vein mineral and is a common accessory mineral in deformation zones. A systematic variation of C- and O-isotope compositions of carbonates from veins, deformation zones and their hosts suggests percolation by external fluids of similar compositions and origin with the amount of fluid infiltration increasing from host rocks to vein to deformation zones. The isotopic trend observed for carbonates in veins and deformation zones follows that shown by carbonates in host limestones, marbles, and other host rocks, increasing with increasing contribution of deep metamorphic crustal volatiles. At each crustal level, the composition of the infiltrating fluids is thus buffered by deeper metamorphic sources. A negative correlation between calcite {delta}{sup 13}C and fluid inclusion {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He is consistent with a mantle origin for a fraction of the infiltrating CO{sub 2}. Noble gas and stable isotope systematics show consistent evidence for the involvement of mantle-derived fluids combined with infiltration of deep metamorphic H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} in faulting, supporting the involvement of deep fluids percolating through and perhaps weakening the fault zone. There is no clear evidence for a significant contribution from meteoric water, except for overprinting related to late weathering.

Pili, E.; Kennedy, B.M.; Conrad, M.E.; Gratier, J.-P.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks  

SciTech Connect

During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the spheroidally weathering quartz diorite. In that rock, Dm is approximately 2.8 andDs is approximately 2.5 prior to weathering. These two fractals transform during weathering to multiple surface fractals as micro-cracking reduces the size of diffusion-limited subzones of thematrix.Across the reaction front of plagioclase in the quartz diorite, the specific surface area and porosity change very little until the pointwhere the rock disaggregates into saprolite. The different patterns in porosity development of the two rocks are attributed to advective infiltration plus diffusion in the rock that spheroidally fractures versus diffusion-only in the rock that does not. Fracturing apparently diminishes the size of the diffusion-limited parts of the spheroidally weathering rock system to promote infiltration of meteoric fluids, thereforeexplaining the faster weathering advance rate into that rock.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Jin, Lixin [University of Texas, El Paso; Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

286

2004 Initial Assessments for the T and TX TY Tank Farm Field Investigation Report (FIR): Numerical Simulations  

SciTech Connect

In support of CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.’s (CHG) preparation of a Field Investigative Report (FIR) for the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) T and TX-TY, a suite of numerical simulations of flow and solute transport was executed using the STOMP code to predict the performance of surface barriers for reducing long-term risks from potential groundwater contamination at the T and TX-TY WMA. The scope and parametric data for these simulations were defined by a modeling data package provided by CHG. This report documents the simulation involving 2-D cross sections through the T Tank and the TX-TY Tank Farm. Eight cases were carried out for the cross sections to simulate the effects of interim barrier, water line leak, inventory distribution, and surface recharge on water flow and the transport of long-lived radionuclides (i.e., technecium-99 and uranium) and chemicals (i.e., nitrate and chromium For simulations with barriers, it is assumed that an interim barrier is in place by the year 2010. It was also assumed that, for all simulations, as part of tank farm closure, a closure barrier was in place by the year 2040. The modeling considers the estimated inventories of contaminants within the vadose zone and calculates the associated risk. It assumes that no tanks will leak in the future. Initial conditions for contaminant concentration are provided as part of inventory estimates for uranium, technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium. For moisture flow modeling, Neumann boundary conditions are prescribed at the surface with the flux equal to the recharge rate estimate. For transport modeling, a zero flux boundary is prescribed at the surface for uranium, technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium. The western and eastern boundaries are assigned no-flux boundaries for both flow and transport. The water table boundary is prescribed by water table elevations and the unconfined aquifer hydraulic gradient. No-flux boundaries are used for the lower boundary. Numerical results were obtained for compliance at the WMA boundary, 200 Areas boundary, exclusion boundary beyond the 200 Areas, and the Columbia River (DOE-RL 2000). Streamtube/analytical models were used to route computed contaminant concentrations at the water table to the downstream compliance points. When the interim barrier was applied at 2010, the soil was desaturated gradually. The difference in saturation of the soil with and without the interim barrier was the largest at 2040, the time the closure barrier was applied. After this, the difference in saturation in the two cases became smaller with time. Generally, the solutes broke though faster if there was a water line leak. A relative small five-day leak (Case 4) had little effect on the peak concentration, while a large 20-yr leak (Case 3) increased the peak concentration significantly and reduced the solute travel in the vadose zone. The distribution of the inventory, either uniform or nonuniform, has little effect on peak arrival time; the peak concentrations of the conservative solutes varied by -6.9 to 0.2% for the T tank farm and by 11 to 49.4% for the TX tank farm. The reduction of the meteoric recharge before the barrier was applied led to less soil saturation, as expected, and thus longer solute travel time in the vadose zone and smaller peak fence line concentration. The effect on soil saturation lasted for about another 50 years after the barrier was applied at 2050. However, the reduced recharge rate affected the breakthough curve till the end of the simulation. The fence line concentrations at the year 3000 were always higher for cases with reduced natural recharge than for those of the base case, which indicates that the fundamental impact of the reduced natural recharge is a smoothing of the breakthrough concentrations at the compliance points.

Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Waichler, Scott R.

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

287

Thermal Water of Utah Topical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western and central Utah has 16 areas whose wells or springs yield hot water (35 C or higher), warm water (20-34.5 C), and slightly warm water (15.5-19.5 C). These areas and the highest recorded water temperature for each are: Lower Bear River Area, 105 C; Bonneville Salt Flats, 88 C; Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, 77 C; Curlew Valley, 43 C; East Shore Area, 60 C; Escalante Desert, 149 C; Escalante Valley (Roosevelt, 269 C, and Thermo, 85C); Fish Springs, 60.5 C; Grouse Creek Valley, 42 C; Heber Valley (Midway, 45 C); Jordan Valley, 58.5 C; Pavant Valley-Black Rock Desert, 67 C; Sevier Desert ( Abraham-Crater Hot Springs, 82 C); Sevier Valley (Monroe-Red Hill, 76.5 C, and Joseph Hot Spring, 64 C); Utah Valley, 46 C; and Central Virgin River Basin, 42 C. The only hot water in eastern Utah comes from the oil wells of the Ashley Valley Oil Field, which in 1977 yielded 4400 acre-feet of water at 43 C to 55 C. Many other areas yield warm water (20 to 34.5 C) and slightly warm water (15.5 to 19.5 C). With the possible exception of the Roosevelt KGRA, Crater Hot Springs in the Sevier Desert, Escalante Desert, Pavant-Black Rock, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, and Coyote Spring in Curlew Valley, which may derive their heat from buried igneous bodies, the heat that warms the thermal water is derived from the geothermal gradient. Meteoric water circulates through fractures or permeable rocks deep within the earth, where it is warmed; it then rises by convection or artesian pressure and issues at the surface as springs or is tapped by wells. Most thermal springs thus rise along faults, but some thermal water is trapped in confined aquifers so that it spreads laterally as it mixes with and warms cooler near-surface water. This spreading of thermal waters is evident in Cache Valley, in Jordan Valley, and in southern Utah Valley; likely the spreading occurs in many other artesian basins where it has not yet been recognized. In the East Shore Area thermal water trapped in confined aquifers warms water in overlying aquifers. Some of the areas of hot water, such as Roosevelt, Pavant-Black Rock, and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, probably have a potential to produce electricity; the estimated potential at Roosevelt is 300 megawatts. But the many areas of warm and hot water whose temperatures are too low to produce electricity may still have their waters utilized for space heating, as is planned for Monroe, for greenhouses, and for the processing of farm produce. In this report are tables that give records of about 1500 thermal springs and wells, 66 yield hot water, more than 400 yield warm water, and more than 1000 yield slightly warm water. The records include location, ownership, temperature, yield, depth (of wells), geologic unit, and some chemical analyses.

Goode, Harry D.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Bomb-Pulse Chlorine-36 at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository Horizon: An Investigation of Previous Conflicting Results and Collection of New Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) found elevated ratios of chlorine-36 to total chloride (36Cl/Cl) in samples of rock collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain (YM). The data were interpreted as an indication that fluids containing “bomb-pulse” 36Cl reached the repository horizon in the ~50 years since the peak period of above-ground nuclear testing. Due to the significance of 36Cl data to conceptual models of unsaturated zone flow, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) implemented a study to validate the LANL findings. The USGS drilled new boreholes at select locations across zones where bomb-pulse ratios had previously been identified. The drill cores were analyzed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Because consensus was not reached between the USGS/LLNL and LANL on several fundamental points including the presence or absence of bomb-pulse 36Cl, an evaluation by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), was initiated. The overall objectives of the UNLV study were to investigate the source of the validation study’s conflicting results, and to obtain additional data on bomb-pulse isotopes at the repository horizon. UNLV engaged in discussions with previous investigators, reviewed reports, and analyzed archived samples. UNLV also collected new samples of rock from the ESF, soil profiles from the surface of YM, and samples of seep water from inside the ESF. Samples were analyzed for 36Cl/Cl ratios, and 99Tc and 129I in select samples. A column experiment was conducted mimicking the passage of bomb-pulse 36Cl through YM tuff. The work faced several obstacles including an extended shutdown of the tunnel. Only one sample yielded a background corrected 36Cl/Cl ratio that was higher than the accepted bomb-pulse threshold (1250 x 10-15). Specimen 01034214 obtained from the Drill Hole Wash fault (19+33) had a ratio of 1590 ± 80 (1?) x10-15, whereas the other separate sample from this fault zone yielded 1160 ± 50 (1?) x 10-15. Three samples collected from Alcove 6 averaged 490 ± 100 (1?) x10-15; a sample from Sundance Fault resulted in a ratio of 920 ± 60 (1?) x10-15, and a sample from the Bow Ridge Fault produced 530 ± 20 (1?) x10-15. The results are significant because: 1) they tend to be lower than LANL data for comparable samples, albeit in agreement with the range of data produced in the area, and 2) they show that a bomb-pulse 36Cl/Cl ratio was measured in rock collected at the repository horizon level by a second and independent group of investigators (UNLV). Because of time UNLV was not able to replicate the results, and these few data points are insufficient to draw major and definitive conclusions. Leachates of soil samples collected from the surface above the ESF yielded several ratios with bomb-pulse 36Cl, particularly for samples encompassing the wetting front. Soil samples collected above the south ramp, where there was limited soil coverage due to a large amount of rock outcrop, had relatively large ratios ranging from 2170 ± 110 (1?) x10-15 to 5670 ± 350 (1?) x10-15. Soil samples from profiles from above the north ramp ranged from 820 ± 70 (1?) x10-15 to 2390 ± 160 (1?) x10-15, which compare favorably with previous measurements near the site. Water seepage into the ESF south ramp and 36Cl standards made from NIST material were also analyzed. The standards were produced to have nominal 36Cl/Cl ratios (10-15) of 500, 2,500 and 10,000 and the results showed good agreement with the calculated ratios. The seepage samples ranged between 680 ± 40 (1?) x10-15 to 1110 ± 40 (1?) x10-15, consistent with that found for modern meteoric water, with a small bomb-pulse component. Bomb-pulse 36Cl may not have been incorporated in this fast-path water because the surface above the infiltration zone consists mostly of outcrop and the flow pathways have probably mostly been leached. 99Tc was measured in five of nine leaches of ESF rock but poor analytical recoveries and lack of data overlap with 36Cl limit interpretations of these data

Cizdziel, James

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY10 Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection has constructed interim surface barriers over a portion of the T and TY tank farms as part of the Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The interim surface barriers (hereafter referred to as the surface barriers or barriers) are designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the soil zones containing radioactive contaminants and minimize the movement of the contaminants. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barriers at reducing soil moisture. Solar-powered systems were installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations in the T (i.e., instrument Nests TA, TB, TC, and TD) and the TY (i.e., instrument Nests TYA and TYB) Farms beneath the barriers and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nests TA and TYA are placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serve as controls, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barriers. Nest TB provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests TC, TD, and TYB are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barriers. Except for occasional times for TC and TD and planned dates for TYB, during FY10, the battery voltage at the TMS and instrument Nests in both T and TY tank farms remained above 12.0 V, denoting that the battery voltages were sufficient for the stations to remain functional. All the HDUs were functioning normally, but some pressure-head values were greater than the upper measurement limit. The values that exceeded the upper limit may indicate wet soil conditions and/or measurement error, but they do not imply a malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 through FY09, in FY10, the soil under natural conditions in the T Farm (Nest TA) was generally recharged during the winter period (October–March), and they discharged during the summer period (April–September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP, and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the TISB was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the TISB (Nests TC and TD), the CP-measured water content showed that ? at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water conditions beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) since the completion of the barrier decreased by 0.007 to 0.014 m3 m-3. The HDU-measured soil-water pressure at 1-m, 2-m, and 5-m depths decreased by 0.7 to 2.4 m, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the TISB (Nest TB), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than in Nests TC and TD; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes at Nest TB since the completion of the barrier were generally less than those at TC and TD, but more than those at TA. These results indicate that the TISB is performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil, and the soil is becoming drier gradually. The barrier also had some effects on the soil below the barrier edge, but at a reduced magnitude. There was no significant difference in soil-water regime between the two nests in the TY tank farm because the barrier at the TY Farm was just completed one month before the end of the FY.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

290

T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report  

SciTech Connect

DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the surface barrier was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the surface barrier (Nests C and D), the CP measurements showed that water content at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was very stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water condition beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage seemed occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) in FY09. The HDU-measured water pressure decreased consistently in the soil above 5-m depth, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the surface barrier (Nest B), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year except at the 0.9-m depth; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than those in Nests C and D; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes in FY09 in Nest B were less than those for C and D but more than those for A. The soil-water-pressure head was more sensitive to soil water regime changes under dry conditions. In the soil beneath the barrier, the theoretical steady-state values of pressure head is equal to the negative of the distance to groundwater table. Hence, it is expected that, in the future, while the water content become stable, the pressure head will keep decreasing for a long time (e.g., many years). These results indicate that the T Tank Farm surface barrier was performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil and the soil was becoming drier gradually. The barrier also has some effects on the soil below the barrier edge but at a reduced magnitude.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z